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installation and
basic configuration
guide
procurve routing switches
hp
9304m, 9308m, and 9315m
(software release
7.6.04 or greater
)
www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve

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   Related Manuals for HP ProCurve 9304M

   Summary of Contents for HP ProCurve 9304M

  • Page 1

    9304m, 9308m, and 9315m (software release 7.6.04 or greater www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve...

  • Page 3

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP ProCurve Routing Switches for the 9304M, 9308M, 9315M (Software Release 07.6.04 or Greater)

  • Page 4

    For more safety information, see “Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements”, beginning on page xvii and Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the the Quick Start Guide for your HP 9300M Routing use or reliability of its software on equipment that is Switch product.

  • Page 5

    Contents ..........xv RGANIZATION OF RODUCT OCUMENTATION EMC R .......... xvii AFETY AND EGULATORY TATEMENTS ..........................AFETY NFORMATION XVII ............................ROUNDING XVII ............................ERVICING XVII ....................NFORMATIONS CONCERNANT LA SÉCURITÉ XVIII ......................... INWEISE ZUR ICHERHEIT XIX ......................ONSIDERAZIONI SULLA SICUREZZA ......................

  • Page 6

    Installation and Getting Started Guide ..........................1-3 ARDWARE ........................1-3 AYER NHANCEMENTS ........................1-4 AYER NHANCEMENTS ......................1-4 YSTEM EVEL NHANCEMENTS .....................1-6 UPPORT AND ARRANTY NFORMATION ..........................1-6 ELATED UBLICATIONS HAPTER ..................... 2-1 NSTALLATION ..........................2-1 NPACKING A YSTEM ...........................2-1 ACKAGE ONTENTS ........................2-1 ENERAL EQUIREMENTS ........................2-2 NSTALLATION ROCEDURES ............................2-2...

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Contents ......................2-21 ONNECTING ETWORK EVICES ............................2-22 ONNECTORS .........2-23 ONNECTING TO THER WITCHES OUTING WITCHES THERNET ..............2-24 ONNECTING TO ORKSTATIONS ERVERS OR OUTERS ..................2-24 ROUBLESHOOTING ETWORK ONNECTIONS ......................2-24 ERIFYING ROPER ONNECTIONS IP A ........................2-24 INGING AN DDRESS ..........................2-25 RACING A OUTE ..........................2-25 ANAGING THE EVICE...

  • Page 8: S Ettings

    Installation and Getting Started Guide ..................4-11 ISPLAYING ENERAL ODULE NFORMATION ......................4-12 ETERMINING ODULE TATUS ...............4-14 ETERMINING THE LLOCATIONS FOR THE HAPTER 10-G ........5-1 SING THE IGABIT THERNET ODULE 10 G ) ................5-1 IGABIT THERNET ODULE ISCONTINUED ........................5-2 YSTEM EQUIREMENTS 10 G ..............5-2 ARDWARE ON THE...

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Contents .....................6-27 ONFIGURING ASIC AYER ARAMETERS (STP) ............6-27 NABLING OR ISABLING THE PANNING ROTOCOL ...................6-30 NABLING OR ISABLING AYER WITCHING MAC A ......................6-32 HANGING THE MAC E ....................6-32 ONFIGURING TATIC NTRIES VLAN ......................6-34 NABLING ASED MAC A .....................6-35 EFINING DDRESS ILTERS .................6-40 EFINING...

  • Page 10

    Installation and Getting Started Guide HAPTER (STP) ONFIGURING PANNING ROTOCOL STP F ..............8-1 DVANCED EATURES STP P ....................8-1 ONFIGURING TANDARD ARAMETERS STP P .......................8-2 ARAMETERS AND EFAULTS (STP) ............8-3 NABLING OR ISABLING THE PANNING ROTOCOL STP B .................8-4 HANGING RIDGE AND ARAMETERS STP I...

  • Page 11: V Irtual Lan

    Contents MRP I .......................10-13 ISPLAYING NFORMATION MRP CLI E .........................10-16 XAMPLE (VSRP) ................10-18 IRTUAL WITCH EDUNDANCY ROTOCOL ....................10-19 AYER AYER EDUNDANCY ....................10-19 ASTER LECTION AND AILOVER VSRP-A ....................10-23 WARE ECURITY EATURES VSRP P ........................10-23 ARAMETERS VSRP P CLI ..............10-26 ONFIGURING ASIC ARAMETERS SING THE...

  • Page 12

    Installation and Getting Started Guide IPX N VLAN ............11-32 ONFIGURING AN ETWORK WITH YNAMIC ORTS VLAN ..............11-33 ONFIGURING PLINK ORTS ITHIN A ASED IP S VLAN .......11-33 ONFIGURING THE DDRESS ON ULTIPLE ASED IP F ........11-37 SING EPARATE S ON OLLOWER IRTUAL OUTING...

  • Page 13

    Contents VLAN C GVRP VLAN ........12-8 ONVERTING A REATED BY INTO A TATICALLY ONFIGURED GVRP I ......................12-9 ISPLAYING NFORMATION GVRP C ................12-9 ISPLAYING ONFIGURATION NFORMATION GVRP VLAN I ..................12-12 ISPLAYING NFORMATION GVRP S ......................12-14 ISPLAYING TATISTICS CPU U ..................12-15 ISPLAYING TILIZATION TATISTICS GVRP D...

  • Page 14: Evels

    Installation and Getting Started Guide SNMP ....................14-8 SING PGRADE OFTWARE .............14-8 PGRADING WITCHING ROCESSORS ON A HASSIS EVICE TFTP F ................14-9 HANGING THE LOCK IZE FOR RANSFERS ............................14-10 EBOOTING ..................14-11 OADING AND AVING ONFIGURATION ILES .......14-12 EPLACING THE TARTUP ONFIGURATION WITH THE UNNING ONFIGURATION .......14-12...

  • Page 15

    Contents J4895A 16-P .................... B-4 ORWARDING ODULE EP 10/100 E ..................B-4 THERNET ORWARDING ODULES J4881A 48-P ................ B-4 NTERPRISE ORWARDING ODULE J4889A 48-P ................. B-5 ELCO ORWARDING ODULE ......................B-7 ONFIGURATION ONSIDERATIONS PPENDIX ...............C-1 OFTWARE PECIFICATIONS IEEE C ............................ C-1 OMPLIANCE RFC S ............................

  • Page 16

    Installation and Getting Started Guide xiv...

  • Page 17: O Verview

    The main product documentation for your Routing Switch includes: • HP ProCurve Quick Start Guide – a printed guide you can use as an easy reference to the installation and product safety information needed for out-of-box setup, plus the general product safety and EMC regulatory statements of which you should be aware when installing and using a Routing Switch.

  • Page 18

    Command Line Interface (CLI). An electronic copy of this guide is on the Documentation CD shipped with your HP product and the latest version is also available on the HP ProCurve website.

  • Page 19: F Ilters

    Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements Safety Information Documentation reference symbol. If the product is marked with this symbol, refer to the product documentation to get more information about the product. WARNING A WARNING in the manual denotes a hazard that can cause injury or death.

  • Page 20

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Informations concernant la sécurité Symbole de référence à la documentation. Si le produit est marqué de ce symbole, reportez-vous à la documentation du produit afin d'obtenir des informations plus détaillées. WARNING Dans la documentation, un WARNING indique un danger susceptible d'entraîner des dommages corporels ou la mort.

  • Page 21: Hinweise Zur Sicherheit

    Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements Hinweise zur Sicherheit Symbol für Dokumentationsverweis. Wenn das Produkt mit diesem Symbol markiert ist, schlagen Sie bitte in der Produktdokumentation nach, um mehr Informationen über das Produkt zu erhalten. WARNING Symbol für Dokumentationsverweis. Wenn das Produkt mit diesem Symbol markiert ist, schlagen Sie bitte in der Produktdokumentation nach, um mehr Informationen über das Produkt zu erhalten.

  • Page 22: Considerazioni Sulla Sicurezza

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Considerazioni sulla sicurezza Simbolo di riferimento alla documentazione. Se il prodotto è contrassegnato da questo simbolo, fare riferimento alla documentazione sul prodotto per ulteriori informazioni su di esso. WARNING La dicitura WARNINGdenota un pericolo che può causare lesioni o morte.

  • Page 23: Consideraciones Sobre Seguridad

    Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements Consideraciones sobre seguridad Símbolo de referencia a la documentación. Si el producto va marcado con este símbolo, consultar la documentación del producto a fin de obtener mayor información sobre el producto. WARNING Una WARNING en la documentación señala un riesgo que podría resultar en lesiones o la muerte.

  • Page 24

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Safety Information (Japan) xxii...

  • Page 25

    Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements Safety Information (China) xxiii...

  • Page 26: Odules

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Lasers The Gigabit-SX, Gigabit-LX, and Gigabit LH-LC Modules are Class 1 Laser Products. Laser Klasse 1 The modules comply with IEC 60825-1, IEC 60825-2 EMC Regulatory Statements U.S.A. FCC Class A This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.

  • Page 27: Regulatory Model Identification Number

    Korea Taiwan Regulatory Model Identification Number For regulatory identification purposes, the HP ProCurve Routing Switch 9315M has been assigned a Regulatory Model Number. The Regulatory Model Number for this routing switch is RSVLC-0203. This regulatory number should not be confused with the marketing name (HP ProCurve Routing Switch 9315M), or product numbers (J4874A, J4875A).

  • Page 28

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide xxvi...

  • Page 29: Getting Started

    This manual is designed for system administrators with a working knowledge of Layer 2 and Layer 3 switching and routing. If you are using an HP ProCurve Routing Switch, you should be familiar with the following protocols if applicable to your network—IP, RIP, OSPF, BGP4, IGMP, PIM, DVMRP, IPX, AppleTalk, and VRRP.

  • Page 30: T Raffic

    An example Command Line Interface (CLI) prompt. Actual prompts show HP9300# the product number for the device, such as HP9300#. What’s New in this Edition? This edition describes software release 07.6.04. This release applies to the following HP ProCurve products: • HP ProCurve 9315M •...

  • Page 31

    Getting Started New Hardware Enhancement Description ✓ ✓ New 2-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet This release adds support for a 2-port 10 Gigabit Ethernet Module Module – part number J8174A Layer 3 Enhancements Enhancement Description ✓ ✓ Ability to apply an OSPF Software release 07.6.04 enables you to apply an OSPF distribution list to an interface distribution list to a physical or virtual routing interface.

  • Page 32: Haring

    Enhancements to ToS-based QoS The T-Flow Redundant Management Module now supports marking of ToS bits. ✓ ✓ 802.1X port security The following enhancements have been made to HP’s enhancements implementation of 802.1X port security: • Dynamic VLAN assignment • Removal of restrictions on configuring 802.1X port security on route-only ports and virtual routing interfaces •...

  • Page 33

    You can now enable or disable FDP and CDP at the interface (CDP) level. ✓ ✓ Path MTU discovery (RFC 1191) HP devices support the path MTU discovery method described in support RFC 1191. ✓ MTU enhancement for Standard You can configure some Ethernet interfaces on a Standard...

  • Page 34: C Onfiguration

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Support and Warranty Information Refer to Support is as Close as the World Wide Web , which was shipped with your HP Routing Switch. Related Publications Refer to the “Organization of Product Documentation” on page xv for a list of publications for your HP Routing Switch.

  • Page 35: Unpacking A System, Package Contents, General Requirements

    To unpack a system, refer to the printed Quick Start Guide shipped with your Routing Switch. Package Contents For a list of included parts, please refer to the Read Me First document shipped with your HP device. General Requirements To manage a Routing Switch, you need the following items for serial connection to the device: •...

  • Page 36: Installation Procedures

    3. (Optional) Installing (or Removing) Redundant Power Supplies (page 2-9). The HP 9304M can hold one or two power supplies. The HP 9308M and HP 9315M can hold up to four power supplies. If you have a power supply to install, it may be easier to install it before mounting the Routing Switch, although the power supplies are “hot swappable”, and can be installed or removed after the Routing Switch is mounted and...

  • Page 37: Installation Precautions

    WARNING: The HP 9304M chassis exceeds 40 lbs. (18 kg), or 47.7 lbs.(21.6 kg) when fully populated with modules and power supplies. Also, the HP 9308M chassis exceeds 55 lbs. (24.9 kg) or 69.1 lbs. (31.3 kg) when fully populated with modules and power supplies. TWO OR MORE PEOPLE ARE REQUIRED WHEN LIFTING, HANDLING, OR MOUNTING THESE ROUTING SWITCHES.

  • Page 38: Preparing The Installation Site, Cabling Infrastructure, Installation Location, Installing Modules

    UTP copper networking cables). See the Cable Grounding Instructions included with the CESD grounding tap. If you did not receive a CESD grounding tap kit (HP part number 5064-9974) with the above HP products, you can request one without charge from your HP Customer Care Center (CCC). To contact the CCC for your area, see the support and warranty booklet ( Support is as Close as the World Wide Web! ) shipped with your HP product.

  • Page 39: Removing Modules

    NOTE: Modules for the HP 9308M and HP 9315M slide in vertically with the module label (e.g. ProCurve 9300) and port number 1 at the top (Figure 2.4). Modules for the HP 9304M slide in horizontally with the module label (e.g. ProCurve 9300) and port number 1 on the left (Figure 2.5).

  • Page 40: M Anagement M Odule

    • J4860A HP ProCurve Gigabit LH-LC Mini-GBIC: Supports single-mode fiber; LC connector. You can install any combination of the above mini-GBICs in the HP Procurve 9300 mini-GBIC modules listed in the following note. NOTE: To use a Mini-GBIC, you must install it in either of the Mini-GBIC modules described below. This...

  • Page 41

    2. If you have not already done so, install a J4856A HP Procurve 9300 Mini-GBIC Module or a J4857A HP Procurve 9300 Mini-GBIC Redundant Management Module in your routing switch. (Ensure that your routing switch is running a software version that supports the mini-GBIC module.

  • Page 42: Installation Notes

    Removing and Installing XENPAK Optics You can remove a XENPAK optic from a 10 Gigabit Ethernet module and replace it with a new one while the HP device is powered on and running. Before performing either of these tasks, have the following on hand: •...

  • Page 43

    Hewlett-Packard offers and supports only XENPAK optics that include an HP label (product number J8173A, J8175A , or J8176A) for use with the J8174A HP ProCurve 9300 XENPAK module. Use of other brands of optics or the use of HP-labeled XENPAK optics in non-HP device is not supported.

  • Page 44: Installing Power Supplies

    To install a power supply in the chassis, do the following: CAUTION: Install the J4147A Power Supply only in the HP 9308M (J4138A) and HP 9304M (J4139A) Routing Switch chassis. Install the J4875A Power Supply only in the HP 9315M (J4875A) Routing Switch.

  • Page 45: Removing Power Supplies

    Installation Figure 2.2 Installing a Power Supply Removing Power Supplies To remove a power supply module from the chassis, do the following: CAUTION: Power supplies are hot swappable but they should be disconnected from AC power before being installed or removed. That is, the Routing Switch can be running while a power supply is being installed or removed, but the power supply itself should not be connected to a power source.

  • Page 46

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 2.3 Example of the front panel of an HP 9315M Routing Switch 2 - 12...

  • Page 47: Verifying Proper Operation

    Installation Figure 2.4 Example of the front panel of an HP 9308M Routing Switch Figure 2.5 Example of the front panel of an HP 9304M Routing Switch Link Link Link Link Activity Activity Activity Activity Link Link Link Link Activity...

  • Page 48: Attaching A Pc Or Terminal

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 2. Insert the other end into a properly grounded electrical outlet. NOTE: The devices do not have power switches. They are powered on when the power cord is connected to the device and to a power source. If your installation requires a different power cord than that supplied with the device, be sure to obtain a power cord displaying the mark of the safety agency that defines the regulations for power cords in your country.

  • Page 49

    UTP copper networking cables). See the Cable Grounding Instructions included with the CESD grounding tap. If you did not receive a CESD grounding tap kit (HP part number 5064-9974) with the above HP products, you can request one without charge from your HP Customer Care Center (CCC). To contact the CCC for your area, see the support and warranty booklet ( Support is as Close as the World Wide Web! ) shipped with your HP product.

  • Page 50

    Most PC serial ports also require a cable with a female DB-9 connector. Terminal connections will vary, requiring either a DB-9 or DB-25 connector, male or female. Serial cable options between an HP Routing Switch and a PC terminal are shown in Figure 2.7.

  • Page 51: How To Assign A Password

    Installation switching and routing features. To access the CONFIG mode, you must already be logged into the Privileged level of the EXEC mode. By default, there are no CLI passwords. To secure CLI access, you must assign passwords. NOTE: You must use the CLI to assign a password. You cannot assign a password using the Web management interface or an SNMP network management application.

  • Page 52

    Assign a Permanent IP Address Before attaching an HP Routing Switch to your network, you must assign an interface IP address to the sub-net on which the Routing Switch will be located. For subsequent addresses, you also can use the CLI through Telnet or use the Web management interface.

  • Page 53: Mounting The Device, Desktop Installation

    WARNING: The HP 9304M chassis exceeds 40 lbs. (18 kg), or 47.7 lbs.(21.6 kg) when fully populated with modules and power supplies. Also, the HP 9308M chassis exceeds 55 lbs. (24.9 kg) or 69.1 lbs. (31.3 kg) when fully populated with modules and power supplies. TWO OR MORE PEOPLE ARE REQUIRED WHEN LIFTING, HANDLING, OR MOUNTING THESE ROUTING SWITCHES.

  • Page 54: Rack Mount Installation

    2. Attach the mounting brackets to the sides of the routing switch as illustrated in Figure 2.8. 3. Attach the system in the rack as illustrated in Figure 2.8. 4. Proceed to “Connecting Power to the Device” on page 2-21. Figure 2.8 Installing an HP 9304M Routing Switch in a rack mount 2 - 20...

  • Page 55: Connecting Power To The Device, Connecting Network Devices

    UTP copper networking cables). See the Cable Grounding Instructions included with the CESD grounding tap. If you did not receive a CESD grounding tap kit (HP part number 5064-9974) with the above HP products, you can request one without charge from your HP Customer Care Center (CCC). To contact the CCC for your area, see the support and warranty booklet ( Support is as Close as the World Wide Web! ) shipped with your HP product.

  • Page 56

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Connectors • 10/100BaseTX ports come with RJ45 jacks for standard unshielded twisted pair (UTP/Category 5) cable connections. • 100BaseFX ports come equipped with MT-RJ connectors. • 1000BaseSX ports come equipped with SC connectors. • 1000BaseLX ports come equipped with SC connectors. •...

  • Page 57: Witches , And E Thernet H Ubs

    Connecting to Other Switches, Routing Switches, and Ethernet Hubs For connections to Ethernet hubs, a 10/100BaseTX or 1000BaseT switch, or another HP Routing Switch, a crossover cable is required (Figure 2.10 or Figure 2.11). If the hub is equipped with an uplink port, it will require a straight-through cable instead of a crossover cable.

  • Page 58: R Outers

    You also can perform trace routes. Pinging an IP Address To verify that an HP device can reach another device through the network, enter a command such as the following at any level of the CLI on the HP device: HP9300>...

  • Page 59: Oute

    Logging on Through the CLI Once an IP address is assigned to an interface on the HP Routing Switch, you can access the CLI either through the direct serial connection to the device or through a local or remote Telnet session.

  • Page 60

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide enter part of a command, then enter “?” or press Tab, the CLI lists the options you can enter at this point in the command string. If you enter an invalid command followed by ?, a message appears indicating the command was unrecognized. For example: HP9300(config)# rooter ip Unrecognized command...

  • Page 61: Ommands

    The following command filters the output of the show who command so it displays only lines that do not contain the word “closed”. This command can be used to display open connections to the HP device. HP9300# show who | exclude closed...

  • Page 62

    --More--, next page: Space, next line: Return key, quit: Control-c At the --More-- prompt, you can press the forward slash key ( / ) and then enter a search string. The HP device displays output starting from the first line that contains the search string, similar to the begin option for show commands.

  • Page 63: Ensor

    Installation /telnet The results of the search are displayed: searching... telnet Telnet by name or IP address temperature temperature sensor commands terminal display syslog traceroute TraceRoute to IP node undebug Disable debugging functions (see also 'debug') undelete Undelete flash card files whois WHOIS lookup write...

  • Page 64

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 2.5: Special Characters for Regular Expressions (Continued) Character Operation The asterisk matches on zero or more sequential instances of a pattern. For example, the following regular expression matches output that contains the string “abc”, followed by zero or more Xs: abcX* The plus sign matches on one or more sequential instances of a pattern.

  • Page 65: I Nterface

    Logging On Through the Web Management Interface To use the Web management interface, open a web browser and enter the IP address of the HP device in the Location or Address field. The web browser contacts the HP device and displays a login dialog, as shown in Figure 2.12.

  • Page 66

    RADIUS authentication server, or a TACACS/TACACS+ server. On the HP 9300 series, if you have configured a greeting banner (using the banner motd CLI command), a panel with the greeting is displayed first. Click on the Login link to proceed to the Login dialog. Here is an example of...

  • Page 67

    Installation USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE 1. Click on the plus sign next to Configure in the tree view to expand the list of configuration options. 2. Click on the plus sign next to System in the tree view to expand the list of system configuration links. 3. Click on the plus sign next to Management in the tree view to expand the list of system management links.

  • Page 68: Swapping Modules

    Slots on the HP 9304M are numbered 1 – 4, from top to bottom. Slots on the HP 9308M are numbered 1 – 8, from left to right.

  • Page 69

    HP ProCurve 9300 Mini-GBIC Redundant Management Module Discontinued (8-port) Management modules (MI) J4141A 16-port-copper-management- module (HP 9304M and HP 9308M only. ProCurve 9300 10/100 These modules will not work on Management Module (16-port) Discontinued the HP 9315M) J4144A 8-port-gig-management-module HP ProCurve 9300 Gigabit SX...

  • Page 70

    EP-48-port-10/100-TX-telco­ module HP ProCurve 9300 EP 48-port 10/100-TX RJ-45 Module (48­ port) J4889A EP-48-port-10/100-TX-telco- module HP ProCurve 9300 EP 48-port 10/100-TX Telco (RJ-21) Module (48-port) J4891A 1-port 10Gig-10km-module HP ProCurve 9300 10 Gb 10 km Module (1-port) 2 - 36...

  • Page 71

    HP ProCurve 9300 EP 100/ 1000T Module (16-port) J8174A 2-port-10-Gig-10km-module HP ProCurve 9300 10 Gb 10 km Module (2-port) USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE To configure a chassis slot for a module: 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access. The System configuration panel is displayed.

  • Page 72: Next Steps

    Click the Add Module link to display the following panel. 4. Select slot number from the Slot pulldown menu. • Slots on the HP 9304M are numbered 1 – 4, from top to bottom. • Slots on the HP 9308M are numbered 1 – 8, from left to right.

  • Page 73

    Using Redundant Management Modules This chapter describes the redundant management modules and how to configure and manage them. Redundant management modules provide increased routing capacity and failover for HP 9300 series Chassis devices. See the following sections for information: •...

  • Page 74: Management Sessions

    When a switchover occurs, the software sends a Syslog message to the local Syslog buffer and also to the Syslog server, if you have configured the HP device to use one. In addition, if you have configured an SNMP trap receiver, the software sends an SNMP trap to the receiver.

  • Page 75

    NOTE: The 15-slot chassis makes use of locally administered MAC addresses. If your site already uses locally administered MAC addresses of the HP OUI, which is 00e052, there could be a MAC address conflict with one of the ports on the HP device.

  • Page 76

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To prepare slot 1 to receive an eight-port Gigabit redundant management module, enter the following commands at the global CONFIG level: HP9300(config)# module 1 8-port-gig-management-module HP9300(config)# write memory Syntax: module <slot-num> <module-type> The <slot-num>...

  • Page 77

    For example, if you place one management module in slot 5, HP recommends that you place the other management module in slot 6, 7, or 8. This note does not apply to 4-slot or 8-slot chassis.

  • Page 78

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: The change does not take effect until you reload the system. If you save the change to the active module's system-config file before reloading, the change persists across system reloads. Otherwise, the change affects only the next system reload. USING THE CLI To override the default and specify the active redundant management module, enter the following commands: HP9300(config)# redundancy...

  • Page 79

    Using Redundant Management Modules • Slots in an 8-slot chassis are numbered 1 – 8, from left to right. • Slots in a 15-slot chassis are numbered 1 – 15, from left to right. 4. Click the Apply button to send the configuration change to the active module’s running-config file. 5. If you want the change to remain in effect following the next system reload, select the Save link to save the configuration change to the active redundant management module's startup-config file.

  • Page 80

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Status LED If you are located near the device, you can determine which redundant management module is currently the active module and which one is the standby by observing the upper green LED to the right of the serial management port.

  • Page 81

    Using Redundant Management Modules USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access. The System configuration dialog is displayed. 2. Click on the Module link to display the Module panel, as shown in the following example. The Status column shows the module status.

  • Page 82

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To view the system log, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300> show log Syslog logging: enabled (0 messages dropped, 0 flushes, 0 overruns) Buffer logging: level ACDMEINW, 8 messages logged level code: A=alert C=critical D=debugging M=emergency E=error I=informational N=notification W=warning Static Log Buffer:...

  • Page 83

    Using Redundant Management Modules • Running-config – The running-config is automatically copied from the active redundant management module to the standby redundant management module at regular intervals. The default interval is 10 seconds. You can change the interval to 4 – 20 seconds. If you set the interval to 0, the configuration data is not copied to the standby redundant management module.

  • Page 84

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide When you synchronize software between the modules, the active module copies its software to the standby module. To display the current file synchronization settings, enter the following command: HP9300# sync-standby Sync code image: TRUE Sync config data: TRUE Sync boot image: FALSE Running-config sync interval is 10 seconds NOTE: The values shown in this example are the default values.

  • Page 85

    Using Redundant Management Modules Immediately Synchronizing Software You can immediately synchronize software between the active and standby management modules. When you synchronize software, the active module copies the software you specify to the standby module, replacing the software on the standby module. To synchronize software, use either of the following methods.

  • Page 86

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Select the Redundant link to display the following panel. Click the button for the code or file you want to immediately synchronize: • To synchronize the running-config, select the Synchronize Configuration Now button. • To synchronize the boot flash code, select the Synchronize Boot Flash Now button. As soon as you click the button, the Web management interface immediately performs the synchronization.

  • Page 87

    Using Redundant Management Modules USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE NOTE: This procedure applies only to synchronization of the boot code and running-config. To change automatic synchronization of other software, use the CLI procedure above. 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access. The System configuration dialog is displayed.

  • Page 88

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Specify the slot number containing the currently active management module. Do not specify the slot number containing the standby module to which you want to switch over. The <slot-num> parameter specifies the chassis slot: • Slots in a 4-slot chassis are numbered 1 –...

  • Page 89

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module The T-Flow Redundant Management Module version 1 (T-Flow) is a redundant management module for HP 9300 series Chassis devices. The T-Flow supports all of the features supported by Management 2 and 4 modules, but enhances feature performance using new hardware architecture.

  • Page 90

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • Three T-Flow Switching Processor (TSPs) – The TSPs perform Layer 2 and Layer 3 switching for the forwarding modules. The MP and the TSP have their own flash memory with primary and secondary areas. Figure 4.2 illustrates the architecture of the T-Flow.

  • Page 91

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module Management redundancy is described in “Using Redundant Management Modules” on page 3-1. Management redundancy using a pair of T-Flow modules works as described in the chapter, with the following important differences: • The TSP CPUs on both modules actively process traffic. Only the MP CPU on the standby module is in backup mode.

  • Page 92

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 4.1: Forwarding Module Weights Total Mbps Module type Weight capacity 24-port 10/100 Mbps 2400 4-port 1000 Mbps 4000 8-port 1000 Mbps 8000 The device assigns the forwarding modules to TSPs in numerical order (always starting with TSP 1) and beginning with the module with the highest weight and working down to the module with the lowest weight.

  • Page 93

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module Figure 4.3 TSP allocations for example configuration 1 MP = Management Processor TSP = T-Flow Switching Processor TSP 2 TSP 3 TSP 1 Slot 2 Wt 24 Slot 4 Wt 24 Slot 3 Wt 80 ------------------- ------------------- -------------------...

  • Page 94

    In releases prior to 07.6.04, the T-Flow module distributes the load to the TSPs on a per-module basis. When the HP device is powered on or reset, the T-Flow assigns each of the forwarding modules to a TSP. In release 07.6.04, the T-Flow can distribute the load to the TSPs on a per-DMA basis. DMAs are packet processors that control ports on Ethernet modules.

  • Page 95

    Syntax: [no] vm vm-map per-port-dma If the vm vm-map per-port-dma command is in the HP device’s configuration when the device is started or reset, the T-Flow uses per-DMA TSP load sharing. Otherwise, the T-Flow uses per-module TSP load sharing to balance forwarding among the TSPs.

  • Page 96

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Changing the Management Session from the MP to a TSP By default, management sessions you open with the T-Flow are established with the MP. However, you can establish a session directly with a TSP. Each TSP supports some commands at the Privileged EXEC level. NOTE: You can enter configuration commands only to the MP, not directly to a TSP.

  • Page 97

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module • show mac-address – Shows the MAC table. • show running-config – Shows the running-config. • show usage – Shows Layer 4 session table information. • show trunk – Shows trunk group information. • show vlans –...

  • Page 98

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To display the software version running on the module, enter the following command at any CLI level: MON-HP9300# show version SW: Version 07.6.04T53 Hewlett-Packard Company Compiled on Oct 28 2001 at 15:54:49 labeled as T-FlowR07500 (2852369 bytes) from Primary T-Flowr07500.bin HW: ProCurve HP9308 Routing Switch, SYSIF version 21 ==========================================================================...

  • Page 99

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module USING THE CLI To display the software in the device’s flash areas, enter the following command at any CLI level: MON-HP9300(config)# show flash Active management module: Code Flash Type: AMD 29F032B, Size: 64 * 65536 = 4194304, Unit: 4 Boot Flash Type: AMD 29F040, Size: 8 * 65536 = 524288 Compressed Pri Code size = 2852369, Version 07.6.042SPT23 (T-Flowr7604.bin) Compressed Sec Code size = 2848200, Version 07.6.04T22...

  • Page 100

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To display general information for a T-Flow, enter the following command at any CLI level: HP9308#show vm-state ================================================== T-FLOW MODULE (1) App CPU 0 MB SHM, 3 Application Processors CPU 1 in state of T-FLOW_STATE_RUNNING CPU 2 in state of T-FLOW_STATE_RUNNING CPU 3 in state of T-FLOW_STATE_RUNNING ---------------...

  • Page 101

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module Status LEDs You can determine the status of a T-Flow processor by observing its LEDs. The processors have the following LEDs. Each TSP has its own column of TxAct and RxAct LEDs. The left column shows activity for TSP 1, the middle column shows activity for TSP 2, and the right column shows activity for TSP 3.

  • Page 102

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • STANDBY – The module is the standby management module. (This applies only to management modules that support redundancy.) • COMING UP – The module is coming up as the standby module. This status can be observed during switchover.

  • Page 103

    Using the T-Flow Redundant Management Module NOTE: If the ports on a module are not up, the output says "will be processed" instead of "is processed" and the weight is listed as "0". In this case, the T-Flow reserves a TSP for the module but does not add weight for the module’s ports to the reserved TSP.

  • Page 104

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 4 - 16...

  • Page 105

    Chapter 2, “Installation” on page 2-1 • Quick Start Guide for the HP ProCurve Routing Switches 9304M, 9308M, 9315M , Edition 2, September 2003 or later. (This edition is included with 9300M series chassis models shipped after October 15, 2003.) •...

  • Page 106: System Requirements

    However, the HP 10 Gigabit Ethernet port can detect a link failure if the failure occurs on the transmit side of the remote link.

  • Page 107

    1310nm serial module for single-mode fiber, attach a 1310nm single-mode fiber cable that has an SC connector. System Requirements The XENPAK-based J8174A 2-port 10 Gigabit Ethernet module is supported in the HP 9304M, HP 9308M, and HP 9315M. Hardware on the XENPAK-Based 10 Gigabit Ethernet Module Each port on the XENPAK-based 10 Gigabit Ethernet modules has a 10 Gigabit Ethernet MAC controller and separate transmit and receive controllers.

  • Page 108: Port Leds, Troubleshooting Network Connections

    LED indicators, see Table 5.1. Port LEDs The LEDs listed in Table 5.1 provide status information for 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports. All types of HP 10 Gigabit Ethernet modules use the same port LEDs. Table 5.1: LEDs for 10 Gigabit Ethernet Ports...

  • Page 109

    • Verify that the transmit port on the HP device is connected to the receive port on the other network device, and that the receive port on the HP device is connected to the transmit port on the other network device.

  • Page 110

    <filename> – specifies the FPGA file name. NOTE: You can store and copy the FPGA files using any valid filename; however, HP recommends that you use the file names listed in the “Software Image Files” section of the release notes. The device uses information within the files to install them in the correct FPGAs.

  • Page 111

    Using the 2-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Module in slot 2, and a XENPAK-based 2-port 10 Gigabit Ethernet module in slot 3. Notice that the FPGA names match the file names listed in the release notes. 5 - 7...

  • Page 112

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 5 - 8...

  • Page 113

    Mirror ports (for traffic diagnosis and troubleshooting) – see “Assigning a Mirror Port and Monitor Ports” on page 6-51 HP devices are configured at the factory with default parameters that allow you to begin using the basic features of the system immediately. However, many of the advanced features such as VLANs or routing protocols for the router must first be enabled at the system (global) level before they can be configured.

  • Page 114

    Figure 6.1. Routing Switch Figure 6.1 System configuration panel for an HP You can perform the following configuration tasks from the System configuration panel: • Enter system administration information.

  • Page 115: Configuring Basic System Parameters, Entering System Administration Information

    Entering System Administration Information You can configure a system name, contact, and location for an HP Routing Switch and save the information locally in the configuration file for future reference. This information is not required for system operation but is suggested.

  • Page 116

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Syntax: snmp-server contact <string> Syntax: snmp-server location <string> The text strings can contain blanks. The SNMP text strings do not require quotation marks when they contain blanks but the host name does. NOTE: The chassis name command does not change the CLI prompt. Instead, the command assigns an administrative ID to the device.

  • Page 117

    Specifying an SNMP Trap Receiver You can specify a trap receiver to ensure that all SNMP traps sent by the HP device go to the same SNMP trap receiver or set of receivers, typically one or more host devices on the network. When you specify the host, you also specify a community string.

  • Page 118

    Specifying a Single Trap Source You can specify a single trap source to ensure that all SNMP traps sent by the HP device use the same source IP address. When you configure the SNMP source address, you specify the Ethernet port, loopback interface, or...

  • Page 119

    SNMP trap source for this Routing Switch. Regardless of the port the HP device uses to send traps to the receiver, the traps always arrive from the same source IP address. USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE You cannot configure a trap source using the Web management interface.

  • Page 120

    You cannot configure the parameter using the Web management interface. Disabling SNMP Traps HP Routing Switches come with SNMP trap generation enabled by default for all traps. You can selectively disable one or more of the following traps. NOTE: By default, all SNMP traps are enabled at system startup.

  • Page 121

    Di s a b l i n g S ysl o g M e s s a g es an d T r ap s f o r CL I Ac cess HP devices send Syslog messages and SNMP traps when a user logs into or out of the User EXEC or Privileged EXEC level of the CLI.

  • Page 122: Configuring An Interface As The Source For All Telnet Packets, Cancelling An Outbound Telnet Session

    If your Telnet server is configured to accept packets only from specific links or IP addresses, you can use this feature to simplify configuration of the Telnet server by configuring the HP device to always send the Telnet packets from the same link or source address.

  • Page 123: Configuring An Interface As The Source For All Tftp Packets

    You can configure Routing Switches to consult SNTP servers for the current system time and date. NOTE: HP Routing Switches do not retain time and date information across power cycles. Unless you want to reconfigure the system time counter each time the system is reset, Hewlett-Packard recommends that you use the SNTP feature.

  • Page 124

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide The following table describes the information displayed by the show sntp associations command. Table 6.1: Output from the show sntp associations command This Field... Displays... (leading character) One or both of the following: * Synchronized to this peer ~ Peer is statically configured address IP address of the peer...

  • Page 125: Setting The System Clock

    Setting the System Clock In addition to SNTP support, HP switches and routers also allow you to set the system time counter. The time counter setting is not retained across power cycles and is not automatically synchronized with an SNTP server.

  • Page 126

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Although SNTP servers typically deliver the time and date in Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), you can configure the Routing Switch to adjust the time for any one-hour offset from GMT or for one of the following U.S. time zones: •...

  • Page 127: Changing The Default Gigabit Negotiation Mode

    HP Chassis software provides a solution by changing the default negotiation behavior for Gigabit Ethernet ports. The new default behavior allows a port to establish a link with another port whether the other port is configured for auto-Gigabit or negotiation-off.

  • Page 128

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Changing the Negotiation Mode You can change the negotiation mode globally and for individual ports. Use either of the following methods. USING THE CLI To change the mode globally, enter a command such as the following: HP9300(config)# gig-default neg-off This command changes the global setting to negotiation-off.

  • Page 129

    (not even IGMP packets) are limited. Limiting Broadcasts To limit the number of broadcast packets an HP device can forward each second, use the following CLI method. USING THE CLI To globally limit the number of broadcast packets an HP 9300 series Routing Switch forwards to 100,000 per...

  • Page 130: Configuring Cli Banners

    Setting a Message of the Day Banner You can configure the HP device to display a message on a user’s terminal when he or she establishes a Telnet CLI session. For example, to display the message “Welcome to HP ProCurve!” when a Telnet CLI session is...

  • Page 131: Configuring Terminal Display, Checking The Length Of Terminal Displays

    Configuring Basic Features Setting a Privileged EXEC CLI Level Banner You can configure the HP device to display a message when a user enters the Privileged EXEC CLI level. For example: HP9300(config)# banner exec_mode # (Press Return) Enter TEXT message, End with the character '#'.

  • Page 132: Configuring Basic Port Parameters

    NOTE: To configure trunk groups or dynamic link aggregation, see “Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation” on page 7-1. All HP ports are pre-configured with default values that allow the device to be fully operational at initial startup without any additional configuration. However, in some cases, changes to the port parameters may be necessary to adjust to attached devices or other network requirements.

  • Page 133

    Configuring Basic Features This example shows the port states for an HP 9300 series Routing Switch that has not yet been connected to the rest of the network. Click on the Copy or Modify button next to a row of port information to display a configuration panel for that port.

  • Page 134: Assigning A Port Name

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Here is an example of the Port configuration panel. NOTE: A slot option appears on the chassis port configuration sheet. Slot corresponds to a module slot number. NOTE: The IEEE Tagging option appears only on the Port configuration sheet when tagging is enabled at the system level and a VLAN is defined on the system.

  • Page 135

    Configuring Basic Features 4. Select the link to the port type you want (for example, Ethernet) to display the Port table. 5. Click on the Modify button next to the row of information for the port you want to reconfigure. 6. Enter a name in the Name field.

  • Page 136

    The port can be made inactive (disable) or active (enable) by selecting the appropriate status option. The default value for a port is enabled. USING THE CLI To disable port 8 on module 1 of an HP Chassis device, enter the following: HP9300(config)# interface e 1/8 HP9300(config-if-1/8)# disable...

  • Page 137

    Configuring Basic Features HP9300(config)# interface ve v1 HP9300(config-vif-1)# disable Syntax: disable To re-enable a virtual routing interface, enter the enable command at the Interface configuration level. For example, to re-enable virtual routing interface v1, enter the following command: HP9300(config-vif-1)# enable Syntax: enable USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE To disable or enable a port:...

  • Page 138

    In software release 07.6.00 and higher, the HP device generates 802.3x PAUSE frames when the number of buffers available to a module's Buffer Manager (BM) drops below a threshold value. A module's BM can start running out of buffers when a port receives more traffic than it can handle.

  • Page 139

    Enabling or Disabling the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) The STP (IEEE 802.1d bridge protocol) is supported on all HP Routing Switches. STP detects and eliminates logical loops in the network. STP also ensures that the least cost path is taken when multiple paths exist between...

  • Page 140

    NOTE: The procedures in this chapter describe how to configure basic STP parameters. For more information about STP, see “Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features” on page 8-1. USING THE CLI To enable STP for all ports on an HP Routing Switch: HP9300(config)# spanning tree Syntax: [no] spanning-tree USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access.

  • Page 141

    Configuring Basic Features • Path Cost – This parameter can be used to assign a higher or lower path cost to a port. This value can be used to bias traffic toward or away from a certain path during periods of rerouting. For example, if you wish to bias traffic away from a certain port, assign it a higher value than other ports within the VLAN or all other ports (when VLANs are not active on the Routing Switch).

  • Page 142: Enabling Or Disabling Layer 2 Switching

    Enabling or Disabling Layer 2 Switching By default, HP Routing Switches support Layer 2 switching. These devices switch the routing protocols that are not supported on the devices. If IPX routing is not enabled, then IPX traffic also is switched. By default IPX routing is disabled.

  • Page 143

    Configuring Basic Features NO TE: Make sure you really want to disable all Layer 2 switching operations before you use this option. USING THE CLI To globally disable Layer 2 switching on a Routing Switch, enter commands such as the following: HP9300(config)# route-only HP9300(config)# exit HP9300# write memory...

  • Page 144: Changing The Mac Age Time, Configuring Static Mac Entries

    Static MAC addresses can be assigned to HP Routing Switches. NOTE: HP Routing Switches also support the assignment of static IP Routes, static ARP, and static RARP entries. For details on configuring these types of static entries, see the “Configuring Static Routes” and “Creating Static ARP Entries”...

  • Page 145

    Configuring Static ARP Entries HP recommends that you configure a static ARP entry to match the static MAC entry. In fact, the software automatically creates a static MAC entry when you create a static ARP entry.

  • Page 146

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: When a static MAC entry has a corresponding static ARP entry, you cannot delete the static MAC entry unless you first delete the static ARP entry. To create a static ARP entry for a static MAC entry, enter a command such as the following: HP9300(config)# arp 1 192.53.4.2 aaaa.bbbb.cccc ethernet 1 The arp command allows you to specify only one port number.

  • Page 147: Defining Mac Address Filters

    EtherType, LLC1 DSAP or SSAP numbers, and a SNAP EtherType. The filters apply to incoming traffic only. NOTE: MAC filters do not block management access to the HP device. For example, if you apply a filter to block a specific host, the filter blocks switch traffic from the host but does not prevent the host from establishing a management connection to the device through Telnet.

  • Page 148

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: In software release 07.6.04, you can apply MAC filters to virtual routing interfaces. For more information, see “Configuring MAC Address Filters for Virtual Routing Ports” on page 6-39. The device takes the action associated with the first matching filter. If the packet does not match any of the filters in the access list, the default action is to drop the packet.

  • Page 149

    Configuring Basic Features • etype (Ethertype) – a two byte field indicating the protocol type of the frame. This can range from 0x0600 to 0xFFFF. • llc (IEEE 802.3 LLC1 SSAP and DSAP) – a two byte sequence providing similar function as the EtherType but for an IEEE 802.3 frame.

  • Page 150

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 4. Select the MAC Filter link. • If the device does not have any MAC filters configured, the MAC Filter configuration panel is displayed, as shown in the following example. • If a MAC filter is already configured and you are adding a new one, click on the Add MAC Filter link to display the MAC Filter configuration panel, as shown in the following example.

  • Page 151

    Configuring Basic Features displayed, as shown in the following example. • If a MAC filter group is already configured and you are adding a new one, click on the Show link to display the MAC Filter Group list. Then click on the Add MAC Filter Group link to display the Filter Group configuration panel, as shown in the following example.

  • Page 152

    Enabling Logging of Packets Denied by MAC Filters You can configure the HP device to generate Syslog entries and SNMP traps for packets that are denied by Layer 2 MAC filters. You can enable logging of denied packets on a global basis or an individual port basis.

  • Page 153

    Configuring Basic Features To configure a Layer 2 broadcast or multicast filter, you define the filter globally to either filter out all types of broadcasts or to filter out only IP UDP broadcasts. After configuring a broadcast or multicast filter, you apply it to specific ports.

  • Page 154: Locking A Port To Restrict Addresses

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9300(config-bcast-filter-id-3)# exclude-ports ethernet 4/6 HP9300(config-bcast-filter-id-3)# write memory To configure an IP UDP broadcast filter and apply that applies only to port-based VLAN 10, then apply the filter to two ports within the VLAN, enter the following commands: HP9300(config)# broadcast filter 4 ip udp vlan 10 HP9300(config-bcast-filter-id-4)# exclude-ports eth 1/1 eth 1/3 HP9300(config-bcast-filter-id-4)# write memory...

  • Page 155: Enabling Or Disabling Routing Protocols

    CLI. USING THE CLI To enable a protocol on an HP Routing Switch, enter router at the global CONFIG level, followed by the protocol to be enabled. The following example shows how to enable OSPF: HP9300(config)# router ospf...

  • Page 156: Displaying And Modifying System Parameter Default Settings

    Displaying and Modifying System Parameter Default Settings HP devices have default table sizes for the following parameters. The table sizes determine the maximum number of entries the tables can hold. You can adjust individual table sizes to accommodate your configuration needs.

  • Page 157

    • AppleTalk zones The tables you can configure as well the defaults and valid ranges for each table differ depending on the HP device you are configuring. NOTE: If you increase the number of sub-net addresses you can configure on each port to a higher amount, you might also need to increase the total number of sub-nets that you can configure on the device.

  • Page 158

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To display the configurable tables and their defaults and maximum values, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300# show default values sys log buffers:50 mac age time:300 sec telnet sessions:5 ip arp age:10 min bootp relay max hops:4...

  • Page 159

    Configuring Basic Features Information for the configurable tables appears under the columns that are shown in bold type in this example. To simplify configuration, the command parameter you enter to configure the table is used for the table name. For example, to increase the capacity of the IP route table, enter the following commands: HP9300(config)# system-max ip-route 120000 HP9300(config)# write memory...

  • Page 160: Using The Temperature Sensor, Displaying The Temperature

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Using the Temperature Sensor The following products and modules have a temperature sensor: • T-Flow Redundant Management Module • Management Modules 2 and 4 The redundant management modules contain a temperature sensor. The temperature sensor generates a Syslog message and SNMP trap if the temperature exceeds a specified warning level or shutdown level, and can shut the module down if the temperature exceeds the safe threshold.

  • Page 161: Displaying Temperature Messages

    Configuring Basic Features Displaying Temperature Messages The software sends a Syslog message and an SNMP trap if the temperature crosses the warning or shutdown thresholds. The following methods describe how to view the system log on the device. If you have configured the device to use a Syslog server or SNMP trap receiver, see the documentation for the server or receiver.

  • Page 162

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access. The System configuration dialog is displayed. 2. Select the Advance link to display the following panel. 3. Edit the value in the Temperature Warning Threshold field to change the warning temperature.

  • Page 163: Assigning A Mirror Port And Monitor Ports

    Assigning a Mirror Port and Monitor Ports You can monitor traffic on HP ports by configuring another port to “mirror” the traffic on the ports you want to monitor. By attaching a protocol analyzer to the mirror port, you can observe the traffic on the monitored ports.

  • Page 164: Configuring Port Mirroring And Monitoring

    USING THE CLI Suppose you want to diagnose the in and out traffic on port 3 on a module in slot 4 of an HP 9300 series, and use port 1 in slot 4 as the mirror port. To do so, enter the following commands:...

  • Page 165: Monitoring An Individual Trunk Port

    These commands configure the inbound traffic on ports 1/2 – 1/4 to be mirrored to port 1/1. USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE Suppose you want to diagnose the in and out on traffic on port 3 on a module in slot 4 of an HP 9300 series using port 1 in slot 4. To do so: 1. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access.

  • Page 166

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9300(config-trunk-4/1-4/8)# config-trunk-ind HP9300(config-trunk-4/1-4/8)# monitor ethe-port-monitored 4/5 ethernet 2/1 in Syntax: [no] config-trunk-ind Syntax: [no] monitor ethe-port-monitored <portnum> | named-port-monitored <portname> ethernet <portnum> in | out | both The config-trunk-ind command enables configuration of individual ports in the trunk group. You need to enter the config-trunk-ind command only once in a trunk group.

  • Page 167

    Line Interface Reference or the Advanced Configuration and Management Guide . Syntax: set mirror-interface <slot number>/<port number> The <slot number> parameter specifies the port number on an HP chassis device. The <port number> parameter specifies the mirror port number. You can specify up to 4 mirror ports for each PBR route map instance. To do so, enter the set mirror interface command for each mirror port.

  • Page 168

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 6 - 56...

  • Page 169: Configuring Trunk Groups

    The Trunk Group feature allows you to manually configure multiple high-speed load-sharing links between two HP Routing Switches or between an HP Routing Switch and a server. You can configure up to 8 ports as a trunk group, supporting transfer rates of up to 8 Gbps of bi-directional traffic.

  • Page 170: Trunk Group Connectivity To A Server

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 7.1 Trunk Group application within an HP Routing Switch network HP Switch 4000 Power Users Trunk Group Dedicated 100 Mbps Server HP 9304M Router1 Gigabit Backbone HP 9304M Router2 Super Server NOTE: The ports in a trunk group make a single logical link. Therefore, all the ports in a trunk group must be connected to the same device at the other end.

  • Page 171: Ules

    – 20, 21 – 22, 23 – 24 NOTE: You can configure up to 12 trunk groups on an HP 9300 series 24-port 10/100 module. The 24-port 10/100 modules have the following primary ports: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, and 23. See Figure 7.5.

  • Page 172

    Figure 7.3 shows an example of a valid 2-port trunk group link between devices. The trunk groups in this example are switch trunk groups, between two HP devices. Ports in a valid 2-port trunk group on one device are connected to two ports in a valid 2-port trunk group on another device.

  • Page 173

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation Figure 7.4 shows examples of two Chassis devices connected by multi-slot trunk groups. Figure 7.4 Examples of multi-slot trunk groups 7 - 5...

  • Page 174

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 7.5 shows the valid 2-port and 4-port trunk groups on chassis 10/100 modules. Figure 7.5 Valid 2-port and 4-port trunk groups on chassis 10/100 modules Valid 2-port trunk groups Valid 4-port trunk groups Additional Trunk Group Rules for Multi-Slot Trunk Groups •...

  • Page 175: Trunk Group Load Sharing

    Switch. • Server trunk group – Use this type of trunk group to connect an HP Routing Switch to a file server or single host device. The HP device load shares across the ports in the trunk group. The method used for the load sharing depends on the following: •...

  • Page 176

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 7.1: HP Trunk Group Load Sharing – EP devices (Continued) Traffic Type Trunk Type Input Port Type Load Balancing Method Layer 2 IP Switch 10/100 Ethernet Destination IP address Gigabit Ethernet Destination IP address...

  • Page 177: Configuring A Trunk Group

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation Trunk Load Sharing with Standard (non-EP) Modules Table 7.2 lists how Standard (non-EP) Chassis devices load balance traffic . Table 7.2: HP Trunk Group Load Sharing Traffic Layer Trunk Group Type Traffic Type...

  • Page 178

    Please save configuration to flash and reboot. Router2(config)# write memory Write startup-config in progress. .Write startup-config done. Router2(config)# exit Router2# reload You then configure the trunk group on the HP 2626 Switch. HP2626(config)# trunk e 17/18 trk1 trunk HP2626(config)# write memory 7 - 10...

  • Page 179

    6. Click in the checkbox next to Server to place a checkmark in the box if the other end of the trunk group is a server. If the other end of the connection is an HP Routing Switch, do not click this checkbox.

  • Page 180

    Example 2: Configuring a Trunk Group That Spans Multiple Gigabit Ethernet Modules in a Routing Switch To configure a trunk group that spans two modules in an HP 9300 series Chassis device, use one of the following methods. USING THE CLI To configure a trunk group consisting of two groups of ports, 1/1 –...

  • Page 181

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation • If a trunk group is already configured and you are adding a new one, click on the Add Trunk Group link to display the Trunk configuration panel, as shown in the following example. •...

  • Page 182: Additional Trunking Options

    The server | switch parameter specifies whether the trunk ports will be connected to a server or to another Routing Switch. This parameter affects the type of load balancing performed by the HP device. See “Trunk Group Load Sharing” on page 7-7. The default is switch.

  • Page 183

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation NOTE: If you enter no config-trunk-ind, all port configuration commands are removed from the individual ports and the configuration of the primary port is applied to all the ports. Also, once you enter the no config-trunk-ind command, the enable, disable, and monitor commands are valid only on the primary port and apply to the entire trunk group.

  • Page 184

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE To delete a trunk group: 1. Disconnect the ports to the server or Routing Switch at the other end of the trunk. 2. Log on to the device using a valid user name and password for read-write access. The System configuration panel is displayed.

  • Page 185

    The HP device selects the trunk port based on a hash value, which can be a number from 1 – 256. The HP device calculates a hash value for traffic that enters the device through the server trunk load balancing port and exits the device through a trunk group.

  • Page 186

    Trunk ports keep the hash values that are assigned to them until a trunk port’s state changes or a trunk port is added or removed. When any of these changes occurs, the HP device clears the hash values from all of the trunk ports and begins calculating and assigning hash values again for new traffic.

  • Page 187: Displaying Trunk Group Configuration Information

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation TRUNK ID: 71 server:1 multi-slot:0 configured ports: 8/1 8/4 active ports : 8/1 (2) 8/2 (2) 8/3 (2) 8/4 (1) HP93002/1 # rconsole-exit The rconsole 2 1 command logs on to TSP CPU 1 on the T-Flow module in slot 2. The show trunk command displays the trunk information for the ports managed by the CPU.

  • Page 188

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 7.3: CLI Trunk Group Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... Duplex The mode of the port, which can be one of the following: • None – The link on the primary trunk port is down. •...

  • Page 189

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation To display trunk group information for specific ports, enter a command such as the following: HP9300(config)# show trunk ethernet 1/1 to 1/8 Configured trunks: Trunk ID: 1 Type: Switch Ports_Configured: 8 Primary Port Monitored: Jointly Ports Port Names none...

  • Page 190

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 7.4: CLI Trunk Group Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... Duplex The mode of the port, which can be one of the following: • None – The link on the primary trunk port is down. •...

  • Page 191

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation This display shows the following information. Table 7.5: Web Management Trunk Group Information This Field... Displays... Connection Type The type of trunk group, which can be one of the following: • Server – The trunk group is connected to a server. •...

  • Page 192: Usage Note

    (aggregate link), without the need for manual configuration of the ports into trunk groups. When you enable link aggregation on a group of HP ports, the HP ports can negotiate with the ports at the remote ends of the links to establish trunk groups.

  • Page 193

    HP devices. The HP rules apply to an HP device even if the device at the other end is from another vendor and uses different rules.

  • Page 194

    802.3 aggregate link. In 07.6.04 and later, if a device changes the number of ports in an active aggregate link, the HP device on the other end of the link tears down the link. Once the other device recovers, 802.3 can renegotiate the link without a mismatch.

  • Page 195

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation Figure 7.8 Trunk port mismatch Four ports on each device are eligible for link aggregation. The device negotiates a four-port trunk using the ports. Port 1/1 Port 1/1 Port 1/2 Port 1/2 Port 1/3 Port 1/3 Port 1/4 Port 1/4...

  • Page 196

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 7.9 shows an example of 2-port groups in a range of eight ports on which link aggregation is enabled. Based on the states of the ports, some or all of them will be eligible to be used in an aggregate link. Figure 7.9 Two-port groups used to determine aggregation eligibility Port 1/1...

  • Page 197

    For example, a 4-port link consisting of ports 1/4 – 1/7 is not valid because this port configuration is not valid for static trunk groups on the HP device. En abl i n g L i nk A ggr e g a t i o n By default, link aggregation is disabled on all ports.

  • Page 198: P Arameters

    NOTE: If you are connecting the HP device to another vendor’s device and the link aggregation feature is not working, set the system priority on the HP device to a lower priority (a higher priority value). In some cases, this change allows the link aggregation feature to operate successfully between the two devices.

  • Page 199

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation Figure 7.10 Ports with the same key in different aggregate links Port 1 Port 1 System ID: dddd.eeee.ffff Port 1 Ports 1/5 - 1/8: Key 4 All these ports have the same key, but are Port 1 in two separate aggregate links with...

  • Page 200

    1/3 and 1/4 in VLAN 2, change the key for ports 1/3 and 1/4. NO TE: If you change the key for a port group, HP recommends that you use the value 10000 or higher, to avoid potential conflicts with dynamically created keys.

  • Page 201: Displaying And Determining The Status Of Aggregate Links

    LACP messages exchanged between the ports. Later sections provide instructions for viewing these status reports. About Blocked Ports HP devices can block traffic on a port or shut down a port that is part of a trunk group or aggregate link for the following reasons: •...

  • Page 202

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide If either of these events occur, the HP device shuts down the port and notifies all the upper layer protocols that the port is down. HP devices can also block traffic on a port that is initially configured with link aggregation. The port is blocked until it joins a trunk group.

  • Page 203

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation The show link aggregation command shows the following information. Table 7.7: CLI Display of Link Aggregation Information This Field... Displays... System ID Lists the base MAC address of the device. This is also the MAC address of port 1 (or 1/1).

  • Page 204

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 7.7: CLI Display of Link Aggregation Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... Indicates the synchronization state of the port. The state can be one of the following: • No – The port is out of sync with the remote port. The port does not understand the status of the LACPDU process and is not prepared to enter a trunk link.

  • Page 205

    Configuring Trunk Groups and Dynamic Link Aggregation Table 7.7: CLI Display of Link Aggregation Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... • Ope (operational) - The port is operating normally. • Ina (inactive) - The port is inactive because the port on the other side of the link is down or has stopped transmitting LACP packets.

  • Page 206

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 7 - 38...

  • Page 207: Configuring Standard Stp Parameters

    By default, each port-based VLAN on an HP device runs a separate spanning tree (a separate instance of STP). An HP device has one port-based VLAN (VLAN 1) by default that contains all the device’s ports. Thus, by default each HP device has one spanning tree. However, if you configure additional port-based VLANs on an HP device, then each of those VLANs on which STP is enabled and VLAN 1 all run separate spanning trees.

  • Page 208: Stp Parameters And Defaults

    A higher numerical value means a lower priority; thus, the highest priority is 0. NOTE: If you plan to change STP bridge timers, HP recommends that you stay within the following ranges, from section 8.10.2 of the IEEE STP specification.

  • Page 209

    STP only within individual VLANs. USING THE CLI To enable STP for all ports in all VLANs on an HP device, enter the following command: HP9300(config)# spanning-tree This command enables a separate spanning tree in each VLAN, including the default VLAN.

  • Page 210: Changing Stp Bridge And Port Parameters

    2 * (forward_delay -1) >= max_age max_age >= 2 * (hello_time +1 ) USING THE CLI To change an HP device’s STP bridge priority to the highest value to make the device the root bridge, enter the following command: 8 - 4...

  • Page 211

    The forward-delay <value> parameter specifies the forward delay and can be a value from 4 – 30 seconds. The default is 15 seconds. NOTE: You can configure an HP device for faster convergence (including a shorter forward delay) using Fast Span or Fast Uplink Span. See “Configuring Advanced STP Features” on page 8-19.

  • Page 212

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 4. Click the Modify button in the STP bridge parameters table to display the STP configuration panel, as shown in the following example. If the device has multiple port-based VLANs, select the Modify button next to the VLAN on which you want to change the parameters.

  • Page 213

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features value that is not divisible by four the software rounds to the nearest value that is. The default is 128. A higher numerical value means a lower priority; thus, the highest priority is 8. NOTE: The range in software releases earlier than 07.5.04 is 0 –...

  • Page 214: Displaying Stp Information

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Displaying STP Information You can display the following STP information: • All the global and interface STP settings • CPU utilization statistics • Detailed STP information for each interface • STP state information for a port-based VLAN •...

  • Page 215

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features The detail parameter and its additional optional parameters display detailed information for individual ports. See “Displaying Detailed STP Information for Each Interface” on page 8-14. The show span command shows the following information. Table 8.4: CLI Display of STP Information This Field...

  • Page 216

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 8.4: CLI Display of STP Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... State The port’s STP state. The state can be one of the following: • BLOCKING – STP has blocked Layer 2 traffic on this port to prevent a loop.

  • Page 217

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Table 8.5: Web Management Display of STP Information This Field... Displays... STP Bridge Parameters (global parameters) VLAN ID The port-based VLAN that contains this spanning tree (instance of STP). VLAN 1 is the default VLAN. If you have not configured port- based VLANs on this device, all STP information is for VLAN 1.

  • Page 218

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 8.5: Web Management Display of STP Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... State The port’s STP state. The state can be one of the following: • BLOCKING – STP has blocked Layer 2 traffic on this port to prevent a loop.

  • Page 219

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features USING THE CLI To display CPU utilization statistics for STP for the previous one-second, one-minute, five-minute, and fifteen- minute intervals, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300# show process cpu Process Name 5Sec(%) 1Min(%)

  • Page 220

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE You cannot display this information using the Web management interface. Displaying the STP State of a Port-Based VLAN When you display information for a port-based VLAN, that information includes the STP state of the VLAN. Use either of the following methods to display port-based VLAN information.

  • Page 221

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features USING THE CLI To display the detailed STP information, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300# show span detail ====================================================================== VLAN 1 - MULTIPLE SPANNING TREE (MSTP) ACTIVE ====================================================================== Bridge identifier - 0x800000e0804d4a00...

  • Page 222

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 8.6: CLI Display of Detailed STP Information for Ports (Continued) This Field... Displays... Active global timers The global STP timers that are currently active, and their current values. The following timers can be listed: •...

  • Page 223

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Table 8.6: CLI Display of Detailed STP Information for Ports (Continued) This Field... Displays... Root The ID assigned by STP to the root bridge for this spanning tree. Designated Bridge The MAC address of the designated bridge to which this port is connected.

  • Page 224

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To display information for a specific port, enter a command such as the following at any level of the CLI: HP9300(config)# show interface ethernet 3/11 FastEthernet3/11 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is FastEthernet, address is 00e0.52a9.bb49 (bia 00e0.52a9.bb49) Configured speed auto, actual 100Mbit, configured duplex fdx, actual fdx Member of L2 VLAN ID 1, port is untagged, port state is FORWARDING...

  • Page 225: Configuring Advanced Stp Features, Fast Port Span

    Fast Port Span reduces the number of STP topology change notifications on the network. When an end station attached to a Fast Span port comes up or down, the HP device does not generate a topology change notification for the port. In this situation, the notification is unnecessary since a change in the state of the host does not affect the network’s topology.

  • Page 226

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide that are not eligible for Fast Port Span, such as ports connected to other networking devices, the device automatically uses the normal STP settings. If a port matches any of the following criteria, the port is ineligible for Fast Port Span and uses normal STP instead: •...

  • Page 227: Fast Uplink Span

    (two seconds for listening and two seconds for learning). The wiring closet switch must be an HP device but the device at the other end of the link can be an HP device or another vendor’s switch.

  • Page 228

    You cannot configure the Fast Uplink Span feature using the Web management interface. 802.1W Rapid Spanning Tree (RSTP) HP’s earlier implementation of Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), which was 802.1W Draft 3, provided only a subset of the IEEE 802.1W standard; whereas the 802.1W RSTP feature provides the full standard. The implementation of the 802.1W Draft 3 is referred to as RSTP Draft 3.

  • Page 229

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features NOTE: This rapid convergence will not occur on ports connected to shared media devices, such as hubs. To take advantage of the rapid convergence provided by 802.1W, make sure to explicitly configure all point-to-point links in a topology.

  • Page 230

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Assignment of Port Roles At system start-up, all 802.1W-enabled bridge ports assume a Designated role. Once start-up is complete, 802.1W algorithm calculates the superiority or inferiority of the RST BPDU that is received and transmitted on a port.

  • Page 231

    E d g e P o r t s an d E d g e P o r t Ro l e s HP’s implementation of 802.1W allows ports that are configured as Edge ports to be present in an 802.1W topology.

  • Page 232

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 8.2 Topology with Edge Ports Routing Switch Routing Switch Bridge priority = 600 Bridge priority = 1000 Port2 Port2 Port5 Port3 Port3 Edge Port Port2 Port3 Routing Switch 3 Bridge priority = 2000 Port5 Edge Port However, if any incoming RST BPDU is received from a previously configured Edge port, 802.1W automatically makes the port as a non-edge port.

  • Page 233

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Bridge Port States Ports roles can have one of the following states: • Forwarding – 802.1W is allowing the port to send and receive all packets. • Discarding – 802.1W has blocked data traffic on this port to prevent a loop. The device or VLAN can reach the root bridge using another port, whose state is forwarding.

  • Page 234

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide maximum number of BPDUs per hello interval are sent every second. Based on what mode it is operating in, it sends out either legacy BPDUs or RST BPDUs. In this document legacy BPDUs are also referred to as STP BPDUs.

  • Page 235

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features point link, it asserts the Proposed signal and one of the following occurs (Figure 8.4): • If the RST BPDU that the port receives is superior to what it can transmit, the port assumes the role of a Root port.

  • Page 236

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • Sync – Once the Root port is elected, it sets a sync signal on all the ports on the bridge. The signal tells the ports to synchronize their roles and states (Figure 8.5). Ports that are non-edge ports with a role of Designated port change into a discarding state.

  • Page 237

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features • Synced – Once the Designated port changes into a discarding state, it asserts a synced signal. Immediately, Alternate ports and Backup ports are synced. The Root port monitors the synced signals from all the bridge ports.

  • Page 238

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • Agreed – The Root port sends back an RST BPDU containing an agreed flag to its peer Designated port and moves into the forwarding state. When the peer Designated port receives the RST BPDU, it rapidly transitions into a forwarding state.

  • Page 239

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Handshake When a Root Port Has Been Elected If a non-root bridge already has a Root port, 802.1W uses a different type of handshake. For example, in Figure 8.8, a new root bridge is added to the topology. Fig u r e 8 .

  • Page 240

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide The handshake that occurs between Routing Switch 60 and Routing Switch 100 follows the one described in the previous section (“Handshake When No Root Port is Elected” on page 8-28). The former root bridge becomes a non-root bridge and establishes a Root port (Figure 8.9).

  • Page 241

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features • Sync and Reroot – The Root port then asserts a sync and a reroot signal on all the ports on the bridge. The signal tells the ports that a new Root port has been assigned and they are to renegotiate their new roles and states.

  • Page 242

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • Sync and Rerooted – When the ports on Routing Switch 200 have completed the reroot phase, they assert their rerooted signals and continue to assert their sync signals as they continue in their discarding states. They also continue to negotiate their roles and states with their peer ports (Figure 8.11).

  • Page 243

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features • Synced and Agree – When all the ports on the bridge assert their synced signals, the new Root port asserts its own synced signal and sends an RST BPDU to Port4/Routing Switch 60 that contains an agreed flag (Figure 8.11).

  • Page 244

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 8.13 Handshake Completed After Election of New Root Port Routing Switch 100 Port2 Designated port Port2 Routing Switch 60 Root port Port4 Port1 Designated port Proposing Port1 Alternate port Port4 Routing Switch 200 Root port Port2 Port2 Port3...

  • Page 245

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Convergence in a Simple Topology The examples in this section illustrate how 802.1W convergence occurs in a simple Layer 2 topology at start-up. NOTE: The remaining examples assume that the appropriate handshake mechanisms occur as port roles and states change.

  • Page 246

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Next, Routing Switch 1 is powered up (Figure 8.15). Figure 8.15 Simple Layer 2 Topology Port3 Port5 Routing Designated Backup port Switch Routing Switch 2 port Port2 Port2 Bridge priority = 1500 Root port Designated Bridge priority = 1000 port Port3...

  • Page 247

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Now, Port3/Routing Switch 3 is currently in a discarding state and is negotiating a port role. It received RST BPDUs from Port3/Routing Switch 2. The 802.1W algorithm determines that the RST BPDUs Port3/Routing Switch 3 received are superior to those it can transmit;...

  • Page 248

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Convergence After a Link Failure What happens if a link in the 802.1W topology fails? For example, Port2/Routing Switch , which is the port that connects Routing Switch 2 to the root bridge (Routing Switch 1), fails. Both Routing Switch 2 and Routing Switch 1 notice the topology change (Figure 8.17). Figure 8.17 Link Failure in the Topology Routing...

  • Page 249

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features previous Root port, enters a discarding state and negotiates with other ports on the bridge to establish its new role and state, until it finally assumes the role of a Designated port. Next, the following happens: •...

  • Page 250

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Routing Switch 5 sends an RST BPDU that contains a proposal flag to Port5/Routing Switch 2. When handshakes are completed in Routing Switch 5, Port5/Routing Switch 2 is selected as the Root port on Routing Switch 2. All other ports on Routing Switch 2 are given Designated port role with discarding states.

  • Page 251

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features After convergence is complete, Figure 8.19 shows the active Layer 2 path of the topology in Figure 8.18. Figure 8.19 Active Layer 2 Path in Complex Topology Routing Switch 2 Bridge priority = 200 Routing Switch 1 Routing Switch 5 Port7...

  • Page 252

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide For example, Port3/Routing Switch 2 in Figure 8.20, fails. Port4/Routing Switch 3 becomes the new Root port. Port4/Routing Switch 3 sends an RST BPDU with a TCN to Port4/Routing Switch 4. To propagate the topology change, Port4/Routing Switch 4 then starts a TCN timer on itself, on the bridge’s Root port, and on other ports on that bridge with a Designated role.

  • Page 253

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Routing Switch 2 then starts the TCN timer on the Designated ports and sends RST BPDUs that contain the TCN as follows (Figure 8.21): • Port5/Routing Switch 2 sends the TCN to Port2/Routing Switch 5 •...

  • Page 254

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Then FRY1, Routing Switch 5, and Routing Switch 6 send RST BPDUs that contain the TCN to Routing Switch 3 and Routing Switch 4 to complete the TCN propagation (Figure 8.22). Figure 8.22 Completing the TCN Propagation Routing Switch 2 Bridge priority = 200 Routing S...

  • Page 255

    Configuring 802.1W Parameters on an HP Device The remaining 802.1W sections explain how to configure the 802.1W protocol in an HP Chassis device. Chassis devices are shipped from the factory with 802.1W disabled. Use the following methods to enable or disable 802.1W.

  • Page 256

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Enabling or Disabling 802.1W on a Single Spanning Tree To enable 802.1W for all ports of a single spanning tree, use the procedure in this section. USING THE CLI Enter a command such as the following: HP9300(config-vlan-10)# spanning-tree single 802-1w Syntax: [no] spanning-tree single 802-1w USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE...

  • Page 257

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features The hello-time <value> parameter specifies the interval between two hello packets. This parameter can have a value from 1 – 10 seconds. The default is 2 seconds; however, set this value to at least 4 seconds to provide enough time for BPDUs to reach the root bridge before the timeout period expires on a non-root bridge port.

  • Page 258

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 1: Recommended Path Cost Values of 802.1W Link Speed Recommended Recommended 802.1W Path (Default) 802.1W Path Cost Range Cost Values 1 Megabit per second 20,000,000 2,000,000 – 200,000,000 10 Megabits per second 2,000,000 200,000 – 200,000,000 100 Megabits per second 200,000 20,000 –...

  • Page 259

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features USING THE CLI To display a summary of 802-1W, use the following command: HP9300(config)#show 802-1w --- VLAN 1 [ STP Instance owned by VLAN 1 ] --------------------------- - VLAN 1 BPDU cam_index is 2 and the IGC and DMA master Are(HEX) 0 1 2 3 Bridge IEEE 802.1W Parameters: Bridge Bridge...

  • Page 260

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 2: CLI Display of 802.1W Summary (Continued) This Field... Displays... Force-Version The configured force version value. One of the following value is displayed: • 0 – The bridge has been forced to operate in an STP compatibility mode.

  • Page 261

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Table 2: CLI Display of 802.1W Summary (Continued) This Field... Displays... Hello The hello value derived from the Root port. It is the number of seconds between two Hello packets. Port IEEE 802.1W Parameters Port Num The port number shown in a slot#/port# format.

  • Page 262

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide To display detailed information about 802-1W, using the following command: HP9300(config)#show 802-1w detail ====================================================================== VLAN 1 - MULTIPLE SPANNING TREE (MSTP - IEEE 802.1W) ACTIVE ====================================================================== BridgeId 800000e080541700, forceVersion 2, txHoldCount 3 Port 1 - Role: ROOT - State: FORWARDING PathCost 200000, Priority 128, AdminOperEdge F, AdminPt2PtMac F DesignatedPriority - Root: 0x800000e0804c9c00, Bridge: 0x800000e080541700 ActiveTimers - rrWhile 4 rcvdInfoWhile 4...

  • Page 263

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features This Field... Displays... Role The current role of the port: • R oot • Designated • Alternate • B ackup • Disabled Refer to “Bridges and Bridge Port Roles” on page 8-23 for definitions of the roles.

  • Page 264

    802.1W STP specification. 8021.W Draft 3 support is disabled by default. When the feature is enabled, if a root port on an HP device that is not the root bridge becomes unavailable, the device can automatically Routing Switch over to an alternate root port, without reconvergence delays.

  • Page 265

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features other path is a backup and is through the alternate port. While the root port is in the forwarding state, the alternate port is in the blocking state. Figure 8.24 802.1W Draft 3 RSTP ready for failover The arrow shows the path to the root bridge Routing Switch 2...

  • Page 266

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 8.25 802.1W Draft 3 RSTP failover to alternate root port The arrow shows the path to the root bridge Routing Switch 1 Routing Switch 2 Port 1 Port 2 Root Bridge Bridge priority = 4 Bridge priority = 2 Port 2 Root port = 2/2...

  • Page 267

    8021.W Draft 3 is disabled by default. To ensure optimal performance of the feature before you enable it: • Configure the bridge priorities so that the root bridge is one that supports 8021.W Draft 3. (Use an HP device or third-party device that supports 8021.W Draft 3.) •...

  • Page 268

    VLAN basis. Alternatively, you can configure an HP device to run a single spanning tree across all ports and VLANs on the device. The Single STP feature (SSTP) is especially useful for connecting an HP device to third-party devices that run a single spanning tree in accordance with the 802.1q specification.

  • Page 269

    VLAN and you want all the ports to be in the same STP broadcast domain. USING THE CLI To configure the HP device to run a single spanning tree, enter the following command at the global CONFIG level.

  • Page 270

    SuperSpan SuperSpan is an HP STP enhancement that allows Service Providers (SPs) to use STP in both SP networks and customer networks. The SP devices are HP devices and are configured to tunnel each customers' STP BPDUs through the SP.

  • Page 271

    SuperSpan uses a SuperSpan customer ID to uniquely identify and forward traffic for each customer. You assign the customer ID as part of the SuperSpan configuration of the HP devices in the SP. In Figure 8.26, the spanning trees of customer 1 and customer 2 do not interfere with one another because the SP network isolates each customer’s spanning tree based on the SuperSpan customer IDs in the traffic.

  • Page 272

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Preforwarding State To ensure that the customer's network has time to converge at Layer 2 and prevent loops, the HP devices configured for SuperSpan use a special forwarding state, Preforwarding. The Preforwarding state occurs between the Learning and Forwarding states and by default lasts for five seconds. During the Preforwarding state, the HP device forwards tunneled BPDUs from customers only and does not forward data traffic.

  • Page 273

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features NO TE: All the combinations listed above are supported when the boundary ports joining the SP SuperSpan domain to the client spanning trees are untagged. For example, all these combinations are valid in super aggregated VLAN configurations.

  • Page 274

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 8.29 Customer using multiple spanning trees and SP using Single STP single span Customer Provider Region Region tagged to multiple vlan Root bridge for VLAN xx stp-boundary untagged to vlan 100 Customer traffic from different VLANs is maintained by different spanning trees, while the SP network is maintained by a single spanning tree.

  • Page 275

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Figure 8.30 Customer using Single STP and SP using multiple spanning trees single span customer Provider Region Region tagged to multiple vlan Root bridge for VLAN xx stp-boundary untagged to vlan 100 In this setup, the customer network is running a single spanning tree for VLANs 10 and 20.

  • Page 276

    To configure an HP device for SuperSpan: • Configure each interface on the HP device that is connected to customer equipment as a boundary interface. This step enables the interface to convert the destination MAC address in the customer's BPDUs.

  • Page 277: Stp Per Vlan Group

    • Standard STP – You can configure only 128 instances of standard STP on an HP device. It is possible to need more instances of STP than this in large configurations. Using STP per VLAN group, you can aggregate STP instances.

  • Page 278

    A master VLAN contains one or more member VLANs. Each of the member VLANs in a master VLAN runs the same instance of STP and uses the STP parameters configured for the master VLAN. In this example, the HP device is configured with VLANs 3, 4, 13, and 14. VLANs 3 and 4 are grouped in master VLAN 2, which is in STP group 1.

  • Page 279

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features HP9300(config-vlan-12)# spanning-tree priority 2 HP9300(config-vlan-12)# tagged ethernet 1/1 ethernet to 1/4 HP9300(config-vlan-12)# vlan 13 HP9300(config-vlan-13)# tagged ethernet 1/1 ethernet to 1/4 HP9300(config-vlan-13)# vlan 14 HP9300(config-vlan-14)# tagged ethernet 1/1 ethernet to 1/4 HP9300(config-vlan-14)# exit The following commands configure the STP groups.

  • Page 280

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Configuration Example for STP Load Sharing Figure 8.33 shows another example of a STP per VLAN group implementation. Figure 8.33 More Complex STP per VLAN Group Example Member VLANs 2 - 200 Root bridge Root bridge Member VLANs for master VLAN 201 for master VLAN 1...

  • Page 281

    HP9300(config-stp-group-20)# master-vlan 3081 HP9300(config-stp-group-20)# member-group 20 PVST/PVST+ Compatibility The following sections describe the Per VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST) and PVST+ compatibility features on HP devices. Use the section that matches the software release you are using: • For release 07.6.04 and later, see “PVST/PVST+ Compatibility – 07.6.04 and Later”.

  • Page 282

    Previous releases allow an HP device to interoperate with IEEE 802.1Q devices only when the HP device is configured for Single STP (SSTP). In this case, the HP device is operating as an IEEE 802.1Q device but cannot run multiple spanning trees. The current release and previous releases allow the HP device to interoperate with PVST when the HP device is configured for MSTP.

  • Page 283

    Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Advanced STP Features Figure 8.34 Interaction of IEEE 802.1Q, PVST, and PVST+ regions PVST BPDUs tunneled through the IEEE 802.1Q region 802.1D BPDUs 802.1D BPDUs PVST+ Region IEEE 802.1Q Region PVST+ Region dual mode dual mode port port...

  • Page 284

    For more information about the dual-mode feature, see “Dual-Mode VLAN Ports” on page 11-54. Displaying PVST+ Support Information To display PVST+ information for ports on an HP device, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300(config)# show span pvst-mode...

  • Page 285

    Tagged PVST BPDUs for VLANs 2, 3, 4 Cisco device Port 3/2 Port 1/1 To implement this configuration, enter the following commands. Commands on the HP Device HP9300(config)# vlan-group 1 vlan 2 to 4 HP9300(config-vlan-group-1)# tagged ethernet 1/1 HP9300(config-vlan-group-1)# exit HP9300(config)# interface ethernet 1/1 HP9300(config-if-1/1)# dual-mode...

  • Page 286

    Untagged PVST BPDU for VLAN 2 Cisco device Port 3/2 Port 1/1 To implement this configuration, enter the following commands. Commands on the HP Device HP9300(config)# default-vlan-id 4000 HP9300(config)# vlan 1 HP9300(config-vlan-1)# tagged ethernet 1/1 HP9300(config-vlan-1)# exit HP9300(config)# vlan 2...

  • Page 287

    BPDUs to the other devices. The other devices forward the BPDUs as needed. The format of an STP BPDU differs depending on whether it is a Cisco PVST BPDU or an HP BPDU. HP and Cisco devices also can support single STP BPDUs, which use another format.

  • Page 288

    The HP PVST support is automatically enabled when a port receives a PVST BPDU and does not require configuration on the HP or Cisco device. When PVST is enabled on an HP port, that port sends BPDUs in PVST format instead of HP’s spanning tree format.

  • Page 289

    This Field... Displays... VLAN ID The VLAN to which the PVST/PVST+ information applies. Port Num. The HP port number. PVST cfg. Whether PVST support is statically enabled on the port. The value can be one of the following: • 0 – The support has not been statically enabled.

  • Page 290

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 8 - 84...

  • Page 291

    Without the UDLD feature, a link failure on a link that is not directly attached to one of the HP devices is undetected by the HP devices. As a result, the HP devices continue to send traffic on the ports connected to the failed link.

  • Page 292: Configuring Udld, Changing The Keepalive Interval, Changing The Keepalive Retries, Displaying Udld Information

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • To configure UDLD on a trunk group, you must configure the feature on each port of the group individually. Configuring UDLD on a trunk group’s primary port enables the feature on that port only. •...

  • Page 293

    Port The port number. Physical Link The state of the physical link. This is the link between the HP port and the directly connected device. Logical Link The state of the logical link. This is the state of the link between this HP port and the HP port on the other end of the link.

  • Page 294: Displaying Information For A Single Port

    This Field... Displays... Current State The state of the logical link. This is the link between this HP port and the HP port on the other end of the link. Remote MAC Addr The MAC address of the port or device at the remote end of the logical link.

  • Page 295: Clearing Udld Statistics

    Configuring Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) The show interface ethernet <portnum> command also displays the UDLD state for an individual port. In addition, the line protocol state listed in the first line will say “down” if UDLD has brought the port down. Here is an example: HP9300(config)# show interface ethernet 1/1 FastEthernet1/1 is down, line protocol is down, link keepalive is enabled...

  • Page 296

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 9 - 6...

  • Page 297: Topology Groups

    Topology groups simplify Layer 2 configuration and provide scalability by enabling you to use the same instance of a Layer 2 protocol for multiple VLANs. For example, if an HP device is deployed in a Metro network and provides forwarding for two MRP rings that each contain 128 VLANs, you can configure a topology group for each ring. If a link failure in a ring causes a topology change, the change is applied to all the VLANs in the ring’s topology group.

  • Page 298: Master Vlan And Member Vlans, Control Ports And Free Ports, Configuring A Topology Group

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: If you plan to use a configuration saved under an earlier software release and the configuration contains STP groups, the CLI converts the STP groups into topology groups when you save the configuration under software release 07.6.01b.

  • Page 299: Displaying Topology Group Information

    Configuring Metro Features HP9300(config-topo-group-2)# master-vlan 2 HP9300(config-topo-group-2)# member-vlan 3 HP9300(config-topo-group-2)# member-vlan 4 HP9300(config-topo-group-2)# member-vlan 5 HP9300(config-topo-group-2)# member-group 2 These commands create topology group 2 and add the following: • Master VLAN 2 • Member VLANs 2, 3, and 4 • Member VLAN group 2 Syntax: [no] topology-group <group-id>...

  • Page 300

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Displaying Topology Group Information To display topology group information, enter the following command: HP9300(config)# show topology-group Topology Group 3 ================= master-vlan 2 member-vlan none Common control ports L2 protocol ethernet 1/1 ethernet 1/2 ethernet 1/5 VSRP ethernet 2/22 VSRP...

  • Page 301

    Customer A The ring in this example is comprised of four MRP nodes (HP switches). Each node has two interfaces with the ring. Each node also is connected to a separate customer network. The nodes forward Layer 2 traffic to and from the customer networks through the ring.

  • Page 302: Ring Initialization

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 10.2 Metro ring – multiple rings Master node port 1/1 port 4/1 Ring 1 Ring 2 port 1/2 port 4/2 Master node Ring 3 In this example, two nodes are each configured with two MRP rings. Any node in a ring can be the master for its ring.

  • Page 303

    Configuring Metro Features Figure 10.3 Metro ring – initial state Customer A Switch B All ports start in Preforwarding state. Switch C Switch A Master Primary port on Master Node node sends RHP 1 Customer A Customer A Switch D Customer A MRP uses Ring Health Packets (RHPs) to monitor the health of the ring.

  • Page 304: How Ring Breaks Are Detected And Healed

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • If the secondary port receives the RHP, all links in the ring are up and the port changes its state to Blocking. The primary port then sends another MRP with its forwarding bit set on. As each of the member ports receives the RHP, the ports changes their state to Forwarding.

  • Page 305: Master Vlans And Customer Vlans

    Configuring Metro Features Figure 10.5 Metro ring – ring break Customer A Switch B Switch C Switch A Master Node Customer A Customer A Switch D Customer A If a break in the ring occurs, MRP heals the ring by changing the states of some of the ring interfaces. •...

  • Page 306

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 10.6 Metro ring – ring VLAN and customer VLANs Customer A Customer B VLAN 30 VLAN 40 Switch B ====== ring 1 interfaces 1/1, 1/2 port 4/1 port 2/1 topology group 2 master VLAN 2 (1/1, 1/2) member VLAN 30 (1/1, 1/2, 2/1) port 1/2 port 1/1...

  • Page 307: Configuring Mrp

    These commands configure an MRP ring on VLAN 2. The ring ID is 1, the ring name is CustomerA, and this node (this HP device) is the master for the ring. The ring interfaces are 1/1 and 1/2. Interface 1/1 is the primary interface and 1/2 is the secondary interface.

  • Page 308: Using Mrp Diagnostics

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide The ethernet <primary-if> parameter specifies the primary interface. On the master node, the primary interface is the one that originates RHPs. Ring control traffic and Layer 2 data traffic will flow in the outward direction from this interface by default.

  • Page 309: Displaying Mrp Information

    Configuring Metro Features Displaying MRP Diagnostics To display MRP diagnostics results, enter the following command on the Master node: HP9300(config)# show metro 2 diag Metro Ring 2 - CustomerA ============= diagnostics results Ring Diag RHP average Recommended Recommended state time(microsec) hello time(ms) Prefwing time(ms) enabled...

  • Page 310

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Displaying Ring Information To display ring information, enter the following command: HP9300(config)# show metro Metro Ring 2 ============= Ring State Ring Master Topo Hello Prefwing role vlan group time(ms) time(ms) enabled master not conf Ring interfaces Interface role Forwarding state Active interface...

  • Page 311

    Configuring Metro Features Table 10.3: CLI Display of MRP Ring Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... Prefwing time The number of milliseconds an MRP interface that has entered the Preforwarding state will wait before changing to the Forwarding state. If a member port in the Preforwarding state does not receive an RHP within the Preforwarding time (Prefwing time), the port assumes that a topology change has occurred and changes to the Forwarding state.

  • Page 312: Mrp Cli Example

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 10.3: CLI Display of MRP Ring Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... RHPs rcvd The number of RHPs received on the interface. Note: This field applies only to the master node. On non-master nodes, this field contains 0. This is because the RHPs are forwarded in hardware on the non-master nodes.

  • Page 313

    Configuring Metro Features Commands on Switch B The commands for configuring Switches B, C, and D are similar to the commands for configuring Switch A, with two differences: the nodes are not configured to be the ring master. Omitting the master command is required for non-master nodes.

  • Page 314

    Virtual Switch Redundancy Protocol (VSRP) is an HP proprietary protocol that provides redundancy and sub- second failover in Layer 2 and Layer 3 mesh topologies. Based on the HP Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Extended (VRRPE), VSRP provides one or more backups for a Routing Switch. If the active Routing Switch becomes unavailable, one of the backups takes over as the active device and continues forwarding traffic for the network.

  • Page 315: Layer 2 And Layer 3 Redundancy, Master Election And Failover

    Configuring Metro Features In this example, two HP devices are configured as redundant paths for VRID 1. On each of the devices, a Virtual Router ID (VRID) is configured on a port-based VLAN. Since VSRP is primarily a Layer 2 redundancy protocol, the VRID applies to the entire VLAN.

  • Page 316

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide and returns to normal Backup status. • If the Backup does not receive a Hello message with a higher priority than its own by the time the hold-down timer expires, the Backup becomes the new Master and starts forwarding Layer 2 traffic on all ports. If you increase the timer scale value, each timer’s value is divided by the scale value.

  • Page 317

    Configuring Metro Features Figure 10.9 VSRP priority recalculation Configured priority = 100 Configured priority = 100 Actual priority = 100 * (2/3) = 67 Actual priority = 100 * (3/3) = 100 VSRP VSRP Backup Master optional link Link down VSRP VSRP VSRP...

  • Page 318

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide resulting in a VSRP priority of 80. The new priority value is used when calculating the VSRP priority. Figure 10.11 shows an example. Figure 10.11 Track port priority Configured priority = 100 Configured priority = 100 Track priority 20 Actual priority = 100 * (3/3) = 100 Actual priority = (100 - 0) * (3/3) = 100...

  • Page 319: Vsrp Parameters

    Configuring Metro Features number in the record. Each subsequent time the device receives a Hello message for the same VRID and VLAN, the device checks the port number. • If the port number is the same as the port that previously received a Hello message, the VSRP-aware device assumes that the message came from the same VSRP Master that sent the previous message.

  • Page 320

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 10.4: VSRP Parameters (Continued) Parameter Description Default See page... Virtual Router The ID of the virtual switch you are creating by None 10-26 ID (VRID) configuring multiple devices as redundant links. You must configure the same VRID on each device that you want to use to back up the links.

  • Page 321

    Configuring Metro Features Table 10.4: VSRP Parameters (Continued) Parameter Description Default See page... VRID IP A gateway address you are backing up. Configuring None 10-30 address an IP address provides VRRPE Layer 3 redundancy in addition to VSRP LAyer 2 redundancy. The VRID IP address must be in the same sub-net as a real IP address configured on the VSRP interface, but cannot be the same as a real IP address...

  • Page 322

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 10.4: VSRP Parameters (Continued) Parameter Description Default See page... Backup Hello The amount of time between Hello messages from a Disabled 10-32 state and Backup to the Master. 60 seconds when interval The message interval can be from 60 – 3600 enabled seconds.

  • Page 323

    Configuring Metro Features • Configure a port-based VLAN containing the ports for which you want to provide VSRP service. NOTE: If you already have a port-based VLAN but only want to use VSRP on a sub-set of the VLANs ports, you can selectively remove ports from VSRP service in the VLAN.

  • Page 324

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide timer values enables you to easily change all the timers while preserving the ratios among their values. Here is an example. Timer Timer Scale Timer Value Hello interval 1 second 0.5 seconds Dead interval 3 seconds 1.5 seconds Backup Hello interval 60 seconds...

  • Page 325

    Configuring Metro Features Configuring Security Features on a VSRP-Aware Device NOTE: This feature is available in software releases 07.6.04 and later. The VSRP-aware security feature enables you to: • Define the specific authentication parameters that a VSRP-aware device will use on a VSRP backup switch. The authentication parameters that you define will not age out.

  • Page 326

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Syntax: [no] include-port ethernet <portnum> The ethernet <portnum> parameter specifies the port you are removing from the VRID. The port remains in the VLAN but its forwarding state is not controlled by VSRP. Configuring a VRID IP Address If you are configuring a Routing Switch for VSRP, you can specify an IP address to back up.

  • Page 327

    Configuring Metro Features By default, each Backup saves the configured timer values to its startup-config file when you save the device’s configuration. You can configure a Backup to instead save the current timer values received from the Master when you save the configuration.

  • Page 328

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: If you change the timer scale, the change affects the actual number of seconds. Changing the Backup Hello State and Interval By default, Backups do not send Hello messages to advertise themselves to the Master. You can enable these messages if desired and also change the message interval.

  • Page 329

    Configuring Metro Features Specifying a Track Port You can configure the VRID on one interface to track the link state of another interface on the device. This capability is useful for tracking the state of the exit interface for the path for which the VRID is providing redundancy.

  • Page 330

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • The interfaces on a VSRP-aware device that are active for the VRID Displaying VRID Information To display VSRP information, enter the following command: HP9300(config-vlan-200-vrid-1)# show vsrp vrid 1 Total number of VSRP routers defined: 2 VLAN 200 auth-type no authentication VRID 1...

  • Page 331

    Configuring Metro Features Table 10.5: CLI Display of VSRP VRID or VLAN Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... Administrative-status The administrative status of the VRID. The administrative status can be one of the following: • disabled – The VRID is configured on the interface but VSRP or VRRPE has not been activated on the interface.

  • Page 332

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 10.5: CLI Display of VSRP VRID or VLAN Information (Continued) This Field... Displays... dead-interval The configured value for the dead interval. The dead interval is the number of seconds a Backup waits for a Hello message from the Master for the VRID before determining that the Master is no longer active.

  • Page 333

    Configuring Metro Features This display shows the following information when you use the aware parameter. For information about the display when you use the vrid <num> or vlan <vlan-id> parameter, see “Displaying VRID Information” on page 10-34. Table 10.6: CLI Display of VSRP-Aware Information This Field...

  • Page 334

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide • If virtual switches have not been configured, you see the VSRP configuration panel: Enter the ID of the VLAN to which the VRID will be assigned in the VlanId field. NOTE: The VLAN you enter must be configured and must be active. STP must also be disabled on the VLAN.

  • Page 335

    Configuring Metro Features 12. Enter a value for Priority. If two or more Backups are tied with the highest priority, the Backup with the highest IP address becomes the Master for the VRID. The default Backup Priority is 100. 13. Enter a value for Backup Hello Interval. This interval is the number of seconds between Hello messages from the Master to the Backups for a given VRID.

  • Page 336

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Click on the Interface link to display the VSRP Interface table, which lists all the VSRP interfaces on the device that have been configured. Click the Modify button for the interface that you want to configure to display the VSRP Interface configuration panel.

  • Page 337

    Configuring Metro Features Click on the Virtual Switch link to display the VSRP Virtual Switch Statistics Display panel. The panel shows the following information: Table 10.7: Web Management Interface Display of VSRP Statistics This Field... Displays... VLAN ID ID of the VLAN used by the virtual switch. VRId The VRID for the virtual switch.

  • Page 338

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 10 - 42...

  • Page 339: Types Of Vlans

    NOTE: For information about the GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP), see “Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP)” on page 12-1. Overview This section describes the HP VLAN features. Configuration procedures and examples appear in later sections of this chapter. Types of VLANs You can configure the following types of VLANs on HP devices.

  • Page 340

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide When an HP device receives a packet on a port that is a member of a VLAN, the device forwards the packet based on the following VLAN hierarchy: • If the port belongs to an IP sub-net VLAN, IPX network VLAN, or AppleTalk cable VLAN and the packet belongs to the corresponding IP sub-net, IPX network, or AppleTalk cable range, the device forwards the packet to all the ports within that VLAN.

  • Page 341

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Since each port-based VLAN is a separate Layer 2 broadcast domain, by default each VLAN runs a separate instance of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP). Layer 2 traffic is bridged within a port-based VLAN and Layer 2 broadcasts are sent to all the ports within the VLAN.

  • Page 342: Default Vlan

    Default VLAN By default, all the ports on an HP device are in a single port-based VLAN. This VLAN is called DEFAULT-VLAN and is VLAN number 1. HP devices do not contain any protocol VLANs or IP sub-net, IPX network, or AppleTalk cable VLANs by default.

  • Page 343

    802.1q tagging is an IEEE standard that allows a networking device to add information to a Layer 2 packet in order to identify the VLAN membership of the packet. HP devices tag a packet by adding a four-byte tag to the packet.

  • Page 344

    If you use tagging on multiple devices, each device must be configured for tagging and must use the same tag value. In addition, the implementation of tagging must be compatible on the devices. The tagging on all HP devices is compatible with other HP devices.

  • Page 345

    User-configured port-based VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) STP is disabled by default on HP Routing Switches. Also by default, each port-based VLAN has a separate instance of STP. Thus, when STP is globally enabled, each port-based VLAN on the device runs a separate spanning tree.

  • Page 346

    VLAN, then configure routing parameters on the virtual routing interfaces. For example, to enable an HP 9300 series Routing Switch to route IP traffic from one IP sub-net VLAN to another, you must configure a virtual routing interface on each IP sub-net VLAN, then configure the appropriate IP routing parameters on each of the virtual routing interfaces.

  • Page 347

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) • Dynamic ports • Static ports You also can explicitly exclude ports. Dynamic Ports Dynamic ports are added to a VLAN when you create the VLAN. However, if a dynamically added port does not receive any traffic for the VLAN’s protocol within ten minutes, the port is removed from the VLAN. However, the port remains a candidate for port membership.

  • Page 348: Super Aggregated Vlans

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Ports in a new protocol VLAN that do not receive traffic for the VLAN’s protocol age out after 10 minutes and become candidate ports. Figure 11.8 shows what happens if a candidate port receives traffic for the VLAN’s protocol.

  • Page 349: Trunk Group Ports And Vlan Membership, Summary Of Vlan Configuration Rules, Routing Between Vlans

    VLAN, nor can you have an IPX protocol VLAN and an IPX network VLAN in the same port-based VLAN. As an HP device receives packets, the VLAN classification starts from the highest level VLAN first. Therefore, if an interface is configured as a member of both a port-based VLAN and an IP protocol VLAN, IP packets coming into the interface are classified as members of the IP protocol VLAN because that VLAN is higher in the VLAN hierarchy.

  • Page 350

    Some configurations may require simultaneous switching and routing of the same single protocol across different sets of ports on the same router. When IP, IPX, or Appletalk routing is enabled on an HP Routing Switch, you can route these protocols on specific interfaces while bridging them on other interfaces. In this scenario, you can create two separate backbones for the same protocol, one bridged and one routed.

  • Page 351: Assigning A Different Vlan Id To The Default Vlan, Assigning Trunk Group Ports

    Dynamic Port Assignment All Switch ports are dynamically assigned to any non-routable VLAN on HP Routing Switches. To maintain explicit control of the VLAN, you can explicitly exclude ports when configuring any non-routable Layer 3 VLAN on an HP Routing Switch.

  • Page 352

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 11.9 Port-based VLANs 222 and 333 9308M Port 1/1 Port 1/2 IP sub-net 1 IP sub-net 2 IPX network 1 IPX network 2 AppleTalk cable range 100 AppleTalk cable range 200 AppleTalk zone “Prepress” AppleTalk zone “CTP”...

  • Page 353

    Zone “B” Zone “A” Zone “B” Zone “A” To configure the Port-based VLANs on the HP 9308M Routing Switches in Figure 11.10, use the following method. USING THE CLI Configuring 9308M-A Enter the following commands to configure 9308M-A: HP9300> enable...

  • Page 354

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9308-A(config-vlan-4)# spanning-tree priority 500 HP9308-A(config-vlan-4)# vlan 5 name RED HP9308-A(config-vlan-5)# untag ethernet 1/13 to 1/16 ethernet 1/20 HP9308-A(config-vlan-5)# tag ethernet 1/25 to 1/26 HP9308-A(config-vlan-5)# spanning-tree HP9308-A(config-vlan-5)# spanning-tree priority 500 HP9308-A(config-vlan-5)# end HP9308-A# write memory Configuring 9308-B Enter the following commands to configure 9308-B: HP9300>...

  • Page 355

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Syntax: [no] spanning-tree Syntax: spanning-tree [ethernet <portnum> path-cost <value> priority <value>] forward-delay <value> hello-time <value> maximum-age <time> priority <value> Modifying a Port-Based VLAN You can make the following modifications to a port-based VLAN: • Add or delete a VLAN port. •...

  • Page 356

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9308-A(config-vlan-4)# 4. Enter the following commands to exit the VLAN CONFIG mode and save the configuration to the system­ config file on flash memory: HP9308-A(config-vlan-4)# HP9308-A(config-vlan-4)# end HP9308-A# write memory HP9308-A# NOTE: Beginning in software release 07.5.04, you can remove all the ports from a port-based VLAN without losing the rest of the VLAN’s configuration.

  • Page 357

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) NO TE: When port-based VLANs are not operating on the system, STP is set on a system-wide level at the global CONFIG level of the CLI. USING THE CLI 1. Access the global CONFIG level of the CLI on 9308-A by entering the following commands: HP9308-A>...

  • Page 358

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Default is (1000/Port Speed) for Half-Duplex ports and is (1000/Port Speed)/2 for Full-Duplex ports. • Priority – value determines when a port will be rerouted in relation to other ports. Possible values: 0 – 255. Default is 128.

  • Page 359: Configuring An Ipv6 Protocol Vlan

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) USING THE CLI 1. To permanently assign ports 1/1 – 1/8 and port 1/25 to IP sub-net VLAN 1.1.1.0, enter the following commands: HP9304> en No password has been assigned yet... HP9304# config t HP9304(config)# HP9304(config)# ip-subnet 1.1.1.0/24 name Green HP9304(config-ip-subnet)# no dynamic HP9304(config-ip-subnet)# static ethernet 1/1 to 1/8 ethernet 1/25 2. To permanently assign ports 1/9 –...

  • Page 360

    Routing Between VLANs Using Virtual Routing Interfaces HP Routing Switches offer the ability to create a virtual routing interface within a Layer 2 STP port-based VLAN or within each Layer 3 protocol, IP sub-net, or IPX network VLAN. This combination of multiple Layer 2 and/or Layer 3 broadcast domains and virtual routing interfaces are the basis for Hewlett-Packard’s very powerful...

  • Page 361

    -IP sub-net 5 -OSPF area 0.0.0.0 -OSPF area 0.0.0.0 -IPX network 8 -IPX network 5 To configure the Layer 3 VLANs and virtual routing interfaces on the HP 9304M Routing Switch in Figure 11.12, use the following procedure. 11 - 23...

  • Page 362

    One way is to create a unique IP sub-net and IPX network VLAN, each with its own virtual routing interface and unique IP or IPX address within VLAN 2 on each HP 9304M. In this example, this is the configuration used for VLAN 3.

  • Page 363

    Now configure VLAN 4. Remember this is a flat segment that, in the previous example, obtained its IP default gateway and IPX router services from an external HP 9304M. In this example, HP9304-A will provide the routing services for VLAN 4. You also want to configure the STP priority for VLAN 4 to make HP9304-A the root bridge for this VLAN.

  • Page 364

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide This completes the configuration for HP9304-A. The configuration for HP9304-B and C is very similar except for a few issues. • IP sub-nets and IPX networks configured on HP9304-B and HP9304-C must be unique across the entire network, except for the backbone port-based VLANs 5, 6, and 7 where the sub-net is the same but the IP address must change.

  • Page 365

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) HP9304-B(config-vlan-4)# untag ethernet 1/17 to 1/24 HP9304-B(config-vlan-4)# tag ethernet 1/25 to 1/26 HP9304-B(config-vlan-4)# spanning-tree HP9304-B(config-vlan-4)# vlan 5 name Rtr_BB_to_Bldg.1 HP9304-B(config-vlan-5)# tag e 1/25 HP9304-B(config-vlan-5)# no spanning-tree HP9304-B(config-vlan-5)# router-interface ve5 HP9304-B(config-vlan-5)# vlan 7 name Rtr_BB_to_Bldg.3 HP9304-B(config-vlan-7)# tag ethernet 1/26 HP9304-B(config-vlan-7)# no spanning-tree HP9304-B(config-vlan-7)# router-interface ve6 HP9304-B(config-vlan-7)# int ve5...

  • Page 366

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9304-C(config-vlan-ipx-network)# other-proto name block-other-protocols HP9304-C(config-vlan-other-proto)# exclude e 1/9 to 1/16 HP9304-C(config-vlan-other-proto)# no dynamic HP9304-C(config-vlan-other-proto)# interface ve 3 HP9304-C(config-vif-3)# ip addr 1.1.10.1/24 HP9304-C(config-vif-3)# ip ospf area 0.0.0.0 HP9304-C(config-vif-3)# int ve4 HP9304-C(config-vif-4)# ipx network 10 ethernet_802.3 HP9304-C(config-vif-4)# vlan 4 name Bridged_ALL_Protocols HP9304-C(config-vlan-4)# untag ethernet 1/17 to 1/24 HP9304-C(config-vlan-4)# tag ethernet 1/25 to 1/26 HP9304-C(config-vlan-4)# spanning-tree...

  • Page 367: Configuration Example

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Configuration Example Figure 11.13 shows an example of an HP 9308M Routing Switch with four AppleTalk cable VLANs configured on a single port-based VLAN. In this example, port-based VLAN 10 is configured, then AppleTalk cable VLANs are configured on ports on chassis modules 2 and 3.

  • Page 368

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9300(config-vlan-10)# appletalk-cable-vlan 1 name cable-one HP9300(config-vlan-10)# static ethe 2/1 to 2/2 ethe 3/1 to 3/2 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# router-interface ve 1 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# appletalk-cable-vlan 2 name cable-two HP9300(config-vlan-10)# static ethe 3/3 to 3/4 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# router-interface ve 2 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# appletalk-cable-vlan 3 name cable-three HP9300(config-vlan-10)# static ethe 3/5 to 3/6 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# router-interface ve 3 HP9300(config-vlan-10)# appletalk-cable-vlan 4 name cable-four...

  • Page 369: Configuring Protocol Vlans With Dynamic Ports, Aging Of Dynamic Ports

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Configuring Protocol VLANs With Dynamic Ports The configuration examples for protocol VLANs in the sections above show how to configure the VLANs using static ports. You also can configure the following types of protocol VLANs with dynamic ports: •...

  • Page 370: Configuring An Ipx Network Vlan With Dynamic Ports

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Syntax: untagged ethernet <portnum> to <portnum> Syntax: untagged ethernet <portnum> ethernet <portnum> NOTE: Use the first untagged command for adding a range of ports. Use the second command for adding separate ports (not in a range). Syntax: ip-proto [name <string>] Syntax: ipx-proto [name <string>] Syntax: appletalk-cable-vlan <num>...

  • Page 371

    Configuring the Same IP Sub-Net Address on Multiple Port-Based VLANs For an HP device to route between port-based VLANs, you must add a virtual routing interface to each VLAN. Generally, you also configure a unique IP sub-net address on each virtual routing interface. For example, if you...

  • Page 372

    The IP address on each of the virtual routing interfaces must be in a separate sub-net. The HP device routes Layer 3 traffic between the sub-nets using the sub-net addresses. NOTE: Before using the method described in this section, see “Configuring VLAN Groups and Virtual Routing Interface Groups”...

  • Page 373

    Routing Switches configured for HP’s VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol). The HP device performs proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) for hosts that want to send IP traffic to hosts in other VLANs that are sharing the same IP sub-net address. If the source and destination hosts are in the same VLAN, the HP device does not need to use ARP.

  • Page 374

    ARP for the destination to the other VLANs that are using the same IP sub-net address. • If the destination is in the same VLAN as the source, the HP device does not need to perform a proxy ARP. To configure multiple VLANs to use the same IP sub-net address: •...

  • Page 375

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Using Separate ACLs on IP Follower Virtual Routing Interfaces NOTE: This section applies to flow-based ACLs only. The IP follower feature allows multiple virtual routing interfaces to share the same IP address. One virtual routing interface has the IP address and the other virtual routing interfaces are configured to follow the virtual routing interface that has the address.

  • Page 376: Configuring Vlan Groups And Virtual Routing Interface Groups, Configuring A Vlan Group

    To simplify configuration when you have many VLANs with the same configuration, you can configure VLAN groups and virtual routing interface groups. NOTE: VLAN groups are supported on HP Routing Switches with Management 2 or higher modules. NOTE: VLAN groups and virtual interface groups are supported only on the chassis-based Routing Switches.

  • Page 377: Configuring A Virtual Routing Interface Group

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) NOTE: The device’s memory must be configured to contain at least the number of VLANs you specify for the higher end of the range. For example, if you specify 2048 as the VLAN ID at the high end of the range, you first must increase the memory allocation for VLANs to 2048 or higher.

  • Page 378

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9300(config-vlan-group-1)# exit HP9300(config)# interface group-ve 1 HP9300(config-vif-group-1)# ip address 10.10.10.1/24 These commands enable VLAN group 1 to have a group virtual routing interface, then configure virtual routing interface group 1. The software always associates a virtual routing interface group only with the VLAN group that has the same ID.

  • Page 379

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Allocating Memory for More VLANs or Virtual Routing Interfaces HP 9300 series Routing Switches with Management II or higher modules support up to 4095 VLANs and 4095 virtual interfaces. The number of VLANs and virtual interfaces supported depends on the amount of DRAM memory on the management module.

  • Page 380: Configuring Super Aggregated Vlans

    The network that connects them is transparent to the two devices. You can aggregate up to 4094 VLANs within another VLAN. This provides a total VLAN capacity on one HP device of 16,760,836 channels (4094 * 4094).

  • Page 381

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Figure 11.16 Conceptual Model of the Super Aggregated VLAN Application ..Client 1 Client 5 Client 3 Client 1 192.168.1.69/24 Path = a single VLAN into which client VLANs are aggregated Channel = a client VLAN nested inside a Path sub-net...

  • Page 382: Configuring Aggregated Vlans

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 11.17 Example Super Aggregated VLAN Application Client 6 Client 10 Client 8 Client 1 Client 3 Client 5 Port 1/1 Port 1/3 Port 1/5 Port 1/1 Port 1/3 Port 1/5 ..

  • Page 383

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) • Add the port connected to the core device (the device that will aggregate the VLANs) as a tagged port. This port must be tagged because all the client VLANs share the port as an uplink to the core device. •...

  • Page 384: Complete Cli Examples

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE You cannot enable VLAN aggregation using the Web management interface. The other options you need for configuring Aggregated VLANs are present in earlier software releases and are supported in the Web management interface.

  • Page 385

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) HP9300A(config-vlan-102)# exit HP9300A(config)# vlan 103 by port HP9300A(config-vlan-103)# tagged ethernet 2/1 HP9300A(config-vlan-103)# untagged ethernet 1/3 HP9300A(config-vlan-103)# exit HP9300A(config)# vlan 104 by port HP9300A(config-vlan-104)# tagged ethernet 2/1 HP9300A(config-vlan-104)# untagged ethernet 1/4 HP9300A(config-vlan-104)# exit HP9300A(config)# vlan 105 by port HP9300A(config-vlan-105)# tagged ethernet 2/1 HP9300A(config-vlan-105)# untagged ethernet 1/5 HP9300A(config-vlan-105)# exit...

  • Page 386

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Commands for Device D Device D is at the other end of path and separates the channels back into individual VLANs. The tag type must be the same as tag type configured on the other core device (Device C). In addition, VLAN aggregation also must be enabled.

  • Page 387: Configuring Private Vlans

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) HP9300F(config-vlan-103)# exit HP9300F(config)# vlan 104 by port HP9300F(config-vlan-104)# tagged ethernet 2/1 HP9300F(config-vlan-104)# untagged ethernet 1/4 HP9300F(config-vlan-104)# exit HP9300F(config)# vlan 105 by port HP9300F(config-vlan-105)# tagged ethernet 2/1 HP9300F(config-vlan-105)# untagged ethernet 1/5 HP9300F(config-vlan-105)# exit HP9300F(config)# write memory Configuring Private VLANs A private VLAN is a VLAN that has the properties of standard Layer 2 port-based VLANs but also provides additional control over flooding packets on a VLAN.

  • Page 388: Implementation Notes, Configuring A Private Vlan

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide By default, the private VLAN does not forward broadcast or unknown-unicast packets from outside sources into the private VLAN. If needed, you can override this behavior for broadcast packets, unknown-unicast packets, or both. (See “Enabling Broadcast or Unknown Unicast Traffic to the Private VLAN” on page 11-52.) You can configure a combination of the following types of private VLANs: •...

  • Page 389

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) • You cannot share a port between a private VLAN and a standard port-based VLAN or protocol VLAN. You can configure private VLANs and standard port-based VLANs and protocol VLANs on the same device, but a port cannot be a member of both a private VLAN and a port-based VLAN or protocol VLAN.

  • Page 390

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide mapped to the promiscuous port. Configuring the Primary VLAN Use the following CLI method to configure the primary VLAN. NOTE: The primary private VLAN has only one active port. If you configure the VLAN to have more than one port, the lowest-numbered port is the active one.

  • Page 391

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) USING THE CLI To configure the ports in the primary VLAN to forward broadcast or unknown unicast traffic received from sources outside the private VLAN, enter the following commands at the global CONFIG level of the CLI: HP9300(config)# pvlan-preference broadcast flood HP9300(config)# pvlan-preference unknown-unicast flood These commands enable forwarding of broadcast and unknown-unicast packets to ports within the private VLAN.

  • Page 392

    VLAN, flows from a Switch to this port. The dual-mode feature allows traffic for VLAN 20 and untagged traffic to go through the port at the same time. Figure 11.19 Dual-mode VLAN port example VLAN 20 Untagged Traffic Traffic HP Switch 4000 Port 2/11 Tagged, VLAN 20 dual-mode Port 2/9 Port 2/10 Tagged, VLAN 20...

  • Page 393

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Figure 11.20 Specifying a default VLAN ID for a dual-mode port VLAN 10 VLAN 10 Untagged Untagged Traffic Traffic Dual-mode Port 2/11 Port 2/10 Default VLAN ID 10 Untagged, VLAN 10 Tagged, VLAN 20 Port 2/9 Tagged, VLAN 20 VLAN 20 VLAN 20...

  • Page 394

    HP9300(config)# vlan 2 HP9300(config-vlan-2)# multicast-flooding HP9300(config-vlan-2)# exit Syntax: multicast-flooding After entering the multicast-flooding command for a VLAN, you must reboot the HP device to activate the feature. Notes: • This feature is supported only on EP modules and the 10 Gigabit Ethernet module.

  • Page 395

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) 4. Click on the plus sign next to VLAN in the tree view to expand the list of VLAN option links. 5. Click on the Port link. • If the device does not have any port-based VLANs, the Port VLAN configuration panel is displayed, as shown in the following example.

  • Page 396

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: Ports highlighted in grey are members of a trunk group. The port right before the grey ports is the master port for that trunk group. 12. When you finish selecting the ports, click on the Continue button to return to the Port VLAN configuration dialog.

  • Page 397

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) 7. Select the virtual routing interface from the Router_Interface pulldown list if you configured a virtual routing interface for routing into and out of the VLAN. 8. Select the protocol type. 9. Specify the port that are members for the VLAN: •...

  • Page 398

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide sub-net protocol VLAN (not a protocol, IPX network, or AppleTalk cable VLAN). 5. Enter the VLAN ID that will contain the IP sub-net VLAN in the VLAN ID field. 6. Enter a name for the VLAN in the Protocol_VLAN_Name field. 7. Select the virtual routing interface from the Router_Interface pulldown list if you configured a virtual routing interface for routing into and out of the VLAN.

  • Page 399

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) 4. Click on the Protocol link. • If the device does not have any protocol VLANs, the Protocol VLAN configuration panel is displayed, as shown in the following example. • If at least one protocol VLAN is already configured and you are adding a new one, click on the IPX Network link to display the IP Sub-net Protocol VLAN configuration panel.

  • Page 400

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 11. Click the Add button (if you are adding a new VLAN) or the Modify button (if you are modifying an existing VLAN) to save the change to the device’s running-config file. 12. Select the Save link at the bottom of the dialog. Select Yes when prompted to save the configuration change to the startup-config file on the device’s flash memory.

  • Page 401: Displaying Vlan Information

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) Ports” on page 11-10. • Click the Change Exclude Members button if you want to explicitly exclude some ports. For information, see “Excluded Ports” on page 11-10. NOTE: All the ports must be members of the port-based VLAN that contains this AppleTalk cable VLAN. See “Layer 3 Protocol-Based VLANs”...

  • Page 402: Displaying Vlan Information For Specific Ports

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI Enter the following command at any CLI level. This example shows the display for the IP sub-net and IPX network VLANs configured in the examples in “Configuring an IP Sub-Net VLAN with Dynamic Ports” on page 11-32 and “Configuring an IPX Network VLAN with Dynamic Ports”...

  • Page 403

    Configuring Virtual LANs (VLANs) USING THE CLI To display VLAN information for all the VLANs of which port 7/1 is a member, enter the following command: HP9300(config)# show vlans e 7/1 Total PORT-VLAN entries: 3 Maximum PORT-VLAN entries: 8 legend: [S=Slot] PORT-VLAN 100, Name [None], Priority level0, Spanning tree Off Untagged Ports: (S7) Tagged Ports: None...

  • Page 404

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 11 - 66...

  • Page 405: Application Examples

    An HP device enabled for GVRP can do the following: • Learn about VLANs from other HP devices and configure those VLANs on the ports that learn about the VLANs. The device listens for GVRP Protocol Data Units (PDUs) from other devices, and implements the VLAN configuration information in the PDUs.

  • Page 406

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure 12.1 Example of GVRP Core Device Edge Device A Edge Device B Port 2/24 Port 2 Port 6/24 Port 1/24 Port 4 Port 4/24 Port 4/24 Port 4 Port 8/17 Port 4 Edge Device C Port 2/24 Port 4/24 In this example, a core device is attached to three edge devices.

  • Page 407

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) Core Device Edge Device A Edge Device B Edge Device C GVRP is enabled on all GVRP is enabled on port GVRP is enabled on port GVRP is enabled on port ports. 4/24. Learning is 4/1.

  • Page 408

    • The default VLAN (VLAN 1) is not advertised by the HP implementation of GVRP. The default VLAN contains all ports that are not members of statically configured VLANs or VLANs enabled for GVRP. NOTE: The default VLAN has ID 1 by default. You can change the VLAN ID of the default VLAN, but only before GVRP is enabled.

  • Page 409: Configuring Gvrp, Changing The Gvrp Base Vlan Id

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) • All VLAN ports added by GVRP are tagged. • GVRP is supported only for tagged ports or for untagged ports that are members of the default VLAN. GVRP is not supported for ports that are untagged and are members of a VLAN other than the default VLAN. •...

  • Page 410: Increasing The Maximum Configurable Value Of The Leaveall Timer, Enabling Gvrp, Disabling Vlan Advertising

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Increasing the Maximum Configurable Value of the Leaveall Timer By default, the highest value you can specify for the Leaveall timer is 300000 ms. You can increase the maximum configurable value of the Leaveall timer to 1000000 ms. NOTE: You must enter this command before enabling GVRP.

  • Page 411: Disabling Vlan Learning, Changing The Gvrp Timers

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) NOTE: Leaveall messages are still sent on the GVRP ports. Disabling VLAN Learning To disable VLAN learning on a port enabled for GVRP, enter a command such as the following at the GVRP configuration level: HP9300(config-gvrp)# block-learning ethernet 6/24 This command disables learning of VLAN information on port 6/24.

  • Page 412

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Timer Configuration Requirements • All timer values must be in multiples of 100 ms. • The Leave timer must be >= 3* the Join timer. • The Leaveall timer must be >= 5* the Leave timer. •...

  • Page 413: Displaying Gvrp Information, Displaying Gvrp Configuration Information

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) NOTE: After you convert the VLAN, the VLAN name changes from “‘GVRP_VLAN_<vlan-id>“ to “STATIC_VLAN_<vlan-id>“. Displaying GVRP Information You can display the following GVRP information: • GVRP configuration information • GVRP VLAN information • GVRP statistics •...

  • Page 414

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide This display shows the following information. Table 12.1: CLI Display of Summary GVRP Information This Field... Displays... Protocol state The state of GVRP. The display shows one of the following: • GVRP is disabled on the system •...

  • Page 415

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) To display detailed GVRP information for an individual port, enter a command such as the following: HP9300(config)# show gvrp ethernet 2/1 Port 2/1 - GVRP Enabled : YES GVRP Learning : ALLOWED GVRP Applicant : ALLOWED Port State : UP Forwarding...

  • Page 416: Displaying Gvrp Vlan Information

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 12.2: CLI Display of Detailed GVRP Information for a Port (Continued) This Field... Displays... VLAN Membership The VLANs of which the port is a member. For each VLAN, the following information is shown: • VLAN ID –...

  • Page 417

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) This display shows the following information. Table 12.3: CLI Display of Summary VLAN Information for GVRP This Field... Displays... Number of VLANs in the GVRP The number of VLANs in the GVRP database. Database Note: This number includes the default VLAN (1), the GVRP base VLAN (4093), and the single STP VLAN (4094).

  • Page 418: Displaying Gvrp Statistics

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table 12.4: CLI Display of Summary VLAN Information for GVRP (Continued) This Field... Displays... DEFAULT Whether this is the default VLAN. BASE-VLAN Whether this is the base VLAN for GVRP. Timer to Delete Entry Running Whether all ports have left the VLAN and the timer to delete the VLAN itself is running.

  • Page 419: Displaying Cpu Utilization Statistics

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) This display shows the following information for the port. Table 12.5: CLI Display of GVRP Statistics This Field... Displays... Leave All Received The number of Leaveall messages received. Join Empty Received The number of Join Empty messages received. Join In Received The number of Join In messages received.

  • Page 420

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide To display CPU utilization statistics for GVRP for the previous one-second, one-minute, five-minute, and fifteen- minute intervals, enter the following command at any level of the CLI: HP9300# show process cpu Process Name 5Sec(%) 1Min(%) 5Min(%) 15Min(%) Runtime(ms)

  • Page 421: Displaying Gvrp Diagnostic Information, Clearing Gvrp Statistics, Cli Examples

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) Displaying GVRP Diagnostic Information To display diagnostic information, enter the following command: HP9300# debug gvrp packets GVRP: Packets debugging is on GVRP: 0x2095ced4: 01 80 c2 00 00 21 00 e0 52 ab 87 40 00 3a 42 42 GVRP: 0x2095cee4: 03 00 01 01 02 00 04 05 00 02 04 05 00 07 04 05 GVRP: 0x2095cef4:...

  • Page 422

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide HP9300(config)# gvrp-enable HP9300(config-gvrp)# enable all These commands globally enable GVRP support and enable the protocol on all ports. Enter the following commands on edge device A: HP9300> enable HP9300# configure terminal HP9300(config)# vlan 20 HP9300(config-vlan-20)# untag ethernet 2/1 HP9300(config-vlan-20)# tag ethernet 4/24 HP9300(config-vlan-20)# vlan 40 HP9300(config-vlan-40)# untag ethernet 2/1...

  • Page 423

    Configuring GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) Fixed Core and Dynamic Edge In this configuration, GVRP learning is enabled on the edge devices. The VLANs on the core device are statically configured, and the core device is enabled to advertise its VLANs but not to learn VLANs. The edge devices learn the VLANs from the core.

  • Page 424

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide 12 - 20...

  • Page 425: Using Fdp, Configuring Fdp

    FDP is disabled by default. NOTE: If FDP is not enabled on an HP device that receives an FDP update or the device is running a software release that does not support FDP, the update passes through the device at Layer 2.

  • Page 426: Displaying Fdp Information

    By default, the feature is enabled on an interface once FDP is enabled on the device. Changing the FDP Update Timer By default, an HP device enabled for FDP sends an FDP update every 60 seconds. You can change the update timer to a value from 5 – 900 seconds.

  • Page 427

    Enabling the FDP and Reading Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) Packets Displaying Neighbor Information To display a summary list of all the HP neighbors that have sent FDP updates to this HP device, enter the following command: HP9300A# show fdp neighbor...

  • Page 428

    Capabilities The role the neighbor is capable of playing in the network. Interface The interface on which this HP device received an FDP or CDP update for the neighbor. Port ID The interface through which the neighbor sent the update.

  • Page 429: Clearing Fdp And Cdp Information, Reading Cdp Packets

    07.6.04 extends CDP support to version 2 packets. In 07.6.04 and later, when you enable CDP support, support for both CDP versions is enabled. NOTE: The HP device can interpret only the information fields that are common to both CDP version 1 and CDP version 2.

  • Page 430: Enabling Interception Of Cdp Packets Globally, Enabling Interception Of Cdp Packets On An Interface

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: When you enable interception of CDP packets, the HP device drops the packets. As a result, Cisco devices will no longer receive the packets. Enabling Interception of CDP Packets Globally To enable the HP device to intercept and display CDP packets, enter the following command at the global...

  • Page 431

    Enabling the FDP and Reading Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) Packets To display detailed information for the neighbors, enter the following command: HP9300# show fdp neighbors detail Device ID: Router Entry address(es): IP address: 207.95.6.143 Platform: cisco RSP4, Capabilities: Router Interface: Eth 1/1, Port ID (outgoing port): FastEthernet5/0/0 Holdtime : 150 seconds Version :...

  • Page 432: Clearing Cdp Information

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide To display CDP entries for a specific device, specify the device ID. Here is an example. HP9300# show fdp entry Router1 Device ID: Router1 Entry address(es): IP address: 207.95.6.143 Platform: cisco RSP4, Capabilities: Router Interface: Eth 1/1, Port ID (outgoing port): FastEthernet5/0/0 Holdtime : 156 seconds Version :...

  • Page 433

    Chapter 14 Updating Software Images and Configuration Files This chapter describes how to copy and save configuration files and software image files. NOTE: If you are attempting to transfer a file using TFTP but have received an error message, see “Diagnostic Error Codes and Remedies for TFTP Transfers”...

  • Page 434: Determining The Boot Image Version Running On The Device

    The flash memory module contains only one boot image. Image File Types The following table lists the boot and flash image file types supported on each HP device. For information about a specific version of code, see the release notes. Product...

  • Page 435

    2. Upgrade the flash code on the management module to version 07.6.04, then reload the software. Upgrading Software (Non-T-Flow) For easy software image management, all HP devices support the download and upload of software images between the flash modules on the devices and a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server on the network.

  • Page 436: Upgrading The Boot Code, Upgrading The Flash Code

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: HP devices are TFTP clients but not TFTP servers. You must perform the TFTP transaction from the HP device. You cannot “put” a file onto the HP device using the interface of your TFTP server.

  • Page 437

    Updating Software Images and Configuration Files • reload (this command boots from the default boot source, which is the primary flash area by default) • boot system flash primary | secondary NOTE: When you reload the software after upgrading the flash code, the device displays a message stating that the configuration has changed and asking whether you want to save the changes.

  • Page 438

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide USING THE CLI To upgrade TSP boot code from a TFTP server, enter a command such as the following: HP9300# vm copy tftp flash 192.168.1.170 VSB07300.bin boot Syntax: vm copy tftp flash <ip-addr> <image-file-name> boot USING THE WEB MANAGEMENT INTERFACE You cannot perform this procedure using the Web management interface.

  • Page 439

    Updating Software Images and Configuration Files To copy the flash code from the primary flash to the secondary flash for each of the TSPs on the module, enter a command such as the following: HP9300# vm copy flash flash secondary Syntax: vm copy tftp flash <tftp-server-ip-addr>...

  • Page 440: Using Snmp To Upgrade Software

    Use this procedure to upgrade flash code on the Switching Processors on the T-Flow Redundant Management Module. 1. Configure a read-write community string on the HP device, if one is not already configured. To configure a read-write community string, enter the following command from the global CONFIG level of the CLI: snmp-server community <string>...

  • Page 441: Changing The Block Size For Tftp File Transfers

    Changing the Block Size for TFTP File Transfers When you use TFTP to copy a file to or from an HP device, the device transfers the data in blocks of 8192 bytes by default. You can change the block size to one of the following if needed: •...

  • Page 442

    You can use boot commands to immediately initiate software boots from a software image stored in primary or secondary flash on an HP Routing Switch or from a BootP or TFTP server. You can test new versions of code on a Routing Switch or choose the preferred boot source from the console boot prompt without requiring a system reset.

  • Page 443: Loading And Saving Configuration Files

    TFTP Transfers” on page 18-26 is displayed. Loading and Saving Configuration Files For easy configuration management, all HP Routing Switches support both the download and upload of configuration files between the Routing Switch and a TFTP server on the network.

  • Page 444: Replacing The Startup Configuration With The Running Configuration

    Logging Changes to the Startup-Config File You can configure an HP device to generate a Syslog message when the startup-config file is changed. The trap is enabled by default. The following Syslog message is generated when the startup-config file is changed:...

  • Page 445: Copying A Configuration File To Or From A Tftp Server

    NOTE: You can name the configuration file when you copy it to a TFTP server. However, when you copy a configuration file from the server to an HP device, the file is always copied as “startup-config” or “running-config”, depending on which type of file you saved to the server.

  • Page 446: Dynamic Configuration Loading

    You can load dynamic configuration commands (commands that do not require a reload to take effect) from a file on a TFTP server into an HP device’s running-config. You can make configuration changes off-line, then load the changes directly into the device’s running-config, without reloading the software.

  • Page 447

    Updating Software Images and Configuration Files NOTE: You can enter text following “ ! “ as a comment. However, the “ !” is not a comment marker. It returns the CLI to the global configuration level. NOTE: In software releases earlier than 07.1.x, the CLI ignores the “ ! “ instead of changing the CLI to the global CONFIG level, when you load the configuration using the copy tftp running-config <ip-addr>...

  • Page 448

    Maximum File Sizes for Startup-Config File and Running-Config Each HP device has a maximum allowable size for the running-config and the startup-config file. If you use TFTP to load additional information into a device’s running-config or startup-config file, it is possible to exceed the maximum allowable size.

  • Page 449: Using Snmp To Save And Load Configuration Information

    Releases 07.6.04 and Later” on page 18-22. To determine the size of an HP device’s running-config or startup-config file, copy it to a TFTP server, then use the directory services on the server to list the size of the copied file. To copy the running-config or startup-config file to a TFTP server, use one of the following commands.

  • Page 450: Erasing Image And Configuration Files, Scheduling A System Reload, Reloading At A Specific Time

    You cannot delete image or configuration files using the Web management interface. Scheduling a System Reload In addition to reloading the system manually, you can configure the HP device to reload itself at a specific time or after a specific amount of time has passed.

  • Page 451: Reloading After A Specific Amount Of Time, Canceling A Scheduled Reload

    Updating Software Images and Configuration Files Reloading after a Specific Amount of Time To schedule a system reload to occur after a specific amount of time has passed on the system clock, use one of the following methods. USING THE CLI To schedule a system reload from the secondary flash one day and 12 hours later, enter the following command at the global CONFIG level of the CLI: HP9300# reload after 01:12:00 secondary...

  • Page 452: Diagnostic Error Codes And Remedies For Tftp Transfers

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Diagnostic Error Codes and Remedies for TFTP Transfers If an error occurs with a TFTP transfer to or from an HP Routing Switch, one of the following error codes is displayed. Error Message Explanation and action code Flash read preparation failed.

  • Page 453: Using Syslog

    HP device writes the messages both to the system log and to the Syslog server. Using a Syslog server ensures that the messages remain available even after a system reload. The HP device’s local Syslog buffer is cleared during a system reload or reboot, but the Syslog messages sent to the Syslog server remain on the server.

  • Page 454: Displaying Syslog Messages

    “Displaying the Syslog Configuration” on page A-3. Enabling Real-Time Display of Syslog Messages By default, to view Syslog messages generated by an HP device, you need to display the Syslog buffer or the log on a Syslog server used by the HP device.

  • Page 455: Configuring The Syslog Service, Displaying The Syslog Configuration

    The procedures in this section describe how to perform the following Syslog configuration tasks: • Specify a Syslog server. You can configure the HP device to use up to six Syslog servers. (Use of a Syslog server is optional. The system can hold up to 100 Syslog messages in an internal buffer.) •...

  • Page 456

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide The Syslog display shows the following configuration information, in the rows above the log entries themselves. Table A.1: CLI Display of Syslog Buffer Configuration This Field... Displays... Syslog logging The state (enabled or disabled) of the Syslog buffer. messages dropped The number of Syslog messages dropped due to user-configured filters.

  • Page 457

    Using Syslog The static and dynamic buffers are both displayed when you display the log. HP9300(config)# show logging Syslog logging: enabled (0 messages dropped, 0 flushes, 0 overruns) Buffer logging: level ACDMEINW, 3 messages logged level code: A=alert C=critical D=debugging M=emergency E=error I=informational N=notification W=warning Static Log Buffer: Dec 15 19:04:14:A:Fan 1, fan on right connector, failed...

  • Page 458

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide <num> d – day • • <num> h – hours <num> m – minutes • <num> s – seconds • For example, “188d1h01m00s” means the device had been running for 188 days, 11 hours, one minute, and zero seconds when the Syslog entry with this time stamp was generated.

  • Page 459

    Using Syslog the most recent message, at the top of the list of messages, was generated when the device had been running for 21 days, seven hours, two minutes, and 40 seconds. HP9300(config)# show log Syslog logging: enabled (0 messages dropped, 0 flushes, 0 overruns) Buffer logging: level ACDMEINW, 38 messages logged level code: A=alert C=critical D=debugging M=emergency E=error I=informational N=notification W=warning...

  • Page 460

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide NOTE: A change in the buffer size takes effect only after you restart the system. The buffer size does not affect how many entries the device can log on a Syslog server. The number of entries the device can log on the server depends on the server’s configuration.

  • Page 461: Specifying A Syslog Server, Specifying An Additional Syslog Server

    Using Syslog 16. Click on the Add button to add the server to the list. You can add up to six Syslog servers. 17. When you have finished, select the Save link at the bottom of the dialog. Select Yes when prompted to save the configuration change to the startup-config file on the device’s flash memory.

  • Page 462: Disabling Logging Of A Message Level

    Changing the Log Facility The Syslog daemon on the Syslog server uses a facility to determine where to log the messages from the HP device. The default facility for messages the HP device sends to the Syslog server is “user”. You can change the facility using the following command.

  • Page 463: Displaying The Interface Name In Syslog Messages

    Using Syslog HP9300(config)# logging facility local0 Syntax: logging facility <facility-name> The <facility-name> can be one of the following: • kern – kernel messages • user – random user-level messages • mail – mail system • daemon – system daemons • auth –...

  • Page 464: Clearing The Syslog Messages From The Local Buffer, Syslog Messages

    Dec 15 18:46:17:I:Interface ethernet Lab2, state up Dec 15 18:45:15:I:Warm start Clearing the Syslog Messages from the Local Buffer To clear the Syslog messages stored in the HP device’s local buffer, use one of the following methods: USING THE CLI HP9300# clear logging...

  • Page 465

    Using Syslog • Debugging Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages Message Level Message Explanation Alert Power supply <num>, <location>, failed A power supply has failed. The <num> is the power supply number. The <location> describes where the failed power supply is in the chassis. The location can be one of the following: •...

  • Page 466

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages (Continued) Message Level Message Explanation Alert Management module at slot <slot-num> Indicates a state change in a management state changed from <module-state> to module. <module-state>. The <slot-num> indicates the chassis slot containing the module.

  • Page 467

    The <ip-addr> is the duplicate IP address. The <mac-addr> is the MAC address of the device with the duplicate IP address. The <portnum> is the HP port that received the packet with the duplicate IP address. The address is the packet’s source IP address.

  • Page 468

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages (Continued) Message Level Message Explanation Warning list <acl-num> denied <ip-proto> Indicates that an Access Control List (ACL) <src­ip-addr> (<src-tcp/udp-port>) denied (dropped) packets. (Ethernet <portnum> <mac-addr>) -> The <acl-num> indicates the ACL number.

  • Page 469

    Indicates that the state of an OSPF interface rid <router­id>, intf addr <ip-addr>, has changed. state <ospf-state> The <router­id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <ip-addr> is the interface’s IP address. The <ospf-state> indicates the state to which...

  • Page 470

    Indicates that the state of an OSPF neighbor addr <ip-addr>, nbr rid <nbr-router-Id>, state has changed. <ospf-state> The <router­id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the neighbor. The <nbr-router-id> is the router ID of the neighbor.

  • Page 471

    Indicates that the state of an OSPF virtual rid <router-id>, nbr addr <ip-addr>, neighbor has changed. nbr rid <nbr-router-id>, state <ospf-state> The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the neighbor.

  • Page 472

    Indicates that an OSPF interface intf addr <ip-addr>, configuration error has occurred. pkt src addr <src-ip-addr>, The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP error type <error-type>, pkt type <pkt-type> device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 473

    Indicates that an OSPF virtual routing rid <router-id>, intf addr <ip-addr>, interface configuration error has occurred. pkt src addr <src-ip-addr>, The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP error type <error-type>, pkt type <pkt-type> device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 474

    Indicates that an OSPF interface intf addr <ip-addr>, authentication failure has occurred. pkt src addr <src-ip-addr>, The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP error type <error-type>, pkt type <pkt-type> device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 475

    Indicates that an OSPF virtual routing rid <router-id>, intf addr <ip-addr>, interface authentication failure has occurred. pkt src addr <src-ip-addr>, The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP error type <error-type>, pkt type <pkt-type> device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 476

    Indicates that an OSPF interface received a intf addr <ip-addr>, bad packet. pkt src addr <src­ip-addr>, The <router­id> is the router ID of the HP pkt type <pkt-type> device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 477

    Link State Advertisement pkt type is <pkt-type>, LSA type <lsa-type>, (LSA). LSA id <lsa-id>, LSA rid <lsa-router-id> The <router-id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 478

    Link State Advertisement pkt type is <pkt-type>, LSA type <lsa-type>, (LSA). LSA id <lsa­id>, LSA rid <lsa-router-id> The <router­id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <ip-addr> is the IP address of the interface on the HP device.

  • Page 479

    Notification OSPF LSDB overflow, rid <router­id>, A Link State Database Overflow (LSDB) limit <num> condition has occurred. The <router­id> is the router ID of the HP device. The <num> is the number of LSAs. Notification OSPF LSDB approaching overflow, The software is close to an LSDB condition.

  • Page 480

    The number of ICMP packets exceeds the packets, stopping for <lockup> seconds!! <burst-max> threshold set by the ip icmp burst command. The HP device may be the victim of a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. All ICMP packets will be dropped for the number of seconds specified by the <lockup>...

  • Page 481

    Using Syslog Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages (Continued) Message Level Message Explanation Notification Transit ICMP in interface <portnum> Threshold parameters for ICMP transit exceeds <num> burst packets, stopping for (through) traffic have been configured on an <num> seconds!! interface, and the maximum burst size for ICMP packets on the interface has been exceeded.

  • Page 482

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages (Continued) Message Level Message Explanation Informational Warm start The system software (flash code) has been reloaded. Informational <user-name> login to USER EXEC mode A user has logged into the USER EXEC mode of the CLI.

  • Page 483

    Bridge is new root, vlan <vlan­id>, A Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) topology root ID <root­id> change has occurred, resulting in the HP device becoming the root bridge. The <vlan­id> is the ID of the VLAN in which the STP topology change occurred.

  • Page 484

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table A.2: HP Syslog Messages (Continued) Message Level Message Explanation Informational DOT1X: Port <portnum>, The status of the interface’s controlled port AuthControlledPortStatus change: has changed from unauthorized to authorized authorized. Informational DOT1X: Port <portnum>, The status of the interface’s controlled port...

  • Page 485

    • The HP ProCurve website For more information on HP ProCurve 9300 publications and how to get the latest versions from the HP ProCurve website, refer to “Organization of Product Documentation” in this manual. HP EP modules provide enhanced system performance through custom-designed ASICs.

  • Page 486: Hardware Overview

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table B.1: HP 9300 series EP Modules (Continued) Model Description Ports Interface Type J4889A Forwarding module 48 10/100 Ethernet ports 50-pin Telco connectors for Cat-5 copper (12 ports per connector) J4895A Forwarding module 16 Gigabit Ethernet Copper...

  • Page 487

    Enhanced Performance (EP) Chassis Modules Temperature Sensor Every EP module contains a temperature sensor. Depending on the temperature reported by the sensor, the software can send a warning if the temperature exceeds the normal threshold and can even shut the device down if the temperature exceeds the safe threshold.

  • Page 488

    You also can manually configure a port for 100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps. The ports also support automatic MDI/MDIX crossover. The pin assignments and the status LEDs are the same as the ones for the 100 and 1000 Mbps ports on other HP modules. See Table B.3 on page B-3.

  • Page 489

    To connect the EP module to the network, you can use a cable that terminates in another 50-pin connector or one that terminates in 12 RJ-45 connectors, depending on the patch panel you are using. NOTE: HP does not provide the cables or patch panels. However, you can order cables and patch panels from Superior Module Products, www.superiormod.com.

  • Page 490

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Figure B.7 shows an example of a patch panel that accepts a 50-pin connector, and converts the signals to 12 RJ­ 45 sockets. Each of the RJ-45 sockets uses four signals per the RJ-21 wiring standard. You can use Cat5 cables with RJ-45 connectors to plug your network devices into the patch panel.

  • Page 491

    Not used Not used Configuration Considerations • HP 9300 series EP modules do not require a new chassis. You can use the modules in your installed chassis. • You cannot use EP modules and Standard (non-EP) modules in the same chassis.

  • Page 492

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide B - 8...

  • Page 493: Software Specifications, Ieee Compliance

    ISO/IEC specification support • Internet draft support NOTE: For a list of features supported on a specific product, see the data sheet for that product. IEEE Compliance HP devices support the following standards. • 802.1D Bridging • 802.1p/q VLAN Tagging •...

  • Page 494: Rfc Support

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide RFC Support The following table lists the RFCs supported by HP devices. NOTE: Some devices support only a subset of the RFCs. Table C.1: HP RFC Support RFC Number Protocol or Standard User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

  • Page 495

    Software Specifications Table C.1: HP RFC Support (Continued) RFC Number Protocol or Standard 1215 SNMP generic traps 1256 ICMP Router Discovery Protocol (IRDP) 1267 Border Gateway Protocol version 3 1321 The MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm 1340 Assigned numbers (where applicable) 1354...

  • Page 496: Internet Drafts

    Installation and Basic Configuration Guide Table C.1: HP RFC Support (Continued) RFC Number Protocol or Standard 2138 Remote Authentication Dial In User Server (RADIUS) 2139 RADIUS Accounting 2178 Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) 2328 OSPF Version 2 Note: AS External LSA reduction is supported.

  • Page 497

    Index Numerics Air Flow 2-19 Air Flow, Caution 2-4 10 Gigabit Ethernet 5-1 Ambient temperature 2-4 10/100 Ampere Ratings 2-4 mode 6-24 AppleTalk 1000BaseLx 2-8 VLAN 11-3 11-20 1000BaseSx 2-8 AppleTalk cable VLAN 11-1 11-28 802.1p configuring 11-62 QoS priority 11-5 Assigning 802.1W 8-22 IP address 2-18...

  • Page 498

    Installation and Getting Started Guide replacing power supply 2-9 Cooling 2-5 swapping modules 2-4 Ctrl-A 2-26 CLI Ctrl-B 2-26 access 2-25 Ctrl-C 2-26 access levels 2-16 Ctrl-D 2-26 attaching serial cable 2-14 Ctrl-E 2-27 command completion 2-26 Ctrl-F 2-27 CONFIG Level 2-16 Ctrl-K 2-27 line editing commands 2-26 Ctrl-L 2-27...

  • Page 499

    disabling 6-30 MAC address filter 6-35 Getting Help 1-2 VLAN 11-1 11-2 Gigabit configuring 11-13 11-56 negotiation 6-15 6-26 default 11-4 11-13 Global CONFIG Level 2-17 modifying 11-17 Grounding ii 2-3 Layer 3 VLAN 11-1 11-3 11-20 configuring 11-58 11-59 11-60 11-62 Half-duplex mode 6-24...

  • Page 500

    Installation and Getting Started Guide limiting 6-17 aging 11-31 displaying information 11-64 dynamic 11-9 11-31 excluded 11-10 Name static 11-10 port 6-22 types 11-8 Negotiation Port-based VLAN Gigabit 6-15 configuring 11-56 NetBIOS default 11-4 11-13 VLAN 11-3 11-20 Power Cord 2-14 Netscape version required 2-33 caution 2-3 2-21...

  • Page 501

    RSTP 8-22 configuring basic Layer 2 parameters 6-27 Running-config file 14-11 disabling 6-30 Switchover redundant management module 3-2 Syslog messages 3-9 Scheduled reload 14-18 Syslog A-3 Scroll control 2-26 buffer A-10 A-12 Security changing facility A-10 assigning Enable password 2-17 disabling message level A-10 MAC address lock 6-42 redundant management switchover 3-9...

  • Page 502

    Installation and Getting Started Guide VLAN AppleTalk cable 11-1 11-28 broadcast leaks 11-10 configuring 11-1 default 11-4 11-13 displaying information 11-63 displaying port information 11-64 displaying summary information 11-63 dynamic port 11-9 11-31 aging 11-31 excluded port 11-10 IEEE tagging 6-34 IP sub-net 11-1 IPv6 network 11-1 IPX network 11-1...

  • Page 504

    © 2000, 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, LP. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Edition 1, September 2003 Manual Part Number 5990-6028...

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