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HP ProCurve Management And Configuration Manual

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8200zl
ProCurve Switches
K.12.XX
www.procurve.com
Management and
Configuration Guide

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  Summary of Contents for HP ProCurve

  • Page 1 Management and Configuration Guide 8200zl ProCurve Switches K.12.XX www.procurve.com...
  • Page 3 ProCurve Series 8200zl Switches September 2007 K.12.xx Management and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 4 ProCurve Switch 8212zl (J8715A) contained herein. Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished Trademark Credits by Hewlett-Packard. Microsoft, Windows, and Microsoft Windows NT are US registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents Product Documentation About Your Switch Manual Set ......xxiii Printed Publications........xxiii Electronic Publications .
  • Page 6: Advantages Of Using Procurve Manager

    ProCurve Manager Plus ........
  • Page 7: Using The Procurve Web Browser Interface

    Using ProCurve Manager (PCM) or ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM+) ....... 5-5 Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session .
  • Page 8: Switch Memory And Configuration

    Status Reporting Features ........5-16 The Overview Window .
  • Page 9: Interface Access And System Information

    Multiple Configuration Files ........6-27 General Operation ......... . 6-28 Transitioning to Multiple Configuration Files .
  • Page 10: Configuring Ip Addressing

    8 Configuring IP Addressing Contents ............8-1 Overview .
  • Page 11: Port Status And Configuration

    Configuring a Broadcast Limit on the Switch ....10-14 Configuring ProCurve Auto-MDIX ......10-15 Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters .
  • Page 12 Enabling UDLD ........10-26 Changing the Keepalive Interval .
  • Page 13: Port Traffic Controls

    Applying Security Features to PoE Configurations ... . . 11-23 Assigning Priority Policies to PoE Traffic ..... 11-24 Calculating the Maximum Load for a PoE Module .
  • Page 14 Displaying the Current Rate-Limit Configuration ... . 13-6 Operating Notes for Rate-Limiting ......13-8 ICMP Rate-Limiting .
  • Page 15 SNMP Management Features ....... . . 14-4 Configuring for SNMP version 1 and 2c Access to the Switch ..14-4 Configuring for SNMP Version 3 Access to the Switch .
  • Page 16 Configuring SNMP Notification Support ....14-47 Configuring Per-Port Transmit and Receive Modes ..14-48 Configuring Basic LLDP Per-Port Advertisement Content .
  • Page 17 Resetting the Management Module ......15-14 Hotswapping Management Modules ......15-15 Hotswapping Out the Active Management Module .
  • Page 18 Using the Web Browser for Redundant Management ... 15-36 Identity Page ..........15-36 Overview Page .
  • Page 19 CLI: Xmodem Download from a PC or UNIX Workstation to Primary or Secondary Flash ......A-17 Using USB to Transfer Files to and from the Switch .
  • Page 20 B Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Contents ........... . . B-1 Overview .
  • Page 21 Remote Destinations ........B-27 Mirrored Traffic Sources ........B-27 Criteria for Selecting Traffic To Mirror .
  • Page 22 Remote Mirroring Destination Using a Port Interface and Directional Mirroring Criteria ......B-66 Maximum Supported Frame Size .
  • Page 23 Log Command ......... C-29 Show Logging .
  • Page 24 Displaying Current Resource Usage ......E-3 When Insufficient Resources Are Available ....E-5 F Daylight Savings Time on ProCurve Switches Index...
  • Page 25: Product Documentation

    Electronic Publications The latest version of each of the publications listed below is available in PDF format on the ProCurve Web site, as described in the Note at the top of this page. Management and Configuration Guide—Describes how to configure, ■...
  • Page 26 Software Feature Index For the software manual set supporting your ProCurve 8212zl switch model, this feature index indicates which manual to consult for information on a given software feature. Both Intelligent Edge and Premium Edge software features are available on the Procurve 8212zl switch.
  • Page 27 Intelligent Edge Software Manual Features Management Advanced Multicast and Access Traffic Routing Security Configuration Management Guide Config File Console Access Copy Command CoS (Class of Service) Debug DHCP Configuration DHCP Option 82 DHCP Snooping DHCP/Bootp Operation Diagnostic Tools Downloading Software Dynamic ARP Protection Eavesdrop Protection Event Log...
  • Page 28 MAC-based Authentication Management VLAN Meshing Monitoring and Analysis Multicast Filtering Multiple Configuration Files Network Management Applications (SNMP) OpenView Device Management Passwords and Password Clear Protection ProCurve Manager (PCM) Ping Port Configuration Port Monitoring Port Security Port Status Port Trunking (LACP) xxvi...
  • Page 29 Intelligent Edge Software Manual Features Management Advanced Multicast and Access Traffic Routing Security Configuration Management Guide Port-Based Access Control (802.1X) Power over Ethernet (PoE) Protocol Filters Protocol VLANS Quality of Service (QoS) RADIUS Authentication and Accounting RADIUS-Based Configuration Rate-Limiting Redundant Management RMON 1,2,3,9 Routing Routing - IP Static...
  • Page 30 Intelligent Edge Software Manual Features Management Advanced Multicast and Access Traffic Routing Security Configuration Management Guide Telnet Access TFTP Time Protocols (TimeP, SNTP) Traffic Mirroring Traffic/Security Filters Troubleshooting Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) UDP Forwarder USB Device Support Virus Throttling (Connection-Rate Filtering) VLANs VLAN Mirroring (1 static VLAN) Voice VLAN...
  • Page 31: Contents

    Getting Started Contents Introduction ..........1-2 Conventions .
  • Page 32: Introduction

    Getting Started Introduction Introduction This guide is intended for use with the ProCurve Switch 8212zl. It describes how to use the command line interface (CLI), Menu interface, and web browser to configure, manage, monitor, and troubleshoot switch operation. For an overview of other product documentation for the above switches, refer to “Product Documentation”...
  • Page 33: Command Prompts

    In the default configuration, your switch displays a CLI prompt similar to the following: ProCurve 8212zl# To simplify recognition, this guide uses ProCurve to represent command prompts for all models. For example: ProCurve# (You can use the hostname command to change the text in the CLI prompt.) Screen Simulations Displayed Text.
  • Page 34: Sources For More Information

    For the latest version of all ProCurve switch documentation, including Release Notes covering recently added features, visit the ProCurve Network­ ing web site at www.procurve.com, click on Technical support, and then click on Product Manuals (all). Software Release Notes—Release Notes are posted on the ProCurve ■...
  • Page 35 Getting Started Sources for More Information Management and Configuration Guide—Use this guide for information ■ on topics such as: • various interfaces available on the switch • memory and configuration operation • interface access • IP addressing • time protocols •...
  • Page 36: Getting Documentation From The Web

    Click on Technical support. Click on Product manuals. Click on the product for which you want to view or download a manual. If you need further information on ProCurve switch technology, visit the ProCurve Networking web site at: www.procurve.com Online Help...
  • Page 37: Command Line Interface

    Figure 1-4. Button for Web Browser Interface Online Help N o t e To access the online Help for the ProCurve web browser interface, you need either ProCurve Manager (version 1.5 or greater) installed on your network or an active connection to the World Wide Web. Otherwise, Online help for...
  • Page 38: Ip Addressing

    If you just want to give the switch an IP address so that it can communicate on your network, or if you are not using VLANs, ProCurve recommends that you use the Switch Setup screen to quickly configure IP addressing. To do so, do one of the following: Enter setup at the CLI Manager level prompt.
  • Page 39: Contents

    ProCurve Manager Plus ........
  • Page 40: Overview

    VLAN management. (ProCurve includes a copy of PCM+ in-box for a free 30-day trial.) This manual describes how to use the menu interface (Chapter 3), the CLI (Chapter 4), the web browser interface (Chapter 5), and how to use these interfaces to configure and monitor the switch.
  • Page 41: Advantages Of Using The Menu Interface

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the Menu Interface To use ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus, refer to the Getting Started Guide and the Administrator’s Guide, which are available electron­ ically with the software for these applications. For more information, visit the ProCurve Networking web site at www.procurve.com.
  • Page 42: Advantages Of Using The Cli

    Provides more security; configuration information and passwords are ■ not seen on the network. Advantages of Using the CLI Prompt for Operator Level ProCurve> Prompt for Manager Level ProCurve# Prompt for Global Configuration ProCurve(config)# Level Prompt for Context ProCurve(<context>)#...
  • Page 43: Advantages Of Using The Web Browser Interface

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the Web Browser Interface To perform specific procedures (such as configuring IP addressing or ■ VLANs), use the Contents listing at the front of the manual to locate the information you need. ■ For monitoring and analyzing switch operation, refer to Appendix B.
  • Page 44 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the Web Browser Interface Many features have all their fields in one screen so you can view all ■ values at once ■ More visual cues, using colors, status bars, device icons, and other graphical objects instead of relying solely on alphanumeric values Display of acceptable ranges of values available in configuration list ■...
  • Page 45: Or Procurve Manager Plus

    Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus You can operate ProCurve Manager and ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM and PCM+) from a PC on the network to monitor traffic, manage your hubs and switches, and proactively recommend network changes to increase network uptime and optimize performance.
  • Page 46 Features and benefits of ProCurve Manager Plus: ■ • All of the Features of ProCurve Manager: Refer to the above listing. • In-Depth Traffic Analysis: An integrated, low-overhead traffic mon­ itor interface shows detailed information on traffic throughout the network.
  • Page 47: Web Browser Interfaces

    Updates can be scheduled easily across large groups of devices, all at user-specified times. • Investment Protection: The modular software architecture of ProCurve Manager Plus will allow ProCurve to offer network admin­ istrators add-on software solutions that complement their needs. Custom Login Banners for the Console and Web Browser Interfaces...
  • Page 48: Banner Operation With Telnet, Serial, Or Sshv2 Access

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus N o t e The switch’s Web browser interface does not display the default banner. Banner Operation with Telnet, Serial, or SSHv2 Access When a system operator begins a login session, the switch displays the banner above the local password prompt or, if no password is configured, above the Press any key to continue prompt.
  • Page 49: Example Of Configuring And Displaying A Banner

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus Use show banner motd to display the current banner status. Syntax: banner motd < delimiter > no banner motd This command defines the single character used to termi­...
  • Page 50 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus Figure 2-6. Example of Configuring a Login Banner To view the current banner configuration, use either the show banner motd or show running command. ProCurve(config)# show banner motd...
  • Page 51 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus ProCurve(config)# show running Running configuration ; J9091A Configuration Editor; Created on release K.12.XX hostname “ProCurve” module 1 type J8702A module 2 type J8702A snmp-server community “notpublic” Unrestricted vlan 1 name “DEFAULT_VLAN”...
  • Page 52: Operating Notes

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using ProCurve Manager or ProCurve Manager Plus If someone uses a Web browser to log in to the switch interface, the following message appears: Figure 1. Example of Web Browser Interface Result of the Login Banner...
  • Page 53: Contents

    Using the Menu Interface Contents Overview ........... . . 3-2 Starting and Ending a Menu Session .
  • Page 54: Overview

    Reboot the switch For a detailed list of menu features, see the “Menu Features List” on page 3-14. Privilege Levels and Password Security. ProCurve strongly recom­ mends that you configure a Manager password to help prevent unauthorized access to your network. A Manager password grants full read-write access to the switch.
  • Page 55: Starting And Ending A Menu Session

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session N o t e If the switch has neither a Manager nor an Operator password, anyone having access to the console interface can operate the console with full manager privileges. Also, if you configure only an Operator password, entering the Operator password enables full manager privileges.
  • Page 56: How To Start A Menu Interface Session

    If no password has been configured, the CLI prompt appears. Go to the next step. 4. When the CLI prompt appears, display the Menu interface by entering the menu command. For example: ProCurve# menu [Enter] results in the following display:...
  • Page 57: How To End A Menu Session And Exit From The Console

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session Figure 3-1. Example of the Main Menu with Manager Privileges For a description of Main Menu features, see “Main Menu Features” on page 3-7. N o t e To configure the switch to start with the menu interface instead of the CLI, go to the Manager level prompt in the CLI, enter the command, and in the setup...
  • Page 58 Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session Asterisk indicates a configuration change that requires a reboot to activate. Figure 3-2. Example Indication of a Configuration Change Requiring a Reboot 1. In the current session, if you have not made configuration changes that require a switch reboot to activate, return to the Main Menu and press (zero) to log out.
  • Page 59: Main Menu Features

    Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features Main Menu Features Figure 3-3. The Main Menu View with Manager Privileges The Main Menu gives you access to these Menu interface features: ■ Status and Counters: Provides access to display screens showing switch information, port status and counters, and port and VLAN address tables.
  • Page 60 Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features Command Line (CLI): Selects the Command Line Interface at the same ■ level (Manager or Operator) that you are accessing in the Menu interface. (Refer to Chapter 4, “Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)”.) ■...
  • Page 61: Screen Structure And Navigation

    Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Screen Structure and Navigation Menu interface screens include these three elements: ■ Parameter fields and/or read-only information such as statistics Navigation and configuration actions, such as Save, Edit, and Cancel ■ ■ Help line to describe navigation options, individual parameters, and read- only data For example, in the following System Information screen:...
  • Page 62 Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Table 3-1. How To Navigate in the Menu Interface Task: Actions: Execute an action Use either of the following methods: from the “Actions –>” • Use the arrow keys ([<], or [>]) to highlight the action you want list at the bottom of to execute, then press [Enter].
  • Page 63 Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation To get Help on individual parameter descriptions. In most screens there is a Help option in the Actions line. Whenever any of the items in the Actions line is highlighted, press , and a separate help screen is displayed. For example: Pressing [H] or highlighting Help and pressing [Enter] displays Help for the...
  • Page 64: Rebooting The Switch

    Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Rebooting the Switch Rebooting the switch from the menu interface ■ Terminates all current sessions and performs a reset of the operating system Activates any menu interface configuration changes that require a reboot ■...
  • Page 65 Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes. Configuration changes for most parameters in the menu interface become effective as soon as you save them. However, you must reboot the switch in order to implement a change in the .
  • Page 66: Menu Features List

    Using the Menu Interface Menu Features List Menu Features List Status and Counters • General System Information • Switch Management Address Information • Port Status • Port Counters • Address Table • Port Address Table Switch Configuration • System Information •...
  • Page 67: Where To Go From Here

    Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here Where To Go From Here This chapter provides an overview of the menu interface and how to use it. The following table indicates where to turn for detailed information on how to use the individual features available through the menu interface.
  • Page 68 Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here 3-16...
  • Page 69: Contents

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Contents Overview ........... . . 4-2 Accessing the CLI .
  • Page 70: Accessing The Cli

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Overview Overview The CLI is a text-based command interface for configuring and monitoring the switch. The CLI gives you access to the switch’s full set of commands while providing the same password protection that is used in the web browser interface and the menu interface.
  • Page 71: Privilege Levels At Logon

    In the above case, you will enter the CLI at the level corresponding to the password you provide (operator or manager). If no passwords are set when you log onto the CLI, you will enter at the Manager level. For example: ProCurve# _...
  • Page 72: Privilege Level Operation

    Using the CLI C a u t i o n ProCurve strongly recommends that you configure a Manager password. If a Manager password is not configured, then the Manager level is not password- protected, and anyone having in-band or out-of-band access to the switch may be able to reach the Manager level and compromise switch and network security.
  • Page 73: Manager Privileges

    Manager prompt. For example: Enter config at the Manager prompt. ProCurve# config ProCurve(config)#_ The Global Config prompt. Context Configuration level: Provides all Operator and Manager priv­ ■ ileges, and enables you to make configuration changes in a specific context, such as one or more ports or a VLAN.
  • Page 74 Using the CLI Table 4-1. Privilege Level Hierarchy Privilege Example of Prompt and Permitted Operations Level Operator Privilege Operator Level ProCurve> show < command > View status and configuration information. setup ping < argument > Perform connectivity tests. link-test < argument >...
  • Page 75: How To Move Between Levels

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI How To Move Between Levels Change in Levels Example of Prompt, Command, and Result Operator level > enable ProCurve Password:_ Manager level enable After you enter , the Password prompt appears. After you enter the...
  • Page 76: Listing Commands And Command Options

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI For example, if you use the menu interface to configure an IP address of “X” for VLAN 1 and later use the CLI to configure a different IP address of “Y” for VLAN 1, then “Y”...
  • Page 77 [Tab] (with no spaces allowed). For example, at the Global Configuration level, if you press [Tab] immediately after typing “t”, the CLI displays the available command options that begin with “t”. For example: ProCurve(config)# t [Tab] tacacs-server telnet-server time timesync...
  • Page 78: Listing Command Options

    CLI completes the current word (if you have typed enough of the word for the CLI to distinguish it from other possibilities), including hyphenated exten­ sions. For example: ProCurve(config)# port- [Tab] ProCurve(config)# port-security _ Pressing after a completed command word lists the further options for [Tab] that command.
  • Page 79: Displaying Cli "Help

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Displaying CLI “Help” CLI Help provides two types of context-sensitive information: ■ Command list with a brief summary of each command’s purpose Detailed information on how to use individual commands ■ Displaying Command-List Help.
  • Page 80: Configuration Commands And The Context Configuration Modes

    For example, trying to list the help for the interface command while at the global configuration level produces this result: ProCurve# speed-duplex help Invalid input: speed-duplex Configuration Commands and the Context...
  • Page 81 Port or Trunk-Group Context . Includes port- or trunk-specific com­ mands that apply only to the selected port(s) or trunk group, plus the global configuration, Manager, and Operator commands. The prompt for this mode includes the identity of the selected port(s): ProCurve(config)# interface c3-c6 ProCurve(eth-C5-C8)# ProCurve(config)# interface trk1 ProCurve(eth-Trk1)#...
  • Page 82 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI In the port context, the first block of commands in the “?” listing show the context-specific commands that will affect only ports C3-C6. The remaining commands in the listing are Manager, Operator, and context commands.
  • Page 83 VLAN ID of the selected VLAN. For example, if you had already configured a VLAN with an ID of 100 in the switch: ProCurve(config)# vlan 100 Command executed at configuration level to enter VLAN 100 context. ProCurve(vlan-100)# Resulting prompt showing VLAN 100 context.
  • Page 84: Cli Control And Editing

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) CLI Control and Editing CLI Control and Editing Keystrokes Function [Ctrl] [A] Jumps to the first character of the command line. or [<] Moves the cursor back one character. [Ctrl] [B] [Ctrl] [C] Terminates a task and displays the command prompt. [Ctrl] [D] Deletes the character at the cursor.
  • Page 85: Contents

    Using ProCurve Manager (PCM) or ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM+) ....... 5-5 Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session .
  • Page 86: Overview

    Command Prompt or changing the Web Agent Enabled parameter setting to No (page 7-4). For information on operating system, browser, and Java versions for the switches covered in this guide, go to the ProCurve Networking web site at www.procurve.com and: Click on: Technical support...
  • Page 87: General Features

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface General Features General Features The web browser interface includes these features: Switch Identity and Status: • General system data • Software version • Redundant Management Module software version • IP address • Status Overview •...
  • Page 88: Interface Session With The Switch

    Location or Address field instead of the IP address. Using DNS names typically improves browser performance. Contact your network adminis­ trator to enquire about DNS names associated with your ProCurve switch. Type the IP address (or DNS name) of the switch in the browser Location or Address (URL) field and press .
  • Page 89: Procurve Manager Plus (Pcm+)

    Using ProCurve Manager (PCM) or ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM+) ProCurve Manager and ProCurve Manager Plus are designed for installation on a network management workstation. For this reason, the system require­ ments are different from the system requirements for accessing the switch’s web browser interface from a non-management PC or workstation.
  • Page 90 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Starting a Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch First time install alert Figure 5-1. Example of Status Overview Screen...
  • Page 91: Tasks For Your First Procurve Web Browser Interface Session

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session The first time you access the web browser interface, there are three tasks you should perform: ■...
  • Page 92: In The Browser Interface

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session This window is the launching point for the basic configuration you need to perform to set web browser interface passwords for maintaining security and a fault detection policy, which determines the types of messages that the Alert Log displays.
  • Page 93 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session Figure 5-3. The Device Passwords Window To set the passwords: 1. Access the Device Passwords screen by one of the following methods: • If the Alert Log includes a “First Time Install” event entry, double click on this event, then, in the resulting display, click on the secure access to the device link.
  • Page 94: Entering A User Name And Password

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First ProCurve Web Browser Interface Session Entering a User Name and Password Figure 5-4. Example of the Password Prompt in the Web Browser Interface The manager and operator passwords are used to control access to all switch interfaces.
  • Page 95: Online Help For The Web Browser Interface

    Context-sensitive help is provided for the screen you are on. N o t e To access the online Help for the ProCurve web browser interface, you need either ProCurve Manager (version 1.5 or greater) installed on your network or an active connection to the World Wide Web. Otherwise, Online help for the web browser interface will not be available.
  • Page 96: Support/Mgmt Urls Feature

    Support tab. The default is the URL for the ProCurve Networking home page. – The URL of a PCM (ProCurve Network Manager) workstation or other server for the online Help files for this web browser interface. (The default setting accesses the switch’s browser-based Help on the ProCurve World Wide...
  • Page 97: Support Url

    As an alternative, you can replace the ProCurve URL with the URL for a local site used for logging reports on network performance or other support activ­...
  • Page 98: Using The Pcm Server For Switch Web Help

    Figure 5-7. How To Access Web Browser Interface Online Help Using the PCM Server for Switch Web Help For ProCurve devices that support the “Web Help” feature, you can use the PCM server to host the switch help files for devices that do not have HTTP access to the ProCurve Support Web site.
  • Page 99 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Support/Mgmt URLs Feature 3. Add an entry, or edit the existing entry in the Discovery portion of the global properties (globalprops.prp) in PCM to redirect the switches to the help files on the PCM server. For example:...
  • Page 100: Status Reporting Features

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Status Reporting Features Browser elements covered in this section include: The Overview window (below) ■ ■ Port utilization and status (page 5-17) ■ The Alert log (page 5-20) The Status bar (page 5-22) ■...
  • Page 101: The Port Utilization And Status Displays

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Policy Management and Configuration. PCM can perform network-wide policy management and configuration of your switch. The Management Server URL field (page 5-13) shows the URL for the management station performing that function. For more information, refer to the documentation provided with the PCM software.
  • Page 102 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features % Error Pkts Rx: All error packets received by the port. (This indicator ■ is a reddish color on many systems.) Although errors received on a port are not propagated to the rest of the network, a consistently high number of errors on a specific port may indicate a problem on the device or network segment connected to the indicated port.
  • Page 103: Port Status

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Figure 5-11. Display of Numerical Values for the Bar Port Status Port Status Indicators Legend Figure 5-12. The Port Status Indicators and Legend The Port Status indicators show a symbol for each port that indicates the general status of the port.
  • Page 104: The Alert Log

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Alert Log The web browser interface Alert Log, shown in the lower half of the screen, shows a list of network occurrences, or alerts, that were detected by the switch. Typical alerts are Broadcast Storm, indicating an excessive number of broadcasts received on a port, and Problem Cable, indicating a faulty cable.
  • Page 105: Alert Types And Detailed Views

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Alert Types and Detailed Views As of June, 2007, the web browser interface generates the following alert types: • Auto Partition • High collision or drop rate • Backup Transition • Loss of Link •...
  • Page 106: The Status Bar

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Figure 5-14. Example of Alert Log Detail View The Status Bar The Status Bar appears in the upper left corner of the web browser interface window. Figure 5-15 shows an expanded view of the status bar.
  • Page 107 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Status bar includes four objects: ■ Status Indicator. Indicates, by icon, the severity of the most critical alert in the current display of the Alert Log. This indicator can be one of four shapes and colors, as shown below.
  • Page 108: Setting Fault Detection Policy

    Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Setting Fault Detection Policy One of the powerful features in the web browser interface is the Fault Detection facility. For your switch, this feature controls the types of alerts reported to the Alert Log based on their level of severity.
  • Page 109 Never. Disables the Alert Log and transmission of alerts (traps) to the ■ management server (in cases where a network management tool such as ProCurve Manager is in use). Use this option when you don’t want to use the Alert Log. The Fault Detection Window also contains three Change Control Buttons: Apply Changes.
  • Page 110 Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features 5-26...
  • Page 111: Contents

    Switch Memory and Configuration Contents Overview ........... . . 6-3 Configuration File Management .
  • Page 112 Switch Memory and Configuration Contents Changing or Overriding the Reboot Configuration Policy ..6-32 Managing Startup-Config Files in the Switch ....6-34 Renaming an Existing Startup-Config File .
  • Page 113: Configuration File Management

    Switch Memory and Configuration Overview Overview This chapter describes: ■ How switch memory manages configuration changes How the CLI implements configuration changes ■ ■ How the menu interface and web browser interface implement configu­ ration changes ■ How the switch provides software options through primary/secondary flash images How to use the switch’s primary and secondary flash options, including ■...
  • Page 114 This allows you to test the change without making it “permanent”. When you are satisfied that the change is satisfactory, you can make it permanent by executing the command. For example, write memory suppose you use the following command to disable port 5: ProCurve(config)# interface ethernet 5 disable...
  • Page 115 ProCurve(config)# write memory If you use the CLI to make a configuration change and then change from the CLI to the Menu interface without first using write memory to save the change to the startup-config file, then the switch prompts you to save the change.
  • Page 116: Using The Cli To Implement Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes The CLI offers these capabilities: Access to the full set of switch configuration features ■ ■ The option of testing configuration changes before making them perma­ nent How To Use the CLI To View the Current Configuration Files.
  • Page 117 ProCurve(config)# interface e a5 speed-duplex auto-10 After you are satisfied that the link is operating properly, you can save the change to the switch’s permanent configuration (the startup-config file) by...
  • Page 118 For example: Disables port 1 in the running configuration, which causes port 1 to block all traffic. ProCurve(config)# interface e 1 disable ProCurve(config)# boot Device will be rebooted, do you want to continue [y/n]? y Press [Y] to continue the rebooting process.
  • Page 119 Syntax: erase startup-config For example: ProCurve(config)# erase startup-config Configuration will be deleted and device rebooted, continue [y/n]? Figure 6-3. Example of erase startup-config Command Press to replace the current configuration with the factory default config­...
  • Page 120: Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes The menu and web browser interfaces offer these advantages: Quick, easy menu or window access to a subset of switch configuration ■...
  • Page 121: Rebooting From The Menu Interface

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes To save and implement the changes for all parameters in this screen, press the [Enter] key, then press [S] (for Save). To cancel all changes, press the [Enter] key, then press [C] (for Cancel) Figure 6-4.
  • Page 122 Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes Optional Reboot Switch Command Figure 6-5. The Reboot Switch Option in the Main Menu Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes. Configuration changes for most parameters become effective as soon as you save them. However, you must reboot the switch in order to implement a change in the Maximum VLANs to support...
  • Page 123: Web: Implementing Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes Asterisk indicates a configuration change that requires a reboot in order to take effect. Reminder to reboot the switch to activate configuration changes. Figure 6-6. Indication of a Configuration Change Requiring a Reboot Web: Implementing Configuration Changes You can use the web browser interface to simultaneously save and implement...
  • Page 124: Using Primary And Secondary Flash Image Options

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options The switches covered in this guide feature two flash memory locations for storing switch software image files: ■ Primary Flash: The default storage for a switch software image. ■...
  • Page 125 Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options For example, if the switch is using a software version of K.12.XX stored in Primary flash, show version produces the following: ProCurve(config)# show version Image stamp: /su/code/build/info(s01) Dec 01 2006 10:50:26 K.12.XX...
  • Page 126: Switch Software Downloads

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options 1. In this example show version indicates the switch has version K.12.02 in primary flash. 2. After the boot system command, show version indicates that version K.12.01 is in secondary flash.
  • Page 127: Local Switch Software Replacement And Removal

    If you want to remove an unwanted software version from flash, ProCurve recommends that you do so by overwriting it with the same software version that you are using to operate the switch, or with another acceptable software version.
  • Page 128 Figure 6-10. Example Indicating Two Different Software Versions in Primary and Secondary Flash Execute the copy command as follows: ProCurve(config)# copy flash flash primary Erasing the Contents of Primary or Secondary Flash. This command deletes the software image file from the specified flash location.
  • Page 129: Operating Notes About Booting

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options The prompt shows which flash location will be erased. Figure 6-11. Example of Erase Flash Prompt Type y at the prompt to complete the flash erase. Use show flash to verify erasure of the selected software flash image The “...
  • Page 130: Boot And Reload Command Comparison

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options tures. For example, suppose you have just downloaded a software upgrade that includes new features that are not supported in the software you used to create the current startup-config file. In this case, the software simply assigns factory-default values to the parameters controlling the new features.
  • Page 131: Setting The Default Flash

    You can specify the default flash to boot from on the next boot by entering the boot set-default flash command. Syntax: boot set-default flash [primary |secondary] Upon booting, set the default flash for the next boot to primary or secondary. ProCurve(config)# boot set-default flash secondary ProCurve(config)# show flash Image Size(Bytes) Date Version...
  • Page 132: Booting From The Default Flash (Primary Or Secondary)

    You can optionally select a configuration file from which to boot. ProCurve(config)# boot This management module will now reboot from primary image and will become the standby module! You will need to use the other management module's console interface.
  • Page 133: Booting From A Specified Flash

    : Primary The next boot is from primary Set to secondary flash ProCurve(config)# boot set-default flash secondary This command changes the location of the default boot. This command will change the default flash image to boot from secondary. Hereafter, 'reload' 'boot' commands will boot from secondary.
  • Page 134: Using Reload

    For example, if you change the number of VLANs the switch supports, you must reboot the switch in order to implement the change. The reload command prompts you to save or discard the configuration changes. ProCurve(config)# max-vlans 12 Command will take effect after saving configuration and reboot. ProCurve(config)# reload This command will cause a switchover to the other management module which may not be running the same software image and configurations.
  • Page 135 To schedule a reload for the same time the following day: ProCurve# reload after 01:00:00 To schedule a reload for the same day at 12:05: ■ ProCurve# reload at 12:05 To schedule a reload on some future date: ■ ProCurve# reload at 12:05 01/01/2008 6-25...
  • Page 136 Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options ProCurve(config)# reload after 04:14:00 Reload scheduled in 4 days, 14 hours, 0 minutes This command will cause a switchover at the scheduled time to the other management module which may not be running the same software image and configurations.
  • Page 137: Multiple Configuration Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Multiple Configuration Files Action Page Listing and Displaying Startup-Config Files 6-31 Changing or Overriding the Reboot Configuration Policy 6-32 Managing Startup-Config Files Renaming Startup-Config Files 6-35 Copying Startup-Config Files 6-35 Erasing Startup-Config Files 6-36 Effect of Using the Clear + Reset Buttons 6-38...
  • Page 138: General Operation

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Transitions from one software release to another can be performed while ■ maintaining a separate configuration for the different software release versions. ■ By setting a reboot policy using a known good configuration and then overriding the policy on a per-instance basis, you can test a new configu­...
  • Page 139 Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files 2. Use the CLI to make configuration changes in the running-config file, and then execute write mem. The result is that the startup-config file used to reboot the switch is modified by the actions in step 2. Boot Command Primary Boot Path Active Startup-Config File:...
  • Page 140: Transitioning To Multiple Configuration Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Transitioning to Multiple Configuration Files At the first reboot with a software release supporting multiple configuration, the switch: Assigns the filename oldConfig to the existing startup-config file (which is ■ stored in memory slot 1). Saves a copy of the existing startup-config file in memory slot 2 with the ■...
  • Page 141: Listing And Displaying Startup-Config Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Listing and Displaying Startup-Config Files Command Page show config files Below show config < filename > 6-32 Viewing the Startup-Config File Status with Multiple Configuration Enabled Rebooting the switch automatically enables the multiple configuration fea­ ture.
  • Page 142: Displaying The Content Of A Specific Startup-Config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Displaying the Content of A Specific Startup-Config File With Multiple Configuration enabled, the switch can have up to three startup­ config files. Because the show config command always displays the content of the currently active startup-config file, the command extension shown below is needed to allow viewing the contents of any other startup-config files stored in the switch.
  • Page 143 Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Syntax: startup-default [ primary | secondary ] config < filename > Specifies a boot configuration policy option: [ primary | secondary ] config < filename >: Designates the startup-config file to use in a reboot with the software version stored in a specific flash location.
  • Page 144: Managing Startup-Config Files In The Switch

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files ProCurve(config)# startup-default pri config minconfig ProCurve(config) # startup-default sec config newconfig. Overriding the Default Reboot Configuration Policy. This command provides a method for manually rebooting with a specific startup-config file other than the file specified in the default reboot configuration policy.
  • Page 145: Renaming An Existing Startup-Config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Renaming an Existing Startup-Config File Syntax: rename config < current-filename > < newname-str > This command changes the name of an existing startup­ config file. A file name can include up to 63, alphanumeric characters.
  • Page 146: Erasing A Startup-Config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files For example, suppose both primary and secondary flash memory contain software release “A” and use a startup-config file named config1: Figure 6-22. Example of Using One Startup-Config File for Both Primary and Secondary Flash If you wanted to experiment with configuration changes to the software version in secondary flash, you could create and assign a separate startup­...
  • Page 147 Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files In a redundant management system, this command erases the config or startup config file on both the active and the standby management modules as long as redundancy has not been disabled. If the standby management module is not in standby mode or has failed selftest, the config or startup config file is not erased.
  • Page 148: Switch To Its Default Configuration

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Figure 6-24 illustrates using erase config < filename > to remove a startup-config file. Figure 6-24. Example of Erasing a Non-Active Startup-Config File With the same memory configuration as is shown in the bottom portion of figure 6-24, executing erase startup-config boots the switch from primary flash, resulting in a new file named minconfig in the same memory slot.
  • Page 149: Transferring Startup-Config Files To Or From A Remote Server

    “TFTP: Copying a Configuration File to a Remote Host” on page A-26. For example, the following command copies a startup-config file named test­ 01 from the switch to a (UNIX) TFTP server at IP address 10.10.28.14: ProCurve(config)# copy config test-01 tftp 10.10.28.14 test-01.txt unix 6-39...
  • Page 150: Tftp: Copying A Configuration File From A Remote Host

    For example, the following command copies a startup-config file named test­ 01.txt from a (UNIX) TFTP server at IP address 10.10.28.14 to the first empty memory slot in the switch: ProCurve(config)# copy tftp config test-01 10.10.28.14 test-01.txt unix Xmodem: Copying a Configuration File to a Serially...
  • Page 151: Connected Host

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files Xmodem: Copying a Configuration from a Serially Connected Host Syntax: copy xmodem config < dest-file > < pc | unix > This is an addition to the copy xmodem command options. Use this command to download a configuration file from an Xmodem host to the switch.
  • Page 152 Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files 6-42...
  • Page 153: Contents

    Interface Access and System Information Contents Overview ........... . . 7-2 Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet .
  • Page 154: Overview

    Chapter 3, “Using the Menu Interface” ■ Chapter 4, “Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)” Chapter 5, “Using the ProCurve Web Browser Interface” ■ Why Configure Interface Access and System Information? The inter­ face access features in the switch operate properly by default. However, you can modify or disable access features to suit your particular needs.
  • Page 155: Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, And Inbound Telnet

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Interface Access Features Feature Default Menu Inactivity Time 0 Minutes page 7-4 page 7-6 — (disabled) Inbound Telnet Access Enabled page 7-4 page 7-5...
  • Page 156: Menu: Modifying The Interface Access

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Menu: Modifying the Interface Access The menu interface enables you to modify these parameters: ■ Inactivity Timeout Inbound Telnet Enabled ■ Web Agent Enabled ■ To Access the Interface Access Parameters: From the Main Menu, Select...
  • Page 157: Cli: Modifying The Interface Access

    Console Control Options Figure 7-2. Listing of Show Console Command Reconfigure Inbound Telnet Access. In the default configuration, inbound Telnet access is enabled. Syntax: [no] telnet-server To disable inbound Telnet access: ProCurve(config)# no telnet-server To re-enable inbound Telnet access: ProCurve(config)# telnet-server...
  • Page 158 Telnet to another device that has an IP address. Syntax: telnet < ip-address > For example: ProCurve # telnet 10.28.27.204 Reconfigure Web Browser Access. In the default configuration, web browser access is enabled. Syntax: [no] web-management...
  • Page 159 Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet N o t e If you change the Baud Rate or Flow Control settings for the switch, you should make the corresponding changes in your console access device. Oth­ erwise, you may lose connectivity between the switch and your terminal emulator due to differences between the terminal and switch settings for these two parameters.
  • Page 160: Sessions

    Interface Access and System Information Denying Interface Access by Terminating Remote Management Sessions You can also execute a series of console commands and then save the configuration and boot the switch. For example: Configure individual parameters. Save the changes. Boot the switch.
  • Page 161 Interface Access and System Information Denying Interface Access by Terminating Remote Management Sessions Session 2 is an active Telnet session. The kill 2 command terminates session 2. Figure 7-5. Example of Using the “Kill” Command To Terminate a Remote Session...
  • Page 162: System Information

    Configuring system information is optional, but recommended. System Name: Using a unique name helps you to identify individual devices where you are using an SNMP network management tool such as ProCurve Manager. System Contact and Location: This information is helpful for identifying the person administratively responsible for the switch and for identifying the locations of individual switches.
  • Page 163: Menu: Viewing And Configuring System Information

    Daylight Time Rule: Specifies the daylight savings time rule to apply for your location. The default is None. (For more on this topic, refer to Appendix D, “Daylight Savings Time on ProCurve Switches.) Time: Used in the CLI to specify the time of day, the date, and other system parameters.
  • Page 164: Cli: Viewing And Configuring System Information

    Interface Access and System Information System Information 2. Press (for Edit). The cursor moves to the System Name field. 3. Refer to the online help provided with this screen for further information on configuration options for these features. 4. When you have finished making changes to the above parameters, press (for Save) and return to the Main Menu.
  • Page 165 Interface Access and System Information System Information Configure a System Name, Contact, and Location for the Switch. To help distinguish one switch from another, configure a plain-language identity for the switch. Syntax: hostname < name-string > snmp-server [contact <system-contact>] [location <system-location>] Each field allows up to 255 characters.
  • Page 166 Interface Access and System Information System Information MENU ProCurve Switch 5406zl 24-Oct-2006 12:41:47 ===========================- TELNET - MANAGER MODE =========================== Switch Configuration - System Information System Name : Blue Switch System Contact : Bill_Smith System Location : + characters of the location are missing. It’s too long.
  • Page 167 Syntax: mac-age-time < 60-999960 > (seconds) For example, to configure the age time to seven minutes: ProCurve(config)# mac-age-time 420 Configure the Time Zone and Daylight Time Rule. These commands: Set the time zone you want to use ■...
  • Page 168: Web: Configuring System Parameters

    Syntax: time [ hh:mm [ :ss ]] [ mm/dd/ [ yy ] yy ] For example, to set the switch to 9:45 a.m. on November 17, 2002: ProCurve(config)# time 9:45 11/17/02 N o t e Executing reload or boot resets the time and date to their default startup values.
  • Page 169: Contents

    Configuring IP Addressing Contents Overview ........... . . 8-2 IP Configuration .
  • Page 170: Ip Configuration

    Configuring IP Addressing Overview Overview You can configure IP addressing through all of the switch’s interfaces. You can also: ■ Easily edit a switch configuration file to allow downloading the file to multiple switches without overwriting each switch’s unique gateway and VLAN 1 IP addressing.
  • Page 171: Just Want A Quick Start With Ip Addressing

    If you just want to give the switch an IP address so that it can communicate on your network, or if you are not using VLANs, ProCurve recommends that you use the Switch Setup screen to quickly configure IP addressing. To do so, do one of the following: Enter setup at the CLI Manager level prompt.
  • Page 172: Ip Addressing With Multiple Vlans

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration For more on using the Switch Setup screen, refer to the Installation and Getting Started Guide you received with the switch. IP Addressing with Multiple VLANs In the factory-default configuration, the switch has one, permanent default VLAN (named DEFAULT_VLAN) that includes all ports on the switch.
  • Page 173: Menu: Configuring Ip Address, Gateway, And Time-To-Live (Ttl)

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration Menu: Configuring IP Address, Gateway, and Time-To- Live (TTL) Do one of the following: To manually enter an IP address, subnet mask, set the IP Config parameter ■ to Manual and then manually enter the IP address and subnet mask values you want for the switch.
  • Page 174: Cli: Configuring Ip Address, Gateway, And Time-To-Live (Ttl)

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration 3. If the switch needs to access a router, for example, to reach off-subnet destinations, select the Default Gateway field and enter the IP address of the gateway router. 4. If you need to change the packet Time-To-Live (TTL) setting, select Default TTL and type in a value between 2 and 255.
  • Page 175 Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration (You can also use the show management command to display the IP addressing and time server IP addressing configured on the switch. Refer to figure 9-6 on page 9-10.) For example, in the factory-default configuration (no IP addressing assigned), the switch’s IP addressing appears as: The Default IP Configuration...
  • Page 176 ProCurve(config)# vlan 1 ip address 10.28.227.103/24 This example deletes an IP address configured in VLAN 1. ProCurve (config) no vlan 1 ip address 10.28.227.103/24 Configure Multiple IP Addresses on a VLAN (Multinetting). The fol­ lowing is supported: Up to 2000 IP addresses for the switch ■...
  • Page 177 Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration 1. Go to VLAN 20. 2. Configure two additional IP addresses on VLAN 3. Display IP addressing. Figure 8-4. Example of Configuring and Displaying a Multinetted VLAN If you then wanted to multinet the default VLAN, you would do the following: Figure 8-5.
  • Page 178: Web: Configuring Ip Addressing

    Syntax: ip default-gateway < ip-address > For example: ProCurve(config)# ip default-gateway 10.28.227.115 Note The switch uses the IP default gateway only while operating as a Layer 2 device. While routing is enabled on the switch, the IP default gateway is not used.
  • Page 179: How Ip Addressing Affects Switch Operation

    Console RS-232 port. You can use direct-connect console access to take advantage of features that do not depend on IP addressing. However, to realize the full capabilities ProCurve proactive networking offers through the switch, configure the switch with an IP address and subnet mask compatible with your network.
  • Page 180: Dhcp/Bootp Operation

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration DHCP/Bootp Operation Overview. DHCP/Bootp is used to provide configuration data from a DHCP or Bootp server to the switch. This data can be the IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, Timep Server address, and TFTP server address. If a TFTP server address is provided, this allows the switch to TFTP a previously saved configuration file from the TFTP server to the switch.
  • Page 181 Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration DHCP Operation. A significant difference between a DHCP configuration and a Bootp configuration is that an IP address assignment from a DHCP server is automatic. Depending on how the DHCP server is configured, the switch may receive an IP address that is temporarily leased. Periodically the switch may be required to renew its lease of the IP configuration.
  • Page 182: Network Preparations For Configuring Dhcp/Bootp

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration gw=10.66.77.1:\ lg=10.22.33.44:\ T144=”switch.cfg”:\ vm=rfc1048 where: 8212switch is a user-defined symbolic name to help you find the correct section of the bootptab file. If you have multiple switches that will be using Bootp to get their IP configuration, you should use a unique symbolic name for each switch.
  • Page 183: Loopback Interfaces

    Configuring IP Addressing Loopback Interfaces N o t e Designating a primary VLAN other than the default VLAN affects the switch’s use of information received via DHCP/Bootp. For more on this topic, refer to the chapter describing VLANs in the Advanced Traffic Management Guide for your switch.
  • Page 184: Configuring A Loopback Interface

    Configuring IP Addressing Loopback Interfaces You can use a loopback interface to establish a Telnet session, ping the ■ switch, and access the switch through SNMP, SSH, and HTTP (web interface). ■ A loopback IP address can be used by routing protocols. For example, you can configure the loopback IP address as the router ID used to identify the switch in an OSPF area.
  • Page 185 Configuring IP Addressing Loopback Interfaces ProCurve(config)# interface loopback 1 ProCurve (lo1)# ip address 10.1.1.1 Figure 8-6. Example of a Loopback Interface Configuration N o t e s ■ You can configure a loopback interface only from the CLI; you cannot configure a loopback interface from the web management or Menu inter­...
  • Page 186: Displaying Loopback Interface Configurations

    (TTL) and ARP age-out values, and VLAN IP configura­ tions. The following example displays the IP addresses configured for two user-defined loopback interfaces (lo1 and lo2). ProCurve> show ip Internet (IP) Service IP Routing : Enabled Default TTL : 64...
  • Page 187 IP address, enter the show ip route command. The following example displays the configuration of the default loopback interface (lo0) and one user-defined loopback interface (lo2). ProCurve> show ip route IP Route Entries IP Routing : Enabled Default TTL : 64...
  • Page 188: Ip Preserve: Retaining Vlan-1 Ip Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads For the switches covered in this guide, IP Preserve enables you to copy a configuration file to multiple switches while retaining the individual IP address and subnet mask on VLAN 1 in each switch, and the Gateway IP address assigned to the switch.
  • Page 189: Enabling Ip Preserve

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads Enabling IP Preserve To set up IP Preserve, enter the ip preserve statement at the end of a configu­ ration file. (Note that you do not execute IP Preserve by entering a command from the CLI).
  • Page 190 Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads ProCurve(config)# show run Running configuration: ; J9091A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.12.30 hostname "ProCurve" module 1 type J8702A module 2 type J8705A trunk A11-A12 Trk1 Trunk ip default-gateway 10.10.10.115...
  • Page 191 Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads ProCurve# show run Running configuration: ; J9091A Configuration Editor; Created on release #K.12.30 hostname "ProCurve" module 1 type J8702A module 2 type J8705A trunk A11-A12 Trk1 Trunk Because switch 4 (figure 8-10) ip default-gateway 10.10.10.115...
  • Page 192 Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads 8-24...
  • Page 193: Contents

    Time Protocols Contents Overview ........... . . 9-2 TimeP Time Synchronization .
  • Page 194: Timep Time Synchronization

    Time Protocols Overview Overview This chapter describes: ■ SNTP Time Protocol Operation Timep Time Protocol Operation ■ Using time synchronization ensures a uniform time among interoperating devices. This helps you to manage and troubleshoot switch operation by attaching meaningful time data to event and error messages. The switch offers TimeP and SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol) and a timesync command for changing the time protocol selection (or turning off time protocol operation).
  • Page 195: Protocol Operation

    Time Protocols Selecting a Time Synchronization Protocol or Turning Off Time Protocol Operation ular server, it ignores time broadcasts from other SNTP servers unless the configurable Poll Interval expires three consecutive times without an update received from the first-detected server. N o t e To use Broadcast mode, the switch and the SNTP server must be in the same subnet.
  • Page 196: Disabling Time Synchronization

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Disabling Time Synchronization You can use either of the following methods to disable time synchronization without changing the Timep or SNTP configuration: In the System Information screen of the Menu interface, set the Time ■...
  • Page 197: Menu: Viewing And Configuring Sntp

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Table 9-1. SNTP Parameters SNTP Parameter Operation Time Sync Used to select either SNTP, TIMEP, or None as the time synchronization method. Method SNTP Mode Disabled The Default. SNTP does not operate, even if specified by the Menu interface Time Sync Method parameter or the CLI timesync command.
  • Page 198 Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Time Protocol Selection Parameter – TIMEP – SNTP – None Figure 9-1. The System Information Screen (Default Values) 2. Press [E] (for Edit). The cursor moves to the System Name field. 3. Use [v] to move the cursor to the Time Sync Method field. 4. Use the Space bar to select SNTP, then press [v] once to display and move to the SNTP Mode field.
  • Page 199 SNTP server version running on the device you specified in the preceding step (step ii). If you are unsure which version to use, ProCurve recommends leaving this value at the default setting of and testing SNTP operation to determine whether any change is necessary.
  • Page 200: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Sntp

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring CLI: Viewing and Configuring SNTP CLI Commands Described in this Section SNTP Command Page show sntp [no] timesync 9-10 and ff., 9-13 sntp broadcast 9-10 sntp unicast 9-11 sntp server 9-11 and ff. Protocol Version 9-13 poll-interval...
  • Page 201 Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-4. Example of SNTP Configuration When SNTP Is the Selected Time Synchronization Method In the factory-default configuration (where TimeP is the selected time synchronization method), show sntp still lists the SNTP configuration even though it is not currently in use.
  • Page 202: Configuring (Enabling Or Disabling) The Sntp Mode

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-6. Example of Display Showing IP Addressing for All Configured Time Servers and VLANs Configuring (Enabling or Disabling) the SNTP Mode Enabling the SNTP mode means to configure it for either broadcast or unicast mode.
  • Page 203 Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Syntax: sntp broadcast Configures broadcast as the SNTP mode. For example, suppose: ■ Time synchronization is in the factory-default configuration (TimeP is the currently selected time synchronization method). You want to: ■ 1. View the current time synchronization. 2.
  • Page 204 ProCurve(config)# timesync sntp Selects SNTP. ProCurve(config)# sntp unicast Activates SNTP in Unicast mode. ProCurve(config)# sntp server 10.28.227.141 Specifies the SNTP server and accepts the current SNTP server version (default: 3). In this example, the Poll Interval and the Protocol Version appear at their default settings.
  • Page 205 720 seconds. (This parameter is separate from the poll inter­ val parameter used for Timep operation.) For example, to change the poll interval to 300 seconds: ProCurve(config)# sntp poll-interval 300 Disabling Time Synchronization Without Changing the SNTP Configuration. The recommended method for disabling time synchroniza­...
  • Page 206 Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-10. Example of SNTP with Time Sychronization Disabled Disabling the SNTP Mode. If you want to prevent SNTP from being used even if selected by timesync (or the Menu interface’s Time Sync Method param­ eter), configure the SNTP mode as disabled.
  • Page 207: Timep: Viewing, Selecting, And Configuring

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring TimeP Feature Default Menu view the Timep time synchronization configuration page 9-16 page 9-18 — select Timep as the time synchronization method TIMEP page 9-14 pages 9-20 ff. —...
  • Page 208: Menu: Viewing And Configuring Timep

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Menu: Viewing and Configuring TimeP To View, Enable, and Modify the TimeP Protocol: 1. From the Main Menu, select: 2. Switch Configuration... 1. System Information Time Protocol Selection Parameter – TIMEP (the default) –...
  • Page 209 Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Use the Space bar to select the Manual mode. • [>] i. Press to move the cursor to the Server Address field. ii. Enter the IP address of the TimeP server you want the switch to use for time synchronization.
  • Page 210: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Timep

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring CLI: Viewing and Configuring TimeP CLI Commands Described in this Section Command Page show timep 9-18 [no] timesync 9-20 ff., 9-23 ip timep dhcp 9-20 manual 9-21 server <ip-addr> 9-21 interval 9-22 no ip timep 9-23 This section describes how to use the CLI to view, enable, and configure TimeP parameters.
  • Page 211 Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring If SNTP is the selected time synchronization method, still lists the show timep TimeP configuration even though it is not currently in use: Even though, in this example, SNTP is the current time synchronization method, the switch maintains the TimeP configuration.
  • Page 212: Configuring (Enabling Or Disabling) The Timep Mode

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Configuring (Enabling or Disabling) the TimeP Mode Enabling the TimeP mode means to configure it for either broadcast or unicast mode. Remember that to run TimeP as the switch’s time synchronization protocol, you must also select TimeP as the time synchronization method by using the CLI timesync command (or the Menu interface Time Sync Method parameter).
  • Page 213 For example, to select TimeP and configure it for manual operation using a TimeP server address of 10.28.227.141 and the default poll interval (720 minutes, assuming the TimeP poll interval is already set to the default): ProCurve(config)# timesync timep Selects TimeP. ProCurve(config)# ip timep manual 10.28.227.141 Activates TimeP in Manual mode. 9-21...
  • Page 214 1 to 9999 minutes. (This parameter is separate from the poll interval parameter used for SNTP operation.) Syntax: ip timep < dhcp | manual > interval < 1 - 9999 > For example, to change the poll interval to 60 minutes: ProCurve(config)# ip timep interval 60 9-22...
  • Page 215 TimeP mode, and the factory-default polling DHCP interval. You would halt time synchronization with this command: ProCurve(config)# no timesync If you then viewed the TimeP configuration, you would see the following: Figure 9-18. Example of TimeP with Time Sychronization Disabled Disabling the TimeP Mode.
  • Page 216: Sntp Unicast Time Polling With Multiple Sntp Servers

    Time Protocols SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers When running SNTP unicast time polling as the time synchronization method, the switch requests a time update from the server you configured with either the Server Address parameter in the menu interface, or the primary server in a list of up to three SNTP servers configured using the CLI.
  • Page 217: Displaying All Sntp Server Addresses Configured On The Switch

    Time Protocols SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers Displaying All SNTP Server Addresses Configured on the Switch The System Information screen in the menu interface displays only one SNTP server address, even if the switch is configured for two or three servers. The CLI show management command displays all configured SNTP servers on the switch.
  • Page 218 (Refer to “Address Prioritization” on page 9-24.) Syntax: no sntp server < ip-addr > For example, to delete the primary address in the above example (and automatically convert the secondary address to primary): ProCurve(config)# no sntp server 10.28.227.141 9-26...
  • Page 219: Configured

    Time Protocols SNTP Messages in the Event Log Menu: Operation with Multiple SNTP Server Addresses Configured When you use the Menu interface to configure an SNTP server IP address, the new address writes over the current primary address, if one is configured. If there are multiple addresses configured, the switch re-orders the addresses according to the criteria described under “Address Prioritization”...
  • Page 220 Time Protocols SNTP Messages in the Event Log 9-28...
  • Page 221: Contents

    Configuring a Broadcast Limit on the Switch ....10-14 Configuring ProCurve Auto-MDIX ......10-15 Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters .
  • Page 222: Viewing Port Status And Configuring Port Parameters

    10-6 page 10-11 page 10-18 10-1 on pages 10-3 thru 10-4 configuring ProCurve auto-mdix page 9-11 Note On Connecting If the switch either fails to show a link between an installed transceiver and Transceivers to another device, or demonstrates errors or other unexpected behavior on the...
  • Page 223 • Auto-10: Allows the port to negotiate between half-duplex (HDx) and full-duplex (FDx) while keeping speed at 10 Mbps. Also negotiates flow control (enabled or disabled). ProCurve recommends Auto­ 10 for links between 10/100 auto-sensing ports connected with Cat 3 cabling. (Cat 5 cabling is required for 100 Mbps links.).
  • Page 224 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Status or Description Parameter — Continued From Previous Page — Gigabit Fiber-Optic Ports (Gigabit-SX, Gigabit-LX, and Gigabit-LH): • 1000FDx: 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps), Full Duplex only • Auto (default): The port operates at 1000FDx and auto-negotiates flow control with the device connected to the port.
  • Page 225: Menu: Port Configuration

    Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Menu: Port Configuration From the menu interface, you can view and change the port configuration. Using the Menu To View Port Configuration. The menu interface dis­ plays the configuration for ports and (if configured) any trunk groups. From the Main Menu, select: 1.
  • Page 226 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Using the Menu To Configure Ports. You can configure and view the port settings by using the menu. N o t e The menu interface uses the same screen for configuring both individual ports and port trunk groups.
  • Page 227: Cli: Viewing Port Status And Configuring Port Parameters

    Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters CLI: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters From the CLI, you can configure and view all port parameter settings and view all port status indicators. Port Status and Configuration Commands show interfaces brief page 10-8 show interfaces config...
  • Page 228 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters ProCurve(config)# show interfaces brief Status and Counters - Port Status | Intrusion Flow Bcast Port Type | Alert Enabled Status Mode Mode Ctrl Limit ----- --------- + --------- ------- ------ ----------...
  • Page 229: Viewing Port Utilization Statistics

    Viewing Port Utilization Statistics Use the show interface port-utilization command to view a real-time rate display for all ports on the switch. The following shows a sample output from this command. ProCurve(config)# show interfaces port-utilization Status and Counters - Port Utilization Port Mode...
  • Page 230 • Part number—Allows you to determine the manufacturer for a spec­ ified transceiver and revision number. For a non-ProCurve installed transceiver (see line 23 Figure 10-6), no ■ transceiver type, product number, or part information is displayed. In the Serial Number field, non-operational is displayed instead of a serial num­...
  • Page 231: Enabling Or Disabling Ports And Configuring Port Mode

    • Transceiver type not supported in this port. • Transceiver type not supported in this software version. • Not a ProCurve Transceiver. Please go to: www.hp.com/rnd/device_help/2_inform for more info. Enabling or Disabling Ports and Configuring Port Mode You can configure one or more of the following port parameters. Refer to table 10-1 on pages 10-3 through 10-4.
  • Page 232: Enabling Or Disabling Flow Control

    ProCurve(config)# int c8 enable These commands enable and configure port C8 from the config level: ProCurve(config)# int c8 speed-duplex 100-full ProCurve(config)# int c8 flow-control These commands select the port C8 ProCurve(config)# int c8 context level and then apply the...
  • Page 233 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Assuming that flow control is currently disabled on the switch, you would use these commands: Enables per-port flow control for ports A1 - A6. Figure 10-8. Example of Configuring Flow Control for a Series of Ports Disables per-port flow control on ports A5 and A6.
  • Page 234: Configuring A Broadcast Limit On The Switch

    Broadcast-Limit on switches covered in this guide is configured on a per-port basis. You must be at the port context level for this command to work, for example: ProCurve(config)#int B1 ProCurve(int B1)# broadcast-limit 1 Broadcast-Limit. Syntax: broadcast-limit <0-99> Enables or disables broadcast limiting for outbound broadcasts on a selected port on the switch.
  • Page 235: Configuring Procurve Auto-Mdix

    ProCurve Auto-MDIX was developed for auto-negotiating devices, and was shared with the IEEE for the development of the IEEE 802.3ab standard. ProCurve Auto-MDIX and the IEEE 802.3ab Auto MDI/MID-X feature are completely compatible. Additionally, ProCurve Auto-MDIX supports opera­ tion in forced speed and duplex modes.
  • Page 236 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters For more information on MDI-X, refer to the appendix titled “Switch Ports and Network Cables” in the Installation and Getting Started Guide for your switch. Manual Override. If you require control over the MDI/MDI-X feature you can set the switch to either of two non-default modes: ■...
  • Page 237 Port Status and Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Syntax: show interfaces brief Where a port is linked to another device, this command lists the MDI mode the port is currently using. In the case of ports configured for Auto (auto-mdix), the MDI mode appears as either MDI or MDIX, depending upon which option the port has negotiated with the device on the other end of the link.
  • Page 238: Web: Viewing Port Status And Configuring Port Parameters

    Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters In the web browser interface: 1. Click on the Configuration tab. 2. Click on [Port Configuration]. 3. Select the ports you want to modify and click on [Modify Selected Ports]. 4. After you make the desired changes, click on [Apply Settings].
  • Page 239: Configuring Friendly Port Names

    Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names The friendly port names you configure appear in the output of the show ■ name [ port-list ], show config, and show interface < port-number > commands. They do not appear in the output of other show commands or in Menu interface screens.
  • Page 240: Displaying Friendly Port Names With Other Port Data

    Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Configuring the Same Name for Multiple Ports. Suppose that you want to use ports A5 through A8 as a trunked link to a server used by a drafting group. In this case you might configure ports A5 through A8 with the name “Draft-Server:Trunk”.
  • Page 241 Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Syntax: show name [ port-list ] Lists the friendly port name with its corresponding port number and port type. The show name command without a port list shows this data for all ports on the switch. For example: Ports Without “Friendly”...
  • Page 242 Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Syntax: show interface < port-number > Includes the friendly port name with the port’s traffic statistics listing. For example, if you configure port A1 with the name “O’Connor_10.25.101.43”, the show interface output for this port appears similar to the following: Friendly Port Name Figure 10-17.
  • Page 243 Port Status and Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names For example, if you configure port A1 with a friendly port name: This command sequence saves the friendly port name for port A1 in the startup­ config file. The name entered for port A2 is not saved because it was executed after write memory.
  • Page 244: Uni-Directional Link Detection (Udld)

    When UDLD is enabled on the trunk ports on each ProCurve switch, the switches detect the failed link, block the ports connected to the failed link, and use the remaining ports in the trunk group to forward the traffic.
  • Page 245: Configuring Udld

    When configuring UDLD, keep the following considerations in mind: ■ UDLD is configured on a per-port basis and must be enabled at both ends of the link. See the note below for a list of ProCurve switches that support UDLD. ■...
  • Page 246: Enabling Udld

    Enabling UDLD UDLD is enabled on a per port basis. For example, to enable UDLD on port a1, enter: ProCurve(config)#interface al link-keepalive To enable the feature on a trunk group, enter the appropriate port range. For example: ProCurve(config)#interface al-a4 link-keepalive...
  • Page 247: Changing The Keepalive Interval

    The default implementation of UDLD sends the UDLD control packets untagged, even across tagged ports. If an untagged UDLD packet is received by a non-ProCurve switch, that switch may reject the packet. To avoid such an occurrence, you can configure ports to send out UDLD control packets that are tagged with a specified VLAN.
  • Page 248: Viewing Udld Information

    Port Status and Configuration Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) N o t e s You must configure the same VLANs that will be used for UDLD on ■ all devices across the network; otherwise, the UDLD link cannot be maintained. If a VLAN ID is not specified, then UDLD control packets are sent out ■...
  • Page 249 Port Status and Configuration Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) To display summary information on all UDLD-enabled ports, enter the show link-keepalive command. For example: ProCurve(config)# show link-keepalive Total link-keepalive enabled ports: 4 Keepalive Retries: Keepalive Interval: 1 sec Port 1 is UDLD-enabled, and tagged for a specific VLAN.
  • Page 250 To display detailed UDLD information for specific ports, enter the show link­ keepalive statistics command. For example: Ports 1 and 2 are UDLD-enabled and show the number of health check packets sent and received on each port. ProCurve(config)# show link-keepalive statistics Port: Current State: Neighbor MAC Addr: 0000a1-b1c1d1...
  • Page 251: Configuration Warnings And Event Log Messages

    Port Status and Configuration Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) Configuration Warnings and Event Log Messages Warning Messages. The following table shows the warning messages that may be issued and their possible causes, when UDLD is configured for tagged ports. Table 10-3. Warning Messages caused by configuring UDLD for Tagged Ports CLI Command Example Warning Message Possible Problem...
  • Page 252 Port Status and Configuration Uni-Directional Link Detection (UDLD) 10-32...
  • Page 253: Contents

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation Contents PoE Devices ..........11-3 Introduction to PoE .
  • Page 254 Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation Contents Calculating the Maximum Load for a PoE Module ....11-25 When a Power Supply Fails ....... . . 11-26 PoE Operating Notes .
  • Page 255: Poe Devices

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation PoE Devices PoE Devices The ProCurve 8212zl switches are used as a Power Sourcing Equipment (PSE) device providing PoE power to the Powered Devices (PDs) through the ProCurve Switch zl 24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE module (J8702A), or the 20-port Gig-T plus 4 mini-GBIC PoE module (J8705A).
  • Page 256: Introduction To Poe

    LAN cabling. For more information about PoE technology, refer to the PoE Plan­ ning and Implementation Guide, which is available on the ProCurve Net­ working web site at www.procurve.com. (Click on technical support, then Product manuals (all)).
  • Page 257: Overview Of Operation

    Overview of Operation An 8212zl 24-port Gig-T PoE module (J8702A) is a PSE device that receives PoE power from either a ProCurve J8712A Power Supply or a ProCurve J8713A Power Supply and distributes this power to the PDs connected to the PoE module’s Gig-T ports.
  • Page 258: Related Publications

    ProCurve Networking web site at www.procurve.com. (Click on technical support, then Product manuals (all).) The latest version of any ProCurve product guide is always on the ProCurve Networking web site. Refer to “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6.
  • Page 259: General Poe Operation

    Product manuals (all)). Configuration Options In the default configuration, all Gig-T ports on the PoE module in a ProCurve 82121zl switch are configured to support PoE operation. You can: Disable or re-enable per-port PoE operation on individual ports to ■...
  • Page 260: Pd Support

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation General PoE Operation Note The ports on a PoE module support standard networking links and PoE links. Thus, you can connect either a non-PoE device or a PD to a PoE-enabled port without reconfiguring the port. PD Support When you connect the first PD to a PoE port, the PoE module must have a minimum of 17 watts of PoE power available in order to detect and supply...
  • Page 261 Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation General PoE Operation the lowest-priority port on the module loses PoE power and remains unpow­ ered until the module once again has 17 or more watts available. (For infor­ mation on power priority, refer to “Power Priority Operation” on page 11-10.) Disconnecting a PD from a PoE port causes the module to stop providing PoE power to that port and makes the power available to any other PoE ports that have PDs connected and waiting for power.
  • Page 262: Determining The Amount Of Poe Power Available

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation General PoE Operation Determining the Amount of PoE Power Available PoE Power Table 11-1 shows the amount of PoE power available for powering PDs depending on the power supplies used. Table 11-1. PoE Power Available Source of Power PoE Power Available PoE Power Available for...
  • Page 263: How Is Power Allocation Prioritized

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation General PoE Operation to the ports that present a PD power demand. This causes the loss of power from one or more lower-priority ports to meet the power demand on other, higher-priority ports. This operation occurs regardless of the order in which PDs connect to the module’s PoE-enabled ports.
  • Page 264: Poe Priority With Two Or More Modules

    Critical In this example, the following CLI command sets ports C3-C17 to Critical: ProCurve(config)# interface c3-c17 power critical The Critical priority class always receives power. If there is not enough power to provision PDs on all of the ports configured for this class, then no power goes to ports configured for High and Low priority.
  • Page 265 For example: All ports on module C are prioritized as Critical. ProCurve(config)# interface c1-c24 power critical All ports on module A are prioritized as Low. ProCurve(config)# interface a1-a24 power low There are 48 PDs attached to all ports of modules A and C (24 ports each module).
  • Page 266: Configuring Poe Operation

    You can use one command to set the same priority level on PoE ports in multiple modules. For example, to configure the priority to High for ports c5-c10, C23-C24, D1-D10, and D12, you could use this command: ProCurve(config)# interface c5-c10,c23-c24,d1- d10,d12 power high 11-14...
  • Page 267: Disabling Or Re-Enabling Poe Port Operation

    You must disable ALL ports in the module for this to occur. Enabling Support for Pre-Standard Devices The ProCurve 8212zl switch also supports some pre-802.3af devices. For a list of the devices supported, refer to the FAQs for your switch model. Syntax: [no] power pre-std-detect Detects and powers pre-802.3af standard devices.
  • Page 268: Changing The Threshold For Generating A Power Notice

    In this case, executing the following command sets the global notification threshold to 70% of available PoE power. ProCurve(config)# power threshold 70 With this setting, if module B is allocated 100 watts of PoE power and is using 68 watts, and then another PD is connected to the module in slot B that uses 8 watts, the 70% threshold of 70 watts is exceeded.
  • Page 269: Configuring Optional Poe Port Identifiers

    PoE module in slot “A” to 75% and the threshold for the module in slot “B” to 68% by executing the following two commands: ProCurve(config)# power slot a threshold 75 ProCurve(config)# power slot b threshold 68 Note that the last threshold command affecting a given slot supersedes the previous threshold command affecting the same slot.
  • Page 270 For example, to return port B2 in the above figure to a null setting, use this command: ProCurve(config)# setmib pethPsePortType.2.27 -D " " For more on displaying PoE configuration and status, refer to “Viewing PoE Configuration and Status” on page 11-19.
  • Page 271: Viewing Poe Configuration And Status

    For example, in the default PoE configuration, when the switch is running with several ports supporting PD loads on the PoE module in slot A, show power-management displays data similar to the following: ProCurve(config)# show power-management Status and Counters - System Power Status Pre-standard Detect...
  • Page 272: Displaying An Overview Of Poe Status On All Ports

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Displaying an Overview of PoE Status on All Ports Syntax: show power-management brief Displays the following port power status: • Port: Lists all PoE-capable ports on the switch. • Power Enable: Shows Yes for ports enabled to support PoE (the default) and No for ports on which PoE is disabled.
  • Page 273: Displayin