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7015 Models R30, R40, and R50
CPU Enclosure
Operator Guide

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  • Page 1

    7015 Models R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosure Operator Guide...

  • Page 2

    Third Edition (April 1997) This edition notice applies to the 7015 Model R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosure Operator Guide. The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: THIS PUBLICATION IS PRINTED “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents Communications Statements ..........Safety Notices .

  • Page 4

    General Information for 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive ......2-34 Recommendations ........... . . 2-35 Types of 4 mm Tape Cartridges .

  • Page 5

    AC Rack Features ............AC Rack with External Device Container, Cable Channel, and Rack Attachment Plate 4-2 Power Distribution Bus .

  • Page 6

    Running the Diagnostic Programs from Disk or From a Server ....Running the Diagnostic Programs from the Network ..... . . Running the Diagnostic Programs from a TTY Terminal .

  • Page 7

    Display and Change Diagnostic Test List Service Aid ......9-10 Display or Change Key Modes (Display or Change Electronic Mode Switch Task) 9-11 Display Previous Diagnostic Results Service Aid .

  • Page 8

    AIX Diag Command ........... . Modifying Dial-In Phone Numbers .

  • Page 9: Communications Statements

    Communications Statements The following statement applies to this product. The statement for other products intended for use with this product appears in their accompanying manuals. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Statement Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.

  • Page 10

    for Class A equipment were derived for commercial and industrial environments to provide reasonable protection against interference with licensed communication equipment. Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Statement This product has been designed and built to comply with IEC Standard 950.

  • Page 11

    Dieses Gerät ist berechtigt in Übereinstimmung mit dem deutschen EMVG vom 9.Nov.92 das EG-Konformitätszeichen zu führen. Der Aussteller der Konformitätserklärung ist die IBM Germany. Dieses Gerät erfüllt die Bedingungen der EN 55022 Klasse A. Für diese Klasse von Geräten gilt folgende Bestimmung nach dem EMVG: Geräte dürfen an Orten, für die sie nicht ausreichend entstört sind, nur mit besonderer...

  • Page 12

    Operator Guide...

  • Page 13: Safety Notices

    Safety Notices Note: For a translation of these notices see the System Unit Safety Information , form number SA23-2652. Definitions of Safety Notices A danger notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing death or serious personal injury. Danger notices appear on the following pages: 4-11 A caution notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing...

  • Page 14

    Laser Safety Information The optical drive in this system unit is a laser product. The optical drive has a label that identifies its classification. The label, located on the drive, is shown below. CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT LASER KLASSE 1 LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE APPAREIL A LASER DE CLASSE 1 TO IEC 825:1984 CENELEC EN 60 825:1991...

  • Page 15: About This Book

    Definition of Machine Names and Model Numbers The models of CPU Enclosures referred to in this book are the 7015 Model R30, R40, and R50. References to CPU Enclosures in this book apply to the 7015 Models R30, R40, or R50 CPU Enclosures.

  • Page 16

    Operator Guide...

  • Page 17: Chapter 1. Cpu Enclosure Description

    For information about options and compatible optional drawers that can be used with the 7015 Model R30 CPU Enclosure in a 7015 Model R00 rack, see the Adapters, Devices, and Cable Information manual, form number SA23-2764.

  • Page 18: Front View With Bezel Door Closed

    Front View with Bezel Door Closed Bezel Door (Closed Position) Front View with Bezel Door Open CD-ROM Drive Operator 3.5-Inch Optional Panel Diskette Media Drive Position Operator Guide...

  • Page 19: Cpu Enclosure With Connectors (rear View)

    CPU Enclosure with Connectors (Rear View) Battery Backup Unit Connector RS485 (In) RS485 (Out) Parallel Port Serial Port 1 Serial Port 2 Serial Port 3 Adapter Locations Adapter Locations Description...

  • Page 20

    Operator Guide...

  • Page 21: Chapter 2. Using The Cpu Enclosure

    Chapter 2. Using the CPU Enclosure This chapter contains information about using the CPU Enclosure and using devices installed in the CPU Enclosure. For information about using a -48 V dc system unit, refer to Chapter 6. General Information about Multiple Systems If your system is attached to another system, certain actions performed by an operator can affect either one or both systems, and these actions may require further consideration before any changes are made to either system.

  • Page 22: The Operator Panel

    The Operator Panel The operator panel is located behind the front bezel door. To access the operator panel, rotate the top of the front bezel door downward. The operator panel is controlled by the CPU and a special microprocessor located on the I/O card, called SystemGuard.

  • Page 23: Setting The Key Mode Switch

    Setting the Key Mode Switch The key mode switch has three positions: – Normal – Secure – Service The switch is used to establish the initial program load (IPL) path. The IPL loads the system programs, checks the system hardware, and prepares the system for user operation. Before starting the system unit for normal day-to-day operation, set the key mode switch to the Normal ( ) position.

  • Page 24

    The following table summarizes the operations possible for each key mode position for the CPU enclosure. Operation Key Mode Switch Position Normal Secure Service Reset/Scroll Key Enabled Disabled Enabled SystemGuard Console Enabled Enabled Enabled Active SystemGuard Console Disabled Disabled Enabled Debug/Dump Normal IPL Enabled...

  • Page 25

    The Secure position ( The Secure position prevents the system from doing an IPL. If the operating system is already loaded, this position does not lock the system console or block system network communication. When loading the operating system with the Key Mode Switch in the Secure Position a 200 is displayed.

  • Page 26: Electronic Mode Switch

    (CH) or IBM service center and to run off-line and online diagnostics from a remote location to isolate a problem to the FRU level,...

  • Page 27: Reading The Operator Panel Display

    Reading the Operator Panel Display Attention: If you have a flashing 888 in the Operator Panel Display, do not push the Reset/Scroll button before you carefully read the related documentation. The operator panel display has two 16-position rows. The operator panel display is used for: Event indications and problem reporting during Power-On-Self-Test (POST) and Configuration Methods.

  • Page 28: Using The Reset/scroll Button

    Using the Reset/Scroll Button Attention: When the key mode switch is in the Normal or Service position, pressing the Reset/Scroll button causes the unit to reset and do an initial program load (IPL). Pressing the Reset/Scroll button while the operating system is running can result in damaged or lost data.

  • Page 29: Using The 3.5-inch Diskette Drive

    Using the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive The diskette drive is located to the right of the CD-ROM drive on the CPU Enclosure. The In-Use light is on when the system is accessing the drive. Do not stop the system unit or remove a diskette when the In Use light is on, or you may lose some of the data on the diskette.

  • Page 30

    Types of 3.5-Inch Diskettes Attention: Diskette drives and diskettes must be the correct type to store data successfully. If you use the wrong diskette in your 3.5-inch diskette drive, the data on the diskette could be destroyed. Some computers operate with 720K-byte diskette drives (no printing on the diskette-unload button) and use only 1M-byte capacity diskettes.

  • Page 31

    Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 3.5-Inch Diskettes Setting the write-protect tab on a diskette is necessary so that information is not accidentally lost. When the write-protect tab is set (slot open) on a diskette, information can be read from the diskette but cannot be written to it. There is a write-protect tab on the 3.5-inch diskette.

  • Page 32

    Loading and Unloading the 3.5-Inch Diskette To load a diskette into the drive, first insert the diskette into the 3.5-inch diskette drive with the labeled metal shutter facing upward and the beveled corner facing to your right and away from you. Push the diskette into the drive until you hear a click.

  • Page 33: Using The Cd-rom Drive

    Using the CD-ROM Drive The CD-ROM drive position is located in the top media position to the left of the operator panel. Type B Bezel (CD-ROM and CD-ROM2) CD-ROM Drive Note: For a translation of this notice, see System Unit Safety Information . CAUTION: A Class 3 laser is contained in the device.

  • Page 34

    Loading the CD-ROM Disc Caddy Note: The disc caddy is not compatible with the Type C bezel CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM media kit contains a CD-ROM diagnostic disc and a disc caddy. Open the disc caddy and place the CD-ROM disc in the caddy with the printed side up. Hinged Cover CD-ROM Disc (Printed Side Up)

  • Page 35: Type C Bezel Cd-rom Drive

    Type C Bezel CD-ROM Drive Note: For a translation of this notice, see System Unit Safety Information . CAUTION: A Class 3 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the device while it is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the device, as it is not serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.

  • Page 36

    Loading the CD-ROM Drive Notes: The disc caddy is not compatible with the Type C bezel CD-ROM drive. Always handle discs by the edges to avoid leaving fingerprints. Discs can be wiped with a soft, lint-free cloth or lens tissue. Always wipe in a straight line from the inner hub to the outer rim.

  • Page 37

    Unloading the CD-ROM Drive Note: Always handle discs by the edges to avoid leaving fingerprints. Discs can be wiped with a soft, lint-free cloth or lens tissue. Always wipe in a straight line from the inner hub to the outer rim. 1.

  • Page 38

    Emergency Eject Note: Execute the following procedure only when the disc drawer does not eject after the unload button is pressed. 1. Power-off the CD-ROM drive. 2. Insert a straight metal small-diameter rod such as a straightened paper clip into the emergency eject hole as shown in the figure.

  • Page 39: Using The 1/4-inch Internal Tape Drive

    Using the 1/4-Inch Internal Tape Drive The 1.2 G-byte or the 150 MB 1/4-inch tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel. 1.2GB Tape Drive Blue Unload Button Status Light...

  • Page 40: Setting The Write-protect Tab On 1/4-inch Tape Cartridges

    Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridges Setting the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge is necessary so that information is not accidentally lost. When the write-protect tab of a tape cartridge is set (pointing to SAFE), information can be read from the tape but cannot be written to it. The write-protect tab positions for a typical tape cartridge are shown in the following illustration.

  • Page 41: Loading The 1/4-inch Tape Cartridge

    the 1/4-Inch Tape Loading Cartridge A diagram inside the drive opening shows how to load a tape. To load a tape cartridge, push the unload button. When the button is pushed, the front panel of the drive partially opens toward the front of the system unit. Drive Opening Unload Button Status Light...

  • Page 42: Unloading The 1/4-inch Tape Cartridge

    Unloading the 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridge To unload the cartridge, use the same procedure you used for loading except pull the cartridge from the drive opening. 1. Push the unload button. 2. Pull the front panel open (flat). 3. Pull the tape cartridge out of the drive. 4.

  • Page 43

    Retensioning The tape drive works best when it is operated as a streaming tape. If the tape cartridge has been operated in the streaming mode, it is not necessary to re-tension the tape. If the tape is used in a non-streaming mode (many start and stop operations), re-tension the tape after approximately every 30 minutes.

  • Page 44

    Tape Cartridge Data Efficiency Note: For maximum efficiency, operate the 1/4-inch tape drive in the streaming mode whenever possible. The 1/4-inch tape cartridge efficiency is defined as the amount of data that can be stored on the cartridge and the data rate at which the data can be read from the tape cartridge. When in use, the tape in the cartridge is moved at a constant speed.

  • Page 45

    General Information for 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive Note: The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel. Recommendations Use only data grade 8 mm tape cartridges.

  • Page 46

    Tape Cartridge Compatibility The 8 mm tape drive is compatible with existing 8-mm tape subsystems that comply with the American National Standard (ANSI) X3B5/89–136, Helical-scan Digital Computer Tape Cartridge, 8 mm for Information Exchange. Data compression effectively increases the cartridge capacity and data transfer rate for the 5.0GB tape cartridges. Format Mode (C = compression mode) 8 mm Tape Drive 5.0GB...

  • Page 47

    Operating in Harsh Environments The 8-mm tape drive is ideally suited to streaming operations, as opposed to tape movement operations involving multiple stop/starts and random searches. When the tape is used for frequent stop and start operations, streaming movement is beneficial and should be used whenever possible.

  • Page 48

    8 mm Media Capacity vs File Size 5.0GB Mode 100K 100M Average Data File Size (One filemark per data file) Short Filemark Long Filemark 2-28 Operator Guide...

  • Page 49

    Using the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel. Status Lights The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive has two green status lights and one amber status light.

  • Page 50

    Status Light States The following table explains the meaning of the green and amber status lights. Status Lights on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive Status Lights State Status The power-on self-test (POST) is running, or the system sent a Reset signal to the 8-mm tape drive. One of the following has occurred: The power is off.

  • Page 51

    the 8 mm Tape Loading Cartridge Before loading the tape cartridge, make sure the power is on and the write-protect switch on the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to “Setting the Write-Protect Tab” on page 2-26. The tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing. To load the 8 mm tape cartridge, do the following: 1.

  • Page 52

    Unloading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge Before performing the unload operation, make sure the power to the 8 mm tape drive is on. To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The 8 mm tape drive rewinds the tape and then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive. After pressing the unload button, the following will occur: 1.

  • Page 53

    Cleaning the Tape Path on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive Attention: Do not use video cleaning cartridges in the 8 mm tape drive. Video cleaning cartridges can damage the 8-mm tape drive. Some video cleaning cartridges are extremely abrasive. A 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive may be permanently damaged after only a few cleaning operations using an abrasive-type cleaning cartridge.

  • Page 54: General Information For 4.0gb 4 Mm Tape Drive

    General Information for 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel. The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive is an internal streaming tape drive that is used to: Save and restore system data files.

  • Page 55: Recommendations

    Recommendations Attention: Tape cartridges that do not carry the proper DDS symbol cannot be written to and their use will cause the 4 mm tape drive to report an error. Use only 4 mm Digital Data Storage (DDS) cartridges. Attention: Use of other than recommended cleaning cartridges can damage your tape drive and will void the drive warranty.

  • Page 56: Tape Cartridge Compatibility

    Tape Cartridge Compatibility The 4 mm tape drive is compatible with existing 4 mm tape subsystems that are designed to operate with Digital Data Storage approved media, which meet the following standards: For DDS llll – American National Standard (ANSI) standard, X3.203-191, Helical-scan Digital Computer Tape Cartridge, 3.81mm .

  • Page 57: Operating In Harsh Environments

    increased if 4 mm tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the temperature or humidity ranges shown in the following table. Before using a cartridge, always let it adjust (acclimate) to the operating environment. Do this by placing the cartridge with its container in the operating environment for as long as it has been away from this environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.

  • Page 58: Using The 4.0gb 4 Mm Tape Drive

    Using the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel. Status Lights The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive has two green status lights and one amber status light.

  • Page 59

    Status Lights on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive Status Ready Read-Write Disturbance (green) (green) (amber) LED test. On 2 seconds On 2 seconds On 2 seconds at power on at power on at power on The power-on self-test (POST) is running or Flashing the Diagnostic Cartridge is running.

  • Page 60: Loading The 4 Mm Tape Cartridge

    the 4 mm Tape Loading Cartridge Before loading the tape cartridge, make sure the power is on and the write-protect switch on the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to “Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 4 mm Tape Cartridges” on page 2-36. The tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing.

  • Page 61: Unloading The 4 Mm Tape Cartridge

    Unloading the 4 mm Tape Cartridge Before performing the unload operation, make sure the power to the 4 mm tape drive is on. To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The 4 mm tape drive rewinds the tape and then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive. After pressing the unload button, the following occurs: 1.

  • Page 62: Cleaning The Tape Path On The 4.0gb 4 Mm Tape Drive

    Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive The 4 mm tape path should be cleaned either approximately every 30 hours of tape motion or once a month, whichever occurs first. The 4 mm tape drive monitors the recording quality of the tape cartridge and indicates that the tape path requires cleaning when the disturbance status light (amber) is on.

  • Page 63: Chapter 3. Using Systemguard

    Chapter 3. Using SystemGuard This chapter introduces the SystemGuard service processor which is included in all Symmetric Multiprocessor models. Introduction SMP servers include a service processor, called SystemGuard, as a standard feature. SystemGuard continually monitors the hardware as well as the operating system. If, for instance, a CPU fails, the system detects this, reboots itself automatically and runs the built-in diagnostics on the hardware.

  • Page 64: Systemguard Power

    SystemGuard Power SystemGuard has its own DC power boundary. This means that even if the system power is off (power button of the system in the off position), SystemGuard is still powered on, as long as the CPU enclosure still still has power. This allows control of the system even though the system is down.

  • Page 65: The Operator Panel

    Key Mode Switch (Physical Key) In the 7015 R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosures the I/O card contains the NVRAM while the NVRAM battery and the TOD (Time-Of-Day) are located in the Operator Panel. You can drain NVRAM in the following ways:...

  • Page 66: Systemguard Consoles

    SystemGuard Consoles SystemGuard works with two types of consoles: The Bump Console , which is an ASCII terminal attached to the S1 serial port. This console provides the normal input to the BUMP. It can be local or remote. The line speed for the BUMP console must be set to 9600 baud for either type of connection.

  • Page 67: Init Phase

    Init Phase Init phase is entered when the power button on the Operator Panel is pressed on or when the power-on command is entered on the BUMP Console or Service Console. If the System Key is in Normal mode, the BUMP runs the built-in or resident power-on (PON)-tests on the CPU module hardware, IPLs on the first available processor, runs the functional power on self-tests (POST) on the I/O subsystem to check the system, and finally loads the AIX operating system.

  • Page 68

    Phase Change (Stand-By to Init) The phase change from Stand-By to Init is called Crossing the Power boundary. This is achieved by pushing the power button on the Operator Panel or by typing the keyword power at the Stand-By prompt (>). Note that if you type power while the power button is not pushed in, nothing happens until you press the power button.

  • Page 69

    Power-on (PON) Tests PON tests are run by SystemGuard whenever the system power comes on. There are two types of tests: A comprehensive set of tests are performed on the processors, cache, memory and related hardware when the Fast-IPL flag is disabled. A minimum core set of tests are performed on the processors, cache, memory and related hardware during fast-IPL which cannot be turned off.

  • Page 70

    There are other resident PON tests to check other system resources. These tests are a subset of the SystemGuard maintenance offline tests, and reside within the flash EPROM. These tests are divided into the following groups: BUMP Quick I/O Test Group These tests check the accessibility and the functions of the standard and direct I/O components from the BUMP: Async lines (S1, S2, and S3), EEPROMs, NVRAM, Flash EPROM, and TOD...

  • Page 71: Systemguard Parameters And Flags

    Service contract flags These flags enable Service Console usage, maintenance usage and determine if dial-out messages are to be sent to IBM or to a Customer Service Center. These flags are stored in the SID (System Identification) field of the System EEPROM.

  • Page 72: Working With Systemguard

    Working with SystemGuard You can change SystemGuard parameters and flags from different locations They can be changed from the SystemGuard STAND-BY MENU, the SystemGuard MAINTENANCE MENU, the Diagnostics interface, and also from AIX. When the key signal is received, SystemGuard clears the screen and displays the SystemGuard prompt.

  • Page 73: Systemguard Menus

    When the system is in Stand-By mode and the System Key (Physical or Electronic Key) is in Service mode, the STAND-BY MENU can be accessed and SystemGuard executed. If you turn the system unit power on from Stand-By mode with the System Key in the Normal position, the system boots to AIX Multi-User.

  • Page 74

    Stand-By Menu The STAND-BY MENU can only be entered when the system is in Stand-By mode (the word Stand-By must be displayed on the LCD display). Perform the following steps to bring up the STAND-BY MENU. 1. With Stand-By displayed on the LCD display press the Enter key on the BUMP console. The Stand-By prompt is the greater than (>) sign.

  • Page 75

    Display Configuration (option 0). The first-level screen is displayed with features and devices that can be configured. Here is an example of the display configuration screen for a 7013 J Series system. The screens for the 7015 R30, R40, and R50 are similar: Display Configuration SID TM...

  • Page 76

    Display Configuration SIB14 PS04 SIB24 SIB15 PS05 SIB25 SIB16 PS06 SIB26 fc8e000000000000 SIB17 PS07 SIB27 D78605 19H0464 D78605 01 C fc8e000000000000 MCAe 01 C e1ff000000000000 02 C f48e000000000000 MCAe 02 C 708f000000000000 03 C fc8e000000000000 MCAe 03 C ec8f000000000000 04 C ffde000000000000 MCAe 04 C fc8e000000000000...

  • Page 77

    CPUx EC+s: The agent status information of the CPU cards and the VPD information is given. MCx EC+s: This field gives the memory card VPD values. MCAx loc. code+status: This parameter contains the location code and the status information of the Micro Channel adapters (MCA). The contents of the 8 programmable option select (POS) registers are also displayed in the second column.

  • Page 78

    and parameters (set during manufacturing), see the table in “Default Parameter Values” on page B–1 of the service guide for your system. The following flags can be managed: Remote Authorization: Only the local operator can enable this flag to enable remote maintenance to be performed.

  • Page 79

    Set Configuration This menu option enables you to configure or unconfigure units and devices. 1. Enter 3 in the main menu to select this option. 2. You should then see a first-level screen similar to the following. It displays the units and devices that can be configured, along with their menu index number: Set Configuration 00 CPU0...

  • Page 80

    SSBus Maintenance This option is used to investigate and check devices on the SSBus and is meant only for trained service personnel. Use this option to investigate and check devices on the SSBus. 1. Enter 4 in the main menu to select this option. SystemGuard displays the following menu, which allows you to read the time of day (TOD) registers and to read or write the non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) and lines S1 and S2.

  • Page 81

    C Maintenance Use this option to do maintenance operations on the I C buses of a selected unit, in order to investigate and check the connected devices. When exiting this menu, the previous status of the OP and SIB microcontrollers are restored (except for voltage margins). 1.

  • Page 82

    Set voltage margins Note: This option can be only used for error analysis or factory test and must be used only by trained service personnel. Restore nominal voltage values before restarting other operations. Any data written on the disk in marginal mode must be removed before restarting normal operations.

  • Page 83: Maintenance Menu

    Maintenance Menu The MAINTENANCE MENU also enables you to display the configuration of the system in a non-cryptic, easily understandable way, to perform various tests, to continue IPL either from network, a specific SCSI device or from the boot list, and to set flags concerning various system operation.

  • Page 84: Display Configuration

    Display Configuration Use this option to view the system hardware configuration. This option provides different screens with the following levels of information: System-level information Unit-level information Device-level information. Enter 0 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the Display Configuration option. Display Configuration –...

  • Page 85

    Voltage Margins for CPUs, ASICs, and other components. Device status information. Options to select various types of devices. DISPLAY CONFIGURATION – MAIN UNIT MARGINS VALUE: +5 VOLT –> Normal CPU (3.65 VOLT) –> Normal ASIC (3.6 VOLT) –> Normal SCSI DEVICES: Present –>...

  • Page 86

    1. To see device-level information, enter the corresponding command number for the device. The device-level screen is displayed. 2. Enter x to return to the system-level configuration display screen. Display Configuration – Device Level This screen is shown when you select one of the devices of your choice from either the Main Unit or Unit 1 screen.

  • Page 87: Display Bump Error Log

    Display BUMP Error Log Use this option to view the BUMP firmware error log. 1. Enter 1 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select this option. The contents of the logging buffer are displayed as shown in the following screen: DISPLAY BUMP ERROR LOG EVENT # 1: 40140100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000...

  • Page 88: System Boot

    1. Enter 0 to select the bus identification number. The system displays: BUS# [0>Internal | 1>External or x: exit] BUS 0 represents the MicroChannel bus 0 in the 7015 R30, R40, and R50. BUS 1 represents Micro Channel bus 1 of the 7015 R30, R40, and R50.

  • Page 89

    2. Enter 1 to select the slot number. The system displays: SLOT# [1–7 (Internal Bus) | 1–8 (External Bus) or x: exit] Enter your choice. The displayed location code is updated. 3. Enter 2 to select the SCSI identification number. The system displays: SCSI ID [0–F or x: exit] Enter your choice.

  • Page 90: Off-line Tests

    Off-Line Tests Attention: These menus are only to be used when directed by service support personnel. Some of the tests described require test equipment or resources not available on your system. This option under the MAINTENANCE MENU enables you to run the off-line tests in a controlled and interactive mode.

  • Page 91

    Displays the build test menu, which enables you to specify the test list (see “Build Test List” below). Displays and enables modification of the tests in the build list (see page 3-31). Deletes the tests in the build list, after operator confirmation. Attempting to delete tests from an empty list causes an error message to be displayed.

  • Page 92

    3. Once you have selected the test groups, you can specify individual tests within a group. For example, the following screen enables you to specify individual BUMP Quick IO tests: BUILD TEST LIST GROUP 01 BUMP QUICK IO TEST DESCRIPTION TEST DESCRIPTION DEBUG LINE...

  • Page 93

    Modify/Display Test List Once the test list is built, you can use this option to view or modify it. Each test is identified by a number xxyy , where xx is the group number and yy is the test number. 1.

  • Page 94: Set Parameters

    Execute Test List This command enables you to run the test list once it is built (and possibly modified). All the tests in the test list are run one at a time with the selected execution options. Enter 3 in the OFF-LINE TESTS main menu to run the selected tests. The following screen displays the selected execution parameters for the test list.

  • Page 95

    Power-On Command Parameters During the standby idle phase, the system power can be turned on (and the IPL started) by entering a BUMP console power-on string through line S1 or a service console power-on string through line S2 (see “Working with SystemGuard” on page 3-10 for a description of available keywords).

  • Page 96

    Set Configuration This command is used to configure electronic boards like I/O cards or Micro Channel adapter (MCA) devices. 1. Enter 2 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the SET CONFIGURATION menu as shown below: SET CONFIGURATION 0> CPU CARD 1>...

  • Page 97

    1. Enter 3 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the PHONE NUMBERS menu shown here: PHONE NUMBERS 0> SERVICE CENTER DIAL–OUT (1) –> 1> SERVICE CENTER DIAL–OUT (2) –> 2> CUSTOMER HUB DIAL–OUT (1) –> 3> CUSTOMER HUB DIAL–OUT (2) –> 4>...

  • Page 98

    Enter 4 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu. The value set for all the flags, except Fast IPL , is permanent until a new change is made. MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS 0> BUMP CONSOLE –> Present 1> AUTOSERVICE IPL –> Disabled 2>...

  • Page 99

    2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed. Boot Multiuser AIX In Service Flag Enables multiuser AIX boots to proceed even if the Mode Switch is in the Service position (when booting by selecting option 6 in the MAINTENANCE MENU).

  • Page 100: Set National Language

    Set National Language Use this option in the main menu to set the national language used for “SystemGuard”. Once selected, the effect is immediate and all the console messages are presented in the selected language. 1. Enter 9 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select this option. The following menu is displayed: SET NATIONAL LANGUAGE 0>...

  • Page 101: Some Common Systemguard Tasks

    Some Common SystemGuard Tasks The following tasks are done through the STAND-BY and MAINTENANCE MENUs that are part of SystemGuard. Note that these tasks can also be carried out from AIX diagnostics. How to Set the Electronic Key The key can be set electronically, making it easier to provide remote support without physically touching the machine.

  • Page 102

    The configuration display is a good picture of the SystemGuard configuration on one screen. Here is an example: DISPLAY CONFIGURATION MACHINE TYPE/MODEL: 7013J30 45067 FIRMWARE RELEASE: Standby –> 1600 Backup eprom –> 0701 Flash eprom –> 0704 SERVICE CONTRACT: Last update (yymmdd) –> 950707 Validity –>...

  • Page 103

    Setting Fast IPL through the Maintenance Menu 1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU. 2. Enter 8 to select the SET PARAMETERS menu. 3. Enter 4 from the SET PARAMETERS menu to select the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS Menu. 4. Option 3 in this menu should show the current status of the Fast IPL flag. If it is disabled, simply enter 3, and the flag is changed to enabled.

  • Page 104

    How to Set the Service Line Speed By default, the service line speed is 1200 baud or 2400 baud depending on the level of SystemGuard. This speed can be changed through the SystemGuard MAINTENANCE MENU. In order to use the Service Console properly, the terminal connected to the S2 connector has to be set to the same speed.

  • Page 105

    Setting Line Speed through AIX 1. With AIX up and running, log in as user root . 2. Type the following command to view current settings: mpcfg –dm The following is the output of the command: Index Name Value Modem Parameters File Name Service Line Speed Protocol Inter Data Block Delay Protocol Time Out...

  • Page 106

    How to Set Up Console Mirroring Console Mirroring Concepts Console mirroring is a way to provide the customer a view of what the person working remotely from the Service Console is doing on the system. When mirroring is active, the Service Console and the BUMP Console are logically identical, and both are tty0 (tty1 is disabled when the mirroring starts).

  • Page 107

    Setting Up Console Mirroring In order to setup console mirroring, you need first to authorize the Service Console, and set up the right line speed. Refer to previous chapters on how to set up the service line speed and how to authorize the Service Console. Then do the following: 1.

  • Page 108

    How to Enable Surveillance Surveillance is implemented by the survd daemon. This daemon, when started, establishes a heartbeat between AIX and SystemGuard. In case of an AIX hang, SystemGuard detects it and reboots the system. To implement the surveillance, do the following: 1.

  • Page 109

    Modem Configuration The modem on line S2 must be configured using an ASCII modem configuration file which describes various parameters using a specific syntax. AIX uses this file directly. The BUMP uses the same information (in condensed form) stored in non-volatile memory (NVRAM). The modem line speed must be correctly set, either by using SystemGuard (see “Miscellaneous Parameters”...

  • Page 110

    How to Reboot AIX from the Remote Service Console It is possible for the remote personnel connected via the Service Console to reboot AIX from the remote site. Prerequisites The following procedure must be carried out from the BUMP Console in order to allow AIX to boot remotely from the Service Console.

  • Page 111

    Rebooting to Single-User and then to Multi-User This allows the remote support personnel connected to the system via a modem to the S2 port to shut down and reboot the system in Diagnostics mode for hardware diagnostics purposes. After running diagnostics, the remote personnel can reboot the system in AIX Multi-User without having a need to physically touch the machine.

  • Page 112

    3. From this menu, enter 4. to select the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu, which is similar to the following: MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS 0> BUMP CONSOLE –> Present 1> AUTOSERVICE IPL –> Disabled 2> DIAL_OUT AUTHORIZATION –> Disabled 3> FAST IPL –> Enabled 4>...

  • Page 113

    10.At this point, a BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE screen appears. This displays the PRESENT DEVICE LOCATION CODE. If it is not the device you want to boot from, go through each option and change it to the desired BUS, SLOT, SCSI ID, and LUN ID. Option 4 allows you to change all these options at once.

  • Page 114

    How to Boot from the Network The system can be booted from the network through the MAINTENANCE MENU. Network boot allows a system to be reinstalled via the network and also allows various maintenance tasks to be carried out on the local machine. Use the following procedure to boot from the network: 1.

  • Page 115

    5. The SELECT BOOT (STARTUP) DEVICE menu appears, which is similar to the following: SELECT BOOT (STARTUP) DEVICE Select the device to BOOT (Startup) this machine. WARNING: If you are using Token–Ring, selection of an incorrect data rate can result in total disruption of the Token–Ring network.

  • Page 116

    7. Enter the appropriate IP addresses, and enter 99 to return to the MAIN MENU. A screen similar to the following appears: MAIN MENU Select BOOT (Startup) Device Select Language for these Menus Send Test Transmission (PING) Exit Main Menu and Start System (BOOT) Type the number for your selection, then press ”ENTER”...

  • Page 117

    How to Disable and Enable Processors In the SMP servers, it is possible to disable/enable processors. A suspected faulty processor can be disabled so that the system can run without it. The processors can be disabled/enabled through the STAND-BY MENU, MAINTENANCE MENU, Diagnostics, or through AIX commands.

  • Page 118

    5. Enter 04 to deconfigure CPU1. You should see the status changed to D, disabled. CPU1 | Status 00 CPU0 01 CPU0 02 CPU0 03 CPU1 04 CPU1 05 CPU1 Select(x:exit): 6. Now, once the system is rebooted, it runs without processor 1. 7.

  • Page 119

    5. The CPU CARD screen appears and looks similar to the following: CPU CARD – (CPU1) PRESENT CONDITIONS: PR #0 –> Valid & Enabled PR #1 –> Valid & Enabled COMMANDS: 0> ENABLE 1> DISABLE 2> TEMPORARY DISABLE SELECT [x:exit]: 6.

  • Page 120: Customizing Systemguard For Your Needs

    Customizing SystemGuard For Your Needs SystemGuard is controlled by several flags. The flags consist of Contract Flags, Operational Flags, Remote Maintenance Flags, and Test Flags. Remote Service Flag This flag is disabled at the factory and must be enabled for remote service Operational Flags The Operational Flags are the BUMP Console flag, the AutoService IPL flag, and Set Mode to Normal When Booting flag, which are enabled at the factory, however, they can be...

  • Page 121

    Phone Numbers If remote maintenance is used, SystemGuard requires several phone numbers to be entered. Additional information is provided in “Phone Numbers” on page 3-34. Service Line Speed Parameters If remote maintenance is used, SystemGuard requires that the line speed be configured. The default is 1200 baud.

  • Page 122: Reloading The Flash Eeprom

    Reloading the Flash EEPROM Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM. Only system administrators should perform this procedure. Prerequisites To install a new version of the EEPROM firmware, you need either a firmware diskette containing a binary firmware image, or a file containing the firmware.

  • Page 123: Chapter 4. Ac Rack Description

    Chapter 4. AC Rack Description This chapter contains information about the AC 7015 Model R00 rack features and parts. For information about using the AC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapter 5. For information about the DC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapters 6 and 7. AC Rack The 7015 Model R00 rack can contain a CPU Enclosure with other optional compatible drawers such as disk drive drawers, tape drive drawer, and SCSI device drawer.

  • Page 124: Ac Rack Features

    AC Rack Features The AC 7015 rack can contain the following alternate rack features: External device container Cable channel Rack attachment plate AC Rack with External Device Container, Cable Channel, and Rack Attachment Plate External Device Cable Channel Rack Attachment Container Plate Operator Guide...

  • Page 125: Power Distribution Bus

    Power Distribution Bus The power distribution bus (PDB) can be installed in an AC 7015 Model R00 rack with a 7015 CPU Enclosure. The PDB contains six 200 to 240 V ac outlets for providing power to all the drawers in the rack. Each outlet is connected to a separate circuit breaker for protection against excessive currents.

  • Page 126: Cluster Power Control

    Cluster Power Control The cluster power controller (CPC) provides: Connectivity between the remote support facility and multiple CPUs through the modem Connectivity from any attached CPU to any attached disk drive drawer Central power-on and power-off through the TTY. The CPC provides ports for connection of multiple G Series system units, J Series system units, and CPU enclosures for power control interface connection of CPUs and disk drive drawers.

  • Page 127: Uninterruptible Power Source

    Uninterruptible Power Source The uninterruptible power source (UPS) can be installed in a 7015 Model R00 rack. The UPS contains one power plug (in) and one power outlet (out) for connecting to the power distribuion bus (PDB). Power SourcePDB PlugConnects toUPS Receptacle Power DistributionBus (PDB)Rear View of UPS Power Output...

  • Page 128: Power Distribution Unit (supported)

    Power Distribution Unit (Supported) The power distribution unit supplies 200 to 240 V ac from each of the six AC power outlets. These outlets provide power to all the drawers in the rack. The optional battery backup unit attaches to the power distribution unit and can provide 300 V dc to three drawers for 10 minutes.

  • Page 129

    Battery Backup Unit (Supported) Note: The battery backup unit (BBU) can only be installed in the rack with a power distribution unit. The BBU cannot be installed in a rack with a power distribution bus. In addition to supporting other types of drawers in a rack, the BBU can support only one CPU-type drawer in a rack.

  • Page 130: System Unit Devices

    System Unit Devices For more information about system unit devices, refer to the Site and Hardware Planning Information . SCSI-2 Drawer (Supported) Note: Compartment D of the SCSI drawer can contain a 5.0 GB 8 mm tape drive, a 4.0 GB 4 mm tape drive, 1/4-inch tape drive, or a disk drive.

  • Page 131

    Disk Drive There are no operator controls on the disk drive. Because data can become unusable if a disk drive problem occurs, you should back up the data stored on the disks. See your operating system documentation for information about using diskettes or tape drives to back up files.

  • Page 132: Ac Rack Cables And The Cpu Enclosure

    AC Rack Cables and the CPU Enclosure Connectors Enclosure Enclosure Installed 70159Model Rack 4-10 Operator Guide Rear View 70159Model PowerDistributionBus(Maximumof aRack)ClusterPowerControl(Maximumof aRack)

  • Page 133

    Notes: 1. It is recommended that a trained service representative connect or disconnect any cables attached to the CPU enclosure. However, if you choose to connect or disconnect cables attached to the system unit, observe the following safety notices. 2. For a translation of these notices, see the System Unit Safety Information manual. DANGER An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage on metal parts of the system or the devices that attach to the system.

  • Page 134

    Cable Path Note: It is recommended that a trained service representative connect or disconnect any cables attached to the CPU enclosure. However, if you choose to connect or disconnect cables attached to the system unit, observe the following information. Use the cable restraint strap located on an attachment holes on the sides of the rack to attach the cables to the rack.

  • Page 135: Location Codes And Identification Labels

    SCSI controller. 0S - External bus connector of an integrated SCSI controller, Slot number of the SCSI controller. For the IBM 7012 direct bus attach disk drive, 7 is the rear drive and 8 is the front drive. Always 0.

  • Page 136: Scsi Drawer Id Label

    SCSI Drawer ID Label This label contains a two-digit number that identifies the slot in the CPU Enclosure where the SCSI adapter is located (drawer ID). The number on this label corresponds to the characters CD in the location code. One label is located in the lower-right corner on the rear of the drawer, and one is located in the lower-left corner on the front of the drawer (behind the cover).

  • Page 137: Scsi Device Address Label

    SCSI Device Address Label This label contains a one-digit number that identifies the address of the device. The number on this label corresponds to the character G in the location code. One label is located in the upper-right corner of each device (behind the cover). A second SCSI device address label is required for media positions containing dual disk drives and is located below the other SCSI device address label.

  • Page 138: Creating Cover Labels

    Creating Cover Labels Note: Either a 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive or a 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive can be installed in the right media position. Use the following steps and the sheet of peel-off numbers supplied with your system to create cover labels for SCSI drawers.

  • Page 139

    4. Look at the SCSI device address label on the bracket for each device. These numbers are the third digits of the cover labels. 4-17 AC Rack Description SCSI 0 2 1 0 2 2 0 2 3 0 2 4 6 . Apply 0 2 1 0 2 2 0 2 3 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 7.

  • Page 140: Location Code Format For Non-scsi Devices

    Location Code Format for Non-SCSI Devices The following example is for non-SCSI devices. These include planars, memory cards, adapters, and async distribution boxes. Use the example to determine the physical location of a device. Note: The G and H fields each can contain one, two, or three characters. AB - CD - EF - GH Async port number or FRU location on a card or planar.

  • Page 141: Location Code Table For Scsi And Non-scsi Devices

    Location Code Table for SCSI and Non-SCSI Devices Use the following table to determine the physical location of a device or unit. Note: The location code format for 9333 devices is described on the previous page and in 9333 documentation. Use the following example to identify these two-character pairs: AB-CD-EF-GH.

  • Page 142

    Pair Value Description Serial port 1 connector. Serial port 2 connector. Serial Port 3 connector. Remote async node 1 on line 1. Remote async node 2 on line 1. Remote async node 3 on line 1. Remote async node 4 on line 1. Remote async node 1 on line 2.

  • Page 143: Chapter 5. Using The Ac Rack

    Chapter 5. Using the AC Rack This chapter contains information about using, starting, and stopping the AC 7015 Model R00 rack containing a 7015 CPU Enclosure. For information about using the DC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapters 6 and 7. Starting the AC Rack Powering on the system unit includes: 1.

  • Page 144

    Manually Starting by Reloading the Flash EEPROM Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM. Prerequisites If the system is not yet booted, you need a firmware diskette containing the new version of the firmware to be loaded. If the system is already booted, you need the full path name of a file containing the new version of the firmware to be loaded.

  • Page 145

    Manually Powering On the AC Rack Containing a PDU 1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position. Operator Panel Normal Secure Service Key Mode Switch Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual. CAUTION: This product is equipped with a 3-wire power cable and plug for the user’s safety.

  • Page 146

    5. Close the rear door of the rack. 6. Plug all external device power cords into the electrical outlets. 7. Switch on power to all external devices attached to the rack (including rack expansion drawers). Note: Before setting the Power button to on, wait for the operator panel display to display the word “Stand-By.”...

  • Page 147

    Manually Powering On the AC Rack with a PDB Note: Ensure that the key mode switch is set to the Service position to prevent system unit power from being switched on unexpectedly. 1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position. Operator Panel Power Button Normal...

  • Page 148

    3. Plug all drawer power cords into the outlets on the PDB. 4. Close the rear door of the rack. 5. Switch on power to all drawers connected to the PDB. 6. Set the key mode switch to the Normal position. Note: Before setting the Power button to on, wait for the operator panel display to display the word “Stand-By.”...

  • Page 149: Stopping The Ac Rack

    Stopping the AC Rack Note: The system unit can contain either a power distribution unit (PDU) or a power distribution bus (PDB). The following methods can be used to stop (switch off power to) the rack containing either a PDU or a PDB: Under ordinary conditions power is switched off to the CPU Enclosure and to other drawers if they are connected with the power control cables.

  • Page 150: Immediately Stopping The Ac Rack Containing A Pdu

    Attention: This unit may have more than one power supply cord. To completely remove power, you must disconnect all power supply cords. 3. Switch off power to all external devices attached to the system unit, and then unplug the device power cords from the electrical outlets. Note: Because many external devices can be connected to the system unit, it may be impractical for you to switch off power to all the devices and unplug their power cords.

  • Page 151: Stopping The Ac Rack Containing A Pdb - Under Ordinary Conditions

    Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB – Under Ordinary Conditions Notes: Before turning the power off the drawers or external devices, ask the customer about their system high availability requirements. Other drawers in this system unit may be provided power from a PDB in an attached system unit.

  • Page 152: Immediately Stopping The Ac Rack Containing A Pdb

    Immediately Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB Attention: Unpredictable results can occur that affect your data files if you use this method to stop the system unit. If drawers in an attached system unit are receiving power from the PDB of this system unit, the drawers in the attached rack will lose power when the PDB of this system unit is unplugged.

  • Page 153: Chapter 6. Description - -48 V Dc Rack

    Chapter 6. Description – -48 V dc Rack This chapter contains information about a -48 V dc rack containing a 7015 CPU Enclosure. For a description of an AC rack, refer to Chapter 4. -48 V dc Rack The DC 7015 Model R00 rack contains a 7015 CPU enclosure with a -48 V dc power supply.

  • Page 154: Power Distribution Panel

    Power Distribution Panel The power distribution panel (PDP) is installed in a 7015 Model R00 rack with a 7015 CPU enclosure containing a -48 V dc power supply. The PDP provides circuit breakers that protect each drawer in the rack from excess currents and functions as a DC power switch for switching off power to the rack before servicing.

  • Page 155: Power Cable Paths And The Cpu Enclosure

    Power Cable Paths and the CPU Enclosure Note: The following illustration shows the power cable path going from the top of the rack to the bottom of the rack. The power cables can be connected to the PDP from above the rack. Rear View of Rack Cable Restraint Mounting Brackets...

  • Page 157: Chapter 7. Using The -48 V Dc Rack

    Chapter 7. Using the -48 V dc Rack This chapter contains information about using the -48 V dc rack. For information about using an AC rack and the devices installed in an AC rack, refer to Chapter 3. Some devices installed in an AC system with a CPU enclosure containing AC power supply can be installed in a rack with a CPU enclosure containing a -48 V dc power supply.

  • Page 158: Methods Of Starting The -48 V Dc Rack

    Methods of Starting the -48 V dc Rack The four methods of starting the 7015 CPU enclosure installed in a DC rack are as follows: Manually. The power is switched on manually, and the rack does a normal or a service IPL.

  • Page 159: Stopping The -48 V Dc Rack

    Stopping the -48 V dc Rack The following methods can be used to stop (switch off power to) the rack: Under ordinary conditions. Power is switched off to the CPU enclosure and to other drawers if they are connected using the power control cables. Immediately.

  • Page 160: Stopping The -48 V Dc Rack Immediately

    Stopping the -48 V dc Rack Immediately Attention: Unpredictable results that affect your data files can occur if you use this method to stop the rack. Note: Drawers in this rack may be receiving power from a PDP in another rack. If you need to switch off all power to the system quickly, set all of the circuit breaker switches on the power distribution panel to Off (switches in the down position).

  • Page 161: Chapter 8. Using The Diagnostics

    Chapter 8. Using the Diagnostics This chapter describes how to run the diagnostics from the network server. Diagnostic Programs Operating Considerations The following items identify some things to consider before using the diagnostic programs. Note: When possible, run the Online Diagnostics in Service Mode. Online Diagnostics perform additional functions, compared to Standalone Diagnostics.

  • Page 162: Running Diagnostic Programs From Tape Drives

    Running Diagnostic Programs From Tape Drives To load and execute diagnostics from a tape drive perform the following: 1. Power-on the tape drive if it is an externally attached device. 2. Set the key mode switch to the Service position, and then power-on the system unit. 3.

  • Page 163: Running The Diagnostic Programs From A Tty Terminal

    Running the Diagnostic Programs from a TTY Terminal Consider the following when you run diagnostic programs using a TTY-type terminal as the console display: See the operator manual for your type of tty terminal to find the key sequences you need to respond to the diagnostic programs.

  • Page 164

    /51/61 3161/3164 Attributes Settings Settings Settings Description Machine IBM 3151 IBM 3161 The diagnostic programs are set to mode 3151 PC emulate use of the 3161 ASCII IBM 3164 Display Terminal. If your terminal can emulate a 5085, 3161 or 3164 terminal, use the following attribute settings.

  • Page 165

    General 3151 3151 Setup /11/31/41 /51/61 3161/3164 Attributes Settings Settings Settings Description Field Field Field The column tab stops are ignored, and the tab operation depends on the field attribute character positions. Trace Both inbound data (data to the system unit) and outbound data (data from the system unit) to and from the main port can be transferred to the auxiliary port...

  • Page 166

    Additional Keyboard Attributes The following keyboard attributes are for the keyboard attached to the 3151, 3161, and 3164 terminals. Keyboard 3151/11/ 3151 3161 Setup 31 /41 /51/61) /3164 Attributes Settings Settings Settings Description Enter Return Return Return The Enter key functions as the Return key.

  • Page 167: Diagnostic Modes Of Operation

    Diagnostic Modes of Operation The diagnostics can be run in three modes: Maintenance Mode allows checking of most system resources Concurrent Mode allows the normal system functions to continue while selected resources are being checked. Standalone Mode allows checking of all the system devices and features Maintenance Mode Maintenance mode runs the diagnostics using the customer’s version of the AIX operating system.

  • Page 168: Concurrent Mode

    Concurrent Mode Concurrent mode provides a way to run diagnostics on some of the system resources while the system is running normal system activity. Because the system is running in normal operation, some of the resources cannot be tested in concurrent mode. The following resources cannot be tested in concurrent mode: SCSI adapters connected to paging devices The disk drive used for paging Some display adapters.

  • Page 169: Standalone Mode

    Standalone Mode Standalone mode provides the most complete checkout of the system resources. This mode also requires that no other programs be running on the system. Standalone mode can be loaded in three ways: From removable media. This method is the only method available for those systems that do not have the AIX operating system installed.

  • Page 170: System Exerciser

    11. If you loaded the diagnostics from the disk, press the F3 key (from a defined terminal) or press 99 (for an undefined terminal) to shutdown the diagnostics before turning off the system unit. Note: Pressing the F3 key (from a defined terminal) produces a “Confirm Exit” popup menu which offers two options: continuing with the shutdown by pressing F3;...

  • Page 171: Cpu And Memory Testing And Error Log Analysis

    When the System Exerciser is running, most built-in error recovery procedures are turned off. This can cause occasional errors to be reported that normally have no effect on system operation. Parts should only be replaced when the following occurs: A high number of errors are reported in relation to the number of times the device was tested.

  • Page 172: Reading A Flashing 888 Message On A Multi-line Operator Panel Display

    Reading a Flashing 888 Message on a Multi-Line Operator Panel Display An 888 flashing in the first line of the operator panel display indicates that a hardware or software error has been detected and that an error message is being displayed. For additional information about flashing 888 numbers, refer to “System Unit Error Isolation Features”...

  • Page 173

    Is the second line of the operator panel display blank? The message has a type 103 or 105 message included in it. Press the Reset button once, then go to Step 3. Read out the SRN and FRU information for these message types.

  • Page 174

    Step 3. Reading the Type 103 and 105 Message A type 103 and 105 message is generated when a hardware error is detected. Use the following steps and information to record SRN and FRU location code information. 1. Record all characters following the first 103 or 105 in the first line of the operator panel display.

  • Page 175

    Chapter 9. Introduction to Tasks and Service Aids Beginning with version 4.2 there are two top level menus seen by the user – Tasks and Resources. Once a Task has been selected, then a list of resources will be displayed for selection to run the Task on.

  • Page 176

    Run Diagnostics Task The Run Diagnostics task invokes the Resource Selection List menu. When the commit key is pressed, Diagnostics are run on all selected resources. The procedures for running the diagnostics depends on the states of the Diagnostics Run Time Options.

  • Page 177

    Run Tests Multiple Times This option allows the user to select if the diagnostic should be run in loop mode or not (the default is no). Note: This option is only displayed when running Online Diagnostics in Service Mode. Process Supplemental Media Task This prompts for either diskette or tape media, reads in media using cpio, and executes diagstart shell script.

  • Page 178

    Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid 9-13 Product Topology Service Aid 9-13 SCSI Bus Service Aid and SCSI Bus Analyzer Task 9-13 SCSI Tape Utilities Service Aid 9-14 Service Aids for use with Ethernet 9-14 Service Hints Service Aid 9-15 SSA Service Aid 9-15 Trace Service Aid 9-15...

  • Page 179

    Save or Restore Diagnostics Modes and Remote Support Phone Number This function allows the diagnostics modes and remote support phone number to be saved and restored. The location of the save area is to be defined. Flash EPROM Download This function updates the Flash EPROM. Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid The Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid allows the user to perform the following actions: Format a 1, 2, or 4MB diskette...

  • Page 180

    Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid and Update Disk Based Diagnostic Task This service aid allows fixes (APARs) to be applied. Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid Before Version 4.2 Prior to version 4.2 this service aid is used to update the diagnostics on the disk drive. The updates may be new diagnostics or an update to the existing diagnostics.

  • Page 181

    To prevent problems that may occur when running this service aid from disk, it is suggested that this service aid be run from the diagnostics that are loaded from removable media when possible. Display/Alter Sector Service Aid Note: To access this service aid refer to the Disk Maintenance Service Aid. This service aid allows you to display and alter information on a disk sector.

  • Page 182

    2. Do a format without certify. 3. Run a second pass of the erase service aid. For a newly installed drive, you can insure that all blocks on the drive are overwritten with your pattern if you use the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 183

    indicates that the disk needs to be backed up and replaced. Formatting the disk does not improve the availability of spare sectors. Diskette Media Service Aid This service aid provides a way to verify the data written on a diskette. When this service aid is selected, a menu asks you to select the type of diskette being verified.

  • Page 184: Display And Change Diagnostic Test List Service Aid

    Display Software Product Data Beginning with Version 4.2 This service aid displays information about the installed software and provides the following functions: List Installed Software List Applied but Not Committed Software Updates Show Software Installation History Show Fix (APAR) Installation Status List Fileset Requisites List Fileset Dependents List Files Included in a Fileset...

  • Page 185: Display Or Change Key Modes (display Or Change Electronic Mode Switch Task)

    Diagnostic Test List Menu lists all resources that can be deleted from the Diagnostic Test List. Note: Only resources that were previously detected by the diagnostics and have not been deleted from the Diagnostic Test List is listed. If no resources are available to be deleted, then none are listed.

  • Page 186: Hardware Error Report Service Aid And Display Hardware Error Log Task

    Hardware Error Report Service Aid and Display Hardware Error Log Task This service aid provides a tool for viewing the hardware error log and performing error log analysis. It uses the errpt command to do this. The Display Error Summary and Display Error Detail selection provide the same type of report as the errpt command.

  • Page 187: Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid

    Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid This service aid provides a tool for configuring periodic diagnostics and automatic error log analysis. A hardware resource can be chosen to be tested once a day, at a user specified time. If the resource cannot be tested because it is busy, error log analysis is performed. Hardware errors logged against a resource can also be monitored by enabling Automatic Error Log Analysis.

  • Page 188: Scsi Tape Utilities Service Aid

    When the SCSI Bus Service Aid is entered a description of the service aid is displayed. Pressing the Enter key will display the Adapter Selection menu. This menu allows the user to enter which address to transmit the SCSI Inquiry Command. When the adapter is selected the SCSI Bus Address Selection menu is displayed.

  • Page 189: Service Hints Service Aid

    When the Ethernet service aid is executed, one of the following messages is returned: No errors occurred. An adapter error occurred. A transmit time–out occurred. A transmit error occurred. A receive time–out occurred. A receive error occurred. A system error occurred. Receive and transmit data did not match.

  • Page 190: 7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid

    7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid This service aid provides a tool for diagnosing terminal server problems. 9-16 Operator Guide...

  • Page 191: Chapter 10. Using The System Verification Procedure

    Chapter 10. Using the System Verification Procedure The system verification procedure is used to check the system for correct operation. This chapter contains information about pre-procedure considerations and running the system verification. Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure This procedure requires use of all of the system resources. No other activity can be running on the system while you are doing this procedure.

  • Page 192: Step 2. Loading The Diagnostic Programs

    Step 2. Loading the Diagnostic Programs 1. Stop all application programs running on the operating system. 2. Stop the operating system. (If help is needed, call your 800 support number.) 3. Turn off the system. 4. Set the mode switch to the Service position. 5.

  • Page 193: Step 4. Additional System Verification

    Step 4. Additional System Verification The checkout programs end with either the TESTING COMPLETE menu and a message stating No trouble was found or the A PROBLEM WAS DETECTED ON (Time stamp) menu with an SRN. 1. Press Enter to return to the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu. 2.

  • Page 194

    10-4 Operator Guide...

  • Page 195: Chapter 11. Hardware Problem Determination

    Chapter 11. Hardware Problem Determination If you have an error or failure on your system, this chapter contains steps for obtaining a service request number (SRN). You report the SRN to the service organization. The service organization uses the SRN to determine which field replaceable units (FRUs) are needed to restore the system to correct operation.

  • Page 196

    Step 2 (From Step 1) The AIX operating system contains the diagnostic programs. Other operating systems may not contain diagnostic programs. Is AIX operating system used on this system? Go to Step 21. Go to Step 3. Step 3 (From Step 2) Determine if the AIX operating system is accepting commands.

  • Page 197

    Step 5 (From Step 4) This step loads concurrent diagnostics. 1. Log on as root or as superuser. 2. Enter the diag command. 3. Wait until the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed, or wait for three minutes. Are the DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS displayed without any obvious console display problems? Do the following to shut down your system: 1.

  • Page 198

    Step 6 (From Steps 3, 4, 5, 7) This step loads the diagnostics. 1. Set the mode switch to the Service position. 2. Be sure the power switches of the attached devices are set to On. 3. Set the power switch on the system unit to On. 4.

  • Page 199

    6. Starting at the top of the following table, find your symptom and follow the instructions given in the Action column. Symptom Action The system stops with a blank operator Go to Step 10. panel display and the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed with no obvious problem on the console display (for example, it is not...

  • Page 200

    Step 7 (From Step 6, 18) The following steps analyze a steady (not flashing) number displayed in the operator panel display while attempting to load the diagnostics. operator panel Display Action Number Be sure the key mode switch is set to the Service position. If the key mode switch was not in the Service position, set it to the Service position;...

  • Page 201

    Step 9 (From Steps 6, 18, 20) The following steps analyze a console display problem. Find your type of console display in the following table; then, follow the instructions given in the Action column. Console Display Action Display Device Go to the your display documentation for problem determination.

  • Page 202

    Step 11 (From Steps 10, 20) There is a problem with the keyboard. Find the type of keyboard you are using in the following table; then follow the instructions given in the Action column. Keyboard Type Action tty-terminal keyboard. This applies to all Go to the documentation for problem attached terminals.

  • Page 203

    System Response Action The DIAGNOSTIC MODE SELECTION Select Problem Determination, and menu is displayed. then go to Step 13. The MISSING RESOURCE menu is Follow the displayed instructions until displayed. either the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu or an SRN is displayed. If the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu is displayed, go to Step 13.

  • Page 204

    Step 13 (From Step 12) The system checkout option checks all of the resources (available in standalone mode only). Select and run the diagnostic tests on the resources you are having problems with or run system checkout to check all of the configured resources. Find the response in the following table and perform the specific action.

  • Page 205

    Step 15 (From Steps 12, 13) The diagnostic programs produced an SRN for this problem. 1. Record the SRN and any other numbers. 2. Report the SRN to the service organization. 3. STOP. You have completed these procedures. Step 16 (From Step 6) The system stopped with two or more numbers between 221 and 296 alternating in the operator panel display.

  • Page 206

    Step 18 (From Step 17) The following steps analyze a failure to load the diagnostic programs from a disk, or a failure to determine whether the diagnostic programs are on a disk. 1. Set the power switch on the system unit to Off. 2.

  • Page 207

    7. Starting at the top of the following table, find your symptom; then perform the specific action. Symptom Action The system stops with a blank operator panel Go to Step 10. display, and the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed with no obvious problem on the console display (for example, it is not distorted or blurred).

  • Page 208

    Step 21 (From Steps 2 and 7) An English-only version of diagnostics are provided on CD-ROM disc. Do you want to run diagnostics from CD-ROM disc? If you have a problem, call for service, and report the problem. Go to Step 17. Step 22 (From Step 16) An English-only version of diagnostics are provided on CD-ROM disc.

  • Page 209: Appendix A. Systemguard Test Groups

    Appendix A. SystemGuard Test Groups SystemGuard Test Groups Table The following diagram shows the various test groups and their associated tests. To modify the test list, the tests have to be selected in the xxyy format, where xx is the group number and yy is the test number within the group.

  • Page 210

    GROUP NO GROUP TEST NO TEST DCB and Memory MM Data lines Test test group MM Address lines Test MM board dec. Test MM Basic acc. Test MM components Test ECC component Test ECC mechanism Test Refresh mech. Test ECC Data lines access. Test MM Full Test (K/H) Interrupt test group BUMP to CPU interrupt Test...

  • Page 211: Systemguard Test Group Descriptions

    SystemGuard Test Group Descriptions The following is a description of the different test groups and the tests available under them. All of these tests are performed automatically at Power-On with default parameters. They can also be performed selectively (selection of test group/subtest/parameter) with user configured parameters, under the control of the Off Line Test monitor.

  • Page 212

    BUMP, Remote, and Special Asynchronus Lines Test These tests are meant to check the Asynchronus lines of the Standard I/O and the Asynchronus Lines controller in the Super I/O. These tests contain sub-tests, which are described as follows. Each sub-test saves and restores the line parameters. When an error is detected, it is reported to the operator with a suitable error message.

  • Page 213

    NVRAM Test This test checks the accessibility of NVRAM bytes. It contains the following sub-tests: NVRAM Data Lines Access Test This test saves the first NVRAM byte. Then a read / write operation is done word by word. It restores the first NVRAM byte. NVRAM Address Lines Access Test This test reads, writes and compares 2 NVRAM addresses.

  • Page 214

    DTR Register Test This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among 0 bits in DTR registers. CTR Register Test This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among 0 bits in CTR registers. It saves and restores the CTR register value. Miscellaneous Registers Test This test checks accessibility to the MC68230 chip and its internal registers.

  • Page 215

    Entry Parameters Parameters Name Definition Possible Values Default Value Parameter 1 Sub test # Subtest Number 0 or 1 0 = All tests linked Parameter 2 Proc # Processor Number 8 = BUMP Check–Sum Test It checks the CRC value for all present VPDs; It checks the CRC value according to the configuration and it checks the coherency of the configuration.

  • Page 216: Jtag Test Group

    BPP External LoopBack Test (BPP EXT L–B TEST Note: This test can only be performed by Field or Manufacturing people. This test checks the accessibility of the Super–IO chip. It saves and restores used registers. This test is not performed at power on. Entry Parameters Parameters Name...

  • Page 217

    IONIAN-SSGA Registers Test This test is performed by all the processors and it checks the accessibility from the processor to the IONIAN and SSGA chips. Following h/w parts are checked. 1. DCB ASIC 2. IONIAN ASIC 3. SSGA ASIC The following sub-tests are included under the IONIAN-SSGA Registers Test: IONIAN Registers Test This test operates on the DSC register, CONFIG register, Personalization register, Bus_Status register.

  • Page 218

    Walking 0 Address Test This test detects the address lines which are cut. Super I/O and UART Access Test This test checks the accessibility of the Super I/O chip from the processors. They don’t check the functional aspects of the Super I/O chip (this is done by the BUMP directly). The following sub-tests are available under this test: Super I/O UART 1 Access Test Specific values are written and read in the data register scratch...

  • Page 219: Cpu Test Group

    Initial Values Test This test checks the initial values of the IONIAN and SSGA ASICs. It is only run at PON time. SSGA Interrupt Registers Test This test writes and reads specific values from each of the interrupt registers. The values are then compared.

  • Page 220: Dcb And Memory Test Group

    in memory and in cache. Then it reads the second MB from cache and first MB from the memory. Level 2 Cache Data Test This test checks the validity of the static memory RAMs forming the Level 2 cache. It calculates the memory address available and then validates the Level 2 cache before writing 1 MB.

  • Page 221

    Walking 1 Data Test This test basically identifies if any data lines are stuck at level 0 or to any other data line. This test writes “1s among 0s” pattern on the cache line. Then it is read and compared. Walking 0 Data Test This test isolates the open lines among the data lines.

  • Page 222

    2. Connection of high order address lines between CPU cards and System Planar ASICs 3. Connection of high order address lines between System Planar ASICs and memory chips. This test consists of two sub-tests. Words manipulated / used are not restored at the end of the test.

  • Page 223

    Basic Main Memory Test This test is performed by all the processors and it checks the capability to access the main memory in all kinds of data formats. This test applies to one main memory location and the words used during the test are not restored. This test partially checks the DCB ASICs.

  • Page 224

    Main Memory Components Test This test is performed by all the processors to check all the main memory locations. From the h/w point of view, this test checks the memory chips mounted on the main memory cards. This test can be launched in two modes, as follows: 1.

  • Page 225

    ECC Data Lines Accessibility Test This test checks the accessiblity for all the data lines to the ECC memory banks, through SMC ASICs. The following h/w parts are checked by running this test. DCB ASICs SMC ASICs Connection of data lines between CPU daughter boards and MPB ASICs Connection of data lines between MPB ASICs and ECC memory chips.

  • Page 226

    ECC Memory Component Test This test is identical to the main memory components test but it is applied to the ECC memory components. Error Correction Mechanism Test This test checks the hardware mechanisms enabling the detection of and the correction of single bit errors when working with the main memory.

  • Page 227: Interrupt Tests Group

    Interrupt Tests Group These tests are performed by the BUMP as well as the processors. They are launched at Power On and under control of Off Line Test Monitor. They collectively check the interrupt system. The following tests are available under this group. BUMP To CPU Interrupt Test This test is performed jointly by the BUMP and the processor.

  • Page 228: Cpu Multiprocessor Test Group

    CPU MultiProcessor Test Group These tests are launched at Power-On and are also available under the control of the Off Line Tests monitor. These tests check the multi-processor mechanisms, atomic instructions, cache coherency, main memory sharing, and multi-resources sharing. The following tests are available under this group. Atomic Instructions Test This test checks the mechanisms enabling the protection of the content of the memory in case of use of some specific instructions, called “atomic instructions”.

  • Page 229

    instruction. This is issued by Processor 0 which is set to Global Copy Back mode. Caching is inhibited for Processor 1. Paradox Detection: DCBST not from Line Owner Here, Processor 1 is set to Local Copy Back mode. Memory coherency is enabled for Processor 0. This test verifies the incoherency introduced by the Local Copy Back.

  • Page 230

    Main Memory Sharing Test This test is launched by the BUMP and performed by all configured processors. It has a sub-test to check the capability of all the processors to access the main memory. The following h/w parts are checked during the process: 1.

  • Page 231: Appendix B. Modifying Systemguard Parameters

    Appendix B. Modifying SystemGuard Parameters Many SystemGuard parameters can be modified in several ways. Some can be modified using the SystemGuard Stand-By menu, others using the SystemGuard Maintenance menu, and others using the AIX diag or mpcfg commands or Diagnostic Service Aids. When you want to modify SystemGuard parameters, the method to use depends on the machine boot phase (stand-by, init, run-time).

  • Page 232

    Flag, Parameter and Keyword Default Values Name Default Value BUMP Console Power-On Command String Power Service Console Power-On Command String Blank (not set) BUMP Console Power-On Command flag Enabled Service Console Power-On Command flag Disabled Remote Authorization flag Disabled Autoservice IPL flag Disabled BUMP Console Present flag Enabled...

  • Page 233: Changing Flags And Parameters Under Aix Service Aids

    Changing Flags and Parameters Under AIX Service Aids The Service Aids are recommended to change the flags. The Service Aids can be entered using the diag command or by booting diagnostics in service mode. They display or change flag values using 0 (zero) for disabled and 1 (one) for enabled. The explanations that follow refer to the Service Aids.

  • Page 234: Systemguard Maintenance Menu

    SystemGuard Maintenance Menu Starting from the main maintenance menu: Enter 2 to enable the flag. Enter 3 to disable the flag. AIX Diag Command Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu: 1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option. 2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option. 3.

  • Page 235: Modifying Dial-in Phone Numbers

    Modifying Dial-In Phone Numbers These parameters can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or under AIX using the diag command. SystemGuard Maintenance Menu Starting from the main maintenance menu: 1. Enter 8 to set parameters. 2. Enter 3 for phone numbers. 3.

  • Page 236: Modifying The Electronic Mode Switch From Service Line Flag

    Modifying the Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag This flag can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or under AIX using the diag command. SystemGuard Maintenance Menu Starting from the main maintenance menu: 1. Enter 8 to set parameters. 2.

  • Page 237: Reloading The Flash Eeprom

    Reloading the Flash EEPROM Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM, which may be necessary when you install a new version of AIX for example. Only system administrators should perform this procedure. Prerequisites If the system is not yet booted, you need a firmware diskette containing the new version of the firmware to be loaded.

  • Page 238

    Operator Guide...

  • Page 239: Appendix C. Systemguard Remote Operation Configuration

    Appendix C. SystemGuard Remote Operation Configuration To use the remote operation capabilities of SystemGuard and also allow console mirroring, you must have flags, parameters and tty configurations properly enabled. Below, are tty0 and tty1 settings, sample modem files and all the parameters that are necessary to allow remote operations.

  • Page 240: Flags And Parameters Settings

    The configuration of the tty1 for the S2 port looks similar to the following: [TOP] [Entry Fields] tty1 TTY type TTY interface rs232 Description Asynchronous Terminal Status Available Location 00–00–S2–00 Parent adapter PORT number [s2] Enable LOGIN disable BAUD rate [9600] PARITY [none]...

  • Page 241

    Customer Hub Dial–Out (2) System Dial–In System Operator Voice The phone number in the Service Center Dial-Out field represents the U.S IBM RETAIN number. It should be set as appropriate to the geography. Other phone numbers should be provided based on account-related information.

  • Page 242: Modem Configuration Files

    This file is also necessary to use the mirroring capabilities supported by the AIX mirrord daemon. The IBM 7851 modem has been tested. Following, are the corresponding configuration files. These files have a very specific format. You can use either of these files as a template to build a configuration file for another model of modem.

  • Page 243

    disconnect: send ”+++ATH0\r” delay 2 send ”ATQ1V0E0\r” delay 2 done condin: send ”AT&F1E0V0Q0S0=2\r” expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n” send ”ATQ1&W0\r” # (there can be no reply) done condwait: send ”AT&F1V0E0Q0S0=2&W0\r” expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n” done waitcall: ignore ”2\r” timeout none expect ”2\r” timeout 10 expect ”17\r”...

  • Page 244: Initializing A Modem

    Initializing a Modem Once flags, parameters and configurations have been enabled, the modem can be initialized to accept incoming calls. This can be done in the following manner: Place the System Key to Normal. Issue a ps –ef|grep mirrord command. Obtain mirrord process ID.

  • Page 245: Appendix D: Supplies

    Appendix D: Supplies This appendix contains a list of supplies and the part numbers needed to order them. Part Number Description 21F8593 8-mm Cleaning Tape Cartridge 21F8595 8-mm Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack) 21F8763 4-mm Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack) 21F8758 4-mm DDS IIII Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack) 21F8762 4-mm DDS IIII Diagnostic Cartridge 8191160...

  • Page 246: Ordering Keys

    Ordering Keys For protection against unauthorized key duplication, the key mode switch is equipped with a Medeco high-security lock. Keys for this lock are a factory restricted series, and duplicate keys are not available through normal commercial channels. The metal code tag supplied with your original keys authorizes you to purchase additional keys direct from the Medeco factory.

  • Page 247: Key Reorder Form

    Key Reorder Form This form, when accompanied by the metal code tag supplied with the original keys, represents an authorized order for additional factory keys. Please indicate the quantity required and enclose a check or money order for the appropriate amount. Number of keys required________ Please Type or Print Your Return Address Name__________________________________________________________________...

  • Page 248

    Operator Guide...

  • Page 249: Appendix E. Operator Panel Display Numbers

    Appendix E. Operator Panel Display Numbers This appendix contains lists of the various numbers and characters that may be displayed in the three-digit display. The numbers and characters are divided into two broad categories. The first grouping is those that track power-on testing of the system unit; the second group provides information about messages that follow a flashing 888 number.

  • Page 250

    A checkstop condition occurred during the PON. System logic-generated checkstop (Model 250 only). Graphics-generated checkstop (Model 250). PON logout completed. PON did not start. Operator Guide...

  • Page 251: Power-on Self-test (post) Indicators

    Power-On Self-Test (POST) Indicators L2 cache POST error. (The display shows a solid 20c for 5 seconds.) L2 cache is not detected. (The display shows a solid 21c for 2 seconds.) Attempting a normal mode IPL from FDDI specified in NVRAM IPL device list.

  • Page 252

    Attempting a Normal mode IPL from adapter feature ROM specified in IPL ROM Device List. Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Ethernet specified in IPL ROM Device List. Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Standard I/O planar-attached devices specified in ROM Default Device List. Attempting a Normal mode IPL from SCSI-attached devices specified in IPL ROM Default Device List.

  • Page 253

    Information is being displayed on the display console. No supported local system display adapter was found. Keyboard not detected as being connected to the system’s keyboard port. Attempting a Normal mode IPL from adapter feature ROM specified in the NVRAM Device List. Stalled state - the system is unable to IPL.

  • Page 254: Configuration Program Indicators

    Flash Utility ROM RAM POST memory configuration error or no memory found (irrecoverable). Flash Utility ROM RAM POST failure (irrecoverable). Flash Utility ROM Power status register failed (irrecoverable). Flash Utility ROM detected a low voltage condition. Flash Utility ROM RAM POST is looking for good memory. Flash Utility ROM RAM POST bit map is being generated.

  • Page 255

    The configuration manager is unable to update ODM data (irrecoverable error). The program savebase returned an error. The configuration manager is unable to access the PdAt object class (irrecoverable error). There is not enough memory to continue (malloc failure); irrecoverable error.

  • Page 256

    POWER GXT150M graphics adapter being identified or configured. Unknown adapter being identified or configured. Graphics slot bus configuration is executing. The IBM ARTIC960 device is being configured. A video capture adapter is being configured. The Ultimedia Services audio adapter is being configured. This LED displays briefly on the panel.

  • Page 257

    Unknown disk being identified or configured. Unknown CD-ROM being identified or configured. Unknown tape drive being identified or configured. Unknown display adapter being identified or configured. Unknown input device being identified or configured. Unknown async device being identified or configured. Parallel printer being identified or configured.

  • Page 258

    3270 Host Connection Program/6000 connection being identified or configured. Portmaster Adapter/A being identified or configured. FSLA adapter being identified or configured. 5085/5086/5088 adapter being identified or configured. FDDI adapter being identified or configured. Optical adapter being identified or configured. Block Multiplexer Channel Adapter being identified or configured. ESCON Channel Adapter or emulator being identified or configured.

  • Page 259

    Three-button mouse being identified or configured. 5083 tablet being identified or configured. 5083 tablet being identified or configured. Standard speaker being identified or configured. Dials being identified or configured. Lighted program function keys (LPFK) being identified or configured. IP router being identified or configured. Async planar being identified or configured.

  • Page 260: Diagnostic Load Progress Indicators

    Diagnostic Load Progress Indicators The following dump progress indicators, or dump status codes, are part of a Type 102 message. Note: When a lowercase c is listed, it displays in the lower half of the seven-segment character position. The leftmost position is blank on the following codes. The dump completed successfully.

  • Page 261: Appendix F. System Power States

    Appendix F. System Power States The state of the system is dependant on the condition of four variable conditions that effect how the system IPLs or shutsdown. The four conditions are: the position of the Power-on button This button has two positions. It can be pressed in to the On position (position for turning the power on), or it can be in the out or Off position.

  • Page 262: Main_standby

    If the command sbb is entered on the BUMP console, and the system key is in the Normal position, the system goes to the SBB_ECMD state. If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position, the system sets the was_shutdown status to false.

  • Page 263: Ipl

    If the power_fault status is false, the system attempts to power on. If the system then detects a power fault, the power_fault status is set to true. The system displays an operator panel LCD error message, and the system goes to the MAIN_STANDBY status. If no power fault is detected, the system goes to the IPL state.

  • Page 264: How To Turn System Power On Using The Power-on Button

    If the system power does not turn on, the Power-on button may be in the off position. Go to the system unit and press the Power-on button (only press the button once), If the system power still does not turn on there may be an earlier fault condition. Remove main power from the system unit, wait 30 seconds, and restore main power.

  • Page 265: Glossary: Special Terms Used In Systemguard

    Glossary: Special Terms Used in SystemGuard BP (back plane). A panel located in the system I/O card. A card which handles system I/O and unit and used to interconnect boards and devices. directly connects to the system planar. BIST (built in self-test). Tests performed during IPL (initial program load).

  • Page 266

    which can be removed without turning the power off such as the EEPROM, the flash EEPROM, and the to the entire system). non-volatile RAM. ROS (read-only storage). Storage which does not SSF (system service facility). See SystemGuard. support writing. SYSID (system identification). Identifies part of SCSI (small computer system interface).

  • Page 267: Index

    Index Symbols types cleaning cartridge, 2-35 data cartridge, 2-35 -48 V dc rack diagnostic cartridge, 2-35 containing CPU enclosure, 6-1 write-protect tab, setting, 2-36 description, 6-1 power distribution panel, 6-2 4 mm tape drive power distribution panel, 6-2 tape cartridge setting the write-protect tab, 2-36 -48 V dc system unit, power cables, 6-3 types, 2-35...

  • Page 268

    tape cartridge attributes required, 8-4 setting the write-protect tab, 2-26 attributes, communication, 8-5 types, 2-25 attributes, keyboard, 8-6 using, 5.0GB drive, 2-29 attributes, printer, 8-6 AutoserviceIPL Flag, 3-36 about this book, xv AC rack, 4-1 cable path, 4-12 backup/restore media service aid, 9-4 containing a PDB battery backup unit (BBU).

  • Page 269

    emergency eject hole, 2-15 crash, crash codes, 8-13 headphone jack, 2-15 creating cover labels, 4-16 loading the disc, 2-16 Customer Maintenance Password, 3-37 status light, 2-15 unload button, 2-15 unloading, 2-17 volume control, 2-15 CD-ROM drive, using, 2-13 data efficiency, tape cartridge, 2-27 change configuration or vital product data service DC rack, manually starting, 7-2 aid, 9-9...

  • Page 270

    disk based diagnostic update service aid, 9-6 disk drive, location, 4-8 E-Key. See electronic mode switch disk maintenance service aid, 9-6 electronic key. See electronic mode switch disk media service aid, 9-7 electronic mode switch, 2-6 disk to disk copy service aid, 9-6 Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag, diskette 3-37...

  • Page 271

    erasure, 4 mm data cartridge, 2-37 erasure, 8 mm data cartridge, 2-27 key mode switch external device container, 4-2 normal IPL, 2-4 normal position, 2-3, 2-4 operations, 2-4 reset button, 2-5 secure position, 2-3, 2-5 FastIPL Flag, 3-36 service IPL, 2-4 flash EEPROM, reloading, B-7 service position, 2-3, 2-5 setting, 2-3, 7-1...

  • Page 272

    location code table, SCSI and non-SCSI devices, key mode switch, 2-3 4-19 normal position, 2-4 operator controls, 2-2 location identification labels, 4-13 key mode switch, 2-2 locations operator panel display, 2-2 adapters, 1-3 power button, 2-2, 2-9 bezel door, opened, 1-2 power light, 2-2, 2-9 front view with bezel door closed, 1-2 reset/scroll button, 2-2...

  • Page 273

    9-15 7015 Model R00 Rack Installation and Service Guide, xv service aids, 9-1, 9-7 7015 Model R30 CPU Enclosure Service Guide, AIX shell prompt service aid, 9-4 backup/restore media service aid, 9-4 9348 Customer Information, xv...

  • Page 274

    display and change diagnostic test list service 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, 2-30 aid, 9-10 status light, 1/4-inch tape drive, 2-19 display diagnostic run time options task, 9-2 status lights display or change configuration or vital product 4.0 GB 4 mm tape drive, 2-38 data, 9-9 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, 2-29 display or change key modes, 9-11...

  • Page 275

    set up console mirroring, 3-44 default values, B-1 set up dial-out feature, 3-46 stand-by menu, 3-12 components, 3-2 display configuration, 3-13 console mirroring, 3-44 I2C maintenance, 3-19 consoles, 3-4 set configuration, 3-17 dial-in phone numbers, modifying, B-5 set flags, 3-15 dial-out authorization flag, modifying, B-4 set unit number, 3-16 dial-out phone numbers, modifying, B-5...

  • Page 276

    4 mm 8 mm tape cartridge, 2-32 4.0 gigabyte, 2-38 diskette, 2-12 general information, 2-34 update disk based diagnostic task, 9-6 8 mm, 5.0GB drive, 2-29 UPS (uninterruptible power source), 4-5 tape drive, 4.0GB 4 mm, general information, 2-34 ut0.9ul(eystem verifndicati È(produreng)TjÏÈ0.9071 -1.1735 TDÏÈ-0. tape drive, 4GB 4 mm, recommendations, 2-35 unloadied diagnostid proamons0 2-3 tape drive, 5.0GB 8 mm, general information, 2-25...

This manual also for:

R40, R50

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