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User's Guide
HP 8712ET and HP 8714ET
RF Network Analyzers
HP Part No. 08714-90011
Printed in USA
Print Date: October 1999
Supersedes: November 1998
© Copyright 1998, 1999 Hewlett-Packard Company

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   Summary of Contents for HP HP 8712ET

  • Page 1 User’s Guide HP 8712ET and HP 8714ET RF Network Analyzers HP Part No. 08714-90011 Printed in USA Print Date: October 1999 Supersedes: November 1998 © Copyright 1998, 1999 Hewlett-Packard Company...
  • Page 2 Notice The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
  • Page 3 Firmware Revision This manual documents analyzers with firmware revisions E.06.00 and above. Acknowledgments Lotus® 1-2-3® are U.S. registered trademarks of Lotus Development Corporation. Windows®, Word97®, and Excel97® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corp. Portions of the software include source code from the Info–ZIP group. This code is freely available on the Internet by anonymous ftp asftp.uu.net:/pub/archiving/zip/unzip51/.tar.Z, and from CompuServe asunz51.zip in the IBMPRO forum, library 10, (data compression).
  • Page 4 Introducing the Analyzer The HP 8712ET and HP 8714ET are easy-to-use RF network analyzers optimized for production measurements of reflection and transmission parameters. The instrument integrates an RF synthesized source, transmission/reflection test set, multi-mode receivers, and display in one compact box.
  • Page 5 How to Use This Guide The first 6 chapters of this guide explain how to perform measurements, calibrate the instrument, and use the most common instrument functions. Chapters 7 through 11 are reference material. Use these chapters to look up information such as front panel features, specific key functions, and specifications.
  • Page 6 Supplement provides information on how to configure and control test systems for automation of test processes. The Programmer’s Guide provides programming information including HP-IB and SCPI command references, as well as short programming examples. The Example Programs Guide provides a tutorial...
  • Page 7 HP Instrument BASIC, and includes a language reference. The HP Instrument BASIC User’s Handbook Supplement shows how to use HP Instrument BASIC to program the analyzer. The Option 100 Fault Location and Structural Return Loss Measurements User’s Guide Supplement provides theory and measurement examples for making fault location and SRL measurements.
  • Page 8 viii ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Contents 1. Installing the Analyzer Introduction ............1-2 Step 1.
  • Page 10 Contents BEGIN Key Overview ..........3-11 Using the BEGIN Key to Configure Measurements .
  • Page 11 Contents 4. Using Instrument Functions Introduction ............4-2 Using Markers .
  • Page 12 To Turn Off Spur Avoidance ..........5-8 To Avoid Frequency Bandcrossings (HP 8714ET only) ......5-8 Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range.
  • Page 13 Contents Reducing Mismatch Errors when Measuring Both Reflection and Transmission . 5-16 Compensating for Phase Shift in Measurement Setups ..... . . 5-17 Port Extensions.
  • Page 14 Contents 7. Front/Rear Panel Introduction ............7-2 Connectors .
  • Page 15 Contents T ..............8-89 U .
  • Page 16 Contents Notice for Germany: Noise Declaration ........10-6 Declaration of Conformity .
  • Page 17: Installing The Analyzer

    Installing the Analyzer ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 18: Introduction

    Installing the Analyzer Introduction Introduction This chapter will guide you through the four steps needed to correctly and safely install your network analyzer. The four steps are: • “Step 1. Check the Shipment” on page 1-3 • “Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements” on page 1-4 •...
  • Page 19: Step 1. Check The Shipment

    Installing the Analyzer Step 1. Check the Shipment Step 1. Check the Shipment After you have unpacked your instrument, it is recommended that you keep the packaging materials so they may be used if your instrument should need to be returned for maintenance or repair. The packaging material is designed to protect the analyzer from damage NOTE that can happen during shipping.
  • Page 20: Step 2. Meet Electrical And Environmental Requirements

    Installing the Analyzer Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements 1. Set the line voltage selector to the position that corresponds to the ac power source you will be using. CAUTION Before switching on this instrument, make sure that the line voltage selector switch is set to the voltage of the mains supply and the correct fuse (T 5 A 250 V) is installed.
  • Page 21 Installing the Analyzer Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements 2. Ensure the available ac power source meets the following requirements: Nominal AC Line Power Setting 115 V 90 to 132 Vac (47 to 63 Hz) 230 V 198 to 264 Vac (47 to 63 Hz) If the ac line voltage does not fall within these ranges, an autotransformer that provides third-wire continuity to ground should be used.
  • Page 22 Installing the Analyzer Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements 4. Verify that the power cable is not damaged, and that the power source outlet provides a protective earth ground contact. Note that the following illustration depicts only one type of power source outlet. Refer to Figure 7-12 on page 7-23 to see the different types of power...
  • Page 23 Installing the Analyzer Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements WARNING If this instrument is to be energized via an external autotransformer for voltage reduction, make sure that its common terminal is connected to a neutral (earthed pole) of the power supply.
  • Page 24 Step 2. Meet Electrical and Environmental Requirements 8. Set up a static-safe workstation. Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage or destroy components. • table mat with earth ground wire: HP part number 9300-0797 • wrist-strap cord with 1 Meg Ohm resistor: HP part number 9300-0980 • wrist-strap: HP part number 9300-1367 •...
  • Page 25: Step 3. Check The Analyzer Operation

    1. Turn on the line switch of the analyzer. After approximately 30 seconds, a display box should appear on the screen with the following information: • the model number of your analyzer (either HP 8712ET or HP 8714ET) • the firmware revision •...
  • Page 26: Step 4. Configure The Analyzer

    Installing the Analyzer Step 4. Configure the Analyzer Step 4. Configure the Analyzer You can begin making measurements by simply connecting your analyzer to an appropriate power source and turning it on. This section, however, will explain how to connect common peripherals and controllers, and how to install your analyzer into a rack system.
  • Page 27: Connecting Peripherals And Controllers

    Refer to Figure 1-4: • The HP-IB port is for use with computers and peripherals (printers, plotters, etc.). • The parallel and RS-232 (serial) ports are also for peripherals. The parallel and serial ports can also be programmed via IBASIC for general I/O control.
  • Page 28 Interface User’s Guide Supplement for information on how to use your analyzer in a LAN. HP-IB An HP-IB system may be connected in any configuration as long as the Connections following rules are observed: • The total number of devices is less than or equal to 15.
  • Page 29 Installing the Analyzer Step 4. Configure the Analyzer Figure 1-5 HP-IB Connection Configurations Table 1-1 Maximum HP-IB Cable Lengths Maximum HP-IB Cable Instruments/Peripherals Length between Each Pair in System of Devices Fifteen (max) 20 m (total) ET User’s Guide 1-13...
  • Page 30 To change the recognized address, press Print/Plot HP-IB Addr number Enter Only one hardcopy HP-IB address can be set at a time. Changing the NOTE printer address, for example, changes the plotter to the same address. 1-14 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 31 Printer: Press HARDCOPY Select Copy Port . Use the entry controls to highlight HP LaserJet PCL5/6 PCL5 LAN, and press Select . If the printer IP address at the top of the screen is incorrect, press LAN Printr IP Addr to enter the correct IP address.
  • Page 32: Installing The Analyzer In A Rack

    (handles) only. This rack mount kit allows you to mount the analyzer with or without handles.To install the network analyzer in an HP 85043D rack, follow the instructions in the rack manual.
  • Page 33: Preventive Maintenance

    Installing the Analyzer Preventive Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance consists of two tasks. It should be performed at least every six months—more often if the instrument is used daily on a production line or in a harsh environment. Use a soft cloth and, if necessary, a mild cleaning solution. Clean the CRT Visually inspect the front panel connectors.
  • Page 34 Installing the Analyzer Preventive Maintenance 1-18 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 35: Getting Started

    Getting Started ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 36: Introduction

    Getting Started Introduction Introduction The HP 8712ET and HP 8714ET are easy-to-use, fully integrated RF component test systems.Each instrument includes a synthesized source, a wide dynamic range receiver, and a built-in test set. Controls are grouped by functional block, and settings are displayed on the instrument screen.
  • Page 37: Front Panel Tour

    6 SYSTEM The system keys control system level functions. These include instrument preset, save/recall, and hardcopy output. HP-IB parameters and IBASIC are also controlled with these system keys. 7 The Numeric Keypad Use the number keys to enter a specific numeric value for a chosen parameter. Use the...
  • Page 38: Entering Measurement Parameters

    Getting Started Entering Measurement Parameters Entering Measurement Parameters This section describes how to input measurement parameter information into the network analyzer. NOTE When entering parameters, you can use the numeric key pad, as described in each example, or you can use the keys or the front panel knob to enter data.
  • Page 39 When the Factory Preset key is pressed, the following major default conditions apply: Frequency range (HP 8712ET) 0.3 to 1300 MHz Frequency range (HP 8714ET) 0.3 to 3000 MHz Power level...
  • Page 40: Entering Frequency Range

    Getting Started Entering Measurement Parameters 1. Press the key to access the frequency softkey menu. Entering FREQ Frequency Range 2. To change the low end of the frequency range to 10 MHz, press Start 3. To change the high end of the frequency range to 900 MHz, press Stop 4.
  • Page 41: Entering Active Measurement Channel And Measurement Type

    Getting Started Entering Measurement Parameters Figure 2-3 Reference Positions Entering Active keys allow you to choose which MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Measurement measurement channel is active, and measurement parameters for that Channel and channel. When a particular measurement channel is active, its display is Measurement Type brighter than the inactive channel, and any changes made to measurement parameters will affect only the active measurement...
  • Page 42: Viewing Measurement Channels

    Getting Started Entering Measurement Parameters Figure 2-4 Both Measurement Channels Active 3. To view only the measurement channel 2 reflection measurement, Viewing Measurement press MEAS 1 Meas OFF Channels 4. To view both measurement channels again, press MEAS 1 5. To view both measurement channels separately on a split screen, More Display Split Disp FULL split press DISPLAY...
  • Page 43 Getting Started Entering Measurement Parameters Figure 2-5 Split Display You have now learned how to enter common measurement parameters and how to manipulate the display for optimum viewing of your measurement. You can now proceed on to performing the operator's check, or refer to Chapter 3, “Making Measurements,”...
  • Page 44: Performing The Operator's Check

    1.3 GHz and ≤0.75 dB of insertion loss from 1.3 to 3.0 GHz. • A known good load (> 40 dB return loss) that matches the test port impedance of your analyzer such as one from calibration kit HP 85032B/E (50 Ω) or HP 85036B/E (75 Ω). 2-10 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 45: Make A Transmission Measurement

    4. Press Default Response 5. Verify that the data trace falls within ±0.5 dB of 0 dB. See Figure 2-7 for a typical HP 8714ET result. The HP 8712ET should look similar, but end at 1300 MHz. ET User’s Guide 2-11...
  • Page 46 Getting Started Performing the Operator's Check Figure 2-7 Verify Transmission Measurement 2-12 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 47: Make A Broadband Power Measurement

    (unless done in the previous measurement). 4. Verify that the data trace is within ±2 dB of 0 dBm. See Figure 2-8 a typical HP 8714ET result. The HP 8712ET should look similar, but end at 1300 MHz. Figure 2-8 Verify Broadband Power Measurement ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 48: Make A Reflection Measurement

    POWER 4. Press Default 1-Port 5. Verify that the data trace falls completely below −16 dB. See Figure 2-9 for a typical HP 8714ET result. The HP 8712ET should look similar, but end at 1300 MHz. 2-14 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 49 Getting Started Performing the Operator's Check Figure 2-9 Verify Reflection Measurement 6. Disconnect the cable and connect a known good load to the RF OUT port as shown in Figure 2-10. ET User’s Guide 2-15...
  • Page 50 Getting Started Performing the Operator's Check Figure 2-10 Connect the Load 7. Verify that the data trace falls below −30 dB. If the data trace is off the screen, press SCALE Reference Level and the until the trace moves up onto the screen. This concludes the operator's check.
  • Page 51: If The Analyzer Fails The Operator's Check

    Getting Started Performing the Operator's Check If the Analyzer Fails the Operator's Check First, repeat the operator's check using a different cable and load to eliminate these as a possible cause of failure. If your analyzer does not meet the criteria in the operator's check, your analyzer may need adjustment or servicing.
  • Page 52 Getting Started Performing the Operator's Check 2-18 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 53: Making Measurements

    Making Measurements ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 54: Introduction

    Making Measurements Introduction Introduction This chapter provides an overview of basic network analyzer measurement theory, a section explaining the typical measurement sequence, a segment describing the use of the key, and detailed BEGIN examples of the following measurements: • “Measuring Transmission Response” on page 3-15 •...
  • Page 55: Measuring Devices With Your Network Analyzer

    Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer This section provides a basic overview of how the network analyzer measures devices. The analyzer has an RF signal source that produces an incident signal that is used as a stimulus to the device under test. Your device responds by reflecting a portion of the incident signal and transmitting the remaining signal.
  • Page 56 Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer Figure 3-2 Simplified Block Diagram Refer to Figure 3-3 for the following discussion. The network analyzer receiver has two signal detection modes: • broadband detection mode • narrowband detection mode There are two internal broadband detectors: B* and R*. External broadband detectors can also be used when connected to the X and Y ports on the rear panel of the analyzer.
  • Page 57 Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer When the network analyzer is in the narrowband detection mode, the receiver is tuned to the source frequency. This technique provides greater dynamic range by decreasing the receiver's bandwidth. Figure 3-3 shows receiver B as the narrowband detection input for the transmitted signal, and receiver R as the narrowband detection input for the reference signal.
  • Page 58 Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer Figure 3-3 Block Diagram ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 59: Attenuation And Amplification In A Measurement Setup

    Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer The following table shows the correlation between different types of measurements, input channels, and signals. Measurement Detection Mode Input Channels Input Signals Transmission Narrowband transmitted/incident Reflection Narrowband reflected/incident Power Broadband transmitted Conversion Loss Broadband B*/R* transmitted/incident...
  • Page 60: When To Change The System Impedance

    Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer When to Use Amplification • For accurate measurements, amplification may be needed on the analyzer's RF OUT port. Use amplification when your test device requires input power that exceeds the analyzer's maximum specified output power.
  • Page 61: The Typical Measurement Sequence

    Making Measurements Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer The Typical Measurement Sequence A typical measurement consists of performing four major steps: The easiest way to set up the analyzer's parameters for a simple Step 1. Enter the Measurement measurement is to use the key.
  • Page 62: Using The Begin Key To Make Measurements

    Making Measurements Using the BEGIN Key to Make Measurements Using the BEGIN Key to Make Measurements Figure 3-4 The BEGIN Key key allows you to quickly and easily configure the analyzer BEGIN (from the condition) to measure the following: PRESET •...
  • Page 63: Begin Key Overview

    Making Measurements Using the BEGIN Key to Make Measurements BEGIN Key Overview key sets up a generic instrument state for the testing of BEGIN various types of devices. key has two different behaviors, depending on whether BEGIN you are selecting a new device type, or a new measurement type. When you use the key to select a new device type and Selecting a New...
  • Page 64: Using The Begin Key To Configure Measurements

    Making Measurements Using the BEGIN Key to Make Measurements BEGIN key is designed to work when measurement channel 1 is BEGIN and Measurement active. However, it does change the mode of measurement channel 2 as Channels well. If measurement channel 2 is active when the key is used to BEGIN select a new device type, measurement channel 2 is turned off, and...
  • Page 65 0.300 MHz to 0.300 MHz to 10 MHz to 10 MHz to 1300 MHz 1300 MHz 1300 MHz 1300 MHz Range (HP 8712ET) Frequency 0.300 MHz to 0.300 MHz to 10 MHz to 10 MHz to 3000 MHz 3000 MHz 3000 MHz...
  • Page 66: Autost files

    Making Measurements Using the BEGIN Key to Make Measurements AUTOST files When the analyzer's power is turned on, it first checks for an IBASIC autostart file (AUTOSTART.BAS) on the non-volatile RAM disk and then on the 3.5” disk. If found, the file is loaded and run. This feature simplifies the task of turning on an automated test station at the beginning of a working day or test session.
  • Page 67: Measuring Transmission Response

    Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Measuring Transmission Response This section uses an example measurement to describe how to calibrate for and make a basic transmission response measurement. This example uses an enhanced response calibration. See the table below for a list of all possible calibration choices for a transmission response measurement.
  • Page 68: Perform An Enhanced Response Calibration

    For Use For Use Cal Kit Model Connector Impedance with Male with Female Number Type Test Ports Test Ports 75 Ω HP 85039B type-F 75 Ω HP 85036B type-N 75 Ω HP 85036E type-N 50 Ω HP 85032B type-N 50 Ω...
  • Page 69 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response NOTE By convention, cal kit labels in the analyzer indicate the sex of the port with which they are used. For example, the default cal kit for the analyzer is type-N female because the front panel RF ports are female (the calibration standards, in turn, have male connectors).
  • Page 70 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Open, Short, Load Connections Through-Cable Connection 3. Press Measure Standard after connecting each standard. 4. The analyzer will measure each standard and then calculate the new calibration coefficients. The message "Calibration complete." will appear for a few seconds when the analyzer is done calculating the new error correction array.
  • Page 71 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Connect the DUT. Figure 3-5 Equipment Setup for a Transmission Response Measurement ET User’s Guide 3-19...
  • Page 72 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response View and Interpret the Transmission Measurement Results. 1. To view the entire measurement trace on the display, press SCALE Autoscale 2. To interpret the transmission measurement, refer to Figure 3-6, “Example of a Transmission Response Measurement Display,” or your analyzer's display if you are making this measurement on your instrument.
  • Page 73 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Figure 3-6 Example of a Transmission Response Measurement Display 5. See “Using Markers” on page 4-3 for more detailed information on using markers to interpret measurements. For the measurement to be valid, input signals must fall within the NOTE dynamic range of the analyzer.
  • Page 74 (Z ), insertion loss, and electrical delay. The adapters in most HP calibration kits have matched electrical lengths, even if the physical lengths appear different. For analyzers with 50 ohm input impedance only: in the 50 ohm type-N...
  • Page 75 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response 4. Press Prior Menu Prior Menu Enhanced Response 5. When the instrument prompts you to connect a through cable, connect the TRANSMISSION port test cable to adapter A on the REFLECTION port as shown in Figure 3-7.
  • Page 76 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Figure 3-8 Open, Short, Load Connections 8. Press Measure Standard after connecting each standard. 9. The analyzer will measure each standard and then calculate the new calibration coefficients. The message "Calibration complete." will appear for a few seconds when the analyzer is done calculating the new error correction array.
  • Page 77 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Connect the DUT. 10. Measure the test device with adapter B in place as shown in Figure 3-9. Figure 3-9 Equipment Setup for a Transmission Response Measurement of a Noninsertable Two-Port Device ET User’s Guide 3-25...
  • Page 78 NOTE For analyzers with 50 ohm input impedance only: in the 50 ohm type-N calibration kit (HP 85032B), there are four equal adapters: two APC-7-to-type-N(f), and two APC-7-to-type-N(m). To create the adapter in the following example, connect two APC-7-to-type-N(f) adapters.
  • Page 79 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Figure 3-10 Short Connection to the Adapter 7. Select the delay format for your measurement by pressing FORMAT Delay 8. Press to automatically select marker 1 as the active MARKER marker. Position marker 1 to the left edge of the measurement trace. 9.
  • Page 80 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response 13. Determine the offset delay of the calibration short: • Press Operating Parameters SYSTEM OPTIONS • Press Next Screen until the Cal Kit screen is displayed. • In the “CAL KIT: Type N(m)” display, find the numeric value for the delay of the short.
  • Page 81 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response 20. When the instrument prompts you, connect three standards (open, short, and load) to the REFLECTION port test cable as shown in Figure 3-11. 21. Press Measure Standard after connecting each standard. Figure 3-11 Open, Short, Load Connections ET User’s Guide 3-29...
  • Page 82 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response 22. When the instrument prompts you to connect a through cable, insert the female-to-female adapter between the test cables connected to the REFLECTION port and the TRANSMISSION port as shown in Figure 3-12. Press Measure Standard Figure 3-12 Through-Cable Connection 23.
  • Page 83 Making Measurements Measuring Transmission Response Connect the DUT. 25. Measure the test device using the setup shown in Figure 3-13. Figure 3-13 Equipment Setup for a Transmission Response Measurement of a Type-N(f) Two-Port Noninsertable Device ET User’s Guide 3-31...
  • Page 84: Measuring Reflection Response

    Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response Measuring Reflection Response This section uses an example measurement to describe how to calibrate for and make a basic reflection response measurement. In this example, a user-defined one-port calibration is used. See the table below for a list of all possible calibration choices for a reflection response measurement.
  • Page 85: Perform A One-port Reflection Calibration

    For Use For Use Cal Kit Model Connector Impedance with Male with Female Number Type Test Ports Test Ports 75 Ω HP 85039B type-F 75 Ω HP 85036B type-N 75 Ω HP 85036E type-N 50 Ω HP 85032B type-N 50 Ω...
  • Page 86 Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response NOTE By convention, cal kit labels in the analyzer indicate the sex of the port with which they are used. For example, the default cal kit for the analyzer is type-N female because the front panel RF ports are female (the calibration standards, in turn, have male connectors).
  • Page 87: Connect The Dut

    Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response NOTE Changing sweep frequencies (and other source parameters) may affect your calibration. See Chapter 6 for more information. Connect the DUT Figure 3-15 Equipment Setup for a Reflection Measurement of a Two-Port Device NOTE If you connect the DUT between both analyzer ports, it is recommended that you use a 10 dB pad on the output of the DUT to improve measurement accuracy.
  • Page 88 Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response Figure 3-16 Equipment Setup for a Reflection Measurement of a One-Port Device 3-36 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 89: View And Interpret The Reflection Measurement Results

    Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response View and Interpret the Reflection Measurement Results 1. To view the entire measurement trace on the display, press SCALE Autoscale 2. To interpret the reflection measurement, refer to Figure 3-17, “Example of a Reflection Measurement Display,” or your analyzer's display if you are making this measurement on your instrument.
  • Page 90 Making Measurements Measuring Reflection Response Figure 3-17 Example of a Reflection Measurement Display 3. To quickly determine the filter's return loss, press MARKER then use the front panel knob, the keys, or the numeric keypad to read the value of return loss at the desired frequency. 4.
  • Page 91: Making A Power Measurement Using Broadband Detection

    Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection Power measurements can be made using either narrowband or broadband detection. The example in this section is of a broadband power measurement. If you are only interested in the output power of your device at the same frequency as the analyzer's source, you can select Detection Options...
  • Page 92: Enter The Measurement Parameters

    Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection Enter the Measurement Parameters Press the following keys on the analyzer: PRESET User Preset Factory Preset MEAS 1 More Power NOTE This example measurement uses the default instrument parameters for a power measurement. If your particular power measurement requires different parameters (such as source power level, number of data points, and sweep time), enter them now.
  • Page 93: Perform A Normalization Calibration

    Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection Perform a Normalization Calibration Normalization is the simplest type of calibration. The analyzer stores a measurement trace into memory and divides subsequent measurements by the stored data to remove unwanted frequency response errors. This calibration is used for the power measurement to remove the insertion-loss error of the test cable.
  • Page 94: Connect The Dut

    Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection 4. Insert the amplifier as shown in Figure 3-19. Connect the DUT Figure 3-19 Equipment Setup for a Power Measurement 3-42 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 95: View And Interpret The Power Measurement Results

    Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection View and Interpret the Power Measurement Results Autoscale 1. To view the measurement trace, press SCALE 2. To interpret the power measurement, refer to Figure 3-20 or your analyzer's display if you are making this measurement on your instrument.
  • Page 96 Making Measurements Making a Power Measurement using Broadband Detection Figure 3-20 Example of a Power Measurement CAUTION If the analyzer's RF output power level is set to higher than the specified output power for your analyzer, the source could go unleveled. See Chapter 9, “Specifications,”...
  • Page 97: Measuring Conversion Loss

    Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss Measuring Conversion Loss Conversion loss is the ratio of IF output power to RF input power expressed in dB. This section uses an example measurement to describe how to measure the conversion loss of a broadband mixer. When characterizing a device's conversion loss, the analyzer uses broadband detection to compare the transmitted signal (B*) to the reference signal (R*).
  • Page 98: Enter The Measurement Parameters

    Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss Inserting a 700 MHz bandpass filter in the measurement setup removes the unwanted signals at 200 MHz, 900 MHz, and 1100 MHz, providing an accurate measurement of the desired IF signal at 700 MHz. In the following example, the conversion loss of a mixer will be measured with RF input frequencies over a 15 MHz span centered at 900 MHz.
  • Page 99 Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss Figure 3-22 Through-Cable Connection 2. Set the following frequency parameters: FREQ Center Span This sets the analyzer frequency range to sweep over the passband of the IF filter (700 MHz). 3. Press Normalize Normalize on OFF DISPLAY This stores the filter response passband into memory, and sets up a normalized trace so that the filter response magnitude is removed...
  • Page 100: Connect The Dut

    Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss Connect the DUT Figure 3-23 Equipment Setup for a Conversion Loss Measurement 3-48 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 101: View And Interpret The Conversion Loss Results

    Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss View and Interpret the Conversion Loss Results 1. If necessary to view the measurement trace, press SCALE Autoscale 2. To interpret the conversion loss measurement, refer to Figure 3-24 your analyzer's display if you are making this measurement on your instrument.
  • Page 102 Making Measurements Measuring Conversion Loss Figure 3-24 Example of a Conversion Loss Measurement For the measurement to be valid, input signals must fall within the NOTE dynamic range and frequency range of the analyzer. See Chapter 5 techniques to increase the dynamic range of the analyzer. 3-50 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 103: Making Measurements With The Auxiliary Input

    Making Measurements Making Measurements with the Auxiliary Input Making Measurements with the Auxiliary Input The auxiliary input (AUX INPUT) is located on the rear panel of your analyzer. See Figure 7-2, “Analyzer Connectors—Rear Panel BNC Connectors,” Chapter 7. This input is designed to monitor sweep-related dc control signals of devices generally used in conjunction with the analyzer, such as a dc-biased amplifier, or a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO).
  • Page 104: Auxiliary Input Characteristics

    Making Measurements Making Measurements with the Auxiliary Input Auxiliary Input Characteristics Nominal impedance 10 kΩ ± (3% of the auxiliary Accuracy input reading + 20 mV) ±10 V Calibrated range ±15 V Usable range ±15 V Maximum input ±15.1 V Damage Level 3-52 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 105: Measuring Group Delay

    Making Measurements Measuring Group Delay Measuring Group Delay The phase linearity of many devices is specified in terms of group delay. This is especially true of telecommunications components and systems where phase distortion is critical. Group delay is a measure of transit time through the DUT as a function of frequency.
  • Page 106: Enter The Measurement Parameters

    Making Measurements Measuring Group Delay Enter the Measurement Parameters 1. Press the following keys on the analyzer: PRESET User Preset Factory Preset MEAS 1 Transmissn FORMAT Delay Center FREQ Span 2. Choose an aperture. When choosing an aperture, there is a trade-off between minimum apertures (giving more resolution but noisier responses) and maximum apertures (giving less resolution but smoother responses).
  • Page 107: Connect The Dut

    Making Measurements Measuring Group Delay Connect the DUT Figure 3-25 Equipment Setup for a Group Delay Measurement View and Interpret the Group Delay Measurement Results 1. To view the entire measurement trace on the display, press SCALE Autoscale 2. To interpret the group delay measurement, refer to Figure 3-26, “Example of a Phase-Derived Delay Measurement Display,”...
  • Page 108 Making Measurements Measuring Group Delay Figure 3-26 Example of a Phase-Derived Delay Measurement Display 5. See “Using Markers” on page 4-3 for more detailed information on using markers to interpret measurements. Phase-derived delay measurements can benefit from the noise reduction NOTE techniques discussed in Chapter...
  • Page 109: Measuring Impedance Using The Smith Chart

    Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart The amount of power reflected from a device is directly related to the impedances of both the device and the measuring system; for example, the value of the complex reflection coefficient Γ is equal to 0 only when the device impedance and the system impedance are exactly the same.
  • Page 110: Perform A One-port Reflection Calibration

    Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart Perform a One-Port Reflection Calibration Since impedance is a reflection measurement, you can perform a reflection calibration to improve accuracy. Refer to “Perform a One-Port Reflection Calibration” on page 3-33. Connect the DUT Figure 3-27 Equipment Setup for a Reflection Measurement of a Two-Port Device...
  • Page 111: View And Interpret The Impedance Measurement Results

    Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart Figure 3-28 Equipment Setup for a Reflection Measurement of a One-Port Device View and Interpret the Impedance Measurement Results 1. Press Smith Chart FORMAT 2. To interpret the impedance measurement, refer to Figure 3-29 for the following discussion:...
  • Page 112 Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart Figure 3-29 Interpreting the Smith Chart d. The magnitude and phase of the reflection coefficient, Γ, can be determined in the following two ways. i. Reading the Smith chart as follows: • ρ = |Γ| = the distance from the measurement point to the center point on the chart.
  • Page 113 Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart ii. Displaying the measurement in polar format and using the marker readout of magnitude and phase. To do so, press Polar FORMAT Figure 3-30 Determining the Magnitude and Phase of the Reflection Coefficient Figure 3-31, “Example of an Impedance Measurement,”...
  • Page 114 Making Measurements Measuring Impedance using the Smith Chart Figure 3-31 Example of an Impedance Measurement 3-62 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 115: Measuring Impedance Magnitude

    Making Measurements Measuring Impedance Magnitude Measuring Impedance Magnitude The impedance (Z) of a DUT can be calculated from the measured reflection or transmission coefficient. The impedance magnitude format allows measurement of impedance versus frequency or power. This measurement can be useful for many types of devices, including resonators and discrete passive components.
  • Page 116: How The Transmission Measurement Works

    Making Measurements Measuring Impedance Magnitude Figure 3-32 Impedance Calculation for Reflection Measurements How the Transmission Measurement Works In a transmission measurement, the data can be converted to its equivalent mathematical series impedance using the model and equations shown in Figure 3-33, “Impedance Calculation for Transmission Measurements.”...
  • Page 117 Making Measurements Measuring Impedance Magnitude load side of the device, as shown in Figure 3-34. If you choose to do this, be sure to connect the attenuator before performing the enhanced response calibration. When interpreting the resulting impedance measurement, remember that the analyzer is computing a transform and displaying the equivalent series impedance.
  • Page 118 Making Measurements Measuring Impedance Magnitude 3-66 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 119: Using Instrument Functions

    Using Instrument Functions ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 120: Introduction

    Using Instrument Functions Introduction Introduction This chapter explains some common analyzer functions that can help you to examine, store, and print measurement data. The following functions are explained in this chapter: • “Using Markers” on page 4-3 • “Using Limit Testing” on page 4-28 •...
  • Page 121: Using Markers

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Using Markers The markers provide numerical readout of trace data. Markers have a stimulus value (the x-axis value in a Cartesian format) and a response value (the y-axis value in a Cartesian format). In Smith chart format, markers have a stimulus value, a resistive value, a reactive value, and a complex impedance value.
  • Page 122 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers NOTE The frequency position of the markers is coupled between the two measurement channels. Changing the frequency of a marker on one measurement channel will also change the frequency of the marker on the other measurement channel. The examples in this section are shown with a transmission response measurement of a filter.
  • Page 123: To Activate Markers

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Activate Markers 1. Press the key to activate marker 1. MARKER 2. To activate markers 2 through 4, use the softkeys. For example, press softkey to activate marker 3. To activate markers 5 through 8, first press More Markers and then the softkey that corresponds to...
  • Page 124: To Use Marker Search Functions

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Use Marker Search Functions Markers can be used to: • search a measurement trace for maximum or minimum points • search for a target value • automatically calculate bandwidth or notch parameters of filters •...
  • Page 125 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-3 Markers at Minimum and Maximum Values − − As explained previously, pressing will Using the Next > Max > Min Peak and Next Min place a marker on the maximum and minimum points on the Functions measurement trace, respectively.
  • Page 126 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-4 Peak and Minimum Search Criteria When the maximum or minimum point is at or near either edge of the display, the excursion requirement is satisfied by a half of a division excursion on just one side of the maximum (or minimum). See Figure 4-5.
  • Page 127 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Search for Target Values 1. Press Prior Menu Prior Menu All Off Marker Search Target Search 2. Press Target Value to choose the target level and enter the target value. (The default value is −3 dB.) 3.
  • Page 128 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers −6 to change the −3 dB bandwidth target level to 2. Press ENTER −6 dB. 3. If you want to change the marker frequency resolution, press Disp Freq Resolution and enter a different resolution FREQ value.
  • Page 129 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers −6 dB Bandwidth Marker Search Figure 4-6 ET User’s Guide 4-11...
  • Page 130 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Search for Notch Values NOTE The notch search function is intended for transmission or power measurements in log mag format only. 1. To follow along with this example, you will need to connect a notch filter to the analyzer in place of the bandpass filter shown in Figure 4-2.
  • Page 131 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers −6 dB Notch Marker Search Figure 4-7 ET User’s Guide 4-13...
  • Page 132 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Multi-peak and multi-notch searches are designed for use when To Use Multi-Peak or Multi-Notch measuring multi-pole filters. Both automatically search the Search measurement trace from left to right, and position a marker at each local maximum or minimum.
  • Page 133 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers When the maximum or minimum point is at or near either edge of the display, the excursion requirement is satisfied by a half of a division excursion on just one side of the maximum (or minimum). See Figure 4-9.
  • Page 134 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-10 Multi-Peak Search Mode 4-16 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 135 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-11 Multi-Notch Search Mode ET User’s Guide 4-17...
  • Page 136: To Use Marker Math Functions

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Use Marker Math Functions The three marker math functions—statistics, flatness, and RF filter stats—perform certain mathematical calculations on the amplitude data of user-defined trace segments. For measurement channel 1, the trace segment is defined with markers 1 and 2;...
  • Page 137 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-12 Marker Statistics Function ET User’s Guide 4-19...
  • Page 138 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers The marker flatness search function measures a user-defined segment of To Use Marker Flatness the measurement trace and calculates the following: • frequency span • gain • slope • flatness The analyzer calculates flatness by drawing a straight line between the markers.
  • Page 139 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-13 Marker Flatness Function ET User’s Guide 4-21...
  • Page 140 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers The RF filter statistics function measures both the passband and the To Use RF Filter Statistics stopband (reject-band) of a filter with a single sweep. 1. On measurement channel 1, press and place marker 1 at MARKER the beginning of the passband and marker 2 at the end of the passband.
  • Page 141 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-14 RF Filter Statistics Function ET User’s Guide 4-23...
  • Page 142: To Use Delta (∆) Marker Mode

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Use Delta (∆) Marker Mode In delta marker mode, a reference marker is placed at the active marker position. All marker values are then displayed in reference to this delta marker. When the amplitude of the measurement trace changes, the reference marker value also changes.
  • Page 143 Using Instrument Functions Using Markers Figure 4-15 Delta Marker Mode ET User’s Guide 4-25...
  • Page 144: To Use Other Marker Functions

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Use Other Marker Functions The marker to center frequency function changes the analyzer's center To Use Marker to Center Frequency frequency to that of the active marker and limits the span if necessary. If the markers are all off, and this function is selected, it first turns on marker 1 at its previous setting or, if no previous setting, at the center frequency (default).
  • Page 145: To Use Polar Format Markers

    Using Instrument Functions Using Markers To Use Polar Format Markers The analyzer displays the polar marker values as magnitude and phase. You can use these markers only when you are viewing a polar display format. The polar format is accessed by pressing Polar FORMAT To Use Smith Chart Markers...
  • Page 146: Using Limit Testing

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Using Limit Testing Limit testing is a measurement technique that compares measurement data to constraints that you define. Depending on the results of this comparison, the analyzer can indicate if your device either passes or fails the test.
  • Page 147: To Create A Flat Limit Line

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing To Create a Flat Limit Line In this example, you will create a minimum limit line from 155 MHz to 195 MHz at a level of −3 dB. 1. To access the limit line menu, press Limit Menu DISPLAY 2.
  • Page 148: To Create A Sloping Limit Line

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing To Create a Sloping Limit Line A sloping limit line has different values for its begin and end limits. In this example, you will create a sloping limit line between 130 MHz and 155 MHz with a beginning level of −35 dB and an ending level of −3 dB. 1.
  • Page 149 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Figure 4-16 Limit Lines ET User’s Guide 4-31...
  • Page 150: To Create A Single Point Limit

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing To Create a Single Point Limit Sometimes you may only be interested in the power level at one particular frequency. In this case, you may wish to use a single point limit. In the following example, use the setup from the previous examples and assume that your bandpass filter’s specified insertion loss at 174 MHz must be less than 3 dB.
  • Page 151 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing 1. This limit test requires that you first define a segment on the Statistical Mean measurement trace using markers 1 and 2 (or markers 3 and 4 for measurement channel 2). Then press MARKER Marker Functions Marker Math Statistics...
  • Page 152 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing 5. Press and enter Prior Menu Edit Limit (Min/Max) Min Limit the minimum limit using the front panel keypad and terminating the entry with the key. ENTER Note that there are no visible limit lines or indicators on the display with NOTE this limit test function.
  • Page 153 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing 3. Use the front panel knob or the keys to select Delta Ampl in the marker limit test table. Turn this limit function on by pressing the Mkr Limit on OFF key. Note that the entry in the on/off column of the table changes to "on."...
  • Page 154: To Use Relative Limits

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing To Use Relative Limits There may be times when you are interested in the shape of a measurement trace, but not concerned with the absolute amplitude. For example, Figure 4-16 on page 4-31 shows limit lines created for tuning a filter to a particular shape.
  • Page 155: Other Limit Line Functions

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Other Limit Line Functions Using the Limit Line ON off softkey toggles any created limit lines on To Turn Limit Lines On and Off and off; it does not delete them. You can still use the limit test function (pass/fail) without the limit lines appearing on the display screen.
  • Page 156 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing You can toggle on or off the pass/fail indicator text (which contains the To Turn the Pass/Fail measurement channel number and the word "pass" or "fail," such as Indicator Text and 1:FAIL) by pressing Limit Menu Limit Options DISPLAY...
  • Page 157: Additional Notes On Limit Testing

    Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Additional Notes on Limit Testing In frequency sweep mode, the stimulus values are interpreted as Stimulus and Amplitude Values frequencies; in power sweep mode, the stimulus values are interpreted as output power levels. CAUTION The values entered for stimulus and amplitude are unitless.
  • Page 158 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Example 1 When using a small number of measurement points, limit lines must be set carefully, or the results may be confusing. The following illustration shows a data trace with three measurement points: A, B, and C, along with a minimum limit line.
  • Page 159 Using Instrument Functions Using Limit Testing Example 2 In this example, the analyzer has been set up with the following parameters: • Start frequency = 90 MHz • Stop frequency = 210 MHz • Number of points = 11 • Maximum limit line begin frequency = 90 MHz •...
  • Page 160: Using Reference Tracking

    Using Instrument Functions Using Reference Tracking Using Reference Tracking The reference tracking functions allow you to track either the peak point or a certain frequency of a measurement trace. It does this by adjusting the reference level with each sweep so that the point of interest always falls on the display reference line.
  • Page 161: To Track The Peak Point

    Using Instrument Functions Using Reference Tracking To Track the Peak Point 1. If you want to move the reference position (indicated by the symbol on the left side of the display), press Reference Position SCALE and then use the front panel knob, the keys, or the numeric keypad to enter a new reference position.
  • Page 162: To Track A Frequency

    Using Instrument Functions Using Reference Tracking To Track a Frequency 1. If you want to move the reference position (indicated by the symbol on the left side of the display), press Reference Position SCALE and then use the front panel knob, the keys, or the numeric keypad to enter a new reference position.
  • Page 163: Customizing The Display

    Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Customizing the Display The analyzer's display can be customized in several ways: • You can choose to view one or both measurement channels using the split display feature. • You can turn on or off features such as the display graticule and limit lines.
  • Page 164: Using The Split Display Feature

    Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Using the Split Display Feature When using both measurement channels, you can choose to either view both of them simultaneously on one full-size display, or use the split screen feature. To use the split display feature, press More Display DISPLAY Split Disp FULL split...
  • Page 165: Enabling/disabling Display Features

    Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Enabling/Disabling Display Features Figure 4-21 shows a display screen with graticule lines (the measurement grid), and two limit lines. In the default or preset state, these lines are turned on. Figure 4-21 Display Features 1.
  • Page 166: Modifying Display Annotation

    Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Modifying Display Annotation When you first turn on your analyzer, or use the key to PRESET return it to the default condition, most of the display annotation is visible. You may want to modify or turn on or off some of the annotation to customize the display to your preferences.
  • Page 167 Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Figure 4-22 The Display Annotation ET User’s Guide 4-49...
  • Page 168 Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display The following display annotation areas can be modified or turned on or off: • Measurement title and clock • Measurement channel annotation • Frequency annotation • Marker annotation • Marker number • Y-axis labels •...
  • Page 169 Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display The measurement channel annotation at the top of the display screen Measurement Channel can be modified through the use of SCPI commands. See the Automating Annotation Measurements User’s Guide Supplement for more information. To turn the measurement channel annotation on or off, press DISPLAY More Display Annotation Options Meas Annot ON off...
  • Page 170: Expanding The Displayed Measurement

    Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Expanding the Displayed Measurement Normally, the displayed measurement is limited in size due to the softkey menu and the surrounding annotation. The expanded display feature removes these size-limiting factors, with the exception of annotation inside the normal graticule, and expands the display to the full screen size.
  • Page 171 Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Figure 4-23 Normal Display ET User’s Guide 4-53...
  • Page 172 Using Instrument Functions Customizing the Display Figure 4-24 Expanded Display 4-54 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 173: Saving And Recalling Measurement Results

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results Saving and Recalling Measurement Results The network analyzer allows you to save the following information to internal memory or to a DOS-formatted 3.5” floppy disk in the analyzer's built-in disk drive: Instrument State Instrument state settings consist of all the stimulus and response parameters that set up the analyzer to...
  • Page 174 Saving and Recalling Measurement Results Special Note for Owners of Older Model Analyzers NOTE (HP 8711A, HP 8711B/12B/13B/14B, HP 8711C/12C/13C/14C) If you own one of these older model analyzers, there are some compatibility issues you should be aware of: • The "A" and "B" model analyzers allowed you to save to a LIF formatted floppy disk.
  • Page 175: Saving Instrument Data

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results Saving Instrument Data When you save data to a file, the analyzer automatically selects a file name for you. Since these names may not be as descriptive as desirable, you may change the name of the file after it has been saved, or you can save it to a file name of your choice by using the Re-Save State function.
  • Page 176 The filename appears on the screen as STATE#.STA (where # is a number the analyzer selects from 0 to 999). 3. If you own older model network analyzers (HP 8711A, HP 8711B/12B/13B/14B, HP 8711C/12C/13C/14C), and you need your saved files to be recalled on any of these older model analyzers, select...
  • Page 177 Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results Your measurement data can be saved in an ASCII format that is To Save Measurement compatible with many personal computer software packages. Data in ASCII To save the measurement trace as an ASCII file: Format 1.
  • Page 178: To Recall From A Floppy Disk Or Internal Memory

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results To Recall from a Floppy Disk or Internal Memory The network analyzer allows you to recall and display measurement results that you saved as STATE files. You can then compare the recalled measurements to subsequent measurements.
  • Page 179 Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results 4. If you have previously saved any files to this disk, they will now be listed on the display. 5. The fast recall feature utilizes only the first seven files listed that contain instrument state, calibration, or measurement data.
  • Page 180 Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results When fast recall is used in conjunction with a switch connected to the Using Fast Recall with a Switch USER TTL IN/OUT rear panel connector, you can cycle through up to seven instrument states in sequence by activating the switch. 1.
  • Page 181: Other File Utilities

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results Other File Utilities 1. Press and press the key that To Rename a File SAVE RECALL Select Disk corresponds to the disk where the desired file is located. 2. Use the front panel knob to move the highlighted bar to the file you want to rename.
  • Page 182 Enter Files on each disk can be accessed via HP-IB using SCPI commands, To Access Files from SCPI, IBASIC, directly from IBASIC, or over a LAN. The table below shows the names or FTP used for each disk.
  • Page 183: To Use Directory Utilities

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results To Use Directory Utilities This section describes how to make directories so you can store files into categories, how to change between the various existing directories, and how to remove an unwanted directory. You can make directories for the analyzer's internal non-volatile RAM disk, the internal volatile RAM disk, and the 3.5”...
  • Page 184: Formatting A Floppy Disk

    Using Instrument Functions Saving and Recalling Measurement Results NOTE You can also change to a directory and use Make Directory to create a subdirectory. The number of characters in a directory and subdirectory path cannot exceed the MS-DOS limitation of 63. Change to a 1.
  • Page 185: Connecting And Configuring Printers And Plotters

    Some common compatible plotters are listed below (some are no longer available for purchase but are listed here for your reference). Also listed below is the address of an HP Web page that displays a current printer compatibility guide.
  • Page 186 • HP C2947A Parallel Printer Cable, 10.m • HP C2913A RS-232C (Serial) Interface Cable, 1.2 m • HP 24542G Serial Interface Cable, 3 m (9F to 25M) If your peripheral is to be connected via the LAN port on the analyzer, you will need a LAN hub and 2 Ethertwist cables.
  • Page 187: Connect The Printer Or Plotter

    Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters Connect the Printer or Plotter 1. Turn off the analyzer and the printer or plotter. 2. Connect to one of the ports shown in Figure 4-26, “Peripheral Connections.” Figure 4-26 Peripheral Connections ET User’s Guide 4-69...
  • Page 188: Configure The Hardcopy Port

    File PCL5 Internal 3.5” Disk File HPGL Non-Vol RAM Disk File Non-Vol RAM Disk File PCL5 Non-Vol RAM Disk HP LaserJet PCL5/6 PCL5 Parallel Port HP LaserJet PCL5/6 PCL5 RS232 Serial HP LaserJet PCL5/6 PCL5 HP-IB HP LaserJet PCL5/6 PCL5 4-70 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 189 Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters The analyzer can send print commands in PCL5, PCL, Epson, or HP-GL languages. Recommended usages are: • Use PCL5 mode for maximum speed, if your printer supports it. HP LaserJet III/4/5 models support PCL5. Typical time to generate and send hardcopy output to a PCL5 printer is 1 to 10 seconds.
  • Page 190: Define The Printer Or Plotter Settings

    Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters Define the Printer or Plotter Settings You will only have to do this setup once if you make all your hardcopies with the same printing or plotting device. Press Define PCL5 , and then Define Printer HARDCOPY...
  • Page 191 Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters Left Margin : Sets the left margin (non-printing space) of the printout in mm. Minimum setting is 0.00 mm; maximum setting is 200.00 mm. Print Width : Sets print width (printing space) of printout in mm.
  • Page 192 Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters Make the following selections in the analyzer menus: Defining a Printer 1. Press Restore Defaults to restore the default parameters for a printer. The defaults are: Parameter Default Monochrome/Color Monochrome Orientation Portrait Auto Feed Printer Resolution...
  • Page 193 96, 192 Epson 60, 120, 240, 360 a. HP DeskJet 540 should not be used at 100 dpi. Top Margin : Sets the top margin (non-printing space) of the printout in mm. Minimum setting is 0.00 mm; maximum setting is 200.00 mm.
  • Page 194 Using Instrument Functions Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters Make the following selections in the analyzer menus: Defining a Plotter 1. Press Restore Defaults to restore the default parameters for a plotter. The defaults are: Parameter Default Monochrome/Color Monochrome Auto Feed Color Plotter Pen Numbers Trace 1 = Pen 1 Trace 2 = Pen 2...
  • Page 195: Printing And Plotting Measurement Results

    file, you must select whether to store it on the analyzer's non-volatile RAM disk or a 3.5” floppy disk in the built-in disk drive. Also, you must select either an HP-GL, PCL5, or PCX file format. All of these formats can be imported to many personal computer (PC) applications such as word processors and drawing programs.
  • Page 196: To Define The Output

    Using Instrument Functions Printing and Plotting Measurement Results To Define the Output The first step in defining the output is deciding which hardcopy components you want in your printout, plot, or file. To select your choice of format, press HARDCOPY Define Hardcopy and then one of the following selections.
  • Page 197 Using Instrument Functions Printing and Plotting Measurement Results Figure 4-27 Hardcopy Components and Formats Available ET User’s Guide 4-79...
  • Page 198 Using Instrument Functions Printing and Plotting Measurement Results outputs only the marker table. (This selection List Trace Values allows printing of the limit-line table as well.) Figure 4-28 Trace Values NOTE Figure 4-28 shows the trace values for a transmission measurement in log mag format.
  • Page 199 Some DeskJets may not support 100 dpi resolution. If your plot is 2/3 size, use 150 dpi. b. These times were measured with the HP DeskJet 1200C in "paper-fast" mode. c. Do not use a color cartridge for mono print on single cartridge DeskJets.
  • Page 200: Using A Keyboard

    DIN to mini-DIN (small 6-pin) adapter to connect the keyboard to the analyzer. These adapters are available as HP part no. 1252-4141. Contact the nearest HP sales or service office for more information. To Use the Keyboard to Edit Using a keyboard makes editing of file and directory names, or program...
  • Page 201: Front Panel Control Using A Keyboard

    Should you misplace your keyboard template, you can reorder with HP part number 08712-80028. You can use the key combinations below with a keyboard connected to the rear panel of the analyzer to activate the indicated front panel hardkeys and softkeys.
  • Page 202 Using Instrument Functions Using a Keyboard Keyboard Front Panel Key Equivalents Keyboard Function Front Panel Equivalents Shift Ctrl Softkey 1 MEAS 1 SAVE RECALL Softkey 2 MEAS 2 HARD COPY Softkey 3 FREQ SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey 4 POWER PRESET Softkey 5 SWEEP BEGIN Softkey 6...
  • Page 203 Using Instrument Functions Using a Keyboard Print capabilities: When you use the analyzer HARDCOPY function to dump a graph, you don't get the softkey menu that appears on the right-hand side of the analyzer display. Pressing Shift Print Screen on a keyboard will dump the current graph along with the current softkey menu.
  • Page 204: Using An External Vga Monitor

    Using Instrument Functions Using an External VGA Monitor Using an External VGA Monitor The rear panel VIDEO OUT COLOR VGA connector can be connected to a VGA compatible monitor for enhanced measurement viewing. This section describes how to customize the color on an external VGA monitor. Refer to Chapter 7, “Front/Rear Panel,”...
  • Page 205 Using Instrument Functions Using an External VGA Monitor Item # Description Background Text User Graphics Pen 2 User Graphics Pen 3 User Graphics Pen 4 User Graphics Pen 5 User Graphics Pen 6 User Graphics Pen 7 Inactive Text Warning Text Graticule Trace 1 Mem 1...
  • Page 206: Synchronizing And Positioning The Display

    Using Instrument Functions Using an External VGA Monitor Synchronizing and Positioning the Display The analyzer provides a CRT adjustment feature which can be used to get an external monitor to synchronize properly, and to optimize the display's position. The following list explains how to use the CRT adjust features.
  • Page 207: Optimizing Measurements

    Optimizing Measurements ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 208: Introduction

    Optimizing Measurements Introduction Introduction This chapter describes techniques and analyzer functions that help you achieve the best measurement results. The following sections are included in this chapter: • “Increasing Sweep Speed” on page 5-3 • “Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range” on page 5-9 •...
  • Page 209: Increasing Sweep Speed

    • turn off alternate sweep • turn off markers and marker tracking • turn off spur avoidance • minimize frequency span to avoid bandcrossings (HP 8714ET only) To Increase the Start Frequency Since the analyzer sweeps frequencies below approximately 20 MHz at a slower rate, you can increase the start frequency to speed up the sweep.
  • Page 210: To Set The Sweep Time To Auto Mode

    Optimizing Measurements Increasing Sweep Speed To Set the Sweep Time to AUTO Mode Auto sweep time mode (the factory preset instrument mode) maintains the fastest sweep speed possible for any particular measurement settings. 1. Press and look at the Sweep Time AUTO man softkey SWEEP label.
  • Page 211: To Reduce The Amount Of Averaging

    Total cycle time is defined as the time from the start of the sweep to the start of the next sweep. This graph was created with data from a setup on an HP 8714ET using...
  • Page 212: To View A Single Measurement Channel

    Optimizing Measurements Increasing Sweep Speed Figure 5-1 Relationship between Frequency Span, Total Cycle Time, and Number of Points Note the following in the graph above: • As the frequency span decreases, the total cycle time generally decreases. • As the number of points decreases, the total cycle time decreases. To View a Single Measurement Channel If you are viewing both measurement channels but only need one, you can decrease measurement time by turning one of the channels off.
  • Page 213: To Turn Off Alternate Sweep

    Optimizing Measurements Increasing Sweep Speed To Turn Off Alternate Sweep Alternate sweep is turned off when the analyzer is preset, but is automatically activated with some dual channel measurements. The alternate sweep feature sweeps and measures one channel at a time. By disengaging this feature, you increase the sweep speed by a factor of two.
  • Page 214: To Turn Off Spur Avoidance

    If Spur Avoid must be used in your measurement, set the start frequency as high as possible to obtain the fastest possible sweeps. To Avoid Frequency Bandcrossings (HP 8714ET only) Sweep time is increased when the analyzer encounters a bandcrossing point. The frequency bandcrossing points are approximately: •...
  • Page 215: Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range

    Optimizing Measurements Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range Receiver dynamic range is the difference between the analyzer's maximum allowable input level and its noise floor. For a measurement to be valid, input signals must be within these boundaries. The dynamic range is affected by two factors: •...
  • Page 216: To Reduce The Receiver Noise Floor

    Optimizing Measurements Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range To Reduce the Receiver Noise Floor Receiver dynamic range is improved by reducing the system bandwidth and by increasing the averaging factor. Changing System Reducing the system bandwidth lowers the noise floor by digitally Bandwidth reducing the receiver input bandwidth.
  • Page 217 Optimizing Measurements Increasing Network Analyzer Dynamic Range In averaging mode, the analyzer measures each frequency point once per Changing Measurement sweep and averages the current and previous trace up to the averaging Averaging factor specified by the user. The instrument computes each data point based on an exponential average of consecutive sweeps weighted by the user-specified averaging factor.
  • Page 218: Reducing Trace Noise

    Optimizing Measurements Reducing Trace Noise Reducing Trace Noise To help reduce the effect of noise on the data trace, you can use three analyzer functions to activate measurement averaging, reduce system bandwidth, and eliminate spurious responses. To Activate Averaging for Reducing Trace Noise The analyzer uses a weighted running average for averaging.
  • Page 219: To Eliminate Receiver Spurious Responses

    Optimizing Measurements Reducing Trace Noise To Eliminate Receiver Spurious Responses Spurious responses are undesirable signals that result from various internal mixing products. The analyzer has two features to eliminate spurious responses. Both features shift the frequency of the spur without changing the RF output frequency.
  • Page 220 Optimizing Measurements Reducing Trace Noise To activate spur avoidance: 1. Press Spur Avoid Options Spur Avoid MENU 2. Make a user-defined measurement calibration. For calibration procedures, refer to Chapter NOTE Using spur avoid increases sweep time. Since there are more spurs at the lower frequencies, the time penalty can be reduced by setting the start frequency of the measurement as high as possible.
  • Page 221: Reducing Mismatch Errors

    Optimizing Measurements Reducing Mismatch Errors Reducing Mismatch Errors Mismatch errors are due to the fact that the analyzer’s port impedances are not exactly 50 ohms or 75 ohms across the frequency range.Source match errors are produced on the source (analyzer RF OUT) side of the DUT;...
  • Page 222: Reducing Mismatch Errors In A Transmission Measurement

    Optimizing Measurements Reducing Mismatch Errors Reducing Mismatch Errors in a Transmission Measurement The best way to reduce mismatch errors in a transmission measurement of a two-port device is to perform an enhanced response calibration directly at the point that will connect to the DUT, using the exact frequency parameters that you will be using for the measurement.
  • Page 223: Compensating For Phase Shift In Measurement Setups

    Optimizing Measurements Compensating for Phase Shift in Measurement Setups Compensating for Phase Shift in Measurement Setups Port Extensions The port extension feature is used to compensate for the phase shift caused by the insertion of cables, adapters, and fixtures into the measurement path.
  • Page 224: Electrical Delay

    Optimizing Measurements Compensating for Phase Shift in Measurement Setups To use the port extension feature, press More Cal Port Extensions Port Ext's on OFF . When port extension is turned on, you can add delay independently to both the reflection port and the transmission port.
  • Page 225: Measuring Devices With Long Electrical Delay

    Optimizing Measurements Measuring Devices with Long Electrical Delay Measuring Devices with Long Electrical Delay When making narrowband-receiver measurements of devices with long electrical delay, measured levels can be affected by the rate at which the source is changing frequency. This sensitivity is related to the time required for the source signal to travel through cables or devices which are connected between the RF OUT and RF IN ports.
  • Page 226 Optimizing Measurements Measuring Devices with Long Electrical Delay 5-20 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 227: Calibrating For Increased Measurement Accuracy

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 228: Introduction

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Introduction Introduction This chapter first explains measurement calibration in the section titled “Measurement Calibration Overview.” The sections following the overview provide instructions for choosing, performing, saving, and checking measurement calibrations. Each example measurement in Chapter 3, “Making Measurements,” provides an example calibration for the particular type of measurement.
  • Page 229 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Measurement Calibration Overview Figure 6-1 Systematic Measurement Errors Frequency response errors (transmission and reflection tracking) are caused by differences between the frequency response of the receivers used during ratio measurements. Leakage errors result from energy leakage between signal paths. In transmission measurements, this leakage is due to crosstalk between test ports.
  • Page 230 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Measurement Calibration Overview The analyzer has several methods of measuring and compensating for these test system errors. Each method removes one or more of the systematic errors using an equation called an error model. Measurement of high quality standards (short, open, load, and through, for example) allows the network analyzer to solve for the error terms in the error model.
  • Page 231: The Calibration Reference Plane

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Measurement Calibration Overview The Calibration Reference Plane Most often you will not be connecting your DUT directly to the analyzer's front panel. More likely, you will be connecting your DUT to some sort of test fixture or cable(s) that is connected to the analyzer. See Figure 6-3, “The Calibration Reference Plane.”...
  • Page 232: Default Versus User-defined Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Default versus User-Defined Calibration Default versus User-Defined Calibration The analyzer features factory-installed default calibrations that use vector error correction, so that measurements can be made on many devices without performing a user-defined calibration. These default calibrations are quick and convenient, but not as accurate as user-defined calibrations.
  • Page 233: Calibration Choices

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Calibration Choices To choose the appropriate calibration method suited to your type of measurement, follow these steps: 1. Set up the analyzer for your measurement: • Select MEAS 1 MEAS 2 • Enter operating parameters other than the default. 2.
  • Page 234 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Table 6-1 Calibration Choices Measurement Type Calibration Choices Transmission Default Response Response Response & Isolation Enhanced Response Normalize Reflection Default 1-Port 1-Port Fault Location See your Option 100 User's Guide Supplement. See your Option 100 User's Guide Supplement. Power Autozero Manual Zero...
  • Page 235 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Figure 6-4 Calibration Choices ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 236: Retrieving Previous User-defined Calibrations

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Retrieving Previous User-Defined Calibrations User-defined calibrations that you have already performed are available for you to use again. In some cases, you can retrieve these calibrations rather than perform new ones. Previous user-defined calibrations can be retrieved as long as the following two conditions are met: 1) current instrument settings are compatible with the calibration, and 2) you have not cancelled the user-defined calibration by manually selecting a default...
  • Page 237: To Perform A Normalization Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices To Perform a Normalization Calibration Normalization is the simplest type of calibration. The analyzer stores data into memory and divides subsequent measurements by the stored data to remove frequency response errors. Follow these general steps when performing a normalization calibration: 1.
  • Page 238: To Perform A Transmission Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices To Perform a Transmission Calibration For a review of which systematic errors are removed by each type of transmission calibration, see the descriptions below. These calibrations are for measurements using the narrowband detectors. For an example of performing a response calibration for a transmission measurement, refer to “Measuring Transmission Response”...
  • Page 239 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Response & Isolation This method of calibration is only necessary when trying to achieve maximum dynamic range (>100 dB). A response and isolation calibration prompts you to connect loads to both ports and then to connect a through cable.
  • Page 240: To Perform A Reflection Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices To Perform a Reflection Calibration For a review of which systematic errors are removed by each type of reflection calibration, see the descriptions below. These calibrations are for measurements using the narrowband detectors. For an example of performing a one-port calibration for a reflection measurement, refer to “Measuring Reflection Response”...
  • Page 241: To Perform A Conversion Loss Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Choices Reflection Calibration Interpolation Widening the frequency span after performing the one-port calibration will invalidate it, and restore the default calibration. You may narrow the span and the analyzer will interpolate between calibration points for the narrower span.
  • Page 242: Calibration Kits

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Kits Calibration Kits When performing a one-port reflection calibration or an enhanced response calibration, you must select a calibration kit to match the port at your calibration reference plane. Selecting a Calibration Kit Stored in the Analyzer To select a calibration kit, press More Cal Cal Kit...
  • Page 243 For Use For Use Cal Kit Model Connector Impedance with Male with Female Number Type Test Ports Test Ports 75 Ω HP 85039B type-F 75 Ω HP 85036B type-N 75 Ω HP 85036E type-N 50 Ω HP 85032B type-N 50 Ω...
  • Page 244: Creating A User-defined Calibration Kit

    • Your port has a connector type listed under the Cal Kit menu, but your calibration standards (such as a short) have different characteristics than the standard HP calibration kits. • Your port has a connector type which does not correspond to one of the standard HP calibration kits.
  • Page 245 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Kits NOTE Calibration kit definitions must be in DOS format. LIF format is not supported for cal kit definitions. 3. Verify performance. Step 1: Determine Determine the characteristics of the calibration standards you plan to the Characteristics use.
  • Page 246 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Kits For all four standard types, the Z (characteristic impedance), Delay, and Loss must be set. For an open, C , and C , the capacitive model parameters, must also be set. When creating a user-defined calibration kit, if a standard is not defined, NOTE the currently defined values for that standard will be retained.
  • Page 247 F/Hz For further information on calibration kits and determining standard characteristics, refer to HP Product Note 8510-5A (HP Publication No. 5956-4352). To view this product note on the Web, go to http://www.tmo.hp.com and select “Application Note Library.”...
  • Page 248 "!" with a "$" directly after it. No characters are allowed between the "!" and the "$" on the first line of a cal kit file. Standard Definitions for HP 85054B Precision Type-N Cal Kit. Definitions for 50 Ohm jack (FEMALE center contact) test 6-22 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 249 50.0 Ohms DELAY 196.0E-12 $ Sec LOSS 2.2E+9 $ Ohms/Sec Standard Definitions for HP 85054B Precision Type-N Cal Kit. Definitions for 50 Ohm jack (FEMALE center contact) test ports, plug (MALE center contact) standards. OPEN: $ HP 85054-60027 Open Circuit Plug 50.0 $ Ohms...
  • Page 250 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Calibration Kits LOSS 2.2E+9 $ Ohms/Sec How to download a calibration kit ASCII file. After creating a calibration kit ASCII file, you can download the program by following these steps: NOTE Calibration kit definitions must be in DOS format. LIF format is not supported for cal kit definitions.
  • Page 251 To achieve more complete verification of a particular measurement calibration, accurately known verification standards with a diverse magnitude and phase response should be used. NIST-traceable standards (such as HP verification standards) are recommended to achieve verifiable measurement accuracy. CAUTION The published specifications for your analyzer system include accuracy enhancement with compatible calibration kits.
  • Page 252: Saving And Recalling The Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Saving and Recalling the Calibration Saving and Recalling the Calibration Saving the Calibration After you have performed your calibration, it is automatically saved in non-volatile (battery-backed) memory. However, it will be overwritten with subsequent calibrations of the same type. To save your calibration to the analyzer’s internal non-volatile RAM disk, volatile RAM disk, or a floppy disk in the built-in disk drive: 1.
  • Page 253: Recalling The Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Saving and Recalling the Calibration Recalling the Calibration Measurement calibration information is linked to the instrument state and measurement parameters for which the calibration was done. Therefore, a saved calibration can be recalled and used for multiple instrument states as long as the measurement parameter, frequency range, and number of points are compatible.
  • Page 254: Checking The Calibration

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Checking the Calibration Your analyzer has a calibration check feature that can compute and display corrected measurement uncertainties (residual errors) that apply to the current instrument settings and calibrations. During a calibration check, you are prompted to connect calibration standards to your measurement ports.
  • Page 255: To Perform A Calibration Check

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration 5. When the residual errors have drifted beyond what is acceptable, note the time interval and use that information to determine what is the best calibration interval for your measurements. 6. Repeat the process above enough times to feel confident that your calibration interval is correct.
  • Page 256 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration To perform a calibration check: 1. Be sure that the analyzer is in the measurement mode and has implemented the particular calibration that you want to check. 2. Press Cal Check Do Cal Check 3.
  • Page 257: Error Term Descriptions And Typical Values

    Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Error Term Descriptions and Typical Values The following table lists the typical residual error term values. Error Term Typical Value < −65 dB Directivity < −53 dB Source Match (corrected) < −22 dB Source Match (uncorrected) <...
  • Page 258 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Directivity Directivity is a reflection measurement error term that indicates the ability of the analyzer to separate the reflected signal from the incident signal. Corrected directivity less than −65 dB is expected after calibrations have been performed.
  • Page 259 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Source Match Source match is an error term which can be used to determine the magnitude of re-reflections from the source port (RF OUT). Reflection calibrations always correct for source match. The two transmission calibration types that will correct for source match are Enhanced Response and Test Set Cal.
  • Page 260 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Figure 6-6 Typical Source Match (Corrected) Error Term All other calibration types do not correct for source match. The source match error term for other types of calibrations will be equal to the raw source match of the port in these cases.
  • Page 261 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Typical Source Match (Uncorrected) Error Figure 6-7 Term ET User’s Guide 6-35...
  • Page 262 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Load Match Load match is a transmission measurement error term. It is a measure of the re-reflections contributed from the match of the through-standard and the receiver port (RF IN). A typical value for this match term is < −22 dB. Figure 6-8 Typical Load Match Error Term 6-36...
  • Page 263 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Transmission Tracking Transmission tracking is a transmission measurement error term. It is a measure of the corrected through-standard. A typical transmission tracking error is ±0.01 dB. Most likely this term will be dominated by trace noise. Typical Transmission Tracking Error Term Figure 6-9 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 264 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Isolation Isolation is a measure of crosstalk between RF signal paths. For example, there may be leakage between the RF OUT and RF IN signal paths inside the analyzer. The isolation term displays the best possible noise floor of a transmission measurement with no external signal path.
  • Page 265 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration Reflection Tracking Reflection tracking is a reflection measurement error term. It is a measure of how well the open or load standards have been corrected. A typical reflection error tracking error is ±0.02 dB. Figure 6-11 Typical Reflection Tracking Error Term ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 266 Calibrating for Increased Measurement Accuracy Checking the Calibration 6-40 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 267: Front/rear Panel

    Front/Rear Panel ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 268: Introduction

    Front/Rear Panel Introduction Introduction This chapter contains detailed information on various aspects of the analyzer front and rear panel. Information on the following can be found in this chapter: • “Connectors” on page 7-3 • “Display” on page 7-16 • “Knob”...
  • Page 269: Connectors

    Front/Rear Panel Connectors Connectors Figure 7-1 Analyzer Connectors - Front Panel ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 270: Bnc Connectors

    Front/Rear Panel Connectors Figure 7-2 Analyzer Connectors—Rear Panel BNC Connectors AUX INPUT This rear panel female BNC connector is for low frequency (dc to approximately 360 Hz), low voltage measurements. This input is calibrated for inputs up to ±10 V, but will accept signals up to ±15 V. See “Making Measurements with the Auxiliary Input”...
  • Page 271 Front/Rear Panel Connectors EXT TRIG IN/OUT This rear panel female BNC connector allows triggering of a analyzer sweep by an external signal. When the external signal is pulled to a high TTL level, the analyzer is triggered to do either one complete sweep, or sweep to the next (frequency) point.
  • Page 272 • The default use for this connector provides a bidirectional open-collector TTL signal which can be set or read from IBASIC or SCPI (HP-IB). This is an open-collector signal which you can drive low, but must not drive high, since the analyzer also drives it.
  • Page 273: Multi-pin Connectors

    HP-IB or devices on the interface bus. Details of this cable are shown in Figure 7-3. HP part numbers for various HP-IB cables that are available are shown in the table following the figure. Figure 7-3 HP-IB Connector and Cable...
  • Page 274 HP 10833D 0.5 m (1.6 ft) As many as 14 HP-IB instruments can be connected to the analyzer (15 total instruments in the system). The cables can be interconnected in a star pattern (one central instrument with the HP-IB cables emanating from that instrument like spokes on a wheel), or in a linear pattern (like boxcars on a train), or a combination of the two.
  • Page 275 Front/Rear Panel Connectors Table 7-1 General Bus Management Lines Name Mnemonic Description Attention Controls whether the bus is in Command Mode (ATN TRUE) or Data Mode (ATN FALSE). Interface Clear Initializes the interface to an idle state (no activity on the bus). Service Request Alerts the Controller to a need for communication.
  • Page 276 Front/Rear Panel Connectors This rear panel connector is used with peripherals with parallel interface PARALLEL PORT such as printers and plotters. The pin-out is standard IBM PC compatible Centronics interface, using a female DB-25 connector, as shown in Figure 7-4. All pins are ESD protected; data and strobe pins have 2200 pF capacitors;...
  • Page 277 Front/Rear Panel Connectors The RS-232 connector is a rear panel connector used with serial RS-232 peripherals such as printers and plotters. The pin-out is shown in Figure 7-5. The connector is a male DB-9. See “Configure the Hardcopy Port” on page 4-70 for information on using this port with a printer or plotter.
  • Page 278 Front/Rear Panel Connectors This rear panel connector provides signals to drive an external VGA VIDEO OUT COLOR VGA compatible monitor. The following table describes a VGA compatible monitor, and Figure 7-6 shows the pin-out for the VIDEO OUT connector, looking into the connector. Table 7-2 VGA Compatible Monitor Characteristics 640 ×...
  • Page 279 Signals are IBM PC/AT compatible. EXT DET Y-INPUT These rear panel connectors power external detectors and accept input EXT DET X-INPUT from them for processing and display. Compatible detectors are: • HP 86201B • HP 86200B ET User’s Guide 7-13...
  • Page 280 Both outputs are fused with 0.75 Amp fuses, which are located on a circuit board on the inside front panel of the analyzer. The fuses are plastic bi-pin type. The replacement HP part number for these fuses is 2110-0424. 7-14...
  • Page 281: Rf Connectors

    75 Ω female connector. To adapt from 50 Ω to 75 Ω, always use a minimum loss pad: • For adapting from 50 Ω female to 75 Ω female use an HP 11852B, Option 004, minimum loss pad. • For adapting from 75 Ω female to 50 Ω female, use a standard HP 11852B minimum loss pad.
  • Page 282: Display

    Front/Rear Panel Display Display The analyzer display shows various measurement information. The following illustration shows several locations where information is provided on the screen. Figure 7-8 7-16 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 283 Front/Rear Panel Display Table 7-3 The data ? status notation in the upper left corner of the display screen indicates that the analyzer source or receiver parameters have changed since the last complete sweep. The active measurement channel indicator is designated by a solid right arrow ( ).
  • Page 284: Knob

    Front/Rear Panel Knob Knob The front panel knob is used to either increase or decrease parameter values, and to give an analog feel to the setting of the values. Any of the values that can be set through the numeric entry pad, or the step keys, can also be set using the knob.
  • Page 285: Power Switch

    Front/Rear Panel Power Switch Power Switch Figure 7-9 The Analyzer Power Switch The power switch selects power to the analyzer to be either on ( ) or standby ( ).The analyzer power switch is located at the bottom left corner of the front panel. When set to standby, the analyzer circuitry is powered off, but a portion of the power supply stays on.
  • Page 286: Display Intensity Control

    Front/Rear Panel Display Intensity Control Display Intensity Control Figure 7-10 Display Intensity Control The display intensity control adjusts the brightness of the display. 7-20 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 287: Disk Drive

    Front/Rear Panel Disk Drive Disk Drive Figure 7-11 Disk Drive The built-in 3.5” disk drive offers permanent information storage capacity. You can use the disk drive to save and recall instrument states, and IBASIC programs. In conjunction with IBASIC, it allows the analyzer to enter a known state or an automated routine at power-on.
  • Page 288: Line Module

    Front/Rear Panel Line Module Line Module The line module contains: • the power cable receptacle • the line fuse (and an extra fuse) • the voltage selector switch Power Cables The line power cable is supplied in one of several configurations, depending on the destination of the original shipment.
  • Page 289 Front/Rear Panel Line Module Figure 7-12 Power Cable and Line (Mains) Plug Part Numbers ET User’s Guide 7-23...
  • Page 290: The Line Fuse

    Front/Rear Panel Line Module The Line Fuse The line fuse (HP part number 2110-0709), and a spare, reside within the line module. Figure 7-13 illustrates where the fuses are and how to access them. Figure 7-13 Location of Line Fuses WARNING For continued protection against fire hazard replace line fuse...
  • Page 291: The Voltage Selector Switch

    Front/Rear Panel Line Module The Voltage Selector Switch Figure 7-14 Voltage Selector Switch Location Use a screwdriver to set the line voltage selector switch to the proper position (either 110 V or 220 V). The power source must meet the following requirements: Table 7-4 Nominal Setting AC Line Power...
  • Page 292 Front/Rear Panel Line Module 7-26 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 293: Hardkey/softkey Reference

    Hardkey/Softkey Reference ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 294: Introduction

    Hardkey/Softkey Reference Introduction Introduction This chapter provides a brief description of the analyzer's hardkeys and softkeys. This chapter is arranged alphabetically for ease of use. NOTE See the Service Guide for a description of service related softkeys. ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 295: Numeric Entries

    Hardkey/Softkey Reference Numeric Entries Numeric Entries … Markers number one through eight in the menu. Pressing MARKER any one of these softkeys makes the marker the active marker and (if previously off) turns it on. “>” after the marker number means the marker is the active marker.
  • Page 296 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Numeric Entries 50 Ω Softkey in the system impedance menu. Selects 50 ohms as the system impedance. Refer to “When to Change the System Impedance” on page 3-8 more information. Access Keys: More Cal System Z0 75 Ω Softkey in the system impedance menu.
  • Page 297 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the narrowband internal menu. Selects the tuned receiver measurement of input A. “Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer” on page 3-3 more information on input A. Access keys: Detection Options MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Narrowband Internal Softkey in the narrowband internal menu.
  • Page 298 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the marker menu that turns off the active marker and Active makes the lowest numbered marker (if any) the active marker. Marker Off “Using Markers” on page 4-3 for an explanation of "active marker," and for more information on using markers. Access Keys: More Markers MARKER...
  • Page 299 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the add limit menu. Displays the menu to add a maximum Add Max Point limit point. “Using Limit Testing” on page 4-28 for detailed information on using limit lines. Access Keys: Limit Menu Add Limit DISPLAY Softkey in the add limit menu.
  • Page 300 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Amplifier Softkey in the BEGIN menu. Displays the menu of measurements suitable for amplifier measurements: transmission, reflection, and power. Softkey in the define graph menu. When annotation is on, printed or Annotation plotted hardcopies will contain screen annotation such as the marker ON off readout that appears in the upper right corner of the display.
  • Page 301 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the NFS device setup menu. Displays the authentication Authentication menu which allows you to enter a User ID and a Group ID for your NFS remote file system. See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: NFS Device Setup SYSTEM OPTIONS...
  • Page 302 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Autozero Softkey in the menu. This softkey is only available when using internal or external broadband detectors. Periodically, this feature compensates for external detector drift due to changes in temperature. When this softkey is selected, the detector(s) are automatically zeroed every five minutes.
  • Page 303 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the narrowband internal menu. Selects the tuned receiver measurement of input B. “Measuring Devices with Your Network Analyzer” on page 3-3 more information on input B. Access keys: Detection Options MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Narrowband Internal Softkey in the broadband internal menu.
  • Page 304 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the marker search menu. Automatically calculates −3 dB Bandwidth (default) or other user-specified bandwidth, center frequency, and Q of a bandpass filter. “Using Markers” on page 4-3 for more information. Access Keys: Marker Search MARKER Softkey in the select copy port menu. Sets the transmission baud rate Baud Rate of the analyzer for serial devices.
  • Page 305 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the LAN menu. Displays the BOOTP setup menu which BOOTP Setup allows you to set up the analyzer as a BOOTP client. See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the detection options menu.
  • Page 306 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the open menu. Allows you to modify the C characteristic of the open calibration standard in your calibration kit. “Calibration Kits” on page 6-16 for more information. Access Keys: More Cal Cal Kit Modify (connector type) Open Softkey in the open menu.
  • Page 307 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Cal Check Softkey in the menu. Provides access to the cal check menu. The cal check feature will compute and display corrected measurement uncertainties (residual errors) that apply to the current instrument settings and calibrations. This information may be used as an analysis or troubleshooting tool when making transmission and reflection measurements.
  • Page 308 IBASIC programs from the front panel of the analyzer. Clears the entire title, name, or line if pressed. Softkey in the IBASIC utilities menu. Clears (erases) the current Clear Program IBASIC program from internal memory. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC Utilities SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the set clock menu.
  • Page 309 Select Disk SAVE RECALL Softkey in the IBASIC menu. Restarts a program that has been Continue paused. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook and Supplement for more information on using IBASIC. Access Keys: IBASIC SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the trigger menu. In the continuous mode, the analyzer is...
  • Page 310 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the mixer menu and measurement menus, for measuring Conversion Loss frequency translating devices. Selects a broadband internal transmission measurement. “Measuring Conversion Loss” on page 3-45 for more information. Access Keys: Mixer BEGIN MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Softkey in the file utilities menu.
  • Page 311 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the system configuration menu. Displays the menu to set CRT Adjust the external CRT position and timing parameters for best image. These settings are not affected by presetting the analyzer. NOTE These adjustments also affect the internal CRT of the analyzer.
  • Page 312 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Data Softkey in the menu. Displays the current measurement DISPLAY data trace. Data and Softkey in the menu. Displays both the current data and DISPLAY memory traces, with identical scaling and format. You must have Memory selected Data->Mem first for this key to function.
  • Page 313 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the user TTL config menu. Pressing this softkey configures Default the rear panel USER TTL IN/OUT connector for general purpose I/O use with IBASIC and SPCI commands. This connector can also be configured for softkey sequencing using an external switch, and as a sweep out connector.
  • Page 314 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Define PCL5 Softkey in the HARDCOPY menu. Displays the menu to define a PCL5 printer in terms of color, orientation, autofeed, and margins. “Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters” on page 4-67 for more information. Softkey in the set pen numbers menu. Resets the plotter pen number Default assignments to their default values.
  • Page 315 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the open, short, load, and through menus. Allows you to Delay modify the delay characteristic of the open, short, load, or through calibration standards in your calibration kit. “Calibration Kits” on page 6-16 for more information. Access Keys: More Cal Cal Kit Modify (connector type)
  • Page 316 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the limit menu. Displays the menu to delete one segment (or Delete Limit point) of a limit line or all limits. “Using Limit Testing” on page 4-28 for more information on limit lines. Access Keys: Limit Menu DISPLAY Softkey in the edit menu of IBASIC.
  • Page 317 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the file utilities menu. Displays the menu to change, make, Directory or remove directories on DOS disks. Utilities “To Use Directory Utilities” on page 4-65 for more information. Access Keys: File Utilities SAVE RECALL Disp Freq Softkey in the menu.
  • Page 318 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the cal check menu. Initiates a calibration check. Do Cal Check Chapter 6 for more information on using cal check. Access Keys: Cal Check Softkey in the select copy port menu. A hardware handshake for some DTR/DSR serial devices.
  • Page 319 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the IBASIC menu. Displays the IBASIC edit menu and a Edit rudimentary word and character editor. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the limit menu. Displays the menu to change the frequency Edit Limit or amplitude of previously entered limits, or add a data trace marker.
  • Page 320 Add Max Line Add Min Line Softkey in the secure menu that is used with the IBASIC feature of the End Line # instrument. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook for information on the secure function. Access Keys: IBASIC Utilities...
  • Page 321 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the more display menu. Toggle to ON if you want to expand Expand on OFF the measurement display to the full screen size and eliminate all annotation except marker annotation. “Expanding the Displayed Measurement” on page 4-52 for more information.
  • Page 322 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the color options menu. Sets the external VGA monitor Factory Default colors to the factory default. “Using an External VGA Monitor” on page 4-86 for more information. Access Keys: DISPLAY More Display Color Options Factory Preset Softkey in the menu.
  • Page 323 IBASIC. bin(ary) Binary format is specific to this family of analyzers (HP 8712ET and HP 8714ET). A program saved in binary format is not readable by an IBASIC computer or other instruments running IBASIC. Binary format, however, is required if you are going to use the LOADSUB keyword.
  • Page 324 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the system bandwidth menu. This is the narrowest system Fine 15 Hz bandwidth available. (Medium wide is the default system bandwidth.) Chapter 5 for information on how system bandwidth can affect your measurements. Access Keys: System Bandwidth Softkey in the marker math menu.
  • Page 325 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the format disk menu. Formats the internal volatile RAM Format disk. Vol RAM Formatting the internal volatile RAM disk erases CAUTION all existing files and directories on the disk. Access Keys: File Utilities Format Disk Menu SAVE RECALL Hardkey in the SOURCE area.
  • Page 326 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the FTP setup menu. Displays a dialog box for entering the FTP Password password of your remote BOOTP host. See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: BOOTP Setup FTP SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the FTP setup menu.
  • Page 327 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the LAN port setup menu. Allows you to set the gateway IP Gateway address that your network administrator assigned to your analyzer. If IP Address no address was assigned, leave the setting at 0.0.0.0 (default value) to disable gateway routing.
  • Page 328 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the set pen numbers menu. Sets pen number assignment Graticule Pen (color or width) for the grid on the hardcopy. Access Keys: Define Plotter Set Pen Numbers HARDCOPY Softkey in the color options menu for use with an external VGA Grey Scale monitor.
  • Page 329 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Hardkey in the SYSTEM area of the front panel. Displays the menu to HARDCOPY start or stop prints or plots, set up the printer or plotter, and determine the appearance of the copy. “Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters” on page 4-67 “Printing and Plotting Measurement Results”...
  • Page 330 System Config CRT Adjust SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the file format menu. Select this key only if you are saving HP 8711A/B instrument states that are to be used in older model ("A" or "B") Compatible analyzers. “Saving and Recalling Measurement Results” on page 4-55 more information.
  • Page 331 Access Keys: Define Save File Format SAVE RECALL Softkey in the HP-IB menu. Sets the actual HP-IB address of the HP 8712ET network analyzer. The default HP-IB address is 16. This setting is not Address affected by or power-on.
  • Page 332 See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: LAN SICL LAN Setup SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the HP-IB menu. Toggle to ON if you want to display HP-IB HP-IB Echo mnemonics on screen as keys are pressed. This is a convenient way to on OFF see the mnemonics associated with the keys.
  • Page 333 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the display frequency resolution menu and the numeric entry menu. When pressed in the display frequency resolution menu, displays frequency to Hz resolution. Access Keys: Disp Freq Resolution FREQ ET User’s Guide 8-41...
  • Page 334 SYSTEM OPTIONS include run, continue, step, edit, key record, utilities, and IBASIC display. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement and the Automating Measurements User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Softkey in the IBASIC menu. Displays a menu to select how to display IBASIC Display an IBASIC program.
  • Page 335 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the IBASIC edit menu. Invokes the insert line menu for Insert Line editing IBASIC programs. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC Edit SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the define save menu. When on, allows you to save the Inst State instrument state.
  • Page 336 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the select disk menu. Selects the analyzer's built-in disk Internal drive as the location where information is saved, re-saved, or recalled. 3.5” Disk “Saving and Recalling Measurement Results” on page 4-55 more information. Access Keys: Select Disk SAVE RECALL Softkey in the color options menu.
  • Page 337 NOTE When editing an IBASIC program, Key Record on OFF should be off. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the display frequency resolution menu and the numeric entry menu.
  • Page 338 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the menu. Displays the menu to setup SYSTEM OPTIONS the following LAN functions on your analyzer: LAN port, login user list, NFS devices, BOOTP, SICL LAN, and SCPI socket. Refer to The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for information. Softkey in the LAN menu.
  • Page 339 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the max point or min point menus. Sets the amplitude of a Limit limit point. “To Create a Single Point Limit” on page 4-32 for an example of how to set a limit point. Access Keys: Limit Menu Add Limit DISPLAY...
  • Page 340 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the limit options menu. Displays a menu that allows you to Limit Options turn visible limit lines on or off, and to reposition and enable/disable the pass/fail indicator and text. “Customizing the Display” on page 4-45 for more information.
  • Page 341 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the define hardcopy menu. Defines the hardcopy as a list of List Trace data trace values. Trace values for Cartesian format are in two Values columns: frequency and amplitude. Trace values for polar format are in three columns: frequency, magnitude, and phase.
  • Page 342 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the automount setup menu and the mount NFS device Local Path menu. Displays a dialog box for entering the local file system path for an NFS device. Access Keys: NFS Device Setup SYSTEM OPTIONS Automount Setup Mount NFS Device This softkey also appears in the automount dev table menu and the NFS device table menu.
  • Page 343 SAVE RECALL Softkey in the IBASIC display menu. Displays the IBASIC program on Lower the lower half of the screen and measurement data on the upper half. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC...
  • Page 344 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the more format menu. Displays choices for various Mag Units magnitude units for the y-axis scale. More Format Access Keys: FORMAT Softkey in the directory utilities menu. Displays the character entry Make Directory menu for entry of the directory name. “To Use Directory Utilities”...
  • Page 345 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the marker functions menu. Adjusts the electrical delay to − Marker > balance the phase of the DUT. This is performed automatically, Elec Delay regardless of the format and the measurement being made. Enough line length is added to or subtracted from the receiver input to compensate for the phase slope at the active marker position.
  • Page 346 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the edit limit (min/max) menu. Use this key to set the Max Limit maximum limit for the marker limit function that is currently highlighted in the on-screen table. “To Use Marker Limit Functions” on page 4-32 for more information.
  • Page 347 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the system bandwidth menu. The default system bandwidth Med Narrow is medium wide. 1200 Hz Chapter 5, “Optimizing Measurements” for information on how system bandwidth can affect your measurements. Access Keys: System Bandwidth Softkey in the system bandwidth menu. Medium wide is the default Med Wide system bandwidth.
  • Page 348 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the display frequency resolution menu and the numeric entry menu. When pressed in the display frequency resolution menu, displays the frequency to MHz resolution. For example, 1.234 567 MHz is displayed as 1 MHz (note rounding down). Access Keys: Disp Freq Resolution FREQ...
  • Page 349 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the mkr limits menu. Toggle to ON if you want to enable Mkr Limit marker limit testing. on OFF “To Use Marker Limit Functions” on page 4-32 for more information. Access Keys: Limit Menu Mkr Limits DISPLAY Softkey in the limit menu.
  • Page 350 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the min search menu. Places the active marker at the − > Min frequency point of minimum amplitude. If tracking is off, marker remains at that frequency. If tracking is on, marker moves to the minimum point with each sweep. “Using Markers”...
  • Page 351 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the set pen numbers menu. Sets the pen number Monochrome assignment for the hardcopy in monochrome plot mode. “Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters” on page 4-67 for more information. Access Keys: Define Plotter Set Pen Numbers HARDCOPY Softkey in the NFS setup menu.
  • Page 352 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the system bandwidth menu. The default system bandwidth Narrow 250 Hz is medium wide. Chapter 5, “Optimizing Measurements” for information on how system bandwidth can affect your measurements. Access Keys: System Bandwidth Softkey in the detection options menu. Selects tuned receiver type Narrowband measurements of inputs A, B, or R or the ratios A/R or B/R.
  • Page 353 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the max search menu. Moves the active marker to the next Next Peak Left nearest peak to the left. “To Use Marker Search Functions” on page 4-6 for more information. Access Keys: Marker Search Max Search MARKER Softkey in the max search menu.
  • Page 354 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the IBASIC display menu. Displays the measurement data None on the full screen. (Does not show the IBASIC program on the display at all.) Normalize Softkey in the DISPLAY menu. Equivalent to selecting Data->Mem Data/Mem . Corrects for frequency response errors only.
  • Page 355 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the modify kit menu. Allows you to modify the following Open characteristics of the open calibration standard in your calibration kit: , delay, loss, and Z “Calibration Kits” on page 6-16 for more information. Access Keys: More Cal Cal Kit Modify (Cal Kit type) Operating...
  • Page 356 LAN Port Setup SYSTEM OPTIONS Diagnostic Utilities Softkey in the secure menu. Use with caution: secured program lines Perform Secure can’t be listed, seen, or edited. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC Utilities Secure...
  • Page 357 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the more format menu. Displays a polar format. Each point Polar on the polar format corresponds to a particular value of both magnitude and phase. Quantities are read vectorally: the magnitude at any point is determined by its displacement from the center (which has zero value), and the phase by the angle counterclockwise from the positive x-axis.
  • Page 358 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Power Sweep Softkey in the SWEEP menu. This softkey turns on a power sweep mode that is used to characterize power-sensitive circuits. In this mode, power is swept at a single frequency. The start- and stop-power values are selectable under the key.
  • Page 359 HARDCOPY Softkey in the select copy port menu. Sets the recognized address of Print/Plot HP-IB printers and plotters only. The default address is 5. The HP-IB Addr "recognized HP-IB address" is the address that the network analyzer uses to communicate with the device. The actual address of the device must be set independently to match.
  • Page 360 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Pwr Level Softkey in the POWER menu. Allows you to set a power level (other than the factory default of 0 dBm) that the analyzer will always return at Preset to when the Factory Preset key is pressed. Be sure to terminate your entry with one of the softkeys or the key.
  • Page 361 Broadband Internal Softkey in the programs menu. Displays the character entry menu to Re-Save re-title the program and save it to memory or disk. Program See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: Programs SAVE RECALL...
  • Page 362 SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the programs menu. Recalls to the network analyzer a Recall Program program from internal memory, internal disk, or external disk. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: Programs SAVE RECALL...
  • Page 363 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the amplifier, filter, broadband passive, mixer, cable (Option Reflection 100 only) and measurement menus. Selects the forward reflection type of measurement. Power is output from the RF OUT port and also measured there. “Measuring Reflection Response” on page 3-32 for more information.
  • Page 364 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the automount setup menu and the mount NFS device Remote Path menu. Displays a dialog box for entering the remote host file system name for an NFS device. Access Keys: NFS Device Setup SYSTEM OPTIONS Automount Setup Mount NFS Device See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information.
  • Page 365 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the CRT adjust menu. A test pattern is displayed whenever Remove Pattern CRT Adjust key is pressed. Use this key to remove the test pattern from the display. Access Keys: System Config CRT Adjust SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the file utilities menu.
  • Page 366 CRT timing values. If this key is pressed in the SCPI sock. setup menu or the SICL LAN setup menu, it resets the socket port number or the HP-IB device address, HP-IB logical unit number, and HP-IB name, respectively, to predetermined values.
  • Page 367 30 seconds. Access Keys: System Config Set Clock SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the IBASIC menu that starts a program. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC SYSTEM OPTIONS ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 368 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the custom colors menu. Use this key to customize the colors Saturation of display items on your external monitor. Saturation is the amount of pure color (selected with the key) to be mixed with white. Saturation values are expressed as a percentage: 0 to 100%, with 0 representing no color, and 100 representing no white.
  • Page 369 Save ASCII SAVE RECALL Softkey in the programs menu. Saves the current program to internal Save Program RAM or 3.5” disk. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: Programs SAVE RECALL Hardkey in the SYSTEM area of the front panel. Displays menus to: SAVE RECALL save, title, define, and recall states and programs;...
  • Page 370 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the LAN menu. Displays the menu to set up the socket port SCPI Sock. number. This socket port number is used for making socket Setup connections to the analyzer for SCPI socket programming. See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the target search menu.
  • Page 371 Displays the menu to select the HARDCOPY hardcopy output device and its operating parameters. Default settings Copy Port (not affected by preset) are HP printer, PCL language, parallel port. Use the front panel knob or arrow keys to highlight the device, then press Select. NOTE "Baud Rate,"...
  • Page 372 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the custom colors menu. Selects the item whose color you Select Item want to customize on the external VGA monitor. Use the front panel knob, the keypad, or the arrow keys to specify the item number you want to customize.
  • Page 373 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the set clock menu. Sets the month on the clock. Set Month NOTE When selecting the month, you will always input a number that corresponds to the month desired. If the clock format is set to "alpha," however, the displayed month will be a three letter abbreviation (such as Mar for March).
  • Page 374 Line 2 Access Keys: DISPLAY More Display Title and Clock Softkey in the LAN menu. Displays the menu to setup the HP-IB SICL LAN device address, HP-IB logical unit number, and HP-IB name for SICL Setup LAN control of the analyzer.
  • Page 375 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the SCPI sock. setup menu. Allows you to enter the port Socket number for a socket connection to the analyzer for SCPI socket Port No. programming. The default port number is 5025. See The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement for more information. Access Keys: LAN SCPI Sock.
  • Page 376 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the spur avoid options menu. If this option is selected, the Spur Avoid analyzer switches between the default and an alternate configuration during a sweep to avoid spurs. NOTE Sweeptime usually increases when this option is selected.
  • Page 377 The disadvantage of a stepped sweep is the slower sweep speed. Stop Softkey in the menu. Sets the stop frequency of the source. FREQ Maximum frequency is 1.3 GHz for the HP 8712ET and 3.0 GHz for the HP 8714ET. ET User’s Guide 8-85...
  • Page 378 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Stop Power Softkey in the POWER menu. Sets stopping point (in dBm) for a power sweep measurement. Power Sweep SWEEP menu must be selected before setting the start and stop power points. See the Power Sweep entry in this chapter for more information on the power sweep function.
  • Page 379 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Sweep Time Softkey in the SWEEP menu. Sets the sweep time from fastest possible to three days (259.2 ks); overrides auto sweep time. Fastest possible sweeptime varies, and depends on other analyzer settings. Chapter 5 for more information on sweep time. Sweep Time Softkey in the menu.
  • Page 380 CRT settings, and configure the rear panel USER TTL IN/OUT port. Softkey in the HP-IB menu. Makes the network analyzer the system System controller of the HP instrument bus. Required mode for interfacing Controller with HP-IB peripherals (printers, plotters, and disk drives).
  • Page 381 Talker Listener the HP instrument bus. The analyzer cannot talk directly with other peripherals in this mode unless the computer establishes a data path for it. HP-IB mode is normally used for remote (computer) control of the analyzer. Access Keys:...
  • Page 382 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the modify kit menu. Allows you to modify the following Thru characteristics of the thru calibration standard in your calibration kit: delay, loss, and Z “Calibration Kits” on page 6-16 for more information. Access Keys: More Cal Cal Kit Modify (Cal Kit type) Softkey in the BOOTP setup menu.
  • Page 383 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the set pen numbers menu. Sets the pen number Trace 1 Pen assignment for data trace 1 on the hardcopy. Different pen numbers can represent different color or width pens. “Connecting and Configuring Printers and Plotters” on page 4-67 for more information.
  • Page 384 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the marker search menu. Toggle to ON if you want the Tracking marker search functions to be updated with each sweep. When toggled on OFF OFF (default setting), the functions are performed only once, when selected. “Using Markers”...
  • Page 385 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the define save menu. For use with a multiport test set. TSet Cal Toggle to ON if you want to save the TSet Cal. on OFF Refer to the multiport test set User's and Service Guide for more information.
  • Page 386 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the NFS device setup menu. Displays the NFS device table, Unmount which lists the currently mounted NFS devices. Select the device you NFS Device want to remove from the table and press the softkey which corresponds to that device.
  • Page 387 System Config SYSTEM OPTIONS Softkey in the IBASIC menu. Enables user to clear program, set Utilities memory size, or secure programs. See the HP Instrument BASIC User's Handbook Supplement for more information. Access Keys: IBASIC SYSTEM OPTIONS ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 388 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the more cal menu. Enters the velocity factor used by the Velocity Factor analyzer to calculate equivalent electrical length. Values entered should be less than 1, however the analyzer accepts values from 0.01 to 1.2. Access Keys: More Cal Softkey in the more CRT adjust menu.
  • Page 389 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the CRT adjust menu. Changes the vertical positioning of Vertical the display on both the internal CRT and an external monitor. Accepts Position whole number values from 1 to 100, with 1 representing as far up as possible and with 100 representing as far down as possible.
  • Page 390 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the system bandwidth menu. This is the widest system Wide 6500 Hz bandwidth available. Medium wide bandwidth is the system default. Chapter 5 for information on how system bandwidth can affect your measurements. Access Keys: System Bandwidth 8-98 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 391 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the broadband external menu. Selects the diode detection type of measurement with an external detector connected to the EXT DET X-INPUT on the rear panel. Access Keys: Detection Options MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Broadband External Softkey in the broadband external menu. Selects the measurement of the ratio of the external detectors at inputs X and Y.
  • Page 392 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the broadband external menu. Selects the diode detection type of measurement with an external detector connected to the EXT DET Y-INPUT on the rear panel. Access Keys: Detection Options MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Detection Options Broadband External Softkey in the more display menu.
  • Page 393 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the broadband external menu. Selects the measurement of Y/R* the ratio of the external detectors at inputs Y and R*. Access Keys: Detection Options More MEAS 1 MEAS 2 Broadband External Softkey in the broadband external menu. Selects the measurement of the ratio of the external detectors at inputs Y and X.
  • Page 394 Hardkey/Softkey Reference Softkey in the open, short, load, and through menus. Allows you to modify the Z characteristic of the open, short, load, or through calibration standards in your calibration kit. “Calibration Kits” on page 6-16 for more information. Access Keys: More Cal Cal Kit Modify (connector type) Open...
  • Page 395 Specifications ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 396 Specifications Definitions All specifications and characteristics apply over a 25 °C ±5 °C range (unless otherwise stated) and thirty minutes after the instrument has been turned on. Specification (spec.): Warranted performance. Specifications include guardbands to account for the expected statistical distribution, measurement uncertainties, and changes in performance due to environmental conditions.
  • Page 397 Specifications System Performance ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 398 Response Cal 0.13 a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. b. These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine” bandwidth, no averaging, and at an environmental temperature of 25° ± 5° C, with less than 1°...
  • Page 399 Transmission Uncertainty: Response Calibration (Specification) Reflection Uncertainty: One-Port Calibration (Specification) Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine” bandwidth, no averaging, and at an environmental tempera- ture of 25° ± 5° C, with less than 1° C deviation from the calibration temperature.
  • Page 400 Specifications Table 9-1 System Performance, Corrected, 50Ω, T/R Calibration (continued) HP 8712ET/8714ET (50 Ω) without Attenuator HP 85032B/E (Type-N, 50 Ω) Cal Kit, T/R Calibration Specification (in dB) Description 300 kHz 1.3 GHz to 1.3 GHz to 3 GHz Directivity Source Match: Reflection (One-Port Cal)
  • Page 401 Table 9-1 System Performance, Corrected, 50Ω, T/R Calibration (continued) HP 8712ET/8714ET (50 Ω) without Attenuator HP 85032B/E (Type-N, 50 Ω) Cal Kit, T/R Calibration Transmission Uncertainty: Enhanced Response Calibration (Specification) Transmission Uncertainty: Response Calibration (Specification) Reflection Uncertainty: One-Port Calibration (Specification) These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine”...
  • Page 402 Response Cal 0.125 0.295 a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. b. These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine” bandwidth, no averaging, and at an environmental temperature of 25° ± 5° C, with less than 1°...
  • Page 403 Transmission Uncertainty: Response Calibration (Specification) Reflection Uncertainty: One-Port Calibration (Specification) Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine” bandwidth, no averaging, and at an environmental tem- perature of 25° ± 5° C, with less than 1° C deviation from the calibration temperature.
  • Page 404 Specifications Table 9-2 System Performance, Corrected, 75Ω, T/R Calibration (continued) HP 8712ET/8714ET (75 Ω) without Attenuator HP 85036B/E (Type-N, 75 Ω) Cal Kit, T/R Calibration Specification (in dB) Description 300 kHz 1.3 GHz to 1.3 GHz to 3 GHz Directivity Source Match: Reflection (One-Port Cal)
  • Page 405 Table 9-2 System Performance, Corrected, 75Ω, T/R Calibration (continued) HP 8712ET/8714ET (75 Ω) without Attenuator HP 85036B/E (Type-N, 75 Ω) Cal Kit, T/R Calibration Transmission Uncertainty: Enhanced Response Calibration (Specification) Transmission Uncertainty: Response Calibration (Specification) Reflection Uncertainty: One-Port Calibration (Specification) These specifications apply for measurements made using “fine”...
  • Page 406 ± Transmission Tracking Crosstalk a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. b. These numbers apply for a measurement made using the “Fine” bandwidth at an environmental tempera- ture of 25° ± 5° C. c. The uncorrected directivity of a network analyzer is calculated in linear terms by dividing the reflection measurement of an ideal load by the average of the reflection measurements of an ideal short and an ideal...
  • Page 407 ± Transmission Tracking Crosstalk a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. b. These numbers apply for a measurement made using the “Fine” bandwidth at an environmental temperature of 25° ± 5° C. c. The uncorrected directivity of a network analyzer is calculated in linear terms by dividing the reflection measurement of a perfect load by the average of the reflection measurements of an ideal short and an ideal open.
  • Page 408 Specifications Test Port Output Table 9-5 Test Port Output HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Output Description Specification Supplemental Information Frequency Range: HP 8712ET/ES 300 kHz to 1.3 GHz HP 8714ET/ES 300 kHz to 3.0 GHz Resolution 1 Hz ±5 ppm, 0°...
  • Page 409 Without Attenuator Option 1E1 HP 8714ES: 50 Ω ±2.0 dB 75 Ω ±3.0 dB at <2 GHz ±3.0 dB at >2 GHz, char. a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. ET User’s Guide 9-15...
  • Page 410 With Attenuator Option 1E1 −8 dBm, nom. Without Attenuator Option 1E1 HP 8714ES: 50 Ω −60 dBm, nom. 75 Ω −60 dBm, nom. a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. 9-16 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 411 4 dBm at >2 GHz, <2 GHz char. a. Maximum power setting is the highest power setting allowed that maintains the network analyzer’s specified level accuracy. b. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. ET User’s Guide 9-17...
  • Page 412 −21 to −6 −31 to −16 −41 to −26 −51 to −36 −60 to −46 −60 to −56 Pmax a. Option 1E1 adds a 60 dB step attenuator to the HP 8712ET/8714ET. b. Pmax = maximum power setting 9-18 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 413 Specifications Table 9-5 Test Port Output (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Output Description Specification Supplemental Information Output Power (continued) Power Resolution 0.01 dB Attenuator Switch Points: HP 8712ET: 50 Ω −1, −11, −21, −31, −41, −51 dBm, nom.
  • Page 414 Specifications Test Port Input Table 9-6 Test Port Input HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Input Description Specification Supplemental Information Frequency Range HP 8712ET/ES: Narrowband 300 kHz to 1.3 GHz Broadband 10 MHz to 1.3 GHz HP 8714ET/ES: Narrowband 300 kHz to 3.0 GHz...
  • Page 415 16. For the HP 8712ES/8714ES, external broadband detectors will provide a lower noise floor than the internal broadband detectors. ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 416 The System Dynamic Range for HP 8714 ET/ES 75 Ω analyzers is not a specifica- tion for frequencies >2 GHz; it is a characteristic. For the HP 8712ES/8714ES, external broadband detectors will provide more dynamic range than the internal broadband detec- tors.
  • Page 417 The System Dynamic Range for HP 8714 ET/ES 75 W analyzers is not a specification for fre- quencies >2 GHz; it is a characteristic. For the HP 8712ES/8714ES, external broadband detec- tors will provide more dynamic range than the internal broadband detectors.
  • Page 418 Range applies to transmission measurements only, since reflection measure- ments are limited by directivity. The Receiver Dynamic Range for HP 8714ET/ES 75 Ω analyzers is not a specification for frequencies >2 GHz; it is a characteristic. For the HP 8712ES/8714ES, external broadband detectors will provide more dynamic range than the internal broadband detectors.
  • Page 419 Specifications Table 9-6 Test Port Input (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Input Description Spec. Typical System Bandwidths: Narrow Narrow Med Wide Wide (250 Hz) (250 Hz) (4000 Hz) (6500 Hz) Trace Noise HP 8712ET/8712ES: Narrowband: Magnitude 0.01 dB rms 0.03 dB-pp 0.12 dB-pp...
  • Page 420 Specifications Table 9-6 Test Port Input (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Input Dynamic Accuracy (Specification) HP 8712ET/8714ET: HP 8712ES/8714ES: a. Narrowband detection mode − b. The reference power for dynamic accuracy is 20 dBm. 9-26 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 421 Specifications Table 9-6 Test Port Input (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Input Power Accuracy: (Characteristic) HP 8712ET/8714ET Magnitude HP 8712ES/8714ES Magnitude a. At 30 MHz, broadband mode, internal detectors ET User’s Guide 9-27...
  • Page 422 HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES Test Port Input Group Delay Accuracy (Characteristic) HP 8712ET/ES and HP8714ET/ES a. Valid for HP 85032B/E (type-N 50 Ω) and HP 85036B/E (type-N 75 Ω) cal kits using either a two-port or enhanced response calibration. 9-28 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 423 Specifications General Information Table 9-7 General Information HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES General Information Description Specification Supplemental Information Display Range Magnitude 200 dB (at 20 dB/div), max 1800° (at 180°/div), max Phase Polar 1 MUnit, max Display Resolution Magnitude 0.01 dB/div, min Phase 0.1°/div, min...
  • Page 424 Specifications Table 9-7 General Information (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES General Information Description Specification Supplemental Information System Bandwidths Wide (6500 Hz) 6500 Hz, nom Medium Wide (4000 Hz) 4000 Hz, nom Medium (3700 Hz) 3700 Hz, nom Medium Narrow (1200 Hz)
  • Page 425 Specifications Table 9-7 General Information (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES General Information Description Specification Supplemental Information Rear Panel (continued) External Reference In: Input Frequency 10 MHz, nom. −5 dBm to +12 dBm, nom. Input Power 50 Ω, nom. Input Impedance VGA Video Output 15-pin mini D-Sub;...
  • Page 426 Specifications Table 9-7 General Information (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES General Information Description Specification Supplemental Information General Environmental Minimize using static-safe work procedures and an antistatic bench mat (HP part number 9300-0797). Dust Minimize for optimum reliability. Operating Environment 0 °C to +55 °C...
  • Page 427 Specifications Table 9-7 General Information (continued) HP 8712ET/ES and HP 8714ET/ES General Information Measurement Speed Conditions Typical Number Meas Number Freq Cycle Recall Data Meas Type of Chans of Points Span Time State & Cal Xfer Cycle 1-Port 6500 100 MHz...
  • Page 428 “corrected” 64-bit, floating point numbers (real and imaginary). f. A “Measurement Cycle” is defined as the time required for an HP S700 workstation to con- trol the analyzer to: (1) recall the state and calibration (analyzer is now in “sweep hold”...
  • Page 429 Specifications Features Measurement Number of Display Measurements Two measurement displays are available. Each measurement can have independent instrument sweep and control parameters (including frequency settings, IF bandwidth, power level, number of trace points, averaging, format, and scale). The instrument can display a single measurement or dual measurements, on a split (two graticules) or overlaid (one graticule) screen.
  • Page 430 Specifications Display Annotations Analyzer display annotations include start/stop, center/span, or CW frequency, scale/division, reference level, marker data, softkey labels, warning and caution messages, screen titles, time and date, and pass/fail indication. Limits Measurement data can be compared to any combination of line or point limits for pass/fail testing.
  • Page 431: Storage

    All files are stored in MS-DOS® -compatible format. Instrument data can be stored in binary or ASCII format (including Touchstone/.s2p format), and screen graphics can be saved as PCX (bit mapped), HP-GL (vector), or PCL5 (printer) files. Network File System (NFS) Remote files and directories, such as those stored on a computer, can...
  • Page 432: Automation

    (API) is compatible with Berkeley sockets, Winsock and other standard socket APIs. Socket programming can be done in a variety of environments, including C programs, HP VEE, SICL LAN, or Java applets. A standard web browser and the analyzer’s built-in web page can be used to remotely enter SCPI commands via a Java applet.
  • Page 433 With SICL LAN, a remote analyzer can be controlled over the LAN with the same methods used for a local analyzer connected directly to the controller with HP-IB. SICL LAN can also be used with Windows 95/98/NT, or HP-UX.
  • Page 434: Measurement Calibration

    Specifications Programming using IBASIC As a standard feature, all HP 8712ET/ES and 8714ET/ES network analyzers come with the Instrument BASIC programming language (IBASIC). IBASIC facilitates automated measurements and control of other test equipment, improving productivity. For simpler applications, you can use IBASIC as a keystroke recorder to easily automate manual measurements.
  • Page 435 Specifications Calibration Interpolation Calibration interpolation is always active. The analyzer automatically recalculates the error coefficients when the test frequencies or the number of points have changed. The resulting frequency range must be within the frequency range used during the user calibration. If this is not the case, the analyzer reverts to the factory default calibration.
  • Page 436 They include: • 3.5 mm (HP 85033D with Option 001 • type-F 75 ohm (HP 85039B) • type-N 50 ohm (HP 85032B with Option 001 , or HP 85032E • type-N 75 ohm (HP 85036B/E •...
  • Page 437: Options

    HP 8712ES/8714ES. Transport case and fault location and structural return loss (Option 101) Combines a rugged transport and operation case (HP part number 08712-60059) with Option 100 for field measurements of fault location and structural return loss.
  • Page 438 Switching test sets enhance productivity by allowing multiple measurements with a single connection to the device under test. They are available in 50 and 75 ohm versions, in a variety of configurations and connector types. Please contact your HP sales representative for more information. 9-44...
  • Page 439: Warranty

    If the warranty covers repair or service to be performed at the Buyer’s facility, then the service or repair will be performed at the Buyer’s facility at no charge within HP service travel areas. Outside HP service travel areas, warranty service will be performed at Buyer’s facility only upon HP’s prior agreement, and Buyer shall pay HP’s round-trip travel...
  • Page 440: Limitation Of Warranty

    Specifications Limitation of Warranty The foregoing warranty shall not apply to defects resulting from improper or inadequate maintenance by Buyer, Buyer-supplied software or interfacing, unauthorized modification or misuse, operation outside of the environmental specifications for the product, or improper site preparation or maintenance.
  • Page 441: Hewlett-packard Sales And Service Offices

    Specifications Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Offices If you should need technical assistance, contact the nearest Hewlett-Packard sales or service office. See Table 9-8 on the next page. ET User’s Guide 9-47...
  • Page 442 Specifications Table 9-8 Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Offices UNITED STATES Instrument Support Center Hewlett-Packard Company (800) 403-0801 EUROPEAN FIELD OPERATIONS Headquarters France Germany Hewlett-Packard S.A. Hewlett-Packard France Hewlett-Packard GmbH 150, Route du Nant-d’Avril 1 Avenue Du Canada Hewlett-Packard Strasse 1217 Meyrin 2/ Geneva Zone D’Activite De Courtaboeuf 61352 Bad Homburg v.d.H Switzerland...
  • Page 443: Safety And Regulatory Information

    Safety and Regulatory Information ET User’s Guide 10-1...
  • Page 444 Safety and Regulatory Information Safety and Regulatory Information Safety and Regulatory Information This chapter contains required safety and regulatory information that is not included elsewhere in the manual. 10-2 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 445: Safety Information

    Safety and Regulatory Information Safety Information Safety Information Much of the required safety information is distributed throughout this manual in appropriate places. This section contains all required safety information that is not included elsewhere in this manual. Warnings Warning Definition Warning denotes a hazard.
  • Page 446: Cautions

    Safety and Regulatory Information Safety Information Cautions Caution Definition Caution denotes a hazard. It calls attention to a procedure that, if not correctly performed or adhered to, would result in damage to or destruction of the instrument. Do not proceed beyond a caution sign until the indicated conditions are fully understood and met.
  • Page 447: Instrument Markings

    Safety and Regulatory Information Safety Information Instrument Markings The instruction manual symbol. The product is marked with this symbol when it is necessary for the user to refer to the instructions in the manual. The CE mark is the registered trademark of the European Community.
  • Page 448: Regulatory Information

    Safety and Regulatory Information Regulatory Information Regulatory Information Notice for Germany: Noise Declaration LpA < 70 dB am Arbeitsplatz (operator position) normaler Betrieb (normal position) nach DIN 45635 T. 19 (per ISO 7779) Declaration of Conformity 10-6 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 449 Safety and Regulatory Information Regulatory Information ET User’s Guide 10-7...
  • Page 450 Safety and Regulatory Information Regulatory Information 10-8 ET User’s Guide...
  • Page 451: Factory Preset State And Memory Allocation

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation ET User’s Guide 11-1...
  • Page 452: Factory Preset And Peripheral States

    PRESET Factory Preset keys, or with the SCPI command "SYST:PRESET", it sets itself to the pre-defined conditions shown below. NOTE The HP-IB command "*RST" is not the same as "SYST:PRESET". BEGIN Key Settings None key device BEGIN MEAS Key Settings...
  • Page 453 RF power Power sweep start power 0.0 dBm Power sweep stop power 1.0 dBm 1. HP 8712ET 2. HP 8714ET 3. Analyzers with Option 100 only 4. Preset power level is user-defined by using the Pwr Level at Preset key. The factory default is 0 dBm.
  • Page 454 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States SOURCE Key Settings (continued) MENU Trigger source Internal Trigger mode Continuous Number of points Start distance 0.00 ft (0.00 m) 100.00 ft (30.48 m) Stop distance External reference Spur avoid options None 1.
  • Page 455 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States CONFIGURE Key Settings SCALE Scale/div 10 dB/div Reference level 0 dB Reference position Reference tracking Electrical delay 0 seconds Phase offset 0 degrees DISPLAY Full/split display Full Display trace Data Graticule Measurement channel annotation...
  • Page 456 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States CONFIGURE Key Settings (continued) Limit fail icon Limit pass/fail indicator "X" position Limit pass/fail indicator "Y" position Marker limits Limit test Previously set limits Deleted Active calibration Last active cal if valid; otherwise, default cal Detector zero Autozero...
  • Page 457 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States CONFIGURE Key Settings (continued) −6 Notch search level −3 Target search level Tracking FORMAT Format type Log mag Averaging Average factor System bandwidth Medium Wide Fault Window Medium Delay Aperture 0.5% (minimum) 1.
  • Page 458: Peripheral State

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States Peripheral State The analyzer is shipped from the factory with the settings in the following table. These settings will remain as shown, until you change them. When they have been changed and you then preset the analyzer with the hardkey, or the SCPI command "SYST:PRESET", or PRESET...
  • Page 459 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States SYSTEM OPTIONS Key Settings Analyzer HP-IB Address System Controller/Talker Listener Talker Listener Power Meter HP-IB Address System Controller Address User TTL Config Softkey Auto-Step Clock: Format YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS Numeric/Alpha...
  • Page 460 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States HARDCOPY Key Settings Select Copy Port: Hardcopy Device HP printer Printer Language Hardcopy Port parallel Printer/Plotter HP-IB Address Baud Rate 19200 Handshake Xon/Xoff Define Hardcopy Graph and Marker Table Define Graph: Trace Data...
  • Page 461 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Factory Preset and Peripheral States HARDCOPY Key Settings (continued) Define Printer: Mono/Color Monochrome Orientation Portrait Auto Feed Resolution 96 dpi Top Margin 0 mm Left Margin 0 mm Print Width 150 mm (5.9 in) Define Plotter: Mono/Color Monochrome...
  • Page 462: Volatile Settings

    PRESET pressed, but not when the analyzer's power is cycled. Examples of volatile settings are: always returns to "HP 8712E Compatible" File Format format after a power cycle. always returns to 0.0.0.0 after a power IP Address to Ping cycle.
  • Page 463: Save/recall Memory Allocation

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation Before reading this section, please refer to “Using Instrument Functions” Chapter 4 for an overview of the Save/Recall functions. This section provides details on the size of Save/Recall instrument state files.
  • Page 464 Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation Table 11-2 Maximum Number of Files and Directories Root Directory Any Subdirectory Non-volatile RAM Disk >1000 Volatile RAM Disk >1000 If you have more files than will fit in a single directory, use additional subdirectories.
  • Page 465: Types Of Storable Information

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation Types of Storable Information The instrument states can contain the instrument state, calibration data, and trace data. Inst State (Instrument state) Data sufficient to set up the network analyzer. The amount of memory used is independent of the number of measurement points unless memory trace functions are used.
  • Page 466: How To Determine The Size Of Disk Files

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation How to Determine the Size of Disk Files This section explains how to calculate the size of the files that you save to disk when using SAVE RECALL As mentioned earlier, there are three types of information that can be saved: •...
  • Page 467 246 + 3 × 8 × Cal reflection 1. Sizes are subject to change with future firmware revisions. 2. If the file format chosen is "HP 8711A/B Compatible," the file header size is 768. 3. N = number of measurement points 4.
  • Page 468: Memory Usage Notes

    Factory Preset State and Memory Allocation Save/Recall Memory Allocation Memory traces are saved with the instrument state for each active channel whose display is set to Memory, Data/Mem, or Data and Memory in the menu. DISPLAY Following are some examples: •...
  • Page 469 3-14 broadband detection mode Add Min Point key auto-step 4-62 Broadband External key 8-13 address autozero 6-15 Broadband Internal key 8-13 HP-IB 1-14 Autozero key 8-10 Broadband Passive key 8-13 plotter 1-14 AUX INPUT connector 3-51 broadband power measurement printer...
  • Page 470 3-22 definition 10-4 damage levels normalize 6-11 8-62 receiver input damage level front panel one-port 3-33 3-35 6-14 HP-IB reflection 3-33 3-35 6-14 CE mark definition 10-5 impedances response 6-12 8-73 Center key 8-15 multi-pin 7-14 Index-2...
  • Page 471 Index rear panel default conditions, presetting the Delta Mkr on OFF key 4-24 specs 1-17 analyzer contents of shipment Default key 8-21 detection Continue key 8-17 default one-port calibration broadband Continuous key 8-17 8-21 narrowband control, intensity 7-20 Default Pen Colors key 8-22 detection modes controllers, connecting...
  • Page 472 Index split 4-46 enhanced response calibration factory preset DISPLAY key 8-25 6-13 Factory Preset key 8-30 Display User List key 8-25 Enhanced Response key 8-28 FAIL! indicator 4-29 4-37 4-51 Distance key 8-25 Enter Line 1 key 8-28 FastRecall on OFF key 8-30 Dither key 8-25...
  • Page 473 Index Frequency key 8-33 group delay 3-53 HP 8712ET IP Address key 8-39 frequency range Group ID key 8-36 HP 8714ET Address key 8-39 entering HP 8714ET IP Address key 8-39 frequency response errors HP-IB 8-22 8-73 addresses 1-14 hardcopy...
  • Page 474 4-68 Load Match key 8-49 X Position 4-37 interface capabilities load, calibration standard 6-19 Y Position 4-37 HP-IB Local Path key 8-50 8-72 Limit Icon ON off key 8-47 8-48 Internal 3.5" Disk key 8-44 lock-up limit indicator 4-38 internal detectors how to fix...
  • Page 475 Index Lower key 8-51 reference 4-24 using the BEGIN key 3-10 Luminance key 8-51 relative mode 4-24 measurement uncertainty search directivity 8-24 bandwidth values isolation 8-44 notch values 4-12 reflection tracking 8-71 Mag Units key 8-52 Smith chart markers 4-27 source match 8-83 magnitude, impedance...
  • Page 476 Notch key 8-62 plane, calibration reference Number of Points key 8-62 plotter Numeric key 8-62 address 1-14 HP 7440A ColorPro Eight-Pen Narrow 250 Hz key 8-60 Color Graphics 4-67 narrow bandwidth 5-10 HP 7470A Two-Pen Graphics narrowband detection mode one-port calibration...
  • Page 477 4-81 measurements 3-38 rear panel features 7-25 Print Width key 8-67 Reflection key 8-71 recall from a disk or memory Print/Plot HP-IB Addr key 8-67 reflection measurements 3-32 printer Reflection Tracking key 8-71 Recall Program key 8-70 address 1-14...
  • Page 478 5-13 Save AUTOST key 8-76 Set Year key 8-81 SRL key 8-84 save definition 4-58 setting HP-IB addresses 1-14 Stack Size key 8-84 Save Meas 1 key 8-76 setting the line voltage standard deviation 4-18 Save Meas 2 key...
  • Page 479 Index Start Line # key 8-85 symbol, instruction manual time, format 8-16 Start Power key 8-85 Timeout key 8-90 static-safe equipment symbols and markings Title and Clock key 4-50 part numbers instrument 10-5 Title+Clk ON off key 8-90 statistical mean, marker limit Sync Green on OFF key 8-87 Top Margin key...
  • Page 480 Index type-F cal kit 8-93 viewing a single measurement Type-F key 8-93 channel type-N(f) cal kit 8-93 Volatile RAM Disk key 8-97 Type-N(f)(Default) key 8-93 volatile settings 11-12 type-N(m) cal kit 8-93 voltage requirements Type-N(m) key 8-93 voltage selector switch 7-25 types of calibration types of calibration standards...

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