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Honeywell Notifier NFS2-640/E Programming Manual

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Fire Alarm Control Panel
NFS2-640/E
Programming Manual
L2
Document 52742
7/17/14
Rev:
P/N 52742:L2
ECN 13-838

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  Summary of Contents for Honeywell Notifier NFS2-640/E

  • Page 1 Fire Alarm Control Panel NFS2-640/E Programming Manual Document 52742 7/17/14 Rev: P/N 52742:L2 ECN 13-838...
  • Page 2 Fire Alarm & Emergency Communication System Limitations While a life safety system may lower insurance rates, it is not a substitute for life and property insurance! An automatic fire alarm system—typically made up of smoke (caused by escaping gas, improper storage of flammable materi- detectors, heat detectors, manual pull stations, audible warning als, etc.).
  • Page 3 HARSH™, NIS™, NOTI•FIRE•NET™, eVance™, and SWIFT™ are all trademarks; and Acclimate® Plus, FAAST®, FlashScan®, NION®, NOTIFIER®, ONYX®, ONYXWorks®, UniNet®, VeriFire®, and VIEW® are all registered trademarks of Honeywell International Inc. Echelon® is a registered trademark and LonWorks™ is a trademark of Echelon Corporation. ARCNET® is a registered trademark of Datapoint Corporation. Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation.
  • Page 4 •Brief description of content you think should be improved or corrected •Your suggestion for how to correct/improve documentation Send email messages to: FireSystems.TechPubs@honeywell.com Please note this email address is for documentation feedback only. If you have any technical issues, please contact Technical Services.
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents Section 1: General Information....................7 1.1: UL 864 Compliance............................7 1.1.1: Products Subject to AHJ Approval......................7 1.1.2: Programming Features Subject to AHJ Approval ................7 1.2: About This Manual ............................8 1.2.1: Cautions, Warning, and Notes......................8 1.2.2: Typographic Conventions........................8 1.2.3: Supplemental Information ........................9 1.2.4: Shortcuts to Operating Functions ......................10 1.3: Introduction to the Control Panel ........................10 1.4: Features................................11...
  • Page 6 Table of Contents A.3: Initiating Devices ............................91 A.4: Warning Sounders ............................91 A.5: Auxiliary Control Functions ........................91 A.6: ACS Annunciation ............................91 B.1: Presignal and Positive Alarm Sequence (PAS) ...................92 B.1.1: What is Presignal and PAS?......................92 B.1.2: Selecting Presignal and PAS Outputs ....................93 B.2: Time Control Zones.............................93 B.3: Coding Functions for NACS ........................93 C.1: Overview ..............................95...
  • Page 7: Section 1: General Information

    Section 1: General Information 1.1 UL 864 Compliance 1.1.1 Products Subject to AHJ Approval This product has been certified to comply with the requirements in the Standard for Control Units and Accessories for Fire Alarm Systems, UL 864 9th Edition. A complete listing identifying which products have or have not received UL 864 9th Edition certification is located in the installation manual of this fire alarm system.
  • Page 8: About This Manual

    General Information About This Manual 1.2 About This Manual 1.2.1 Cautions, Warning, and Notes The following graphics appear in the manual to indicate a caution or a warning. CAUTION: Information about procedures that could cause programming errors, runtime errors, or equipment damage.
  • Page 9: 3: Supplemental Information

    About This Manual General Information 1.2.3 Supplemental Information The table below provides a list of documents referenced in this manual, as well as documents for selected other compatible devices. The document series chart (DOC-NOT) provides the current document revision. A copy of this document is included in every shipment. Compatible Conventional Devices (Non-addressable) Document Number Device Compatibility Document...
  • Page 10: 4: Shortcuts To Operating Functions

    General Information Introduction to the Control Panel AFM-16A Annunciator Fixed Module Manual 15207 ACM-8R Annunciator Control Module Manual 15342 LCD-80 Manual 15037 LCD2-80 Manual 53242 FDU-80 Remote Annunciator Manual 51264 LDM Series Lamp Driver Annunciator Manual 15885 SCS Smoke Control Manual (Smoke and HVAC Control Station) 15712 FireVoice-25/50ZS &...
  • Page 11: Features

    Features General Information The benefits of each method are listed below: Programming method Benefits Refer to Program Change Speed and convenience of Section “Programming” on putting the control panel on page 13 line quickly (using the Autoprogram function) and changing programming information.
  • Page 12 General Information How to Enter a Password From the “SYSTEM NORMAL” screen: Press , press 1 (the password screen will display). ENTER Enter a password, then press ENTER ENTER PROG OR STAT PASSWORD, THEN ENTER. (ESCAPE TO ABORT) _ Enter password here (00000 or 11111) Figure 1.1 Password Screen In Program Change or Status Change, the control panel does the following: •...
  • Page 13: Section 2: Programming

    Section 2: Programming 2.1 Overview Program Change is the programming level that lets you change the essential control panel functions, such as point programming, changing passwords, changing system functions. Included are four options: Basic Program, Network, FlashScan Poll, and Utility Program. The structure of the Program Change option is shown below: 1 = B A S I C P R O G R A M 2 = N E T W O R K...
  • Page 14: How To Enter Programming

    Programming How to Enter Programming 2.2 How to Enter Programming To enter Program Change, follow these steps: At the “SYSTEM NORMAL” screen, press the key. The control panel displays the ENTER “Entry” screen, as shown below: 1 = P R O G R A M M I N G 2 = R E A D S T A T U S E N T R Y ( E S C A P E T O A B O R T ) At the “Entry”...
  • Page 15: 1: Clear Memory (0= Clr )

    Basic Program Programming 2.3.1 Clear Memory (0= The Clear option removes all programming information from control panel memory. If installing the control panel for the first time, use option 0 to clear Program Change control panel memory. To do so, follow these steps: Password From the “Basic Program”...
  • Page 16 Programming Basic Program Use the Clear option to clear program information from memory. For instructions on clearing memory, refer to “How to Clear Memory (0= )” on page page 15. NOTE: Once Step 1 is completed, Step 2 will cause the panel to assess whether a loop is comprised of all FlashScan devices or not.
  • Page 17 Basic Program Programming Press the key to add detector 147 to the program with the default program information. ENTER If you want to change the default information, use the programming keys to do so, then press key to add detector 147 to the program. ENTER The Autoprogram Summary screen appears.
  • Page 18 Programming Basic Program Change Autoprogram Default Values To assign system default values from the basic program screen, Press 0 (clear), then press 1 (autoprogram). Refer to the chart below for default values and how to modify them. Table 2.1 Autoprogram Defaults (1 of 2) Function Default Values To Alter, refer to...
  • Page 19: 3: Modify Or Delete A Point (2= Point )

    Basic Program Programming Table 2.1 Autoprogram Defaults (2 of 2) Function Default Values To Alter, refer to System (YOUR CUSTOM SYSTEM MESSAGE HERE) “How to Create a System Message (4= )” on page MESSAGE Message SYSTEM NORMAL 10:23A 041508 Tue page 26 The first line of the LCD display contains 40 blank characters for a custom message.
  • Page 20 Programming Basic Program The Modify Point and Delete Point screens let you edit or delete points for a detector, a monitor or control module, or NAC. To select a point, follow these steps: To select Do the following Refer to an addressable Press “Modify an Addressable Detector...
  • Page 21 Basic Program Programming Table 2.2 Detector Program Values Field Description Set as Follows Extended 12 character custom label See “Custom Label” above. Label extension. Note that spaces must be input by the user, including any space necessary between the custom and extended label fields. An 80-column printout will run the two fields together.
  • Page 22 Programming Basic Program Modify an Addressable Monitor Module Point When you select a point address, the control panel returns a screen that displays information about the point. Below is an example of information for a monitor module (2M101) in the LCD display: Blinking Type Code selection 20-character user-editable custom label.
  • Page 23 Basic Program Programming Modify an Addressable Control Module Point When you select a point address for modification, the control panel returns a screen that displays information about the point. For example, the illustration below shows sample information for a control module (2M101) in the LCD display. Blinking Type Code selection 20-character user-editable custom label P R O G R A M C O N T R O L...
  • Page 24 Programming Basic Program Table 2.5 Modifying Control Module Programming Selections (2 of 2) Field Description Set as follows: Walk Test Specifies if outputs sound during Walk Type one of the following entries. Test W = devices sound (Basic Walk Test) * = devices do not sound (Silent Walk Test) (default) When finished modifying a point, press the key;...
  • Page 25: 4: Change A Password (3= Passwd )

    Basic Program Programming Table 2.6 Modifying a NAC Programming Selections (2 of 2) Field Description Set as follows: Silenceable Specifies if an operator can manually Type in one of the following values. silence an activated output * = output nonsilenceable F = silenceable, resound by fire alarm U = silenceable, resound by supervisory alarm B = silenceable, resound by security alarm...
  • Page 26: 5: Create A System Message (4= Message )

    Programming Basic Program A Forgotten Password? If a password is entered incorrectly, the panel will respond by displaying an INCORRECT PASSWORD message and a code. The programmer may hit escape and reenter the password correctly. However, if the password has been forgotten, record the code and contact Notifier. After proper authentication, the original password can be determined by deciphering the code.
  • Page 27: 6: Create A Custom Zone Label (5= Zone )

    Basic Program Programming 2.3.6 Create a Custom Zone Label (5= ZONE The Zone option lets you change the custom label assigned to zones 1-99. From the “Basic Program” screen, press the 5 key to display the “Zone Program Change Change” screen as shown below: Password blinking cursor prompt C H A N G E Z O N E L A B E L...
  • Page 28 Programming Basic Program Table 2.10 Summary of Special Zones Special Zone Lets you Select a Presignal Delay Timer and select PAS (Positive Alarm PRESIG Sequence) F5-F6= Specify Time Control functions such as the start time, stop time, or TIME days of the week Specify up to nine holiday dates.
  • Page 29 Basic Program Programming Table 2.11 Special Output Functions F1-F4 (2 of 2) Special Function Specifies F2 (AC Trouble) An output programmed to turn on/off if an AC power loss or a brownout condition occurs F3 (Security) An output programmed to turn on/off if a Security input activates F4 (Supervisory) An output programmed to turn on/off if a Supervisory input activates...
  • Page 30 Programming Basic Program F5-F6 (Time Control Functions) The Time Control screen provides fields for changing the start time, stop time, or days of the week. For details on time selections, refer to “Time Control Zones” on page 93. From the Special Function Change screen, select F5 or F6 to display the Time Control screen: Time Control programming status banner P R G T I M E F U N C T I O N...
  • Page 31: 8: Change Global System Functions (7= System )

    Basic Program Programming F9 (Pre-Alarm) The Pre-Alarm screen provides fields for programming the Alert or Action Pre-Alarm functions. For details on Pre-Alarm selections, refer to “Pre-Alarm” on page 99. From the Special Function Change screen, press F9 to display the Pre-Alarm screen: ACTION or ALERT Pre-Alarm level: press the NEXT PREVIOUS...
  • Page 32 Programming Basic Program Table 2.12 Settings for Global Systems Functions (2 of 2) System Function Setting Default USA TIME USA time (mm/dd/yy) or EUR time (dd/mm/yy) Press the key to change. Note that NEXT PREVIOUS (European) time changes to 24-hour time format and date format.
  • Page 33 Basic Program Programming Annunciator Options NOTE: An ACM-24AT or AEM-24AT LED point must be programmed as a dedicated visual indicator for a mass notification or CO event. This is not required for displayless systems. Use Annunciator Selection screens to select information that will display on the ACS annunciators. (Table 2.13 on page 34 contains the ACS display selections.) Setting from the “System Function”...
  • Page 34 Programming Basic Program Annunciation Points The control panel’s annunciation points are divided into 23 ACS selection groups of 64 points each. The table below contains a list of these groups, what an annunciator displays when a group is selected, and where to locate a definition of the 64 points within the group. Table 2.13 ACS Selection Groups (1 of 2) ACS Selection Annunciator Display...
  • Page 35 Basic Program Programming Table 2.13 ACS Selection Groups (2 of 2) ACS Selection Annunciator Display Refer to Group Programmable Annunciator #4 See Note Programmable Annunciator #5 See Note Programmable Annunciator #6 See Note Programmable Annunciator #7 See Note Programmable Annunciator #8 See Note Programmable Annunciator #9 See Note...
  • Page 36 Programming Basic Program ACS Selection Group B: Table 2.15 ACS Group B Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input Zone 57 Active Zone 57 Trouble Not Used Input Zone 58 Active Zone 58 Trouble Not Used Input Zone 59 Active Zone 59 Trouble Not Used to (see note 1)
  • Page 37 Basic Program Programming ACS Selection Group D (SLC #2, Modules 1-64): Table 2.17 ACS Group D Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function Input or Output Module 001 Active Module 001 Trouble Controls Output Module Input or Output Module 002 Active Module 002 Trouble Controls Output Module Input or Output...
  • Page 38 Programming Basic Program Table 2.20 ACS Group G (2 of 2) Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function Output SLC 1, Module 131 Active SLC 1, Module 131 Trouble Controls SLC 1, Module 131 to (see note 1) to (see note 1) Output SLC 1, Module 159 Active SLC 1, Module 159 Trouble...
  • Page 39 Basic Program Programming ACS Selection Group I (SLC #2, Detectors 1-64): Table 2.22 ACS Group I Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Not Used Input Detector 001 Alarm Detector 001 Trouble Not Used Input Detector 002 Alarm Detector 002 Trouble Not Used Input Detector 003 Alarm...
  • Page 40 Programming Basic Program ACS Selection Group L (SLC #1, Detectors 129-159, and SLC #2, Detectors 129-159): Table 2.25 ACS Group L Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input SLC 1, Detector 129 Alarm SLC 1, Detector 129 Not Used Trouble Input SLC 1, Detector 130 Alarm SLC 1, Detector 130...
  • Page 41 Basic Program Programming • Map the panel zones to the desired annunciator point. Refer to the FirstCommand or FireVoice NFV-25/50ZS manual for more information, including dipswitch settings. Table 2.26 Point Definitions for Group M Annunciator Point Type 1 - 9 Unused Message 0 (No Message/Message Off) Message 1...
  • Page 42 Programming Basic Program ACS Selection Group P (SLC #1, Modules 65-100 and Detectors 1-14): Table 2.27 ACS Group P (see note 3) Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input SLC 1, Module 65 Alarm SLC 1, Module 65 Trouble Not Used Input SLC 1, Module 66 Alarm SLC 1, Module 66 Trouble Not Used...
  • Page 43 Basic Program Programming ACS Selection Group Q (SLC #2, Modules 65-100 and Detectors 1-14): Table 2.28 ACS Group Q (see note 3) Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input SLC 2, Module 65 Alarm SLC 2, Module 65 Trouble Not Used Input SLC 2, Module 66 Alarm SLC 2, Module 66 Trouble Not Used...
  • Page 44 Programming Basic Program ACS Selection Group R (SLC #1, Detectors 15-46): Table 2.29 ACS Group R Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input Detector 015 Alarm Detector 015 Trouble Not Used Input Detector 015 Trouble Detector 015 Trouble Not Used Maintenance Urgent Maintenance Alert...
  • Page 45 Basic Program Programming ACS Selection Group T (SLC #1, Detectors 47-78): Table 2.31 ACS Group T Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input Detector 047 Alarm Detector 047 Trouble Not Used Input Detector 047 trouble Detector 047 Trouble Not Used Maintenance Urgent Maintenance Alert...
  • Page 46 Programming Basic Program ACS Selection Group V (SLC #1, Detectors 79-100): Table 2.33 ACS Group V Point Type Red LED Yellow LED Switch Function* Input Detector 079 Alarm Detector 079 Trouble Not Used Input Detector 079 Trouble Detector 079 Trouble Not Used Maintenance Urgent Maintenance Alert...
  • Page 47: 9: How To Check The Program For Errors

    The Network Program Programming 2.3.9 How to Check the Program for Errors (8= CHECK PRG When finished programming, you can use the Check option to search the program entries for possible errors. From the “Basic Program” screen, press the 8 key. The Check option searches the program for the following Program Change conditions that can cause errors: Password...
  • Page 48: The Utility Program

    Programming The Utility Program To select network options, follow these steps: Using the arrow keys, move the blinking cursor to a selection. Press the key to select H or L (Threshold Ch. A, Threshold Ch. B). a three- NEXT PREVIOUS digit number (Node), or Y or N (Style 7).
  • Page 49: Flashscan Poll

    FlashScan Poll Programming Table 2.35 Utility Program Options (2 of 2) Utility Option Description IP ACCESS Note: Use of this option is subject to local AHJ approval. This option allows the programmer to choose one of three options for Wide Area Network (WAN) communication.
  • Page 50: Setting The Baud Rate Of Serial Ports

    Programming Setting the Baud Rate of Serial Ports Option 2 Program all modules and detectors on an SLC as CLIP. (In the “FlashScan Poll” screen, enter N for DET and N for MOD. It is possible to have up to 99 CLIP modules and 99 CLIP detectors on this SLC.) CAUTION: Do not program more than 99 CLIP addresses, as this will compromise the response time of the panel to display off-normal events.
  • Page 51: 2: Crt Serial Port

    Setting the Baud Rate of Serial Ports Programming 2.7.2 CRT Serial Port The default setting for the serial EIA-232 CRT port is “disabled”. To enable the EIA-232 CRT port at 9600 baud, follow the steps below. NOTE: The serial EIA-232 CRT port can only be enabled in standalone (non-networked) applications.
  • Page 52: Section 3: Status Change

    Section 3: Status Change 3.1 Overview Status Change provides a second programming level - accessed by an assigned password - for changing operating parameters. (These operating parameters do not affect control program settings.) For example, the Status Change password lets you change settings such as detector sensitivity and system time and date.
  • Page 53: Disable Or Enable A Point

    Disable or Enable a Point Status Change 3.3 Disable or Enable a Point WARNING: Do not rely on disable/enable software settings to lock out releasing devices. Releasing devices must be physically disconnected. NOTE: When an input or output point associated with releasing functions is disabled, a single supervisory trouble will be generated.
  • Page 54: Changing Detector Sensitivity

    Status Change Changing Detector Sensitivity Table 3.1 Changing the Status Banner (2 of 2) Press Save the status Go to the next or previous point address (Next Selection) or (Previous Selection) 3.4 Changing Detector Sensitivity The Detector Sensitivity option lets you change the Alarm and Pre-Alarm (sensitivity) level for an installed detector.
  • Page 55: Clearing Alarm Verification Counters

    Clearing Alarm Verification Counters Status Change 3.5 Clearing Alarm Verification Counters The Clear Verification screen lets you clear all counters for detectors selected for Alarm Verification. From the “Status Change Selection” screen, press the 3 key to display the “Clear Verification” screen as shown below: Status Change Password P R E S S E N T E R T O C L E A R V E R I F I C A T I O N C O U N T S...
  • Page 56: Walk Test

    Status Change Walk Test Do this Save the time and date and return Press 3.8 Walk Test Walk Test allows the user to test the entire fire alarm system. There are two kinds of Walk Test - Basic and Advanced, described later in this section. Before entering Walk Test, note the following: •...
  • Page 57: 1: Basic Walk Test

    Walk Test Status Change 3.8.1 Basic Walk Test When the tester activates an input during Basic Walk Test, all silenceable outputs mapped by CBE to that input will activate. The activations are tracking; once the activation stimulus is removed, the input will deactivate.
  • Page 58: 2: Advanced Walk Test

    Status Change Walk Test 3.8.2 Advanced Walk Test During Advanced Walk Test, when the tester activates an input, all CBE mapped to that input will activate with the exception of releasing functions. Each input activation is latching; that is, it will not deactivate until the system is reset.
  • Page 59: 4: Viewing Walk Test Results

    Walk Test Status Change • an input device activated in Basic Walk Test latches on steady green for the duration of the test. • an output device activated in Basic Walk Test will remain active and the LED will glow steady green for: - approximately 4 seconds for alarms - approximately 8 seconds for troubles.
  • Page 60: A.1: Overview

    Appendix A: Releasing Applications WARNING: When used for CO releasing applications, observe proper precautions as stated in NFPA 12. Do not enter the protected space unless physical lockout and other safety procedures are fully completed. Do not use software disable functions in the panel as lockout. Do not enable the BACKUP option switch for any of the four Notification Appliance Circuits (NACs) if they are used for releasing functions.
  • Page 61: A.1.2: Nfpa Releasing Applications

    How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications A.1.2 NFPA Releasing Applications This control panel can be used for agent release or preaction/deluge control applications. In a properly configured system with compatible, listed actuating and initiating devices, this control panel complies with the following NFPA standards for installation in accordance with the acceptable standard: Table A.2 NFPA Standards for Releasing Applications Standard...
  • Page 62: A.2.2: Abort Switches

    Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone A.2.2 Abort Switches Definition of Abort Switches The control panel provides for four (4) types of Abort Switches (ULI, IRI, NYC, and AHJ) that you can use, that will affect the operation of a Delay Timer mapped to the same Releasing Zone. For example, an Abort Switch selected for Releasing Zone R05 only affects the Delay Timer selected for R05.
  • Page 63 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications When an initiating device activates, you must press and hold the Abort Switch or the control panel will send the command to dump releasing agents when the Delay time (15 seconds shown) expires. The Abort selection (ULI, IRI, NYC, or AHJ) determines the function of the Abort Switch.
  • Page 64 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Programming a ULI Abort Switch The following contains information needed to program a ULI Abort Switch. Description  Requires a standard UL-type delay timer that complies with UL Standard 864. How to Program ...
  • Page 65 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Programming an IRI Abort Switch The following contains information needed to program an IRI Abort Switch. Description  A standard UL-type delay timer (complies with UL Standard 864) that operates like ULI, but with additional functions for Cross Zones.
  • Page 66 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Programming a NYC Abort Switch The following contains information needed to program an NYC Abort Switch. Description  A standard NYC delay timer that adds 90 seconds to the programmed Delay Timer. NOTE: NYC timers do not comply with UL Standard 864.
  • Page 67 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications and Releasing Zone outputs will begin releasing at that time. Following is an example of a NYC Abort Switch and a Delay Timer programmed to Releasing Zone R05: P R G R E L E A S E F U N C T I O N R E L E A S E C O N T R O L D E L A Y = 1 5 A B O R T = N Y C C R O S S = N S O K = 0 0 0 0 R 0 5 Program selections for Releasing Zone R05...
  • Page 68 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Programming an AHJ Abort Switch The following contains information needed to program an AHJ Abort Switch: Description  An AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) delay timer that restores the programmed Delay Timer. NOTE: An AHJ timer does not comply with UL Standard 864. How to Program ...
  • Page 69 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Example  An AHJ Abort Switch and a Delay Timer programmed to Releasing Zone R05: P R G R E L E A S E F U N C T I O N R E L E A S E C O N T R O L D E L A Y = 6 0 A B O R T = A H J C R O S S = N S O K = 0 0 0 0 R 0 5 Program selections for Releasing Zone R05...
  • Page 70: A.2.3: Using Cross Zones

    Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone A.2.3 Using Cross Zones Purpose of Cross Zones Using Cross Zones lets you program the control panel to activate a Releasing Zone and any output mapped to the Releasing Zone only after a predetermined sequence of events occurs. (If not using Cross Zones, set CROSS= N.) NOTE: Only the first Software Zone (Z01-Z99) listed in the zone map is used to determine Cross=Z.
  • Page 71 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Software Zone Z01 CBE list = Z02 ZR1 Smoke Heat Smoke Smoke Software Detector Detector Detector Detector Zone Z02 2D104 2D103 2D102 2D101 CBE list = Z01 ZR1 CBE list = Z01 ZR1 Releasing Zone ZR1 CBE list = ZR1...
  • Page 72: A.2.4: Programming A Soak Timer

    Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Press at this point to save the Cross Zone value if no other fields on the screen are changing. To change another field on the screen, move the cursor into position by pressing the arrow keys on the keypad.
  • Page 73: A.2.5: Using Type Codes For Releasing Zones

    How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications A.2.5 Using Type Codes for Releasing Zones The control panel provides a set of Type Codes designed for releasing applications for inputs and outputs. This section details how to program each of these Type Codes. Type Codes designed for Releasing Zone inputs (monitor modules).
  • Page 74 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Type Code ABORT SWITCH The following contains information needed to program an Abort Switch for a monitor module Description  A monitor module, connected to a UL-listed abort station (such as the Notifier NBG-12LRA), that you use as an abort switch for a Releasing Zone.
  • Page 75 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Type Code RELEASE The following contains information needed to program a Manual Release switch for a monitor module Description  A monitor module—connected to a UL-listed manual station (such as the Notifier NBG-12LRA)— used to manually release agents.
  • Page 76 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Type Code MANREL DELAY The following contains information needed to program a Manual Release Delay switch for a monitor module using the Type Code. MANREL DELAY Description  A monitor module—connected to a UL-listed manual station (such as the Notifier NBG-12LRA)— used to initiate a manual release with 30-second delay time.
  • Page 77 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Examples  A programming example of a monitor module programmed for switch for MANREL DELAY Releasing Zone R5. SYSTEM SYSTEM NORMAL ACTIVATED Monitor Detector Module Type Code NBG-12LRA MANREL DELAY station with Manual Release Lever Control...
  • Page 78 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Type Code SECOND SHOT NOTE: The Second Shot switch can only be used with the y Type Code. MANREL DELA The following contains information needed to program a Second Shot switch for a monitor module Description ...
  • Page 79 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Example 1: If the detector initiates the alarm, R05 activates. Releasing begins after the delay timer has expired (15 seconds). Releasing will continue for the soak timer duration (30 seconds). Once the Soak Timer expires, the Second Shot Switch can then be activated to initiate an additional soak cycle.
  • Page 80 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Example  A programming example of a control module programmed as a Release End Bell for Releasing Zone R5. Monitor Detector Detector Detector Module Control Control Module Module Type Code Type Code Type Code Type Code REL END BELL...
  • Page 81 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Type Code REL CKT ULC NOTE: A ULC Release Circuit with this Type Code requires the following selections: A Releasing Zone selection (R0-R9); An output circuit mapped to the same Releasing Zone; Switch Inhibit selected;...
  • Page 82 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Example  A programming example of a control module programmed as a ULC Release Circuit for Releasing Zone R5. Monitor Detector Detector D e t e c Module Type Code Type Code REL CKT ULC REL CKT ULC Control...
  • Page 83 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Type Code RELEASE CKT NOTE: A Release Circuit with this Type Code requires the following selections: A Releasing Zone selection (R0-R9); An output circuit mapped to the same Releasing Zone; Switch Inhibit selected;...
  • Page 84 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Example  A programming example of a control module programmed as a Release Circuit for Releasing Zone Monitor Detector Detector Detector Module Type Code Type Code RELEASE CKT RELEASE CKT Control Control Module Module For example, all control modules programmed with the...
  • Page 85 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Relea. Form-C Type Code NOTE: An output with a relea.form c Type Code requires the following selections: A Releasing Zone selection (R0-R9); An output circuit mapped to the same Releasing Zone; Switch Inhibit selected;...
  • Page 86 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Example  A programming example of a control module programmed as a Release Form-C circuit for Releasing Zone R5. Monitor Detector Detector Detector Module Control Control Module Module Type Code Type Code Type Code Type Code REL CIRCUIT...
  • Page 87 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Type Code REL AUDIBLE NOTE: An output with a Type Code requires the following selections: A Releasing REL AUDIBLE Zone selection (R0-R9); An output circuit mapped to the same Releasing Zone; Switch Inhibit selected.
  • Page 88 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone Example  A programming example of a control module programmed as a Release Audible circuit for Releasing Zone R5. Monitor Detector Detector Detector Module Control Control Module Module Type Code Type Code Type Code Type Code REL CIRCUIT...
  • Page 89 How to Program a Releasing Zone Releasing Applications Type Code INSTANT RELE NOTE: An output with an Type Code requires the following selections: a zone INSTANT RELE selection (a releasing zone may be used, but is not required); an output circuit mapped to the same zone;...
  • Page 90 Releasing Applications How to Program a Releasing Zone REL CODE BELL Type Code NOTE: An output with a Type Code requires the following selections: A REL CODE BELL Releasing Zone selection (R0-R9); An input circuit mapped to the same Releasing Zone. NOTE: For instructions on programming Switch Inhibit, Silenceable, and Walk Test, refer to “Modify NAC Points”...
  • Page 91: A.3: Initiating Devices

    Initiating Devices Releasing Applications A.3 Initiating Devices Releasing zone initiating devices include the following: • FST-851 intelligent heat detectors • FSI-851, FSP-851, FAPT-851, FSL-751 intelligent smoke detectors • Conventional detection UL-listed devices connected to monitor modules Refer to the SLC manual for the most up-to-date information about initiating devices. You can use multiple initiating devices for the same releasing hazard.
  • Page 92: B.1: Presignal And Positive Alarm Sequence (Pas)

    Appendix B: Special Zone Outputs B.1 Presignal and Positive Alarm Sequence (PAS) B.1.1 What is Presignal and PAS? Purpose Presignal is a feature that initially causes alarm signals to only sound in specific areas, monitored by qualified persons. This allows delay of the alarm up to 180 seconds after the start of alarm processing.
  • Page 93: B.1.2: Selecting Presignal And Pas Outputs

    Time Control Zones Special Zone Outputs B.1.2 Selecting Presignal and PAS Outputs Presignal You can set Presignal Delay Timer between 60 and 180 seconds. A Presignal Delay Timer does not apply to the following: • The System Alarm relay • TM-4 polarity reversal alarm output •...
  • Page 94 Special Zone Outputs Coding Functions for NACS Table B.1 Coding Function Selections Coding Function Selection Signal March Time (default) 120 PPM (pulses per minute) Temporal 0.5s on, 0.5s off, 0.5s on, 0.5s off, 0.5s on, 1.5s off, repeats California 10 sec. on, 5 sec. off, repeats Two-stage Alert signal - 20 PPM;...
  • Page 95: C.1: Overview

    Appendix C: Intelligent Sensing Applications C.1 Overview “Intelligent Sensing” is a set of software algorithms that provide the NF2S-640 with industry- leading smoke detection capability. You can program Intelligent Sensing functions on a global or on a per-detector basis. Intelligent Sensing topics covered in this appendix: Topic Page Intelligent Sensing Applications features –...
  • Page 96: C.2.2: Maintenance Warnings - Three Levels

    Intelligent Sensing Applications Features A graphic representation of a detector analog reading using drift compensation and smoothing: Alarm Level without compensation Analog with compensation and Reading smoothing Time Figure C.1 Graphic Representation of Drift Compensation C.2.2 Maintenance Warnings – Three Levels The software determines when the drift compensation for a detector reaches an unacceptable level that can compromise detector performance.
  • Page 97: C.2.3: Self-Optimizing Pre-Alarm

    Features Intelligent Sensing Applications C.2.3 Self-Optimizing Pre-Alarm You can set each detector, except Heat, for Self-Optimizing Pre-Alarm (PA=1). In this Self- Optimizing mode, the software measures the normal peak analog readings and sets the Pre-Alarm level just above these normal peaks. This allows extremely sensitive Pre-Alarm capability with reasonable protection against non-fire signals.
  • Page 98: C.2.5: Cooperative Multi-Detector Sensing

    Intelligent Sensing Applications Features A sample sensitivity window for a laser detector: 2.1% 2.0% Alarm Selection 9 2.0% 1.5% 1.5% Alarm Selection 8 1.5% Pre-Alarm 9 1.0% 1.0% Alarm Selection 7 1.00% Pre-Alarm 8 0.7% 0.7% Pre-Alarm 7 0.5% 0.5% Alarm Selection 6 0.5% Pre-Alarm 6 0.2% Alarm Selection 5 0.2% Pre-Alarm 5...
  • Page 99: C.3: Pre-Alarm

    Pre-Alarm Intelligent Sensing Applications C.3 Pre-Alarm C.3.1 Definition The Pre-Alarm function is a programmable option which determines the system’s response to real- time detector sensing values above the programmed setting. Use the Pre-Alarm function if you want to get an early warning of incipient or potential fire conditions. There are two levels of Pre-Alarm: •...
  • Page 100: C.3.3: Action Level

    Intelligent Sensing Applications Pre-Alarm C.3.3 Action Level Action Functions If you program a detector for Action Pre-Alarm and the detector reaches a level that exceeds the programmed Pre-Alarm level, the control panel indicates an Action condition. Indication at the panel is the same as in Figure C.6 above. The control panel does the following functions when a detector reaches the programmed pre-alarm level: •...
  • Page 101: C.4: Detector Sensitivity Settings

    Detector Sensitivity Settings Intelligent Sensing Applications C.4 Detector Sensitivity Settings C.4.1 How to Select Pre-Alarm and Alarm Sensitivity Each detector provides a host of selectable intelligent options. The control panel provides nine levels of Pre-Alarm (PA:1–PA:9) and Alarm (AL:1–AL:9) in percent per foot obscuration: •...
  • Page 102: C.4.2: How To Test Detectors Set Below 0.50% Obscuration Per Foot

    Intelligent Sensing Applications Detector Sensitivity Settings Table C.2 Detector Sensitivity (in percent obscuration per foot) (2 of 2) Detector Type Alarm (FlashScan) Alarm (CLIP) Pre-Alarm FSC-851 IntelliQuad AL:1=1% PA:1=1% AL:2=2% PA:2=1% Detector AL:3=3% PA:3=2% ††† AL:4=3% w/ 10 minute confirmation PA:4=3% AL:5=4% w/ 10 minute confirmation PA:5=3% w/ 10 minute confirmation...
  • Page 103: C.5: Detector Maintenance Features

    Detector Maintenance Features Intelligent Sensing Applications C.5 Detector Maintenance Features C.5.1 Overview The NF2S-640 provides features to check the maintenance performance level of addressable, intelligent detectors. Detector maintenance features include the following: • View detector maintenance information for an individual detector •...
  • Page 104: C.5.4: Print A Detector Maintenance Report

    Intelligent Sensing Applications Detector Maintenance Features C.5.4 Print a Detector Maintenance Report A Detector Maintenance Report lists detector maintenance status for each installed addressable detector [except FDX-551(an analog heat detector)]. When you press and enter the P key the control panel sends a Detector Maintenance Report (Figure C.8) to the printer connected to the control panel.
  • Page 105 Detector Maintenance Features Intelligent Sensing Applications Alarm Reading (000%) The current alarm reading of the detector, as a percentage of the Alarm Sensitivity setting. Alarm Sensitivity Setting (A8) The Alarm Sensitivity (x=1-9) entered in the Detector Sensitivity Screen. Pre-Alarm Sensitivity Setting (8) The Pre-Alarm Sensitivity (1-9; 0 = Pre-Alarm not used) entered in the Detector Settings Screen.
  • Page 106: D.1: Description

    Appendix D: CBE (Control-By-Event) D.1 Description CBE (Control-By-Event) is a software function that provides a means to program a variety of output responses based on various initiating events. The control panel operates Control-By-Event (CBE) through 99 Software Zones with the following features: •...
  • Page 107: D.4: Equation Entry

    Equation Entry CBE (Control-By-Event) D.4 Equation Entry The equations must be entered using the VeriFire™ Tools Program Utility. All are subject to the maximum number of arguments possible in a logic instruction as discussed above (Item Number 9 on page 106). D.4.1 Logic Functions The “AND”...
  • Page 108: D.4.2: Equation Syntax Example

    CBE (Control-By-Event) Equation Entry Example: AND(RANGE(Z1,Z20)) Zone 1 through Zone 20 must all be in alarm for the output point to be activated. D.4.2 Equation Syntax Example OR(AND(L1D1,L1D4),AND(L2D6,L2M3,NOT(L2M4)),ANY2(L1M13,L1M14,L1M15)) Equation begins with a logic or time delay function - OR 67 Characters (maximum of 73) - includes parentheses and commas. 5 Logic Functions (maximum of 10) - OR, AND, AND, NOT and ANY2.
  • Page 109: D.4.5: Time Delay Functions

    CBE Example CBE (Control-By-Event) D.4.5 Time Delay Functions The “DEL” Operator Used for delayed operation Example: DEL(HH:MM:SS,HH:MM:SS,ZE5) • The first HH:MM:SS is the delay time, the second HH:MM:SS is the duration time. • If delay of zero is entered (00.00.00), the equation will evaluate true as soon as the internal equation (ZE5) evaluates true and will remain that way for the specified duration, unless the internal equation becomes false.
  • Page 110: E.1: Overview

    Appendix E: Detector Initialization E.1 Overview The control panel automatically performs a detector initialization routine when you add or change a detector, unless the control panel is in Walk Test or Advanced Walk Test. If you change a detector with the control panel in Walk Test or Advanced Walk Test, you must manually initialize the detector as detailed in “How to Manually Initialize a Detector”...
  • Page 111: E.4: How To Manually Initialize A Detector

    How to Manually Initialize a Detector Detector Initialization E.4 How to Manually Initialize a Detector You only need to manually initialize a detector when you change a detector during Walk Test or Advanced Walk Test. If, however, you replace a detector with a different type of detector, you must immediately program the new detector according to the instructions in “How to Replace a Detector”...
  • Page 112: F.1: What Are Type Codes

    Appendix F: Type Codes F.1 What are Type Codes? Type Codes are software selections for initiating devices (detectors and monitor modules) and output devices (control modules and NACs). Some Type Codes are self-explanatory; that is, the Type Code matches the function of the device, such as a “Monitor” for a monitor module, “Photo” for a photoelectric detector, and so on.
  • Page 113 Type Codes for Input Devices Type Codes Table F.1 Intelligent Detector Type Codes (2 of 3) SUP.L(DUCTP) supervisory lights supervisory LED Photoelectric smoke detector used as a duct detector to report supervisory condition rather than alarm. Latching. SUP.T(PHOTO) supervisory lights supervisory LED Photoelectric smoke detector used to report supervisory condition rather than alarm.
  • Page 114: F.4.3: Type Codes For Monitor Modules

    Type Codes Type Codes for Input Devices Table F.1 Intelligent Detector Type Codes (3 of 3) CLIP Mode only Requires approval of AHJ. Not suitable for Canadian applications. LED representation of a CO alarm may be performed using an ACS annunciator. Photo element can be programmed as latching or tracking for all Photo/Co devices programmed as this type ID via VeriFire Tools.
  • Page 115: F.5: Type Codes For Output Devices

    Type Codes for Output Devices Type Codes Table F.2 Type Codes for Monitor Modules (2 of 2) CO MON CO alarm No LED will light. Special Function Zone FC Monitors conventional CO detector and the sixth CBE zone will activate (sixth CBE programmable via VeriFire Tools.) ECS/MN MONITOR MN alarm...
  • Page 116: F.5.3: Nac Type Codes

    Type Codes Type Codes for Output Devices Table F.3 Control Module Type Codes (2 of 2) GEN SUPERVIS Control Module, an XPR-8 relay, or an XP5-C (in relay mode) activated under any Supervisory condition (includes sprinkler type). It is programmed as “switch inhibit”. GEN TROUBLE Control Module, an XPR-8 relay, or an XP5-C (in relay mode) activated under any System Trouble condition.
  • Page 117 Type Codes for Output Devices Type Codes Table F.4 NAC Type Codes GENERAL Control Module, an XPC-8 circuit, or an XP5-C (in NAC mode) that PEND will activate upon receipt of an alarm and/or trouble condition, and remain in the ON state until all events have been ACKNOWLEDGED.
  • Page 118 Appendix G: Region Settings The REGION panel programming selection provides a setting for China. (Refer to “The Utility Program” on page 48.) This selection activates the following features: • POM-8A support • Active output events displayed. A counter is displayed for active outputs. •...
  • Page 119 Appendix H: Intelligent Sounder Base Programming and Operation The NFS2-640 is compatible with the B200 Intelligent Sounder Base. This sounder base allows for multiple tone generation that is user programmable via VeriFire Tools. Programming the Intelligent Sounder Base into the Control Panel: Once the sounder base has been installed and a detector has been plugged into the sounder base, you can do one of the following to program the sounder base into the control panel: •...
  • Page 120 Notes NFS2-640/E Programming Manual — P/N 52742:L2 7/17/14...
  • Page 121: Index

    Index Caution Definition 8 Abort Switch 28 Do not program detectors as CLIP... 50 basic configuration example 63 Do not program more than 99 CLIP... 50 configuration example with monitor mod- – CBE (Control-By-Event) 106 ule 74 example 109 Definition 62 CBE list 20 how it works 62 Check option (program errors) 47...
  • Page 122 F–P Index Evaluating 108 logic and time delay 106 Maintenance Levels by Detector Type 104 Logic Functions 107 Maintenance Warnings 96 rules 106 Manual Release Delay Switch Time Delay Functions 109 monitor module configuration example 77 to program 76 Manual Release Switch monitor module configuration example 75 FCM-1-REL, 2 second delay 18 to program 75...
  • Page 123 Index R–W Terminal mode supervision enable 32 Threshold Ch.A/B 47 REGION Setting 48 Time Regional Settings 118 to set time/date for system clock 52 Release Audible Circuit USA or European 32 control module configuration example 88 Time control, special zones 18 to program 87 Time Delay Functions 109 Release Circuit...
  • Page 124 Z–Z Index Walk Test mode can deactivate fire protec- tion... 56 When used for CO2 releasing applica- tions... 60 Warning Sounders, releasing applications 91 Wheelock Strobes 28 Wheelock Strobes, special zone 94 Zones Custom label 14 Software Zones 01-99 18 to disable programmed points 52 Z00 general alarm 18 NFS2-640/E Programming Manual —...
  • Page 125 Manufacturer Warranties and Limitation of Liability Manufacturer Warranties. Subject to the limitations set forth herein, Manufacturer warrants that the Products manufactured by it in its Northford, Connecticut facility and sold by it to its authorized Distributors shall be free, under normal use and service, from defects in material and workmanship for a period of thirty six months (36) months from the date of manufacture (effective Jan.
  • Page 126 World Headquarters 12 Clintonville Road Northford, CT 06472-1610 USA 203-484-7161 fax 203-484-7118 www.notifier.com...