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hp server rx4610
Online Version: 1.0
Last Updated: June 2001

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   Summary of Contents for HP Integrity rx4610

  • Page 1: User Guide

    hp server rx4610 User Guide Online Version: 1.0 Last Updated: June 2001...

  • Page 2: Audience Assumptions

    Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators ..............1 Introduction ......................1 Front Panel ....................1 Additional Front Panel Controls and Indicators..........3 Rear View ...................... 8 Applying Power to the HP Server ..............11 Powering-Up the HP Server ................ 11 Powering-Down the HP Server ..............

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Contents Mass Storage Guidelines ................27 Boot Priority....................28 Tools Required ....................29 Installing a Hot Swap Hard Drive ..............29 Determining Drive Status ................29 Removing a Hard Disk Drive............... 30 Installing a Hard Disk Drive ................. 31 Installing Non-Hot Swap Drives............... 32 Installing the Floppy Disk Drive..............

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents Tools Required .................... 53 Processor Configuration Guidelines............53 Removing the CPU Thermal Dummy .............. 54 Installing an Additional Processor ..............55 Firmware and Software Changes ..............60 Upgrading the Firmware................60 Reinstalling the NOS ................... 60 Removing a Processor ..................60 Installing a CPU Thermal Dummy ..............

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Contents Installing the Sideplane Board ..............91 PCI Hot Plug LED Board ................. 92 Removing the PCI Hot Plug LED Board............92 Installing the PCI Hot Plug LED Board............93 Legacy I/O Board..................... 94 Removing the Legacy I/O Board ..............94 Installing the Legacy I/O Board ..............

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Contents Beep Codes and Interpretation ..............178 Types of Memory Tests ................. 180 First Row Memory Test ................180 Base Memory Test ..................183 Extended Memory Test ................189 Memory Test Duration................193 Aborting the Memory Test ................. 193 Setup Dialog ....................194 Memory Testing Error Codes\Messages...........

  • Page 9: Controls, Ports, And Indicators, Introduction, Front Panel

    Controls, Ports, and Indicators Introduction Before operating the Server, familiarize yourself with the HP Server’s controls, ports, and indicators, as shown in Figures 1-1 through 1-8. Front Panel The front panel of the HP Server provides the controls and indicators commonly used when operating the HP Server.

  • Page 10

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Table 1-1. Control Panel Switch and Indicators Control / Indicator Description This button turns the HP Server power On or Off. The Power On/Off +12 V standby voltage is On whenever the server power cords are plugged in.

  • Page 11: Additional Front Panel Controls And Indicators

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Additional Front Panel Controls and Indicators The input and storage devices provide additional front panel controls and indicators, which give control and operational status to the respective device. DVD Drive The server supports a slimline IDE DVD drive. This peripheral mounts directly above the top-left power bay on the front of the chassis.

  • Page 12

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Diskette Floppy Drive The server supports a slimline IDE diskette drive for 1.44 MB and 120 MB media. This half-inch slimline peripheral mounts directly above the top-right power bay on the front of the chassis. The drive is mounted on a removable tray that facilitates system assembly and service.

  • Page 13

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators SCSI Hard Drives The server supports up to two hot-swap drive carriers containing standard 1-inch high by 3.5-inch-wide LVDS SCSI hard drives. As part of the hot-swap implementation, drive carriers with integral heat sinks house the drives. Each drive is mounted in a carrier with four fasteners and the carrier snaps into the hard drive bay.

  • Page 14

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Table 1-4. SCSI Drives Control Indicator Description Drive Power LED When lit continuously, it indicates the presence of (Green) the drive and power to the drive. When lit, it indicates drive activity. Drive Active LED (Green) Drive Fail LED When lit continuously, it indicates an asserted fault...

  • Page 15

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Power Supply Indicators POW ER RE SE T SY S P WR PW R LCD DISPLAY PW R AC TIV E FAIL PW R AC TIV E FAIL Figure 1-5. Power Supply Indicators Table 1-5. LEDs for Power Supplies Control Indicator Description When lit continuously, it indicates the power...

  • Page 16: Rear View

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Rear View The ports and connectors at the rear are listed below and shown in Figure 1-6. Figure 1-6 provides a detailed view of the Legacy I/O panel that resides in the upper-right corner of the rear panel. •...

  • Page 17

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Figure 1-6. Rear Panel and Ports Legacy I/O Panel This board contains all legacy I/O connections and plugs into an edge connector on the I/O baseboard. NOTE The keyboard and mouse connector must be plugged into the correct ports or the server will not boot.

  • Page 18

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators PCI LEDs Each PCI slot has four indicator LEDs: two on the outside and two on the inside of the system. The two LEDs for each slot: one amber and one green are visible from the rear (also inside) of the HP Server, as shown in Figure 1-7.

  • Page 19: Applying Power To The Hp Server, Powering-up The Hp Server

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Applying Power to the HP Server Before applying power to the HP Server, verify that the keyboard and mouse are connected to the proper ports. The server will not boot without these devices. Turning on the monitor prior to powering on the HP Server allows proper auto- configuration of the video output as it boots.

  • Page 20: Powering-down The Hp Server, Connecting Ac Power To Multiple-server Configurations

    Chapter 1 Controls, Ports, and Indicators Powering-Down the HP Server To power-down the HP Server, complete the following procedure: 1. Log off all users and, if necessary, back up the system files. Schedule the power down for a time when the Server being down will ◊...

  • Page 21: Opening And Closing The Hp Server, Introduction, Mounting The Front Bezel

    Opening and Closing the HP Server Introduction This chapter describes how to remove and replace the front bezel and the HP Server's main cover. Mounting the Front Bezel The front handles, if not already installed on the HP Server, should be attached to the front of the HP Server before mounting the bezel.

  • Page 22: Removing And Replacing The Hp Server's Main Cover

    Chapter 2 Opening and Closing the HP Server Figure 2-1. Removing and Replacing the Front Bezel Removing and Replacing the HP Server’s Main Cover The server comes with a removable top cover. Removal of this cover is necessary when installing or removing many components. You do not have to remove the top cover when removing or installing PCI hot plug and non-hot plug adapter boards, the Legacy I/O board, fans, hard drives, power supplies, or components inside the Processor/Memory Complex.

  • Page 23: Tools Required, Removing The Top Cover

    Chapter 2 Opening and Closing the HP Server CAUTION For proper cooling and airflow, do not operate the server with the cover off. Always reinstall the cover before turning on the server. Tools Required The following tools may be required to remove and replace the cover. •...

  • Page 24: Replacing The Top Cover

    Chapter 2 Opening and Closing the HP Server Figure 2-2. Removing the Cover 9. Lift the top cover off the chassis. Replacing the Top Cover To replace the cover, complete these steps: 1. Provide ESD protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground of the system when handling components.

  • Page 25

    Chapter 2 Opening and Closing the HP Server Figure 2-3. Replacing the Cover 7. Close the 120 mm fan cover and tighten the thumbscrew. If the door does not close then the top cover hooks have not fully engaged into the chassis. 8.

  • Page 27: Installing Fans And Power Supplies, Introduction, Tools And Supplies Needed

    Installing Fans and Power Supplies Introduction The fans and power supplies used by the HP Server are hot swappable. The HP Server has four 172 mm fans located on each side of the chassis and two 120 mm cooling fans located on the top front of the chassis. The server has a maximum of four 800 watt autoranging power supplies located in the front of the chassis.

  • Page 28: Hot Swapping The 172 Mm Fans, Removing The 172 Mm Fans

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Hot Swapping the 172 mm Fans The four 172 mm cooling fans are mounted in pairs on each side of the chassis. You can hot-swap these fans without turning the server system power off. Each fan uses an amber LED located on the fan’s casing to indicate the fan has failed.

  • Page 29: Installing The 172 Mm Fans

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies LED Indicator Figure 3-1. Removing the 172 mm Fans Installing the 172 mm Fans To install the 172 mm fan, complete the following procedure: 1. Lift the latch on the fan-access door and open the door. NOTE Verify the connector orientation prior to installing the new fan.

  • Page 30: Hot Swapping The 120 Mm Fans, Removing The 120 Mm Fans

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Hot Swapping the 120 mm Fans The two 120 mm cooling fans are mounted on the top front of the chassis. These fans can be replaced without shutting down power to the system. If it is a failed fan, the amber LED will be illuminated on the front panel, and the amber LED on the failed fan itself will be illuminated.

  • Page 31: Installing The 120 Mm Fans

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Figure 3-2. Removing the 120 mm Fans Installing the 120 mm Fans Follow these steps to install a 120 mm fan: 1. Slide the server out of the rack far enough to expose the fan-access door on the top of the chassis.

  • Page 32: Hot Swapping Power Supplies

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Hot Swapping Power Supplies The power system contains four 800-watt autoranging power supplies. The third bay’s power supply from the left as you face the chassis serves a redundancy function for the server’s power supply requirements. CAUTION Because of chassis airflow disruption, the power supply bay should not be vacant for more than five minutes when server...

  • Page 33: Determining Power Supply Status, Removing A Power Supply

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Determining Power Supply Status When the amber power supply failure LED on the front of the chassis turns on, determine which power supply is defective by checking the three status LEDs on each supply. Each power supply has three LEDs that both indicate whether power is supplied to the power supply and the health of the power supply.

  • Page 34: Installing A Power Supply

    Chapter 3 Installing Fans and Power Supplies Figure 3-4. Removing a Power Supply 3. Pull the power supply straight forward, out of the chassis. Set it aside. Installing a Power Supply The power supply bay should not be vacant for more than five minutes when server power is on.

  • Page 35: Installing Mass Storage Devices, Introduction, Mass Storage Guidelines

    Installing Mass Storage Devices Introduction The HP Server comes standard with a DVD and a floppy diskette drive. The internal mass storage cages support a maximum of two hot swap drive carriers. Each carrier can house a standard one inch high by three and half inch wide SCSI-2 or SCSI-3 hard drive.

  • Page 36: Boot Priority

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Use only low-voltage differential (LVD) SCSI devices. ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Boot Priority The HP Server's boot order should be considered when selecting a PCI slot on the system board. This is especially important if you are installing a board that requires an early number in the boot order.

  • Page 37: Installing A Hot Swap Hard Drive, Tools Required, Determining Drive Status

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices NOTE The boot order can be changed using the Server's (BIOS) Setup Utility and the Qlogic SCSI Utility. Refer to Chapter 10, "Configuring the HP Server" for more information. Tools Required The following tools are required for the removal and installation of mass storage devices in the HP Server: •...

  • Page 38: Removing A Hard Disk Drive

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Table 4-1. SCSI Drive Status LED Descriptions SCSI drive present SCSI drive SCSI drive with power on active faulty* Green LED Green LED Amber LED Description and Action Left Middle Right (If Required) Drive is present with power.

  • Page 39: Installing A Hard Disk Drive

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Figure 4-1. Removing a Hard Disk Drive 4. Carefully slide the assembly out of the bay, and place it on an antistatic surface. Installing a Hard Disk Drive Hard disk drives are packaged in their drive carriers for immediate installation. They require no assembly and may be installed without the use of any tools.

  • Page 40: Installing Non-hot Swap Drives, Installing The Floppy Disk Drive

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices While grasping only the drive carrier handle, firmly push the assembly into the bay until the drive docks with the backplane connector and the carrier latch locks. Figure 4-2 Hot Swapping a SCSI Drive Replace the plastic bezel on the front of the server.

  • Page 41

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Removing the Floppy Diskette Drive To remove the floppy diskette drive, complete the following procedure: 1. Observe all safety and ESD precautions whenever you remove the cover from the HP Server. WARNING Before removing the top cover, always disconnect the power cord and unplug the Ethernet cables.

  • Page 42: Installing The Dvd Drive

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices 4. Grasp the sides of the drive and drive carrier assembly and slide it forward such that the front part of the drive comes through the opening in the chassis. Make sure that the thumbscrew at the rear of the drive carrier assembly aligns with the hole in the surface of the chassis.

  • Page 43

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices 3. Disconnect the drive’s data and power cables from the drive cable adapter PCB at the rear of the drive. 4. Loosen the thumbscrew found at the rear of the drive carrier assembly. 5. Slide the drive and drive carrier assembly towards the rear of the chassis so that the front part of the drive clears the opening in the chassis.

  • Page 44: Connecting External Scsi Devices, Removing And Installing The Hard Disk Bay

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices 4. Grasp the sides of the drive and drive carrier assembly and slide it forward such that the front part of the drive comes through the opening in the chassis. Make sure that the thumbscrew at the rear of the drive carrier assembly aligns with the hole in the surface of the chassis.

  • Page 45: Installing The Hard Disk Bay

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices 5. Grasp the bay by the Front Panel display housing and gently pull the drive bay out of the chassis. Figure 4-5. Hard Disk Bay Installing the Hard Disk Bay To install the Hard Disk Bay, complete the following steps: 1.

  • Page 46: Removing And Installing The Scsi Backplane, Removing The Scsi Backplane

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Removing and Installing the SCSI Backplane The SCSI Backplane resides on the back of the Hard Drive Bay. It is accessed by removing the Hard Disk Bay. Removing the SCSI Backplane To remove the SCSI Backplane, complete the following steps: 1.

  • Page 47: Installing The Scsi Backplane Board, Installing The Front Panel Board, Removing The Front Panel Module

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices Installing the SCSI Backplane Board To install the SCSI Backplane Board, complete the following procedure: 1. Carefully align the SCSI Backplane in the slots to the rear of the Hard Disk Bay. Be sure that the four holes in the SCSI Backplane align with the holes and alignment pin in the bay.

  • Page 48: Installing The Front Panel Board

    Chapter 4 Installing Mass Storage Devices 2. Remove the two screws. 1. Disconnect the cable. Figure 4-7. The Front Panel Board Installing the Front Panel Board To install the new Front Panel Board, complete the following steps: 1. Using two Phillips screws, secure the new Front Panel Board to the Hard Disk Bay.

  • Page 49: Installing Additional Memory, Introduction, Tools Required, Memory Installation Guidelines

    Installing Additional Memory Introduction This chapter provides the procedures for opening the Processor/Memory Complex, installing a memory board, installing DIMMs, and installing memory board DC-to-DC converters. To ensure you have the correct DIMMs before installation, refer to one of the following for a list of qualified DIMMs: •...

  • Page 50: Removing The Processor/memory Complex

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Removing the Processor/Memory Complex The Processor/Memory Complex mounts memory boards to the processor board and forms a module that you can remove from the main system chassis. To access this module, you need to remove the access door on the side of the chassis and remove the four screws on the left side of the chassis to slide the Processor/Memory Complex out of the system.

  • Page 51

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Figure 5-1. Opening the Processor/Memory Complex Bay Cover 7. Remove the four screws that secure the complex to the chassis. These screws are located on the left side of the chassis as you face the front of the system.

  • Page 52: Removing The Memory Board Dc-to-dc Converters

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory WARNING Fully loaded, the Processor/Memory Complex weighs 36 pounds (16.33 kg). Minimally configured, this complex weighs 24 pounds (10.80 kg). Exercise caution when lifting the complex out of the system. 9. Remove the complex from the bay and place it on a clean ESD protected surface.

  • Page 53: Removing And Installing Memory Boards, Removing Memory Boards

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Figure 5-3. Memory Board DC-DC Converters Removing and Installing Memory Boards Two Memory Boards reside in the Processor/Memory Complex: one is on top of the complex and the other underneath. You can remove or install these memory boards.

  • Page 54

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory 4. Loosen the two captive screws holding the sides of the memory board to the processor board. Each of these screws secures a board clamp that runs along the length of the memory board. 5. Lift the board clamps out of the Processor/Memory Complex. 6.

  • Page 55: Installing Memory Boards

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Figure 5-4. Memory Boards Installing Memory Boards Two memory boards exist, one plugged into each side of the Processor Baseboard (the top and the underside of the Processor/Memory Complex). This procedure describes the installation process for either memory board. To re-install the memory board or install a new board, complete the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 56: Installing And Removing Dimms

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory 4. Engage both guide pins at the same time. Ensure that the memory board remains parallel to the Processor Baseboard. NOTE Both extraction levers must be depressed evenly while inserting the Memory Board. The Memory Board must remain parallel to the Processor Baseboard during insertion.

  • Page 57: Installing Dimms

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Installing DIMMs Please refer to the “Memory Installation Guidelines” earlier in this chapter before installing the DIMMs. To install DIMMs, complete the following procedure: CAUTION The memory modules are sensitive to static electricity and can be easily damaged by improper handling.

  • Page 58: Removing Dimms

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Remove the DIMM from its antistatic package. Align the two notches in the bottom edge of the DIMM with the keyed socket on the memory board. DIMM 1 DIMM 5 DIMM 2 DIMM 6 DIMM 9 DIMM 13 DIMM 10 DIMM 14...

  • Page 59: Installing The Memory Board Dc-to-dc Converters

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory 4. Remove the existing DIMM from its socket by gently pushing the plastic ejector levers out and down. 5. Hold the DIMM only by its upper edges, being careful not to touch its components or gold edge connectors. Carefully lift it away from the socket 6.

  • Page 60: Installing The Processor/memory Complex

    Chapter 5 Installing Additional Memory Figure 5-6. Memory Board DC-to-DC Converters Installing the Processor/Memory Complex To replace the Processor/Memory Complex, complete the following procedure: 1. Orient the Processor/Memory Complex so that the high density connector is positioned to slide into the Processor/Memory Bay and connect to the Sideplane board.

  • Page 61: Installing An Additional Processor, Introduction, Tools Required, Processor Configuration Guidelines

    Installing an Additional Processor Introduction Each processor is packaged in a Slot M pin array cartridge. Depending on the configuration, your system has two to four processors. Each processor is powered by a 48V power pod, located adjacent to the processor on the processor board. Attached to the top of each processor is a heat sink that dissipates thermal energy.

  • Page 62: Removing The Cpu Thermal Dummy

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor • The processors must operate at the designated speed stated by the product type on the processor. • If the server has two processors, they must reside on the top half of the Processor/Memory Complex. Use only processor upgrade kits with the same HP product number.

  • Page 63

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Complete the following procedure to remove the CPU thermal dummy: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Remove the Processor/Memory Complex as described in “Removing the Processor/Memory Complex” in Chapter 5. 3.

  • Page 64

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Complete the following steps to install an additional processor: 1. Unpack the processor shipping box and check the contents against its packing list. 2. If the HP Server is already installed and operating, shut down the NOS according to directions in your NOS documentation.

  • Page 65

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Figure 6-2. Installing the Microprocessor 10. Place the power pod into position on the Processor Baseboard. Ensure that the engaging tab is to the rear of the retention module (RM) and then slide it forward to engage its connector on the processor.

  • Page 66

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Figure 6-3. Connecting the Power Pod 11. Place the triple beam into position by lowering it down over the processors/power pod or the CPU thermal dummy. 12. Secure the triple beam into place by tightening the top captive screws and then the four thumbscrews on the end of the beam.

  • Page 67

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Figure 6-4. Placing the Triple Beam Over the Processors 12. If you are installing a CPU thermal dummy, skip this step. Otherwise, connect the Y-cable to each power pod. 13. Insert the sheet metal baffle at the front of the processors or CPU thermal dummies in the Processor/Memory Complex.

  • Page 68: Firmware And Software Changes, Upgrading The Firmware, Reinstalling The Nos, Removing A Processor

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Firmware and Software Changes Adding a processor may require firmware changes and the possible re-installation of the NOS to recognize the additional processor. Upgrading the Firmware If your processor included a new CD, insert the CD into the HP Server DVD drive and power on the HP Server.

  • Page 69: Installing A Cpu Thermal Dummy

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor 4. Remove the sheet metal baffle located at the front of the processors or CPU thermal dummies in the Processor/Memory Complex. To remove the baffle, press the flexible retaining tabs in as you slide the baffle out. You need this sheet metal baffle out of the way to access some of the captive screws in the next step.

  • Page 70: Installing The Processor Baseboard

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Figure 6-5. Inserting a CPU Thermal Dummy 2. Secure the triple beam into place by tightening the captive screws on top of the beam and then the four thumbscrews on the end of the beam. 3.

  • Page 71: Removing The Processor Baseboard

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Removing the Processor Baseboard To remove the processor baseboard, complete the following procedure. 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Remove the Processor/Memory Complex from the system as described in “Removing the Processor/Memory Complex”...

  • Page 72: Installing The Board In A System With Three Or Four Microprocessors

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor 9. Open the four plastic latches that secure the two halves of the Processor/Memory Complex together. Gently lift the top half up and remove it. 10. Remove the Processor Baseboard from the Processor/Memory Complex. NOTE Remember the guide pin position in relation to the Processor Baseboard for re-installation.

  • Page 73

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor NOTE Securing the triple beam into position without the microprocessors and power pods reduces the possibility of stress occurring on the Processor Baseboard when you install microprocessors and the memory board on the topside. Secure the triple beam by tightening the four thumbscrews on the ends of the beam.

  • Page 74

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Figure 6-7. The Triple Beam 16. Install the processors and power pods into the bottom half of the Processor/Memory Complex as described in “Installing an Additional Processor” in Chapter 6. 17. Install the triple beam and the metal baffle. 18.

  • Page 75: Installing The Board In A System With Two Microprocessors

    Chapter 6 Installing an Additional Processor Installing the Board in a System with Two Microprocessors When installing a board with two microprocessors, complete the following procedure: 1. Place the bottom half of the Processor/Memory Complex on a clean ESD-protected work surface. The bottom half has wider rails as compared to the top half.

  • Page 77: Installing Accessory Boards, Introduction, Tested Pci Boards

    Electrical code (NFPA 70) Class 2 or limited power source limits and must use appropriate interconnecting cabling in accordance with the National Electrical Code. (All Hewlett-Packard boards comply with Class 2.) Also refer to the Readme file and Chapter 10, "Configuring the HP Server," for instructions.

  • Page 78: Accessory Board Installation Guidelines, Tools Required, Irq Settings, Boot Priority

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards Tools Required The tools used to remove or add accessory boards in the HP Server include: • Phillips screwdriver (cross-head with #2 bit) • Jumper removal tool or needle-nosed pliers • An anti-static service kit (3M 8501/8502/8503 or equivalent). This kit includes a static-dissipating work surface, a chassis clip lead, and a wrist strap.

  • Page 79: Installing A Hot Swap Pci Board, Installing Accessory Boards

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 5. Other Boot Devices IDE DVD drive • Flexible disk drive • 6. PCI slot 1 7. PCI slot 2 8. PCI slot 3 9. PCI slot 4 10. PCI slot 5 11. PCI slot 6 12.

  • Page 80

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 2. Pull the chassis out of the rack as far as it will go. 3. Loosen the two thumbscrews in the back of the chassis that secure the rear part of the top cover. 4. Lift the rear cover to expose the hot plug PCI slots. CAUTION Do not touch the components or gold edge connectors on the add-in board as this may damage the connectors causing...

  • Page 81

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 9. Be sure that the plastic PCI hot plug (PHP) mechanism that secures the end of the board nearest the rear of the chassis is in the open position. If not, press the center of the PHP until it clicks open and then rotate the mechanism downward from outside the chassis.

  • Page 82: Installing A Non-hot Plug Pci Board

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 12. Close the plastic latching mechanism that secures the end of the board nearest the front of the chassis. 13. Rotate the PHP mechanism near the rear of the chassis up until it clicks into place. This position both secures the end of the board and allows it to be activated with the operating system or GUI application.

  • Page 83

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 5. Read the documentation included with the accessory board and follow any special instructions. 6. Identify the accessory slot number to be used. See Figure 7-3. Non PCI Hot Plug Slots PCI Hot Plug Slots Figure 7-3.

  • Page 84

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards Figure 7-4. Accessing the Non-Hot Plug Boards 10. Release the plastic retaining mechanism (I/O Card Guide) that secures the end of the board nearest the front of the chassis so that it will allow a board to be inserted 11.

  • Page 85: Removing Accessory Boards, Removing A Non-hot Plug Pci Board

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 15. Press the PCI adapter board down firmly until it seats in its slot. 16. Close the plastic latching mechanism (I/O Card Guide) that secures the end of the board nearest the front of the chassis. 17.

  • Page 86: Removing A Hot Plug Pci Board

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards 2. Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system. 3. Power down the server by pressing and holding the Power button on the Front Control Panel. You may have to hold the Power button down for several seconds.

  • Page 87

    Chapter 7 Installing Accessory Boards WARNING Make sure that the rack is anchored securely, so it will not tip when the server chassis is extended. 3. Pull the chassis out of the equipment rack as far as it will go. 4.

  • Page 89: Server Management Boards, Introduction, Baseboard Management Controller (bmc)

    Server Management Boards Introduction The server management features are implemented using three microcontrollers: the Baseboard Management Controller (BMC), the Intelligent Chassis Management Bus Controller (ICMB) controller on the Legacy I/O board, and the Hot-Swap Controller (HSC) on the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking). The firmware of the three microcontrollers is field upgradeable using the Firmware Update utility.

  • Page 90

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards • Access to the non-volatile Sensor Data Record (SDR) Repository. Sensor Data Records provide information that the system management software uses to automatically configure itself for the number and type of Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) sensors in the system (e.g. temperature and voltage sensors).

  • Page 91: Intelligent Chassis Management Bus (icmb) Controller, Hot Swap Controller (hsc)

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards • Secure mode control, including video blank option monitoring and control and front panel lock/unlock initiation. • IPMI Management Controller Initialization Agent • Magic Packet and Wake on LAN / Power on LAN support • Emergency Management Port (EMP) interface Intelligent Chassis Management Bus (ICMB) Controller The ICMB Controller resides on the Legacy I/O Board.

  • Page 92: I/o Baseboard, Removing The I/o Baseboard

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards I/O Baseboard The I/O Baseboard resides in the upper rear of the chassis and plugs into the Sideplane. After removing all the PCI I/O boards, you can remove the I/O Baseboard. Removing the I/O Baseboard To remove the I/O baseboard, complete the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 93

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Disconnect the external SCSI cable from I/O Baseboard Remove protective Sideplane cover Figure 8-1. Removing the SCSI Cable from the I/O Baseboard 8. Loosen the captive screw to disconnect and remove the external SCSI port from the chassis I/O connector at the rear of chassis.

  • Page 94

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards 12. Remove all DC-DC converters from the Sideplane. Figure 8-2. Removing the Sideplane DC-DC Converters 13. Loosen the two captive screws that hold the plastic shield over the I/O Baseboard. These screws also secure the baseboard tray to the server chassis.

  • Page 95: Installing The I/o Baseboard

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-3. I/O Baseboard Removal 19. Lift the connector end out of the chassis first followed by the rest of the I/O Baseboard. 20. Place on a clean ESD-protected work surface. 21. Remove the nine screws and the two hex jackscrews that secure the video connector to the I/O Baseboard in order to separate it from the I/O Baseboard tray.

  • Page 96

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards 7. Rotate the levers downward to press the I/O Baseboard securely into the Sideplane. Connect the Internal SCSI cable to the front of the I/O Baseboard. 9 Install the plastic shield over the I/O Baseboard and tighten the two thumbscrews that secure the shield and the I/O Baseboard in the chassis.

  • Page 97: Sideplane Board, Removing The Sideplane Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Sideplane Board The Sideplane is attached inside the left wall at the rear of the chassis. It receives the I/O Baseboard as well as the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking). To remove the Sideplane you must remove the Power Distribution Board (T- Docking), the I/O Baseboard, and the Processor/Memory Complex.

  • Page 98

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Loosen the three captive thumb screws. Figure 8-4. Removing the Screws from the Sideplane 6. Slide the Sideplane towards the front of the chassis. As you slide the board, keep the front bottom edge of the board in contact with the carrier tray as the board is rotated up and out of the chassis.

  • Page 99: Installing The Sideplane Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-5. Remove the Sideplane Installing the Sideplane Board To install the Sideplane board, complete the following steps: 1. Observe all safety and ESD precautions for handling electronic components. 2. Install the Sideplane on to the mounting plate by tightening the two mounting plate screws.

  • Page 100: Pci Hot Plug Led Board, Removing The Pci Hot Plug Led Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards PCI Hot Plug LED Board The PCI Hot Plug LED Board resides just on the inside of the top rear of the chassis. This board enables PCI hot plug boards to be plugged into and out of the system without it being shut down.

  • Page 101: Installing The Pci Hot Plug Led Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Installing the PCI Hot Plug LED Board To install the PCI Hot Plug LED Board, complete the following steps: 1. Observe all safety and ESD precautions for handling electronic components. 2. Carefully place the PCI Hot Plug LED Board on the inside back of the server chassis in such a way as to line up the four, black pin receptacles with their respective holes.

  • Page 102: Legacy I/o Board, Removing The Legacy I/o Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Legacy I/O Board The Legacy I/O Board is plugged into the I/O Baseboard in the rear of the chassis. It is accessible only when you remove or lift the non-hot plug PCI adapter board cover. Removing the Legacy I/O Board To remove the Legacy I/O Board, complete the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 103: Installing The Legacy I/o Board

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards 13. Remove the server management cable from the Legacy I/O board. Server Management Cable DVD Cable Floppy Disk Drive Cable Figure 8-6. Removing Legacy I/O Board 14. Remove both IDE cables (DVD and Floppy Disk Drive) from the Legacy I/O board by grasping the ends of the cable connectors and rocking them out of their respective connectors.

  • Page 104

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards 2. Be sure that the plastic retaining mechanism (I/O Card Guide) that secures the end of the board nearest the front of the chassis is open so that it will allow a board to be inserted. NOTE Being careful not to touch the components or gold edge connectors on the I/O Legacy board, remove it from its...

  • Page 105: Changing The Legacy I/o Board Battery

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Changing the Legacy I/O Board Battery The lithium battery on the Legacy I/O board powers the real-time clock (RTC) for three to four years in the absence of power. When the battery weakens, it loses voltage and the system settings stored in CMOS RAM in the Real Time Clock (such as the date and time) can be wrong.

  • Page 106: Power Distribution Board (t-docking), Removing The Power Distribution Board (t-docking)

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) The Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) resides in the upper front half of the chassis above the 172 mm fans. You can access it by removing the top cover of the chassis and removing the Hard Drive Bay. Removing the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) 1.

  • Page 107

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-7. Removing the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking)’s Top Bracket 10. Remove the 12 V DC-DC converter from the top of the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking). 11. Remove the fan, DVD, and floppy drive cable power connector from the Power Distribution Board by squeezing the lock tab and carefully pulling the connector upwards.

  • Page 108

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-8. Removing the AC Distribution Bracket 13. Loosen the six captive thumbscrews securing the Power Distribution Board plastic overlay. Remove the overlay. 14. Remove the two hot swap drives from the Hard Drive Bay. 15.

  • Page 109

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-9. Removing the Hard Drive Bay from the Chassis 16. Disconnect the two 172 mm fan cables from the bottom side of the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking). You can access these cables from the emptied Hard Drive Bay.

  • Page 110: Installing The Power Distribution Board (t-docking)

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards Figure 8-10. Removing the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) Installing the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) To install the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking), complete the following procedure: 1. Remove the U-shaped handle on the original Power Distribution Board (T- Docking) and attach it to the replacement board.

  • Page 111

    Chapter 8 Server Management Boards 4. Connect the 172 mm fan cables to the underside of the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking). You can make the connection through the emptied Hard Drive Bay. 5. Reinsert the Hard Drive Bay and secure the four front screws. 6.

  • Page 113: Connecting The Monitor, Keyboard, And Mouse, Introduction

    Connecting the Monitor, Keyboard, and Mouse Introduction The PS/2 compatible keyboard and mouse connectors as well as the connection for the monitor are mounted on the rear panel of the server. The keyboard, mouse, and monitor should be plugged in before powering up the HP Server rx4610. The BIOS detects these peripherals and configures them accordingly.

  • Page 114

    Chapter 9 Connecting the Monitor, Keyboard, and Mouse Use this procedure to connect the peripheral control devices and monitor to the HP Server: CAUTION The Keyboard and Mouse ports are both PS/2 ports, but are not interchangeable. If you plug the keyboard into the Mouse port, or the mouse into the Keyboard port, you will get an error message and the system will not finish the boot process.

  • Page 115: Configuring The Hp Server, Introduction, Power-on Sequence And Power-on Self Test (post)

    10 Configuring the HP Server Introduction This chapter provides instructions for the utilities provided with your HP Server. It supplements the basic installation steps provided in the “HP Server rx4610 Installation Guide”. The CD-ROM shipped with your server contains the latest information regarding the various software and firmware utilities.

  • Page 116

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server monitor boot progress in two different places: the video display and the LCD display on the Front Panel. Information appears in the LCD display first. NOTE To enter the BIOS Setup Utility you must immediately start pressing <F2>...

  • Page 117: The Extensible Firmware Interface (efi) Boot Manager

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server QLogic banner: allows you the opportunity to enter the QLogic SCSI ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ utility by entering the key combination <Alt-Q>. The QLogic SCSI utility allows you to manage and configure the server’s SCSI devices. For information on the screens available in this utility, refer to “QLogic SCSI Utility”.

  • Page 118

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Table 10-1 describes each menu item in the Boot Maintenance Menu. Table 10-1. Boot Maintenance Menu Options Option Description Boot from a File Automatically adds EFI applications as boot options or allows you to boot from a specific file. When you choose this option, the system searches all the EFI System Partitions in the system.

  • Page 119

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Option Description Set Automatic Allows you to define the value in seconds that pass Boot Timeout before the system automatically boots without user intervention. Setting this value to zero disables the timeout feature. Close Redir & Allows you to switch the COM2 from the system port Return EMP Mode (used for redirection) and gives control of the COM2...

  • Page 120

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Table 10-2. EFI Shell Commands Command Description <drive_name>: Changes drives. For example, entering a: and pressing the <ENTER> key changes the drive to the LS120 drive. alias [-bdv] [sname] [value] Sets or gets alias settings attrib [-b] [+/- rhs] [file] Views or sets file attributes bcfg -?

  • Page 121: Server Management Configuration Utility

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Command Description mkdir dir [dir] Makes a directory mm address [Width] [;Type] Memory Modify: Mem, MMIO, IO, PCI mode [col row] Sets or gets the current text mode mount BlkDevice [sname[:]] Mounts a file system on a block device PalProc arg1 [arg2] [arg3] [arg4] Makes a PAL call pause...

  • Page 122

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Running the Server Management Configuration Utility Follow these steps to run the SM Config Utility: 1. Boot to the EFI Shell with the HP Server rx4610 Resource CD-ROM in the DVD-ROM drive. 2. Find the DVD-ROM drive and change to it. 3.

  • Page 123

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Updating/Viewing Config Data The Config menu contains a dynamic list of options that corresponds to the configuration classes in the current ini file. Each configuration class in the ini file represents a configuration item, such as EMP or PEP. When you select an item from the Config menu, the utility reads the configuration data of that item from the BMC and creates a setup page containing those values.

  • Page 124

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Power Setup The Power setup page is used to configure these power features: Power Feature Description Power Restore Policy Determines what happens when the system loses and then regains AC power. The choices are: •...

  • Page 125

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Advanced Configuration Power Interface (ACPI) Setup ACPI Setup provides the ability to configure the ACPI features described below: ACPI Feature Description Button Model Sets the power and/or sleep button model used by the system: •...

  • Page 126

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Reset Enables or disables a system reset when an event filter is triggered. Power Cycle Enables or disables a system power cycle when an event filter is triggered. LAN Alert Enables or disables sending of a LAN alert message when an event filter is triggered.

  • Page 127

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Emergency Management Port (EMP) Setup The EMP setup enables remote server management over a modem or with a direct serial connection. The following features are available: EMP Feature Description Access Mode Set the times during system operation when EMP access over the specified port is available.

  • Page 128

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server EMP Feature Description Modem ESC The Modem ESC Sequence string is sent to the modem Sequence before sending a command string to the modem. The maximum length is 8 bytes and it is usually set to "+++". Modem Phone Enter the phone number of the modem connected to this Number...

  • Page 129

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server DPC/LAN (Direct Platform Control/LAN) Setup The Direct Platform Control (DPC)/ Local Area Network (LAN) setup page lets you configure the following BMC LAN-Alert features. DPC/LAN Feature Description LAN Access Mode Sets the remote access mode. The choices are: •...

  • Page 130

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server DPC/LAN Feature Description Alert IP Address The Alert IP Address is the logical or Internet address of the system(s) to which an Alert message will be sent. For a single node destination, enter the unicast or specific IP address.

  • Page 131: Using Bios Setup

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Using BIOS Setup Use the BIOS Setup Utility to change the server configuration defaults. You can run the utility with or without an operating system being present. Setup stores most of the configuration values in battery backed CMOS. The rest of the values are stored in flash memory.

  • Page 132

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Table 10-3. Using the Setup Screens Press ← Scroll left through the main menu screens. → Scroll right through the main menu screens. ENTER Select a sub-menu item or accept a drop-down choice. Select a field within a value (e.g. date field). Select the default value.

  • Page 133

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Main Table 10-4 describes the menu items available on the Main screen. Default values appear in brackets. Table 10-4. BIOS Setup Main Screen Menu Items Menu Item Default Value Description BIOS Version [bios_version_number] The currently loaded version of BIOS.

  • Page 134

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Advanced Table 10-5 describes the menu items available on the Advanced screen. Five menu items exist on this screen. Each of these items contains sub-menus that in turn can also lead to subsequent sub-menus. Default values appear in brackets. Table 10-5.

  • Page 135

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server BIOS Setup Advanced Screen Menu Items Primary Menu Sub Menu Item Items Value Description [Auto] Determines Serial Port B Serial Port B Enable configuration at boot Disable time. Auto causes the server to determine the Base I/O address and interrupt to use for the port.

  • Page 136

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server BIOS Setup Advanced Screen Menu Items Primary Menu Sub Menu Item Items Value Description [Both] Selects the IDE controller IDE Controller Disabled and hard disk drive type Configuration Primary installed in your system. Secondary Both enables both IDE controllers.

  • Page 137

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server BIOS Setup Advanced Screen Menu Items Primary Menu Sub Menu Item Items Value Description [drive_id] A drive-specific identifier Secondary IDE Not Installed for the secondary IDE Master master device currently installed in the system. Clicking on the value displays a subsequent sub-menu item: Type.

  • Page 138

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server BIOS Setup Advanced Screen Menu Items Primary Menu Sub Menu Item Items Value Description Enters submenus that Memory Related allows you to configure Items System ECC, Base Memory Test Interval, Ext. Memory Test Interval, Defective DIMM Mapout and Clear Bad Memory Row Info.

  • Page 139

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Security Table 10-6 describes the menu items available on the Security screen. Default values appear in brackets. Table 10-6. BIOS Setup Security Screen Menu Items Menu Item Default Value Description Administrator Password Is [Not Installed] The current Administrator Installed password.

  • Page 140

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Table 10-7. BIOS Setup System Management Screen Menu Items Menu Item Default Value Description Console Redirection Selecting this option allows you to configure for console redirection Service Boot [Disabled] Enabling this item will allow you to Enabled boot into Service Partition Boot mode.

  • Page 141: Using The Selviewer Utility

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Using the SELViewer Utility The System Event Log (SEL) viewer utility is an EFI-based program (SELView.EFI) that is used to view the System Event records stored in the non- volatile server management storage device of the HP Server. Using the SELViewer Utility, you can do the following: •...

  • Page 142

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Navigation The SEL Viewer main window contains a display pane that shows all the SEL records. It also contains a pull-down menu, used for selecting the functions available in the SEL Viewer. The user can move between the display pane and the pull-down menu using the function key F10 or the Tab key.

  • Page 143

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server The SEL Viewer can display event logs in raw hexadecimal format as read from the server. Table 10-10 explains the abbreviations used in the hexadecimal mode display. Table 10-10. Abbreviations Used in Hex Mode display Abbreviation Description Record ID...

  • Page 144

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Save As Saves the SEL data to a file, with the .sel file name extension, either in interpreted text format or in raw hex format, depending on the mode in which records are currently displayed. The interpreted text format files contain the SEL properties in the first lines followed by a blank line and the column headings.

  • Page 145: Using The Sdr Viewer Utility

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Display In Hex This option allows the user to toggle between the raw hexadecimal / Display In mode display and the interpreted mode display. In hex mode Text display, all the SEL records are displayed in raw hex format. In interpreted mode display, all the SEL records are decoded and displayed in text format.

  • Page 146

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Using the SDR Viewer Utility, you can do the following: • Examine all SDRs from the Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) • Examine all SDRs from previously stored files • Save all SDRs read from BMC to a file. Running the SDR Viewer Utility To run the SDR Viewer Utility, complete the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 147

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Navigation Use the keystrokes indicated in Table 10-13 to navigate the SDR Viewer Utility’s main window: Table 10-13. SDR Viewer Utility Navigation Keystroke or Combination Description Navigate up and down menu items or scroll through ↑↓...

  • Page 148

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Pull-Down Menu – File The File pull-down menu includes menu items for opening and saving data files. These options are further described in the sections below. Table 10-14. SDR Viewer Utility File Menu Selections Menu Selection Description...

  • Page 149

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Menu Selection Description • Last Erase Time: The date and time data was last erased from the SDR. • Free Space Remaining: Amount of space remaining in the SDR • SDR Version: SDR version information. Reload Allows you to reload the SDR data from the server.

  • Page 150: Upgrading The Server, Upgrading The Bios By Using Iflash64

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Pull-Down Menu – Help The help menu displays detailed information about the program usage to the user. In addition, it also displays the utility version information and IPMI driver version number. Table 10-16. SDR Viewer Utility SDR Menu Selections Menu Selection Description...

  • Page 151

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server NOTE After you complete the Iflash64 BIOS update, you must clear CMOS. For information on how to clear CMOS, refer to “Clearing CMOS”. BIOS Upgrade Procedure To upgrade the BIOS with the Iflash64 utility, follow these steps: 1.

  • Page 152

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 1. Invoke the utility by entering the following command: IFlash64 IFlash64 [File Name] 2. Use the arrow keys to browse through the menu and press the <Enter> key to select an item. A brief description of the selected menu item is displayed in the Tip-View window shown at the bottom of the screen.

  • Page 153

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server To clear CMOS using the jumper setting follow these steps: 1. Power down the server by pressing and holding the Power button on the Front Control Panel. You may have to hold the Power button down for several seconds.

  • Page 154

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 13. Unplug the power cords from the power source and remove them from the server. 14. Remove the Legacy I/O board from the system by following the procedure described in the Chapter 8 section, “Removing the Legacy I/O Board”. 15.

  • Page 155: Upgrading The Firmware

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Upgrading the Firmware Run the Firmware Update Utility each time you upgrade or replace the hardware in your server except for add-in boards, hard drives, and RAM. The program updates the following controllers one at a time: •...

  • Page 156

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 5. Power down the system by pressing and holding the Power button on the Front Control panel. 6. Disconnect the AC power cords from the system and wait 60 seconds. 7. Connect the AC power cords and power up the system. Running the Firmware Update Utility Through the Command Line Interface To use the FWUpdate Utility, complete the following procedure: 1.

  • Page 157

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 5. The utility asks you to update the boot code and/or the operational code. Check the firmware release notes for the release that you are trying to update for information on what you need to update. The update might require you to update both boot code and operational code or it might require you to just update the operational code.

  • Page 158: Using The Frusdr Load Utility

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Using the FRUSDR Load Utility The Field Replacement Unit (FRU) and Sensor Data Record (SDR) Load (FRUSDR) Utility (FRUSDR.EFI) is an Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) program that updates or modifies the server management subsystem’s product level FRU and SDR repository.

  • Page 159

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 4. Run the utility by entering a frusdr command based on the following syntax: frusdr [option] [/p] The frusdr command accepts single options only. You can accompany any option with the /p switch to cause the output to pause between blocks of displayed output.

  • Page 160

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server The command-line options for the FRUSDR Load Utility are described in Table 10-19 below. Each option can be preceded by either the forward slash character (/) or the hyphen character (-). Table 10-19. FRUSDR Load Utility Command-line Options and Parameters Option or Parameter Description...

  • Page 161

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Displaying Usage Information When the utility is invoked with the /? or /h command line arguments, the following message is displayed. FRU & SDR Load Utility for EFI Version 1.0 Usage: FRUSDR /? or /h Displays usage information.

  • Page 162

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Displays Given Area When the utility is invoked with the /d FRU or /d SDR command line argument the indicated area is displayed. If the given display function fails because of an inability to parse the data present or hardware failure the utility will display an error message.

  • Page 163

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server MultiRecord Offset = 00h = 00h CHECKSUM = D0h Displaying Internal Use Area Internal Information Area (Version 0, Length 72) 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00...

  • Page 164

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server Displaying Product Area Product Information Area (Version 1, Length 80) Unicode Country Base = 00h Manufacturer Name (ASCII) = Intel Product Name (ASCII) = DPServer Part Number (ASCII) = 987654321 Product Version (ASCII) = 123456789 Serial Number (ASCII) = 987654321 Asset Tag...

  • Page 165

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server 53 43 53 49 2D 42 2D 54 65 72 6D 33 SCSI-B-Term3 Reading SDR Record #2 0E 40 10 01 30 20 00 13 05 00 10 F1 F8 04 01 05 . @..0 ..

  • Page 166

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server header checksum. If the header checksum is incorrect, then a message will be displayed indicating so. Comparing the FRU File The configuration COMPARE command allows the validation of information to what exists in the non-volatile storage device without programming that information.

  • Page 167

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server FRU & SDR Load Utility Functional Operation Using the information in the configuration file, the utility can probe the product configuration. The following sections describe the operation of the FRU and SDR Load Utility. For the latest information regarding the utility, please visit the HP web site: http://www.hp.com/ Configuration File...

  • Page 168

    Chapter 10 Configuring the HP Server the configuration file. The utility automatically programs all SDRs that are not tagged. The utility also copies all written SDRs to the sdr.tmp file. Because this file contains an image of what was loaded, it is useful for debugging the server. Updating the FRU Non-Volatile Storage Area After the system configuration is determined, a typical configuration file updates the FRU non-volatile storage area.

  • Page 169: Troubleshooting, Introduction, Common Installation Problems

    The following sections contain general procedures to help you locate installation problems. If you need assistance, it is recommended that you contact your reseller first. If you require assistance from Hewlett-Packard, see the "Warranty or Service/Support Booklet" or refer to the HP Server rx4610 Resource CD-ROM included with your product.

  • Page 170: Troubleshooting Sequence

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Troubleshooting Sequence Most HP Server problems are the result of incorrect HP Server and SCSI subsystem configurations. To troubleshoot an installation problem, perform the following checks in the order given: 1. Check all cable and power connections, including those in the rack, etc. 2.

  • Page 171

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting If the HP Server Will Not Power On Use these steps to check for power related problems: 1. On the control panel, verify the LCD screen's backlight is lit (green glow). If it is lit, the HP Server is receiving AC power. If it is not lit, ensure the HP Server's power cord is connected.

  • Page 172

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 3. Check that the DC-DC Converter on the Power Distribution Board is properly installed. 4. Check that the DC-DC Converter on the I/O Baseboard is plugged into the 3.3V number one connector. 5. Check for a Power Pod failure on a Processor. If the HP Server Powers On but then Shuts Down with a Fault Light Use this checklist to check for the following problems when the HP Server powers on and then off:...

  • Page 173

    Verify that the DIMMs in any given row are the same size and have the same Hewlett-Packard part number. vi. Ensure all disk drive power and data cables are securely and properly connected, at the rear of each drive.

  • Page 174

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting ix. Replace all power cords and power cables. x. Turn on the monitor. xi. Turn on the HP Server at the control panel. xii. Check for error messages. If the HP Server Passes POST but a Processor is Disabled or Not Recognized If a processor is not recognized by the Server, check the following items: 1.

  • Page 175: Hp Server Rx4610 Sel Data Tables, Hp Server Rx4610 Generator Id Codes

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 3. Replace the DC-DC Converters. If the HP Server’s SCSI Drives Are Not Recognized Check the following if the SCSI drives are not recognized during POST: 1. Check the seating of the Internal SCSI Cable between the I/O Board and the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking).

  • Page 176: Hp Server Rx4610 Sensor Codes

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting HP Server rx4610 Sensor Codes Sensor Sensor Type Number Sensor Name Spare Sensor Spare Sensor 1 Spare Sensor 2 Temperature Backplane (HSC TeeDock) Temperature HSC SCSI Backplane Temperature Processor 0 Core Temperature Processor 1 Core Temperature Processor 2 Core Temperature Processor 3 Core Temperature Upper Memory Board Temperature Lower Memory Board Temperature...

  • Page 177

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Processor Board +1.5 Volt Processor Board +1.8 Volt Processor Board +3.3 Volt SCSI TERM Volt 00 SCSI TERM Volt 01 SCSI TERM Volt 02 SCSI TERM Volt 10 SCSI TERM Volt 11 SCSI TERM Volt 12 Processor 0 Power Good Processor 1 Power Good Processor 2 Power Good Processor 3 Power Good...

  • Page 178

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Security Violation Attempt Secure Mode Violation Attempt Processor Processor 0 Status Processor 1 Status Processor 2 Status Processor 3 Status Power Supply Power Supply 1 Power Supply 2 Power Supply 3 Power Supply 4 Upper Memory Board D2D_0 Upper Memory Board D2D_1 Lower Memory Board D2D_0 Lower Memory Board D2D_1...

  • Page 179

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Hot Swap Drive 1 Present (left HDD) Hot Swap Drive 2 Present (right HDD) POST Error BIOS POST code Critical Interrupt FP NMI (Front Panel Diag Int) Module / Board Processor Board Present Upper Memory Board Present Lower Memory Board Present Slot / Connector Hot Plug PCI Slot 3...

  • Page 180: Hp Server Rx4610 Event Description Codes

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Upper Memory Board Fan Boost Temperature Lower Memory Board Fan Boost Temperature Sideplane Fan Boost Temperature I/O Board Fan Boost Temperature Processor Board 1 Fan Boost Temperature Processor Board 2 Fan Boost Temperature TeeDock Board Fan Boost Temperature HP Server rx4610 Event Description Codes The purpose of the Event Description field varies, depending on the Generator ID.

  • Page 181: Bios Error Codes\messages

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Event Description Offset Definition PHP slot fault de-asserted PHP slot powered on PHP slot fault asserted PHP slot powered off BIOS Error Codes\Messages The following list defines the BIOS error codes on the HP Server rx4610 server system.

  • Page 182

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 0120: NVRAM cleared By jumper 0121: Password cleared By jumper 0141: PCI Memory Conflict 0142: PCI IO Conflict 0143: PCI IRQ Conflict 0144: Shadow of PCI ROM Failed 0145: PCI ROM not found, May Be OK For This Card 0146: Insufficient Memory to Shadow PCI ROM 8100: BIST Failure : Processor in socket M0 8101: BIST Failure : Processor in socket M1...

  • Page 183

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8151: Processor in socket M1: failed initialization on last boot 8152: Processor in socket M2: failed initialization on last boot 8153: Processor in socket M3: failed initialization on last boot 8190: Watchdog timer failed on last boot 8191: 2:1 core to bus speed ratio: Processor L2 cache disabled 8192: L2 cache size mismatch 8193: CPUID, Processor stepping are different...

  • Page 184

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8C58: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 8 8C59: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 9 8C5A: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 10 8C5B: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 11 8C5C: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 12 8C5D: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 13 8C5E: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 14 8C5F: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 15...

  • Page 185

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8C75: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 5 8C76: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 6 8C77: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 7 8C78: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 8 8C79: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 9 8C7A: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 10 8C7B: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 11 8C7C: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 12...

  • Page 186: Beep Codes, Beep Codes And Interpretation

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8C92: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 9 - 12 8C93: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 17 - 20 8C94: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 25 - 28 8C95: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 5 - 8 8C96: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 13 - 16 8C97: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 21 - 24 8C98: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 29 - 32 8C99: DIMMs mapped out: Upper Board, 1 - 4...

  • Page 187

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Table 11-1. BMC Beep Codes Code Description 1-5-1-1 FRB failure (processor failure) 1-5-2-1 No processors installed/detected 1-5-4-2 Power control fault. Power-good dropped out. This beep code occurs during run time 1-5-4-4 PWRGD-BUF failure. System did not assert power- good on power-up.

  • Page 188: Types Of Memory Tests, First Row Memory Test

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 300Ms 3Sec 600Ms 300Ms 600Ms 600Ms Beep Code for 1-5-1-1 & 1 for Power Supply Configuration Failed to retain 3+1 redundancy Types of Memory Tests The HP Server rx4610 platform memory test is separated into the following three individual tests: •...

  • Page 189

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Table 11-2. First Row Detection Order Order Board DIMM Upper Upper 13-16 Upper 21-24 Upper 29-32 Upper Upper 9-12 Upper 17-20 Upper 25-28 Lower Lower 13-16 Lower 21-24 Lower 29-32 Lower Lower 9-12 Lower 17-20 Lower 25-28 Upon completion of the first row memory test, the memory testing continues with the base memory test.

  • Page 190

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting User Action This memory failure must be fixed and can only be fixed by replacing the bad row of DIMMs. 1. Replace the first row of DIMMs. Determine the location of the defective row using Table 11-2. Starting with #1 in the “Order” column, determine the “DIMM”...

  • Page 191: Base Memory Test

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting - displayed on the upper LCD line “First row test” - displayed on the lower LCD line “0064 MB” “ALL DIMM MAP OUT” - displayed on the upper LCD line User Action 1. Replace the first row of DIMMs. On repacing the DIMMs, make sure the size and HP part number match.

  • Page 192

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting User Notification The first row that contains the defective DIMM will be mapped out and the system will continue to boot with the remaining memory. An error message will be displayed to video for the mapped out defect DIMM. - displayed on the upper LCD line during first row “First row test”...

  • Page 193

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 1. Determine the location of the row of defective DIMMs from the error message or by running the EFI based SELViewer Utility or by running either the Intel Server Control (ISC) or Direct Platform Control (DPC) to read the System Event Log (SEL).

  • Page 194

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Example: Consider a system is populated with two rows of 256 MB DIMMS in the upper board row 1-4 and row 5-8. If an SBE was detected in DIMM 5 during the first row test and an SBE\MBE was detected in DIMM 1 during the base memory test, then the following message will appear on the LCD: “First row test”...

  • Page 195

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Case 3 The system is populated with more than one row of memory, the first row memory test encounters a SBE (Single Bit Error), and the base row test encounters memory errors but not on all the rows. In this case, the BIOS will write the failing row from first row test into CMOS history, map out the first row of DIMMs, and continues with base memory testing.

  • Page 196

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting The first line is the total memory installed (regardless of condition). The second line is the total memory useable (and is less than the first line, only if defective DIMMS were found). The third line counts the memory as the test is being performed.

  • Page 197: Extended Memory Test

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting User Notification The BIOS will try to map out defective rows found during base memory test but will end up in an infinite reset loop. - displayed on the upper LCD line “First row test” - displayed on the lower LCD line “0064 MB”...

  • Page 198

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting There is a 2 GB fixed gap between the memory address 2 GB to 4 GB that is reserved for PCI. This 2 GB of memory addresses, as seen by the processor, will not be tested. User Notification There are two sets of messages associated with this test.

  • Page 199

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting A second set of messages will be seen later in the POST, which indicates where the memory test found errors. The sequence is as follows: Error in memory subsystem: (Lower/Upper) Board, DIMM ERRORS FOUND IN MEMORY SUBSYSTEM. FAILING ROWS WILL BE MAPPED OUT ON THE NEXT RESET.

  • Page 200

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting A second set of messages will be seen later in the POST that indicates where the memory test found errors. The sequence is as follows: 8C81: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 17 8C82: ERRORS FOUND IN MEMORY SUBSYSTEM. FAILING ROWS WILL BE MAPPED OUT ON THE NEXT RESET.

  • Page 201: Memory Test Duration, Aborting The Memory Test

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Error Logging For the extended memory test, four error records will be written for multi-bit errors, one for each DIMM. For single-bit-errors during the extended memory test, error records will be one per DIMM. By specifications, the DIMM number will be one less than the silk-screened number on the printed-circuit board.

  • Page 202: Setup Dialog

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Setup Dialog The BIOS setup (F2) menu has the following selections: ->Advanced->Chipset Configuration->Memory Related Items: Table 11-3. Memory Test Setup Items Name Selection Comments System ECC Enabled Default Disabled First Row Test Interval 4 cache line per 16 MB Default Every location Base Memory Test...

  • Page 203: Memory Testing Error Codes\messages

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting Memory Testing Error Codes\Messages 8C51: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 1 8C52: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 2 8C53: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 3 8C54: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 4 8C55: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 5 8C56: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 6 8C57: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 7...

  • Page 204

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8C6D: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 29 8C6E: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 30 8C6F: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 31 8C70: Error in memory subsystem: Lower Board, DIMM 32 8C71: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 1 8C72: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 2 8C73: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 3 8C74: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 4...

  • Page 205

    Chapter 11 Troubleshooting 8C8A: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 26 8C8B: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 27 8C8C: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 28 8C8D: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 29 8C8E: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 30 8C8F: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 31 8C90: Error in memory subsystem: Upper Board, DIMM 32 8C91: DIMMs mapped out: Lower Board, 1 - 4...

  • Page 207: A Specifications, Introduction

    Specifications Introduction This appendix provides the power requirements, operating conditions (environmental requirements), physical requirements, hardware specifications, and video resolutions of the HP Server. The system board layout is provided in Figure A-1. Figure A-1. System Board Layout...

  • Page 208: Requirements

    Appendix A Specifications Requirements The following tables provide the specifications required for normal operation of the HP Server. Table A-1. Power Supply Specifications Parameter Characteristics Input Power 208/110 VAC Input Range – Dual rating: Maximum 800W minimum over 180-264 VAC 700W minimum over 90-132 VAC Operating Current 100 VAC 5.3 A...

  • Page 209

    Appendix A Specifications Table A-3. Weight and Dimensions Approx. 150 lbs (68.1 kg.), depending on Weight configuration – excludes keyboard and monitor. 31.12 cm (12.25 inches, 7U) Height 44.45 cm (17.5 inches) Width 71.12 cm (28.0 inches) Depth 7.62 cm (3 inches) Required front clearance 20.32cm (8 inches)

  • Page 210: Video Display Modes

    Appendix A Specifications Two Serial ports and one bi-directional parallel port with ECP/EPP high-speed support. PS/2 style mouse and keyboard connectors. Bundled DVD drive with an IDE interface. Video Display Modes The ATI RAGE XL integrated video controller provides VGA modes for resolutions of 1280 x 1024 and below.

  • Page 211: Connector Pinouts And Boardset Locations, Vga Video Port

    Appendix A Specifications Connector Pinouts and Boardset Locations VGA Video Port Figure A-2. Video Port Connector Pinout Table A-6. Video Port Connector Pinout Signal Signal Green Blue DDCDAT HSYNC VSYNC DDCCLK...

  • Page 212: Keyboard And Mouse

    Appendix A Specifications Keyboard and Mouse Figure A-3. Keyboard and Mouse Connectors The PS/2-compatible connectors share a common housing; but they are not functionally equivalent. Table A-7. Keyboard and Mouse Connector Pinouts Keyboard signal Mouse signal KEYDAT MSEDAT FUSED_VCC (+5 V) FUSED_VCC (+5 V) KEYCLK MSECLK...

  • Page 213: Parallel Port

    Appendix A Specifications Parallel Port Figure A-4. Parallel Port Connector Pinout Table A-8. Parallel Port Connector Pinout Signal Signal STROBE_L ACK_L Data bit 0 Busy Data bit 1 Data bit 2 SLCT Data bit 3 AUFDXT_L Data bit 4 ERROR_L Data bit 5 INIT_L Data bit 6...

  • Page 214: Serial Ports A And B

    Appendix A Specifications Serial Ports A and B Figure A-5. Serial Ports A and B Table A-9. Serial Port Connector Pinout Signal Description Data carrier detected Receive data Transmit data Data terminal ready Ground Data set ready Request to send Clear to send Ring indication active...

  • Page 215: Universal Serial Bus (usb)

    Appendix A Specifications Universal Serial Bus (USB) There are two external USB connectors designated A and B at the back panel. Figure A-6. USB Connectors Table A-10. USB Connector Pinout Signal Notes Over current monitor line port 0 DataL0 Differential data line paired with DATAH0 DataH0 Differential data line paired with DATAL0 Cable ground...

  • Page 216: Scsi

    Appendix A Specifications SCSI There is one external SCSI connector on the back of the server. Pin 34 Pin 68 Pin 35 Figure A-7. SCSI Connector Table A-11. Wide SCSI Connector Pinout Signal Signal S1 (+DB 12) S35 (-DB 12) S2 (-DB 13) S36 (-DB 13) S3 (+DB 14)

  • Page 217

    Appendix A Specifications Signal Signal S21 (+ATN) S55 (-ATN) S22 S22 S23 (+BSY) S57 (-BSY) S24 (+ACK) S58 (-ACK) S25 (+RST) S59 (-RST) S26 (+MSG) S60 (-MSG) S27 (+SEL) S61 (-SEL) S28 (+C/D) S62 (-C/D) S29 (+REQ) S63(-REQ) S30 (+I/O) S64 (-I/O) S31 (+DB 8) S65 (-DB 8)

  • Page 218

    Appendix A Specifications Signal Signal IORDY DD10 CSEL (1 KΩ p/d) DACK DD11 DD12 Reserved (N/C) DD13 Reserved (N/C) DD14 CS1P_L DD15 DS3P_L DHACT_ Keyed PCI connectors exist inside the chassis on the I/O Baseboard. Table A-13. 33MHz, 64-bit PCI Connectors (Slots 1 and 2) Signal Signal Signal...

  • Page 219

    Appendix A Specifications Signal Signal Signal Signal RESERVED RESERVED PRSNT2_L REQ64_L ACK64_L RESERVED RESERVED RESET_L RESERVED GRANT_L C/BE7_L C/BE5_L REQ_L C/BE6_L RESERVED C/BE4_L AD30 PAR64 AD31 +3.3V AD62 AD29 AD63 AD28 AD61 AD26 AD60 AD27 AD58 AD25 AD59 AD24 +3.3V AD57 IDSEL AD56...

  • Page 220

    Appendix A Specifications Signal Signal Signal Signal AD34 SERR_L AD35 +3.3V AD33 AD15 AD32 C/BE1_L +3.3V RESERVED AD14 RESERVED AD13 RESERVED AD11 RESERVED AD12 Table A-14. 66MHz, 64-Bit PCI Connectors (Slots 3 through 10) Signal Signal Signal Signal TRST_L -12V AD10 +12V M66EN...

  • Page 221

    Appendix A Specifications Signal Signal Signal Signal AD26 AD60 AD27 +3.3V AD58 AD25 AD59 AD24 +3.3V AD57 IDSEL AD56 C/BE3_L +3.3V AD54 AD23 AD55 AD22 +3.3V AD53 AD20 AD52 AD21 AD50 AD19 AD51 AD18 +3.3V AD49 AD16 AD48 AD17 +3.3V +3.3V AD46 C/BE2_L...

  • Page 222: Information On Jumpers, General Procedure To Change Jumper Settings

    Appendix A Specifications Information on Jumpers The Information on Jumpers section provides an overview of how to change a jumper settings for any board and provides the jumper block diagrams for the following boards: • General Procedure to Change Jumper Settings •...

  • Page 223: Processor Baseboard Jumpers

    Appendix A Specifications Processor Baseboard Jumpers The jumper blocks on the Processor Baseboard allow you to route Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) Test Data In (TDI) and Test Data Out (TDO) signals through different components on the Processor Baseboard. Additionally, jumper blocks allow you to configure the host bus frequency, set the processor frequency, and set other miscellaneous functions.

  • Page 224

    Appendix A Specifications JTAG Select1 Settings Jumper block J2E3 selects combinations of the processor, supporting chip set, memory, and I/O as routes for JTAG TDI and TDO signals. The default jumper setting allows only JTAG TDI and TDO signals to be routed through the processor.

  • Page 225

    Appendix A Specifications JTAG Select2 Settings Jumper block J2E4 adds and skips Processor Board components to the JTAG TDI and TDO signal path. With this jumper you can choose to add memory and I/O, choose to skip Memory and I/O, choose to skip Memory and add I/O, or choose to add Memory and skip I/O.

  • Page 226

    Appendix A Specifications Setting Host Bus Frequencies Jumper blocks J2H1, J2H2, and J2H3 configure the host bus frequency. The settings for all three jumper blocks combine to yield the single frequency. By default, the frequency is set to 133 MHz. J2H1 J2H2 J2H3...

  • Page 227

    Appendix A Specifications Processor Host Core Bus Ratio Jumper block J1E2 configures the host-core bus ratio. By default, the bus ration is two to eleven and the core frequency is 733 MHz. Figure A-13 shows the jumper settings. J1E2 J1E2 J1E2 J1E2 RATIO3...

  • Page 228

    Appendix A Specifications Miscellaneous Jumper Settings Jumper block J2E2 enables server management write protect, configures cache line size, disables the FRB, enables the FSB in common clock mode, applies power to the pullups on the ISP chain for stand-alone programming, and selects between using J1E2 or PCA8550 to set the host core bus ratio.

  • Page 229: Legacy I/o Board Jumpers

    Appendix A Specifications Legacy I/O Board Jumpers Jumper blocks exist on the Legacy I/O Board that allow you to perform recovery boot operations, clear the CMOS register, clear the password, and configure FWH programming. To access these jumper blocks you need remove the Legacy I/O Board by following the instructions in “Legacy I/O Board”...

  • Page 230

    Appendix A Specifications Configuring FWH Programming Jumper block J4A1 allows you to set the FWH programming at 12 Volts. By default, FWH programming is configured for 3.3 Volts. J4A1 J4A1 Figure A-16. Configuring FWH Programming Jumper diagram labeled: FWH Programming at 12 Volts FWH Programming at 3.3 Volts (Default Setting) Configuring Recovery Boot Jumper block J7A1 controls whether the system attempts to boot using the BIOS...

  • Page 231

    Appendix A Specifications Clearing the CMOS Register Jumper block J7A1 controls whether settings stored in CMOS nonvolatile memory (NVRAM) are retained during a system reset. By default, the system does not keep the default values in this register. You can configure J7A1 to restore the system defaults.

  • Page 232

    Appendix A Specifications Jumper diagram labeled: A. Retains System Password (Default Setting) B. Clears the System Password on Reset Jumper block J7B1 controls whether the BMC is in a firmware transfer mode and forces an update to the BMC code. J7B1 J7B1 Figure A-20.

  • Page 233: I/o Baseboard Jumpers

    Appendix A Specifications I/O Baseboard Jumpers Jumper blocks exist on the OEM I/O Baseboard that allow you to include the BMC in the JTAG chain and override the hardware PCI hot plug interlock switches. To access these jumper blocks you need to expose the OEM I/O Baseboard by following the instructions in Chapter 8 “Server Management Boards”.

  • Page 234

    Appendix A Specifications Including the BMC in the JTAG Chain Jumper block J8D1 lets you include or exclude the BMC in the JTAG chain. By default, the BMC is excluded from the JTAG chain. J8D1 J8D1 Figure A-22. BMC Jumper Settings Jumper setting diagram labeled: A.

  • Page 235: Power Distribution Board Jumpers (t-docking)

    Appendix A Specifications Power Distribution Board Jumpers (T-Docking) Jumper blocks exist on the Power Distribution Board (T-Docking) that allow you to force a firmware update, flash bootblock write enable, and configure for 220 Volt brownout protection. To access these jumper blocks you need expose the T- Docking Board by following the instructions in Chapter 8, “Server Management Boards”.

  • Page 236: Determining Dc-to-dc Status

    Appendix A Specifications Forcing a Firmware Update and Flashing Bootblock Write Enable Jumper blocks J4E1 and J4E2 allow you force a firmware update and flash bootblock write enable. By default, both these features are disabled. J4E2 J4E2 J4E2 J4E2 J4E1 J4E1 J4E1 J4E1...

  • Page 237

    Appendix A Specifications Table A-15. DC-to-DC LED AC Power not AC Power Present AC Power Present Present System Powered System Powered Amber LED Off Amber LED On Amber LED Description No AC power to any power supply or DC- to-DC AC present / Standby output on AC present / Standby...

  • Page 239: B Equipment Log And Configuration Worksheet, Equipment Log

    Equipment Log and Configuration Worksheet Equipment Log Use the blank equipment log provided here to record information about your system. You will need some of this information when you run BIOS Setup. Item Manufacturer Name Serial Date Number Installed Model Number System OEM I/O Baseboard Processor Baseboard...

  • Page 240

    Appendix B Equipment Log and Configuration Worksheet Item Manufacturer Name Serial Date Number Installed Model Number Third Installed Power Supply Fourth Installed Power Supply Hot Plug PCI Slot (1) Hot Plug PCI Slot (2) Hot Plug PCI Slot (3) Hot Plug PCI Slot (4) Hot Plug PCI Slot (5) Hot Plug PCI Slot (6) Hot Plug PCI Slot (7)

  • Page 241: C Ini File Format, Introduction, Ini File Structure

    INI File Format Introduction The FRUSDR utility for EFI has a new feature that allows the FRU information retrieved from the EEPROM to be displayed in a manner other than that of the original utilities display. Through the use of an INI file the user can create strings to be displayed and insert information from the data retrieved from the EEPROM into the string.

  • Page 242

    Appendix C INI File Format The other component of the Display entry is the format string and data markers. The format string is similar to a C style format string. Text from the format string will be displayed as written between a set of quotation marks, with the only exceptions being the formatting options.

  • Page 243: Data Markers

    Appendix C INI File Format Data Markers Area Field Marker Chassis Area Chassis type Chassis Part number Chassis Serial number Board Area Manufacture Date/Time Board Manufacturer Board Name Board Serial number Board Part number Product Area Product Manufacturer Product Name Product Part Number Product Serial Number Product Asset Tag...

  • Page 245: Index

    Index board clamps, 48 boot block, 148 boot device priority .CFG files, 157 boot order, 28 Boot Maintenance Menu, 109 boot options, 110 [DISPLAY] Section, 233 Boot Options, 109 [INF_FILE] Section, 233 boot order boot device priority, 28 default, 28 120 mm cooling fans, 19 DVD, 28, 71 172 mm fans, 19...

  • Page 246

    Index control panel, 1 external ports, 106 LEDs, 1 External SCSI Devices, 36 switch, 1 extraction levers, 43 cooling, 15 cover removing, 15 F2 key, 123 replacing, 16 Fails POST, 164 cp command, 112 Fan Control, ACPI, 117 CPU thermal dummies, 54 Fan Fail LED crash dump, 2 fans, 19...

  • Page 247

    Index ports, rear panel, 8 master.cfg, 157 powering down, 12 mem command, 112 memmap command, 112 Memory Board DC-DC Converters, 44 Memory Boards, 45 I/O Baseboard, 84 Memory Installation Guidelines, 41 I/O carrier mkdir command, 113 parallel port, 205 mm address command, 113 serial ports, 206 Mode, 127 video port connector, 203...

  • Page 248

    Index parallel, 8 rear panel, 8 SCSI, 127 serial ports, 106 hard disk drive USB ports, 106 indicator, drive in recovery mode, 30 video, 106 SCSI Backplane, 38 POST, 107 SCSI channel B disabled processors, 166 external SCSI port, 36 Power Cycle Delay, 116 SCSI Device Selection, 27 Power Distribution Board (T-Docking), 98...

  • Page 249

    Index System Event Log, 133 System Fans Come on but then Shutdown, 163 Update Utility, 147 System Management, 131 USB connectors, 106 System Management, BIOS Setup Utility, 124 User Password Is, 131 System Partitions, 110 System Power LED System Time, 125 ver command, 113 monitor connector, 203 time command, 113...

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