Download  Print this page
   
1
2
Table of Contents
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
647
648
649
650
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670
671
672
673
674
675
676
677
678
679
680
681
682
683
684
685
686
687
688
689
690
691
692
693
694
695
696
697
698
699
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730

Advertisement

3Com Switch 4200G Family
Switch 4200G 12-Port
Switch 4200G 24-Port
Switch 4200G 48-Port
Switch 4200G PWR 24-Port
Product Version: V3.02.00
Manual Version:
6PW100-20081201
www.3com.com
3Com Corporation
350 Campus Drive, Marlborough,
MA, USA 01752 3064

Advertisement

   Related Manuals for 3Com 4200G 12-Port

   Summary of Contents for 3Com 4200G 12-Port

  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    3Com Switch 4200G Family Configuration Guide Switch 4200G 12-Port Switch 4200G 24-Port Switch 4200G 48-Port Switch 4200G PWR 24-Port Product Version: V3.02.00 Manual Version: 6PW100-20081201 www.3com.com 3Com Corporation 350 Campus Drive, Marlborough, MA, USA 01752 3064...
  • Page 2 3Com Corporation. 3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change.
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    About This Manual Organization 3Com Switch 4200G Family Configuration Guide is organized as follows: Part Contents Introduces the ways to log into an Ethernet switch and CLI 1 Login related configuration. 2 Configuration File Management Introduces configuration file and the related configuration.
  • Page 4 Part Contents 28 File System Management Introduces basic configuration for file system management. Introduces basic configuration for FTP, SFTP and TFTP, 29 FTP-SFTP-TFTP and the applications. 30 Information Center Introduces information center configuration. 31 System Maintenance and Introduces daily system maintenance and debugging. Debugging 32 Remote-ping Introduces Remote-ping and the related configuration.
  • Page 5: Related Documentation, Obtaining Documentation

    3Com Switch 4200G Family Release information in this guide differs from information in the Notes release notes, use the information in the Release Notes. Obtaining Documentation You can access the most up-to-date 3Com product documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL: http://www.3com.com.
  • Page 6: Login

    Table of Contents Logging In to an Ethernet Switch ············································································································1-1 Logging In to an Ethernet Switch ············································································································1-1 Introduction to the User Interface············································································································1-1 Supported User Interfaces ··············································································································1-1 Relationship Between a User and a User Interface ········································································1-2 User Interface Index ························································································································1-2 Common User Interface Configuration····························································································1-2 Logging In Through the Console Port·····································································································2-1 Introduction ·············································································································································2-1 Setting Up a Login Environment for Login Through the Console Port····················································2-1...
  • Page 7 Switch Configuration························································································································4-2 Modem Connection Establishment ·········································································································4-2 CLI Configuration ······································································································································5-1 Introduction to the CLI·····························································································································5-1 Command Hierarchy ·······························································································································5-1 Command Level and User Privilege Level ······················································································5-1 Modifying the Command Level········································································································5-2 Switching User Level ·······················································································································5-3 CLI Views ················································································································································5-7 CLI Features ·········································································································································5-10 Online Help····································································································································5-10 Terminal Display····························································································································5-11 Command History··························································································································5-12 Error Prompts ································································································································5-12 Command Edit·······························································································································5-13...
  • Page 8 Supported User Interfaces The auxiliary (AUX) port and the console port of a 3Com low-end and mid-range Ethernet switch are the same port (referred to as console port in the following part). You will be in the AUX user interface if you log in through this port.
  • Page 9 Table 1-1 Description on user interface User interface Applicable user Port used Remarks Each switch can Users logging in through the Console port accommodate one AUX console port user. Each switch can Telnet users and SSH users Ethernet port accommodate up to five VTY users.
  • Page 10 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Lock the current user Available in user view lock interface A user interface is not locked by default. Specify to send messages Optional to all user interfaces/a send { all | number | type number } Available in user view specified user interface Optional...
  • Page 11: Logging In Through The Console Port

    Logging In Through the Console Port Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Setting Up a Login Environment for Login Through the Console Port Console Port Login Configuration Console Port Login Configuration with Authentication Mode Being None Console Port Login Configuration with Authentication Mode Being Password Console Port Login Configuration with Authentication Mode Being Scheme Introduction...
  • Page 12 If you use a PC to connect to the console port, launch a terminal emulation utility (such as Terminal in Windows 3.X or HyperTerminal in Windows 9X/Windows 2000/Windows XP. The following assumes that you are running Windows XP) and perform the configuration shown in Figure 2-2 through Figure 2-4...
  • Page 13: Console Port Login Configuration

    Figure 2-4 Set port parameters Turn on the switch. You will be prompted to press the Enter key if the switch successfully completes POST (power-on self test). The prompt appears after you press the Enter key. You can then configure the switch or check the information about the switch by executing the corresponding commands.
  • Page 14 Configuration Remarks Set the maximum Optional number of lines the By default, the screen can contain up to 24 lines. screen can contain Optional Set history command buffer By default, the history command buffer can contain up size to 10 commands. Optional Set the timeout time of a user interface...
  • Page 15: Console Port Login Configurations For Different Authentication Modes

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional By default, the screen can contain up Set the maximum number of screen-length to 24 lines. lines the screen can contain screen-length You can use the screen-length 0 command to disable the function to display information in pages.
  • Page 16: Console Port Login Configuration With Authentication Mode Being None

    Changes made to the authentication mode for console port login takes effect after you quit the command-line interface and then log in again. Console Port Login Configuration with Authentication Mode Being None Configuration Procedure Follow these steps to configure console port login with the authentication mode being none: To do…...
  • Page 17: Console Port Login Configuration With Authentication Mode Being Password

    Network diagram Figure 2-5 Network diagram for AUX user interface configuration (with the authentication mode being none) GE1/0/1 Ethernet Configuration PC running Telnet Configuration procedure # Enter system view. <Sysname> system-view # Enter AUX user interface view. [Sysname] user-interface aux 0 # Specify not to authenticate users logging in through the console port.
  • Page 18 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view Enter AUX user interface user-interface aux 0 — view Required By default, users logging in to a switch Configure to authenticate authentication-mode through the console port are not users using the local password authenticated;...
  • Page 19: Console Port Login Configuration With Authentication Mode Being Scheme

    <Sysname> system-view # Enter AUX user interface view. [Sysname] user-interface aux 0 # Specify to authenticate users logging in through the console port using the local password. [Sysname-ui-aux0] authentication-mode password # Set the local password to 123456 (in plain text). [Sysname-ui-aux0] set authentication password simple 123456 # Specify commands of level 2 are available to users logging in to the AUX user interface.
  • Page 20 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter the Optional default ISP domain domain-name By default, the local AAA scheme domain view is applied. If you specify to apply the local scheme { local | none | AAA scheme, you need to Specify the AAA radius-scheme perform the configuration...
  • Page 21 Set the authentication password of the local user to 123456 (in plain text). Set the service type of the local user to Terminal and the command level to 2. Configure to authenticate the users in the scheme mode. The baud rate of the console port is 19,200 bps. The screen can contain up to 30 lines.
  • Page 22 # Set the maximum number of commands the history command buffer can store to 20. [Sysname-ui-aux0] history-command max-size 20 # Set the timeout time of the AUX user interface to 6 minutes. [Sysname-ui-aux0] idle-timeout 6 After the above configuration, you need to modify the configuration of the terminal emulation utility running on the PC accordingly in the dialog box shown in Figure 2-4 to log in to the switch successfully.
  • Page 23: Logging In Through Telnet

    Logging In Through Telnet Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Telnet Configuration with Authentication Mode Being None Telnet Configuration with Authentication Mode Being Password Introduction Switch 4200G supports Telnet. You can manage and maintain a switch remotely by Telnetting to the switch.
  • Page 24 Configuration Description Optional Configure the protocols the By default, Telnet and SSH protocol are user interface supports supported. Optional Set the commands to be executed automatically after By default, no command is executed a user log in to the user automatically after a user logs into the VTY user interface successfully interface.
  • Page 25 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional The default history command Set the history command buffer history-command buffer size is 10, that is, the history size max-size value command buffer of a user can store up to 10 commands by default.
  • Page 26: Telnet Configuration With Authentication Mode Being None

    To improve security and prevent attacks to the unused Sockets, TCP 23 and TCP 22, ports for Telnet and SSH services respectively, will be enabled or disabled after corresponding configurations. If the authentication mode is none, TCP 23 will be enabled, and TCP 22 will be disabled. If the authentication mode is password, and the corresponding password has been set, TCP 23 will be enabled, and TCP 22 will be disabled.
  • Page 27: Telnet Configuration With Authentication Mode Being Password

    Network diagram Figure 3-1 Network diagram for Telnet configuration (with the authentication mode being none) Configuration procedure # Enter system view. <Sysname> system-view # Enter VTY 0 user interface view. [Sysname] user-interface vty 0 # Configure not to authenticate Telnet users logging in to VTY 0. [Sysname-ui-vty0] authentication-mode none # Specify commands of level 2 are available to users logging in to VTY 0.
  • Page 28 When the authentication mode is password, the command level available to users logging in to the user interface is determined by the user privilege level command. Configuration Example Network requirements Assume current user logins through the console port and the current user level is set to the administrator level (level 3).
  • Page 29: Telnet Configuration With Authentication Mode Being Scheme

    Telnet Configuration with Authentication Mode Being Scheme Configuration Procedure Follow these steps to configure Telnet with the authentication mode being scheme: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter one or more VTY user user-interface vty —...
  • Page 30 Refer to the AAA part of this manual for information about AAA, RADIUS, and HWTACACS. Configuration Example Network requirements Assume current user logins through the console port and the user level is set to the administrator level (level 3). Perform the following configurations for users logging in to VTY 0 using Telnet. Configure the local user name as guest.
  • Page 31: Telnetting To A Switch, Telnetting To A Switch From A Terminal

    # Set the maximum number of lines the screen can contain to 30. [Sysname-ui-vty0] screen-length 30 # Set the maximum number of commands the history command buffer can store to 20. [Sysname-ui-vty0] history-command max-size 20 # Set the timeout time to 6 minutes. [Sysname-ui-vty0] idle-timeout 6 Telnetting to a Switch Telnetting to a Switch from a Terminal...
  • Page 32 <Sysname>) appears if the password is correct. If all VTY user interfaces of the switch are in use, you will fail to establish the connection and receive the message that says “All user interfaces are used, please try later!”. A 3Com switch can accommodate up to five Telnet connections at same time.
  • Page 33: Telnetting To Another Switch From The Current Switch

    Telnetting to another Switch from the Current Switch You can Telnet to another switch from the current switch. In this case, the current switch operates as the client, and the other operates as the server. If the interconnected Ethernet ports of the two switches are in the same LAN segment, make sure the IP addresses of the two management VLAN interfaces to which the two Ethernet ports belong to are of the same network segment, or the route between the two VLAN interfaces is available.
  • Page 34: Logging In Using A Modem, Configuration On The Switch Side, Modem Configuration

    Logging In Using a Modem Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Configuration on the Switch Side Modem Connection Establishment Introduction The administrator can log in to the console port of a remote switch using a modem through public switched telephone network (PSTN) if the remote switch is connected to the PSTN through a modem to configure and maintain the switch remotely.
  • Page 35: Modem Connection Establishment

    You can verify your configuration by executing the AT&V command. The configuration commands and the output of different modems may differ. Refer to the user manual of the modem when performing the above configuration. Switch Configuration After logging in to a switch through its console port by using a modem, you will enter the AUX user interface.
  • Page 36 Figure 4-1 Establish the connection by using modems Modem serial cable Telephone line Modem PSTN Modem Telephone number of the romote end: 82882285 Console port Launch a terminal emulation utility on the PC and set the telephone number to call the modem directly connected to the switch, as shown in Figure 4-2 through...
  • Page 37 Figure 4-3 Set the telephone number Figure 4-4 Call the modem If the password authentication mode is specified, enter the password when prompted. If the password is correct, the prompt (such as <Sysname>) appears. You can then configure or manage the switch.
  • Page 38: Cli Configuration, Introduction To The Cli, Command Hierarchy

    Each 3com switch 4200G provides an easy-to-use CLI and a set of configuration commands for the convenience of the user to configure and manage the switch. The CLI on the 3com switch 4200G provides the following features, and so has good manageability and operability.
  • Page 39: Modifying The Command Level

    Monitor level (level 1): Commands at this level are mainly used to maintain the system and diagnose service faults, and they cannot be saved in configuration file. Such commands include debugging and terminal. System level (level 2): Commands at this level are mainly used to configure services. Commands concerning routing and network layers are at this level.
  • Page 40: Switching User Level

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Configure the level of a command in a command-privilege level level view Required specific view view command You are recommended to use the default command level or modify the command level under the guidance of professional staff; otherwise, the change of command level may bring inconvenience to your maintenance and operation, or even potential security problem.
  • Page 41 can switch to a higher level temporarily; when the administrators need to leave for a while or ask someone else to manage the device temporarily, they can switch to a lower privilege level before they leave to restrict the operation by others. The high-to-low user level switching is unlimited.
  • Page 42 When both the super password authentication and the HWTACACS authentication are specified, the device adopts the preferred authentication mode first. If the preferred authentication mode cannot be implemented (for example, the super password is not configured or the HWTACACS authentication server is unreachable), the backup authentication mode is adopted.
  • Page 43 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view Enter ISP domain view domain domain-name — Required Set the HWTACACS authentication super By default, the HWTACACS authentication scheme for hwtacacs-scheme authentication scheme for user user level switching hwtacacs-scheme-name level switching is not set.
  • Page 44: Cli Views

    # Set the password used by the current user to switch to level 3. [Sysname] super password level 3 simple 123 A VTY 0 user switches its level to level 3 after logging in. # A VTY 0 user telnets to the switch, and then uses the set password to switch to user level 3. <Sysname>...
  • Page 45 Table 5-1 lists the CLI views provided by the 3com switch 4200G, operations that can be performed in different CLI views and the commands used to enter specific CLI views. Table 5-1 CLI views View Available operation Prompt example Enter method...
  • Page 46 View Available operation Prompt example Enter method Quit method Execute the User interface Configure user [Sysname-ui-aux user-interface view interface parameters command in system view. Execute the ftp FTP client Configure FTP client [ftp] command in user view parameters view. Execute the sftp SFTP client Configure SFTP command in...
  • Page 47: Cli Features, Online Help

    View Available operation Prompt example Enter method Quit method Execute the Remote-ping Configure [Sysname-remot remote-ping test group remote-ping test e-ping-a123-a12 command in view group parameters system view. Execute the Configure HWTACACS [Sysname-hwtac hwtacacs HWTACACS view acs-a123] scheme command parameters in system view. Execute the PoE profile Configure PoE...
  • Page 48: Terminal Display

    <Other information is omitted> Enter a command, a space, and a question mark (?). If the question mark “?” is at a keyword position in the command, all available keywords at the position and their descriptions will be displayed on your terminal. <Sysname>...
  • Page 49 Operation Function Press <Enter> Get to the next line. Command History The CLI provides the command history function. You can use the display history-command command to view a specific number of latest executed commands and execute them again in a convenient way. By default, the CLI can store up to 10 latest executed commands for each user.
  • Page 50: Command Edit

    Error message Remarks Wrong parameter A parameter entered is wrong. found at '^' position An error is found at the '^' position. Command Edit The CLI provides basic command edit functions and supports multi-line editing. The maximum number of characters a command can contain is 254. Table 5-4 lists the CLI edit operations.
  • Page 51: Management Interface, Establishing An Http Connection

    Logging In Through the Web-based Network Management Interface Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Establishing an HTTP Connection Configuring the Login Banner Enabling/Disabling the WEB Server Introduction Switch 4200G has a Web server built in. It enables you to log in to Switch 4200G through a Web browser and then manage and maintain the switch intuitively by interacting with the built-in Web server.
  • Page 52: Configuring The Login Banner

    Establish an HTTP connection between your PC and the switch, as shown in Figure 6-1. Figure 6-1 Establish an HTTP connection between your PC and the switch Log in to the switch through IE. Launch IE on the Web-based network management terminal (your PC) and enter the IP address of the management VLAN interface of the switch in the address bar.
  • Page 53 Configuration Example Network requirements A user logs in to the switch through Web. The banner page is desired when a user logs into the switch. Network diagram Figure 6-3 Network diagram for login banner configuration Configuration Procedure # Enter system view. <Sysname>...
  • Page 54 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Enable the Web server ip http shutdown By default, the Web server is enabled. Disable the Web server undo ip http shutdown Required To improve security and prevent attack to the unused Sockets, TCP 80 port (which is for HTTP service) is enabled/disabled after the corresponding configuration.
  • Page 55: Connection Establishment Using Nms

    Logging In Through NMS Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Connection Establishment Using NMS Introduction You can also log in to a switch through a Network Management Station (NMS), and then configure and manage the switch through the agent software on the switch. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is applied between the NMS and the agent.
  • Page 56: Configuring Source Ip Address For Telnet Service Packets

    Configuring Source IP Address for Telnet Service Packets Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Configuring Source IP Address for Telnet Service Packets Displaying Source IP Address Configuration Overview You can configure source IP address or source interface for the Telnet server and Telnet client. This provides a way to manage services and enhances security.
  • Page 57: Displaying Source Ip Address Configuration

    Operation Command Description Specify a source interface for telnet-server source-interface Optional Telnet server interface-type interface-number Specify source IP address for telnet source-ip ip-address Optional Telnet client Specify a source interface for telnet source-interface interface-type Optional Telnet client interface-number To perform the configurations listed in Table 8-1 Table 8-2, make sure that:...
  • Page 58: User Control, Controlling Telnet Users

    User Control Go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction Controlling Telnet Users Controlling Network Management Users by Source IP Addresses Controlling Web Users by Source IP Address Refer to the ACL part for information about ACL. Introduction You can control users logging in through Telnet, SNMP and WEB by defining Access Control List (ACL), as listed in...
  • Page 59 If no ACL is configured on the VTY user interface, users are not controlled when establishing a Telnet connection using this user interface. If an ACL is configured on the VTY user interface, there will be two possibilities: if the packets for establishing a Telnet connection match the ACL rule configured on the VTY user interface, the connection will be permitted or denied according to the ACL rule;...
  • Page 60: Controlling Network Management Users By Source Ip Addresses

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Apply a Required basic or advanced acl acl-number { inbound | Use either command ACL to outbound } Apply an The inbound keyword specifies to control ACL to filter the users trying to Telnet to Telnet users control the current switch.
  • Page 61 Defining an ACL Applying the ACL to control users accessing the switch through SNMP To control whether an NMS can manage the switch, you can use this function. Prerequisites The controlling policy against network management users is determined, including the source IP addresses to be controlled and the controlling actions (permitting or denying).
  • Page 62: Controlling Web Users By Source Ip Address, Controlling Web Users By Source Ip Addresses

    Network diagram Figure 9-2 Network diagram for controlling SNMP users using ACLs 10.110.100.46 Host A IP network Switch Host B 10.110.100.52 Configuration procedure # Define a basic ACL. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] acl number 2000 [Sysname-acl-basic-2000] rule 1 permit source 10.110.100.52 0 [Sysname-acl-basic-2000] quit # Apply the ACL to only permit SNMP users sourced from the IP addresses of 10.110.100.52 to access the switch.
  • Page 63: Logging Out A Web User

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view As for the acl number Create a basic ACL or enter acl number acl-number command, the config keyword basic ACL view [ match-order { config | auto } ] is specified by default.
  • Page 64 [Sysname-acl-basic-2030] quit # Apply ACL 2030 to only permit the Web users sourced from the IP address of 10.110.100.52 to access the switch. [Sysname] ip http acl 2030...
  • Page 65: Configuration File Management

    Table of Contents 1 Configuration File Management···············································································································1-1 Introduction to Configuration File ············································································································1-1 Configuration Task List ···························································································································1-2 Saving the Current Configuration ····································································································1-2 Erasing the Startup Configuration File ····························································································1-3 Specifying a Configuration File for Next Startup ·············································································1-4 Displaying Switch Configuration······································································································1-5...
  • Page 66: Introduction To Configuration File

    Configuration File Management When configuring configuration file management, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to Configuration File Configuration Task List Introduction to Configuration File A configuration file records and stores user configurations performed to a switch. It also enables users to check switch configurations easily.
  • Page 67: Configuration Task List

    When saving the current configuration, you can specify the file to be a main or backup or normal configuration file. When removing a configuration file from a switch, you can specify to remove the main or backup configuration file. Or, if it is a file having both main and backup attribute, you can specify to erase the main or backup attribute of the file.
  • Page 68 When you use the save safely command to save the configuration file, if the switch reboots or the power fails during the saving process, the switch initializes itself in the following two conditions when it starts up next time: If a configuration file with the extension .cfg exists in the Flash, the switch uses the configuration file to initialize itself when it starts up next time.
  • Page 69 To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Erase the startup configuration reset saved-configuration file from the storage switch [ backup | main ] Available in user view You may need to erase the configuration file for one of these reasons: After you upgrade software, the old configuration file does not match the new software.
  • Page 70: Vlan

    The configuration file must use .cfg as its extension name and the startup configuration file must be saved at the root directory of the switch. Displaying Switch Configuration To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the initial configuration display saved-configuration [ unit unit-id ] file saved in the Flash of a switch [ by-linenum ] Display the configuration file used...
  • Page 71 Table of Contents 1 VLAN Overview ··········································································································································1-1 VLAN Overview·······································································································································1-1 Introduction to VLAN ·······················································································································1-1 Advantages of VLANs ·····················································································································1-2 VLAN Fundamentals ·······················································································································1-2 VLAN Interface ································································································································1-4 VLAN Classification ·························································································································1-4 Port-Based VLAN····································································································································1-4 Link Types of Ethernet Ports ···········································································································1-4 Assigning an Ethernet Port to Specified VLANs ·············································································1-5 Configuring the Default VLAN ID for a Port·····················································································1-5 2 VLAN Configuration ··································································································································2-1 VLAN Configuration ································································································································2-1...
  • Page 72 VLAN Overview This chapter covers these topics: VLAN Overview Port-Based VLAN VLAN Overview Introduction to VLAN The traditional Ethernet is a broadcast network, where all hosts are in the same broadcast domain and connected with each other through hubs or switches. Hubs and switches, which are the basic network connection devices, have limited forwarding functions.
  • Page 73 Figure 1-1 A VLAN implementation Advantages of VLANs Compared with traditional Ethernet technology, VLAN technology delivers the following benefits: Confining broadcast traffic within individual VLANs. This saves bandwidth and improves network performance. Improving LAN security. By assigning user groups to different VLANs, you can isolate them at Layer 2.
  • Page 74 Figure 1-3 Format of VLAN tag A VLAN tag comprises four fields: tag protocol identifier (TPID), priority, canonical format indicator (CFI), and VLAN ID. The 16-bit TPID field with a value of 0x8100 indicates that the frame is VLAN tagged. On the Switch 4200G series Ethernet switches, the default TPID is 0x8100.
  • Page 75 Independent VLAN learning (IVL), where the switch maintains an independent MAC address forwarding table for each VLAN. The source MAC address of a packet received in a VLAN on a port is recorded to the MAC address forwarding table of this VLAN only, and packets received in a VLAN are forwarded according to the MAC address forwarding table for the VLAN.
  • Page 76 An access port can belong to only one VLAN. Usually, ports directly connected to PCs are configured as access ports. A trunk port can carry multiple VLANs to receive and send traffic for them. Except traffic of the default VLAN, traffic passes through a trunk port will be VLAN tagged. Usually, ports connecting network devices are configured as trunk ports to allow members of the same VLAN to communicate with each other across multiple network devices.
  • Page 77 Table 1-1 Packet processing of an access port Processing of an incoming packet Processing of an outgoing packet For an untagged packet For a tagged packet If the VLAN ID is just the default VLAN Receive the packet and tag Strip the tag from the ID, receive the packet.
  • Page 78 VLAN Configuration When configuring a VLAN, go to these sections for information you are interested in: VLAN Configuration Configuring a Port-Based VLAN VLAN Configuration VLAN Configuration Task List Complete the following tasks to configure VLAN: Task Remarks Basic VLAN Configuration Required Basic VLAN Interface Configuration Optional...
  • Page 79 VLAN 1 is the system default VLAN, which needs not to be created and cannot be removed, either. The VLAN you created in the way described above is a static VLAN. On the switch, there are dynamic VLANs which are registered through GVRP. For details, refer to “GVRP” part of this manual.
  • Page 80 To do... Use the command... Remarks Optional By default, the VLAN interface Disable the VLAN interface shutdown is enabled. In this case, the VLAN interface’s status is determined by the status of the ports in the VLAN, that is, if all ports of the VLAN are down, the VLAN interface is down (disabled);...
  • Page 81 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required port link-type { access | Configure the port link type The link type of an Ethernet hybrid | trunk } port is access by default.
  • Page 82 To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Assign the specified access port or ports to the current port interface-list By default, all ports belong to VLAN VLAN 1. Configuring the Default VLAN for a Port Because an access port can belong to its default VLAN only, there is no need for you to configure the default VLAN for an access port.
  • Page 83 The devices within each VLAN can communicate with each other but that in different VLANs cannot communicate with each other directly. Network diagram Figure 2-1 Network diagram for VLAN configuration Configuration procedure Configure Switch A. # Create VLAN 101, specify its descriptive string as “DMZ”, and add GigabitEthernet1/0/1 to VLAN 101. <SwitchA>...
  • Page 84 # Configure GigabitEthernet1/0/3 of Switch A. [SwitchA] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port link-type trunk [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port trunk permit vlan 101 [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port trunk permit vlan 201 # Configure GigabitEthernet1/0/10 of Switch B. [SwitchB] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/10 [SwitchB-GigabitEthernet1/0/10] port link-type trunk [SwitchB-GigabitEthernet1/0/10] port trunk permit vlan 101 [SwitchB-GigabitEthernet1/0/10] port trunk permit vlan 201...
  • Page 85: Static Routing

    Table of Contents 1 Static Routing Configuration····················································································································1-1 Introduction ·············································································································································1-1 Routing Table ··································································································································1-1 Static Route ·····································································································································1-2 Default Route···································································································································1-2 Configuring a Static Route ······················································································································1-3 Displaying and Maintaining a Routing Table···························································································1-3 Static Route Configuration Example ·······································································································1-4 Basic Static Route Configuration Example······················································································1-4...
  • Page 86: Static Routing Configuration

    Static Routing Configuration Introduction Routing Table Routing table Routing tables play a key role in routing. Each router maintains a routing table, and each entry in the table specifies which physical interface a packet destined for a certain destination should go out to reach the next hop or the directly connected destination.
  • Page 87: Static Route, Default Route

    Figure 1-1 A sample routing table Switch A Switch F 17.0.0.1 17.0.0.0 17.0.0.3 16.0.0.2 11.0.0.2 17.0.0.2 Switch D 16.0.0.0 11.0.0.0 14.0.0.3 11.0.0.1 16.0.0.1 14.0.0.2 14.0.0.4 Switch B 14.0.0.0 Switch G 15.0.0.2 12.0.0.1 14.0.0.1 Switch E 12.0.0.0 15.0.0.0 13.0.0.2 15.0.0.1 12.0.0.2 13.0.0.3 13.0.0.1 13.0.0.0...
  • Page 88: Configuring A Static Route, Displaying And Maintaining A Routing Table

    If there is no default route and the destination address of the packet fails to match any entry in the routing table, the packet will be discarded and an ICMP packet will be sent to the source to report that the destination or the network is unreachable. The network administrator can configure a default route with both destination and mask being 0.0.0.0.
  • Page 89: Static Route Configuration Example, Basic Static Route Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the statistics on the display ip routing-table statistics routing table Clear statistics about a reset ip routing-table statistics Use the reset command in routing table protocol { all | protocol } user view Use the delete command in Delete all static routes delete static-routes all...
  • Page 90 The default gateways for the three hosts A, B and C are 1.1.2.3, 1.1.6.1 and 1.1.3.1 respectively. The configuration procedure is omitted. Display the configuration. # Display the IP routing table of Switch A. [SwitchA] display ip routing-table Routing Table: public net Destination/Mask Protocol Cost...
  • Page 91: Voice Vlan

    Table of Contents 1 Voice VLAN Configuration························································································································1-1 Voice VLAN Overview·····························································································································1-1 How an IP Phone Works ·················································································································1-1 How Switch 4200G Series Switches Identify Voice Traffic ·····························································1-3 Setting the Voice Traffic Transmission Priority ···············································································1-3 Configuring Voice VLAN Assignment Mode of a Port ·····································································1-4 Support for Voice VLAN on Various Ports·······················································································1-4 Security Mode of Voice VLAN ·········································································································1-6 Voice VLAN Configuration ······················································································································1-7...
  • Page 92 Voice VLAN Configuration When configuring voice VLAN, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Voice VLAN Overview Voice VLAN Configuration Displaying and Maintaining Voice VLAN Voice VLAN Configuration Example Voice VLAN Overview Voice VLANs are VLANs configured specially for voice traffic. By adding the ports connected with voice devices to voice VLANs, you can have voice traffic transmitted within voice VLANs and perform QoS-related configuration and prioritization for voice traffic as required, thus ensuring the transmission priority of voice traffic and voice quality.
  • Page 93 Figure 1-1 Network diagram for IP phones As shown in Figure 1-1, the IP phone needs to work in conjunction with the DHCP server and the NCP to establish a path for voice data transmission. An IP phone goes through the following three phases to become capable of transmitting voice data.
  • Page 94 Pingtel phones 00e0-7500-0000 Polycom phones 00e0-bb00-0000 3Com phones Setting the Voice Traffic Transmission Priority In order to improve the transmission quality of voice traffic, the switch re-marks the precedence of the traffic in the voice VLAN as follows: Set the CoS (802.1p) precedence to 6.
  • Page 95 For more information about CoS and DSCP precedence values, refer to the QoS part of the manual. Configuring Voice VLAN Assignment Mode of a Port A port can work in automatic voice VLAN assignment mode or manual voice VLAN assignment mode. You can configure the voice VLAN assignment mode for a port according to data traffic passing through the port.
  • Page 96 Table 1-2 Matching relationship between port types and voice devices capable of acquiring IP address and voice VLAN automatically Voice VLAN Voice assignment traffic Port type Supported or not mode type Access Not supported Supported Make sure the default VLAN of the port exists and is not Trunk Tagged a voice VLAN, and the access port permits the traffic of...
  • Page 97: Security Mode Of Voice Vlan

    Table 1-3 Matching relationship between port types and voice devices acquiring voice VLAN through manual configuration Voice VLAN assignment Port type Supported or not mode Access Not supported Supported Make sure the default VLAN of the port exists and is not a Trunk voice VLAN, and the access port permits the traffic of the...
  • Page 98 The following table presents how a packet is handled when the voice VLAN is operating in security mode and normal mode. Table 1-4 How a packet is handled when the voice VLAN is operating in different modes Voice VLAN Mode Packet Type Processing Method Untagged packet...
  • Page 99 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the voice VLAN aging timer voice vlan aging minutes The default aging timer is 1440 minutes. Enable the voice VLAN function voice vlan vlan-id enable Required globally interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view Required interface-number Required...
  • Page 100 To do… Use the command… Remarks — Enter system view system-view Optional voice vlan mac-address Set an OUI address that can be identified Without this address, oui mask oui-mask by the voice VLAN the default OUI [ description text ] address is used.
  • Page 101: Displaying And Maintaining Voice Vlan

    VLAN. If you have to do so, make sure that the voice VLAN does not operate in security mode. The voice VLAN legacy feature realizes the communication between 3Com device and other vendor's voice device by automatically adding the voice VLAN tag to the voice data coming from other vendors’...
  • Page 102: Voice Vlan Configuration Example

    Voice VLAN Configuration Example Voice VLAN Configuration Example (Automatic Mode) Network requirements As shown in Figure 1-2, The MAC address of IP phone A is 0011-1100-0001. The phone connects to a downstream device named PC A whose MAC address is 0022-1100-0002 and to GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 on an upstream device named Device A.
  • Page 103 Pingtel phone 00e0-7500-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Polycom phone 00e0-bb00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 3Com phone # Display the current states of voice VLANs. <DeviceA> display voice vlan state Voice Vlan status: ENABLE Voice Vlan ID: 2 Voice Vlan security mode: Security Voice Vlan aging time: 1440 minutes...
  • Page 104 Voice VLAN Configuration Example (Manual Mode) Network requirements Create a voice VLAN and configure it to operate in manual mode. Add the port to which an IP phone is connected to the voice VLAN to enable voice traffic to be transmitted within the voice VLAN. Create VLAN 2 and configure it as a voice VLAN.
  • Page 105 Pingtel phone 00e0-7500-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Polycom phone 00e0-bb00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 3Com phone # Display the status of the current voice VLAN. <DeviceA> display voice vlan status Voice Vlan status: ENABLE Voice Vlan ID: 2 Voice Vlan security mode: Security Voice Vlan aging time: 1440 minutes...
  • Page 106: Gvrp

    Table of Contents 1 GVRP Configuration ··································································································································1-1 Introduction to GVRP ······························································································································1-1 GARP···············································································································································1-1 GVRP···············································································································································1-4 Protocol Specifications ····················································································································1-4 GVRP Configuration································································································································1-4 GVRP Configuration Tasks ·············································································································1-4 Enabling GVRP ·······························································································································1-4 Configuring GVRP Timers ···············································································································1-5 Configuring GVRP Port Registration Mode ·····················································································1-6 Displaying and Maintaining GVRP··········································································································1-7 GVRP Configuration Example ················································································································1-7 GVRP Configuration Example·········································································································1-7...
  • Page 107 GVRP Configuration When configuring GVRP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to GVRP GVRP Configuration Displaying and Maintaining GVRP GVRP Configuration Example Introduction to GVRP GARP VLAN registration protocol (GVRP) is an implementation of generic attribute registration protocol (GARP).
  • Page 108 GARP timers Timers determine the intervals of sending different types of GARP messages. GARP defines four timers to control the period of sending GARP messages. Hold: When a GARP entity receives a piece of registration information, it does not send out a Join message immediately.
  • Page 109 Figure 1-1 Format of GARP packets The following table describes the fields of a GARP packet. Table 1-1 Description of GARP packet fields Field Description Value Protocol ID Protocol ID Each message consists of two Message parts: Attribute Type and —...
  • Page 110 GVRP As an implementation of GARP, GARP VLAN registration protocol (GVRP) maintains dynamic VLAN registration information and propagates the information to the other switches through GARP. With GVRP enabled on a device, the VLAN registration information received by the device from other devices is used to dynamically update the local VLAN registration information, including the information about the VLAN members, the ports through which the VLAN members can be reached, and so on.
  • Page 111: Configuring Gvrp Timers

    To do ... Use the command ... Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Enable GVRP globally gvrp By default, GVRP is disabled globally. interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Enable GVRP on the port gvrp By default, GVRP is disabled on the port.
  • Page 112 Table 1-2 Relations between the timers Timer Lower threshold Upper threshold This upper threshold is less than or equal to one-half of the timeout time of the Join timer. Hold 10 centiseconds You can change the threshold by changing the timeout time of the Join timer.
  • Page 113: Displaying And Maintaining Gvrp, Gvrp Configuration Example

    Displaying and Maintaining GVRP To do … Use the command … Remarks display garp statistics Display GARP statistics [ interface interface-list ] Display the settings of the display garp timer [ interface GARP timers interface-list ] Available in any view display gvrp statistics Display GVRP statistics [ interface interface-list ]...
  • Page 114 [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on GigabitEthernet1/0/1. [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] gvrp [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Configure GigabitEthernet1/0/2 to be a trunk port and to permit the packets of all the VLANs. [SwitchA] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on GigabitEthernet1/0/2.
  • Page 115 5, 7, 8, # Display the VLAN information dynamically registered on Switch B. [SwitchB] display vlan dynamic Total 3 dynamic VLAN exist(s). The following dynamic VLANs exist: 5, 7, 8, # Display the VLAN information dynamically registered on Switch E. [SwitchE] display vlan dynamic Total 1 dynamic VLAN exist(s).
  • Page 116 5, 8, # Display the VLAN information dynamically registered on Switch E. [SwitchE] display vlan dynamic No dynamic vlans exist! 1-10...
  • Page 117: Port Basic Configuration

    Table of Contents 1 Port Basic Configuration ··························································································································1-1 Ethernet Port Configuration ····················································································································1-1 Combo Port Configuration ···············································································································1-1 Initially Configuring a Port ···············································································································1-1 Configuring Port Auto-Negotiation Speed ·······················································································1-2 Limiting Traffic on individual Ports···································································································1-3 Enabling Flow Control on a Port······································································································1-3 Duplicating the Configuration of a Port to Other Ports ····································································1-4 Configuring Loopback Detection for an Ethernet Port·····································································1-4 Enabling Loopback Test··················································································································1-5 Enabling the System to Test Connected Cable ··············································································1-6...
  • Page 118: Ethernet Port Configuration

    Port Basic Configuration Ethernet Port Configuration Combo Port Configuration A Combo port can operate as either an optical port or an electrical port. Inside the device there is only one forwarding interface. For a Combo port, the electrical port and the corresponding optical port are TX-SFP multiplexed.
  • Page 119 To do... Use the command... Remarks Optional Set the speed of the By default, the speed of an Ethernet speed { 10 | 100 | 1000 | auto } Ethernet port port determined through auto-negotiation (the auto keyword). Set the medium Optional dependent interface mdi { across | auto | normal }...
  • Page 120 Only ports on the front panel of the device support the auto-negotiation speed configuration feature. And ports on the extended interface card do not support this feature currently. After you configure auto-negotiation speed(s) for a port, if you execute the undo speed command or the speed auto command, the auto-negotiation speed setting of the port restores to the default setting.
  • Page 121 To do... Use the command... Remarks Enable flow control on the By default, flow control is not flow-control Ethernet port enabled on the port. Duplicating the Configuration of a Port to Other Ports To make other ports have the same configuration as that of a specific port, you can duplicate the configuration of a port to specific ports.
  • Page 122: Link Aggregation

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Enable loopback detection loopback-detection enable By default, loopback detection globally is disabled globally. Optional Set the interval for performing loopback-detection port loopback detection interval-time time The default is 30 seconds. interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view —...
  • Page 123 To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet port view interface interface-type interface-number — Enable loopback test loopback { external | internal } Required external: Performs external loop test. In the external loop test, self-loop headers must be used on the port of the switch ( for 1000M port, the self-loop header are made from eight cores of the 8-core cables, then the packets forwarded by the port will be received by itself.).
  • Page 124 Configuring the Interval to Perform Statistical Analysis on Port Traffic By performing the following configuration, you can set the interval to perform statistical analysis on the traffic of a port. When you use the display interface interface-type interface-number command to display the information of a port, the system performs statistical analysis on the traffic flow passing through the port during the specified interval and displays the average rates in the interval.
  • Page 125: Configuring A Port Group

    Configuration examples # In the default conditions, where UP/DOWN log output is enabled, execute the shutdown command or the undo shutdown command on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1. The Up/Down log information for GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 is generated and displayed on the terminal. <Sysname> system-view System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z.
  • Page 126 Displaying and Maintaining Basic Port Configuration To do... Use the command... Remarks Display port configuration display interface [ interface-type | information interface-type interface-number ] Display the enable/disable status of port loopback display loopback-detection detection Display information for a display port-group group-id specified port group display brief interface [ interface-type Display brief information about...
  • Page 127 Table of Contents 1 Link Aggregation Configuration ··············································································································1-1 Overview ·················································································································································1-1 Introduction to Link Aggregation······································································································1-1 Introduction to LACP ·······················································································································1-1 Consistency Considerations for the Ports in Aggregation·······························································1-1 Link Aggregation Classification···············································································································1-2 Manual Aggregation Group ·············································································································1-2 Static LACP Aggregation Group······································································································1-3 Dynamic LACP Aggregation Group·································································································1-3 Aggregation Group Categories ···············································································································1-4 Link Aggregation Configuration···············································································································1-6 Configuring a Manual Aggregation Group·······················································································1-6...
  • Page 128 Link Aggregation Configuration When configuring link aggregation, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Link Aggregation Classification Aggregation Group Categories Link Aggregation Configuration Displaying and Maintaining Link Aggregation Configuration Link Aggregation Configuration Example Overview Introduction to Link Aggregation Link aggregation aggregates multiple physical Ethernet ports into one logical link, also called an aggregation group.
  • Page 129: Link Aggregation Classification

    Table 1-1 Consistency considerations for ports in an aggregation Category Considerations State of port-level STP (enabled or disabled) Attribute of the link (point-to-point or otherwise) connected to the port Port path cost STP priority STP packet format Loop protection Root protection Port type (whether the port is an edge port) 802.1p priority Traffic accounting...
  • Page 130: Static Lacp Aggregation Group, Dynamic Lacp Aggregation Group

    There is a limit on the number of selected ports in an aggregation group. Therefore, if the number of the selected ports in an aggregation group exceeds the maximum number supported by the device, those with lower port numbers operate as the selected ports, and others as unselected ports. Among the selected ports in an aggregation group, the one with smallest port number operates as the master port.
  • Page 131: Aggregation Group Categories

    are connected to the same peer device and have the same speed, duplex mode, and basic configurations, and their peer ports have the same configurations. Besides multiple-port aggregation groups, the system is also able to create single-port aggregation groups, each of which contains only one port. LACP is enabled on the member ports of dynamic aggregation groups.
  • Page 132 In general, the system only provides limited load-sharing aggregation resources, so the system needs to reasonably allocate the resources among different aggregation groups. The system always allocates hardware aggregation resources to the aggregation groups with higher priorities. When load-sharing aggregation resources are used up by existing aggregation groups, newly-created aggregation groups will be non-load-sharing ones.
  • Page 133 Link Aggregation Configuration The commands of link aggregation cannot be configured with the commands of port loopback detection feature at the same time. The ports where the mac-address max-mac-count command is configured cannot be added to an aggregation group. Contrarily, the mac-address max-mac-count command cannot be configured on a port that has already been added to an aggregation group.
  • Page 134 If the aggregation group you are creating already exists and contains ports, the possible type changes may be: changing from dynamic or static to manual, and changing from dynamic to static; and no other kinds of type change can occur. When you change a dynamic/static group to a manual group, the system will automatically disable LACP on the member ports.
  • Page 135 Configuring a Dynamic LACP Aggregation Group A dynamic LACP aggregation group is automatically created by the system based on LACP-enabled ports. The adding and removing of ports to/from a dynamic aggregation group are automatically accomplished by LACP. You need to enable LACP on the ports which you want to participate in dynamic aggregation of the system, because, only when LACP is enabled on those ports at both ends, can the two parties reach agreement in adding/removing ports to/from dynamic aggregation groups.
  • Page 136: Displaying And Maintaining Link Aggregation Configuration, Link Aggregation Configuration Example

    If you have saved the current configuration with the save command, after system reboot, the configuration concerning manual and static aggregation groups and their descriptions still exists, but that of dynamic aggregation groups and their descriptions gets lost. Displaying and Maintaining Link Aggregation Configuration To do…...
  • Page 137 Configuration procedure The following only lists the configuration on Switch A; you must perform the similar configuration on Switch B to implement link aggregation. Adopting manual aggregation mode # Create manual aggregation group 1. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] link-aggregation group 1 mode manual # Add GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 through GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 to aggregation group 1.
  • Page 138 [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] lacp enable The three LACP-enabled ports can be aggregated into one dynamic aggregation group to implement load sharing only when they have the same basic configuration (such as rate, duplex mode, and so on). 1-11...
  • Page 139: Port Isolation

    Table of Contents 1 Port Isolation Configuration ·····················································································································1-1 Port Isolation Overview ···························································································································1-1 Port Isolation Configuration·····················································································································1-1 Displaying and Maintaining Port Isolation Configuration ········································································1-2 Port Isolation Configuration Example······································································································1-2...
  • Page 140 Port Isolation Configuration When configuring port isolation, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Port Isolation Overview Port Isolation Configuration Displaying and Maintaining Port Isolation Configuration Port Isolation Configuration Example Port Isolation Overview With the port isolation feature, you can add the ports to be controlled into an isolation group to isolate the Layer 2 and Layer 3 data between each port in the isolation group.
  • Page 141: Port Isolation Configuration Example

    When a member port of an aggregation group joins/leaves an isolation group, the other ports in the same aggregation group will join/leave the isolation group at the same time. For ports that belong to an aggregation group and an isolation group simultaneously, removing a port from the aggregation group has no effect on the other ports.
  • Page 142 Configuration procedure # Add GigabitEthernet1/0/2, GigabitEthernet1/0/3, and GigabitEthernet1/0/4 to the isolation group. <Sysname> system-view System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z. [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet1/0/2 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port isolate [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port isolate [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] quit [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet1/0/4 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/4] port isolate [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/4] quit [Sysname] quit...
  • Page 143 Table of Contents 1 Port Security Configuration······················································································································1-1 Port Security Overview····························································································································1-1 Introduction······································································································································1-1 Port Security Features·····················································································································1-1 Port Security Modes ························································································································1-1 Port Security Configuration Task List······································································································1-4 Enabling Port Security ·····················································································································1-5 Setting the Maximum Number of MAC Addresses Allowed on a Port ············································1-5 Setting the Port Security Mode········································································································1-6 Configuring Port Security Features ·································································································1-7 Ignoring the Authorization Information from the RADIUS Server····················································1-8 Configuring Security MAC Addresses ·····························································································1-9...
  • Page 144: Port Security Configuration, Port Security Overview

    Port Security Configuration When configuring port security, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Port Security Overview Port Security Configuration Task List Displaying and Maintaining Port Security Configuration Port Security Configuration Example Port Security Overview Introduction Port security is a security mechanism for network access control. It is an expansion to the current 802.1x and MAC address authentication.
  • Page 145 Table 1-1 Description of port security modes Security mode Description Feature In this mode, neither the In this mode, access to the port is not NTK nor the intrusion noRestriction restricted. protection feature is triggered. In this mode, the port automatically learns MAC addresses and changes them to security MAC addresses.
  • Page 146 Security mode Description Feature In this mode, neither NTK In this mode, port-based 802.1x authentication userlogin nor intrusion protection is performed for access users. will be triggered. MAC-based 802.1x authentication is performed on the access user. The port is enabled only after the authentication succeeds.
  • Page 147: Port Security Configuration Task List

    Security mode Description Feature In this mode, a port performs MAC authentication of an access user first. If the authentication succeeds, the user is authenticated. Otherwise, the port performs macAddressElseUs 802.1x authentication of the user. erLoginSecure In this mode, there can be only one 802.1x-authenticated user on the port, but there can be several MAC-authenticated users.
  • Page 148 Task Remarks Ignoring the Authorization Information from the RADIUS Server Optional Configuring Security MAC Addresses Optional Enabling Port Security Configuration Prerequisites Before enabling port security, you need to disable 802.1x and MAC authentication globally. Enabling Port Security Follow these steps to enable port security: To do...
  • Page 149 This configuration is different from that of the maximum number of MAC addresses that can be leaned by a port in MAC address management. Follow these steps to set the maximum number of MAC addresses allowed on a port: To do... Use the command...
  • Page 150 Before setting the port security mode to autolearn, you need to set the maximum number of MAC addresses allowed on the port with the port-security max-mac-count command. When the port operates in the autoLearn mode, you cannot change the maximum number of MAC addresses allowed on the port.
  • Page 151 Configuring intrusion protection Follow these steps to configure the intrusion protection feature: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Set the corresponding action to port-security intrusion-mode be taken by the switch when { blockmac | disableport | By default, intrusion intrusion protection is triggered...
  • Page 152: Configuring Security Mac Addresses

    Follow these steps to configure a port to ignore the authorization information from the RADIUS server: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Ignore the authorization port-security authorization By default, a port uses the information from the RADIUS ignore...
  • Page 153: Displaying And Maintaining Port Security Configuration, Port Security Configuration Example

    To do... Use the command... Remarks mac-address security mac-address In system Either is interface interface-type interface-number vlan view required. vlan-id Add a security By default, no MAC address interface interface-type interface-number security MAC In Ethernet address is port view mac-address security mac-address vlan configured.
  • Page 154 [Switch] port-security enable # Enter GigabitEthernet1/0/1 port view. [Switch] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 # Set the maximum number of MAC addresses allowed on the port to 80. [Switch-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port-security max-mac-count 80 # Set the port security mode to autolearn. [Switch-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port-security port-mode autolearn # Add the MAC address 0001-0002-0003 of Host as a security MAC address to the port in VLAN 1.
  • Page 155: Port Binding Overview, Displaying And Maintaining Port Binding Configuration

    Port Binding Configuration When configuring port binding, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Port Binding Overview Displaying and Maintaining Port Binding Configuration Port Binding Configuration Example Port Binding Overview Introduction Port binding enables the network administrator to bind the MAC address and IP address of a user to a specific port.
  • Page 156 Port Binding Configuration Example Port Binding Configuration Example Network requirements It is required to bind the MAC and IP addresses of Host A to GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 on Switch A, so as to prevent malicious users from using the IP address they steal from Host A to access the network. Network diagram Figure 2-1 Network diagram for port binding configuration Configuration procedure...
  • Page 157: Mac Address Table Management

    Table of Contents 1 MAC Address Table Management············································································································1-1 Overview ·················································································································································1-1 Introduction to MAC Address Table ································································································1-1 Introduction to MAC Address Learning ···························································································1-1 Managing MAC Address Table ·······································································································1-3 Configuring MAC Address Table Management ······················································································1-4 Configuration Task List····················································································································1-4 Configuring a MAC Address Entry ··································································································1-5 Setting the Aging Time of MAC Address Entries ············································································1-6 Setting the Maximum Number of MAC Addresses a Port Can Learn ·············································1-6 Displaying MAC Address Table Information ···························································································1-7...
  • Page 158 MAC Address Table Management This chapter describes the management of static, dynamic, and blackhole MAC address entries. For information about the management of multicast MAC address entries, refer to the part related to multicast protocol. Overview Introduction to MAC Address Table An Ethernet switch is mainly used to forward packets at the data link layer, that is, transmit the packets to the corresponding ports according to the destination MAC address of the packets.
  • Page 159 Figure 1-1 MAC address learning diagram (1) Figure 1-2 MAC address table entry of the switch (1) After learning the MAC address of User A, the switch starts to forward the packet. Because there is no MAC address and port information of User B in the existing MAC address table, the switch forwards the packet to all ports except GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 to ensure that User B can receive the packet.
  • Page 160: Managing Mac Address Table

    Figure 1-4 MAC address learning diagram (3) At this time, the MAC address table of the switch includes two forwarding entries shown in Figure 1-5. When forwarding the response packet, the switch unicasts the packet instead of broadcasting it to User A through GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, because MAC-A is already in the MAC address table. Figure 1-5 MAC address table entries of the switch (2) After this interaction, the switch directly unicasts the communication packets between User A and User B based on the corresponding MAC address table entries.
  • Page 161: Configuring Mac Address Table Management

    Aging timer only takes effect on dynamic MAC address entries. Entries in a MAC address table Entries in a MAC address table fall into the following categories according to their characteristics and configuration methods: Static MAC address entry: Also known as permanent MAC address entry. This type of MAC address entries are added/removed manually and can not age out by themselves.
  • Page 162 Configuring a MAC Address Entry You can add, modify, or remove a MAC address entry, remove all MAC address entries concerning a specific port, or remove specific type of MAC address entries (dynamic or static MAC address entries). You can add a MAC address entry in either system view or Ethernet port view. Adding a MAC address entry in system view Table 1-3 Add a MAC address entry in system view Operation...
  • Page 163 Setting the Aging Time of MAC Address Entries Setting aging time properly helps effective utilization of MAC address aging. The aging time that is too long or too short affects the performance of the switch. If the aging time is too long, excessive invalid MAC address entries maintained by the switch may fill up the MAC address table.
  • Page 164: Displaying Mac Address Table Information, Adding A Static Mac Address Entry Manually

    Operation Command Description Required Set the maximum number of mac-address max-mac-count By default, the number of the MAC addresses the port can count MAC addresses a port can learn learn is not limited. Displaying MAC Address Table Information To verify your configuration, you can display information about the MAC address table by executing the display command in any view.
  • Page 165 4 mac address(es) found on port GigabitEthernet1/0/2 ---...
  • Page 166: Mstp

    Table of Contents 1 MSTP Configuration ··································································································································1-1 STP Overview ·········································································································································1-1 MSTP Overview ······································································································································1-9 Background of MSTP ······················································································································1-9 Basic MSTP Terminologies ···········································································································1-10 Principle of MSTP··························································································································1-13 MSTP Implementation on Switches ······························································································1-14 STP-related Standards ··················································································································1-15 Configuring Root Bridge························································································································1-15 Configuration Prerequisites ···········································································································1-16 Configuring an MST Region ··········································································································1-16 Specifying the Current Switch as a Root Bridge/Secondary Root Bridge·····································1-17 Configuring the Bridge Priority of the Current Switch····································································1-19 Configuring How a Port Recognizes and Sends MSTP Packets ··················································1-19...
  • Page 167 Configuring Loop Guard ················································································································1-37 Configuring TC-BPDU Attack Guard ·····························································································1-37 Configuring Digest Snooping ················································································································1-38 Introduction····································································································································1-38 Configuring Digest Snooping·········································································································1-38 Configuring Rapid Transition ················································································································1-39 Introduction····································································································································1-39 Configuring Rapid Transition·········································································································1-41 STP Maintenance Configuration ···········································································································1-42 Introduction····································································································································1-42 Enabling Log/Trap Output for Ports of MSTP Instance·································································1-42 Configuration Example ··················································································································1-42 Enabling Trap Messages Conforming to 802.1d Standard···································································1-43 Displaying and Maintaining MSTP ········································································································1-43 MSTP Configuration Example···············································································································1-43...
  • Page 168: Mstp Configuration, Stp Overview

    MSTP Configuration Go to these sections for information you are interested in: MSTP Overview Configuring Root Bridge Configuring Leaf Nodes Performing mCheck Operation Configuring Guard Functions Configuring Digest Snooping Configuring Rapid Transition STP Maintenance Configuration Enabling Trap Messages Conforming to 802.1d Standard Displaying and Maintaining MSTP MSTP Configuration Example STP Overview...
  • Page 169 There is one and only one root bridge in the entire network, and the root bridge can change alone with changes of the network topology. Therefore, the root bridge is not fixed. Upon network convergence, the root bridge generates and sends out configuration BPDUs periodically. Other devices just forward the configuration BPDUs received.
  • Page 170 All the ports on the root bridge are designated ports. Path cost Path cost is a value used for measuring link capacity. By comparing the path costs of different links, STP selects the most robust links and blocks the other links to prune the network into a tree. How STP works STP identifies the network topology by transmitting configuration BPDUs between network devices.
  • Page 171 Table 1-2 Selection of the optimum configuration BPDU Step Description Upon receiving a configuration BPDU on a port, the device performs the following processing: If the received configuration BPDU has a lower priority than that of the configuration BPDU generated by the port, the device will discard the received configuration BPDU without doing any processing on the configuration BPDU of this port.
  • Page 172 Step Description The device compares the calculated configuration BPDU with the configuration BPDU on the port whose role is to be determined, and acts as follows based on the comparison result: If the calculated configuration BPDU is superior, this port will serve as the designated port, and the configuration BPDU on the port will be replaced with the calculated configuration BPDU, which will be sent out periodically.
  • Page 173 Device Port name BPDU of port {2, 0, 2, CP1} Device C {2, 0, 2, CP2} Comparison process and result on each device The following table shows the comparison process and result on each device. Table 1-5 Comparison process and result on each device BPDU of port after Device Comparison process...
  • Page 174 BPDU of port after Device Comparison process comparison By comparison: The configuration BPDUs of CP1 is elected as the optimum Root port CP1: configuration BPDU, so CP1 is identified as the root port, the {0, 0, 0, AP2} configuration BPDUs of which will not be changed. Designated port Device C compares the calculated designated port CP2:...
  • Page 175 To facilitate description, the spanning tree calculation process in this example is simplified, while the actual process is more complicated. The BPDU forwarding mechanism in STP Upon network initiation, every switch regards itself as the root bridge, generates configuration BPDUs with itself as the root, and sends the configuration BPDUs at a regular interval of hello time. If it is the root port that received the configuration BPDU and the received configuration BPDU is superior to the configuration BPDU of the port, the device will increase message age carried in the configuration BPDU by a certain rule and start a timer to time the configuration BPDU while it sends...
  • Page 176: Mstp Overview

    MSTP Overview Background of MSTP Disadvantages of STP and RSTP STP does not support rapid state transition of ports. A newly elected root port or designated port must wait twice the forward delay time before transiting to the forwarding state, even if it is a port on a point-to-point link or it is an edge port (an edge port refers to a port that directly connects to a user terminal rather than to another device or a shared LAN segment.) The rapid spanning tree protocol (RSTP) is an optimized version of STP.
  • Page 177: Basic Mstp Terminologies

    Basic MSTP Terminologies Figure 1-4 illustrates basic MSTP terms (assuming that MSTP is enabled on each switch in this figure). Figure 1-4 Basic MSTP terminologies Region A0: VLAN 1 mapped to MSTI 1 VLAN 2 mapped to MSTI 2 Other VLANs mapped to CIST BPDU BPDU BPDU...
  • Page 178 region A0 contains these mappings: VLAN 1 to MSTI 1; VLAN 2 to MSTI 2, and other VLANs to CIST. In an MST region, load balancing is implemented according to the VLAN-to-MSTI mapping table. An internal spanning tree (IST) is a spanning tree in an MST region. ISTs together with the common spanning tree (CST) form the common and internal spanning tree (CIST) of the entire switched network.
  • Page 179 switch blocks one of the two ports to eliminate the loop that occurs. The blocked port is the backup port. Figure 1-5, switch A, switch B, switch C, and switch D form an MST region. Port 1 and port 2 on switch A connect upstream to the common root.
  • Page 180 Table 1-6 Combinations of port states and port roles Port role Region Root/master Designated Alternate Backup Boundary port port port port port Port state Forwarding √ √ √ — — Learning √ √ √ — — Discarding √ √ √ √...
  • Page 181 MSTP is compatible with both STP and RSTP. That is, MSTP-enabled switches can recognize the protocol packets of STP and RSTP and use them for spanning tree calculation. In addition to the basic MSTP functions, 3com switches also provide the following functions for users to manage their switches. Root bridge hold...
  • Page 182: Configuring Root Bridge

    STP-related Standards STP-related standards include the following. IEEE 802.1D: spanning tree protocol IEEE 802.1w: rapid spanning tree protocol IEEE 802.1s: multiple spanning tree protocol Configuring Root Bridge Complete the following tasks to configure the root bridge: Task Remarks Required To prevent network topology jitter caused by other Enabling MSTP related configurations, you are recommended to enable MSTP after other related configurations are...
  • Page 183 In a network containing switches with both GVRP and MSTP enabled, GVRP messages travel along the CIST. If you want to advertise a VLAN through GVRP, be sure to map the VLAN to the CIST (MSTI 0) when configuring the VLAN-to-MSTI mapping table. Configuration Prerequisites The role (root, branch, or leaf) of each switch in each MSTI is determined.
  • Page 184 802.1s-defined protocol selector, which is 0 by default and cannot be configured), MST region name, VLAN-to-MSTI mapping table, and revision level. The 3com switches support only the MST region name, VLAN-to-MSTI mapping table, and revision level. Switches with the settings of these parameters being the same are assigned to the same MST region.
  • Page 185 To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Specify the current switch as stp [ instance instance-id ] root primary the root bridge of a spanning [ bridge-diameter bridgenumber [ hello-time Required tree centi-seconds ] ] Specify the current switch as the secondary root bridge of a spanning tree Follow these steps to specify the current switch as the secondary root bridge of a spanning tree: To do...
  • Page 186 Configuration example # Configure the current switch as the root bridge of MSTI 1 and a secondary root bridge of MSTI 2. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] stp instance 1 root primary [Sysname] stp instance 2 root secondary Configuring the Bridge Priority of the Current Switch Root bridges are selected according to the bridge priorities of switches.
  • Page 187 The port automatically determines the format (legacy or dot1s) of received MSTP packets and then determines the format of the packets to be sent accordingly, thus communicating with the peer devices. If the format of the received packets changes repeatedly, MSTP will shut down the corresponding port to prevent network storm.
  • Page 188 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo stp compliance Configuring the MSTP Operation Mode To make an MSTP-enabled switch compatible with STP/RSTP, MSTP provides the following three operation modes: STP-compatible mode, where the ports of a switch send STP BPDUs to neighboring devices. If STP-enabled switches exist in a switched network, you can use the stp mode stp command to configure an MSTP-enabled switch to operate in STP-compatible mode.
  • Page 189 Configuration procedure Follow these steps to configure the maximum hop count for an MST region: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Configure the maximum hop stp max-hops hops By default, the maximum hop count of the MST region count of an MST region is 20.
  • Page 190 Configuring the MSTP Time-related Parameters Three MSTP time-related parameters exist: forward delay, hello time, and max age. You can configure the three parameters to control the process of spanning tree calculation. Configuration procedure Follow these steps to configure MSTP time-related parameters: To do...
  • Page 191 You are recommended to specify the network diameter of the switched network and the hello time by using the stp root primary or stp root secondary command. After that, the three proper time-related parameters are determined automatically. Configuration example # Configure the forward delay parameter to be 1,600 centiseconds, the hello time parameter to be 300 centiseconds, and the max age parameter to be 2,100 centiseconds (assuming that the current switch operates as the CIST root bridge).
  • Page 192 Configure the maximum transmitting rate for specified ports in system view Follow these steps to configure the maximum transmitting rate for specified ports in system view: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Configure the maximum stp interface interface-list The maximum transmitting rate transmitting rate for specified...
  • Page 193 To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Configure the specified ports as stp interface interface-list By default, all the Ethernet edge ports edged-port enable ports of a switch are non-edge ports. Configure a port as an edge port in Ethernet port view Follow these steps to configure a port as an edge port in Ethernet port view: To do...
  • Page 194 You can determine whether or not the link connected to a port is a point-to-point link in one of the following two ways. Specify whether the link connected to a port is point-to-point link in system view Follow these steps to specify whether the link connected to a port is point-to-point link in system view: To do...
  • Page 195: Configuring Leaf Nodes

    Enabling MSTP Configuration procedure Follow these steps to enable MSTP in system view: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Enable MSTP stp enable MSTP is enabled by default. Optional By default, MSTP is enabled on all ports. Disable MSTP on stp interface To enable a switch to operate more flexibly, you can...
  • Page 196 Task Remarks Required To prevent network topology jitter caused by other Enabling MSTP related configurations, you are recommended to enable MSTP after performing other configurations. Configuring an MST Region Required Configuring How a Port Recognizes and Optional Sends MSTP Packets Configuring the Timeout Time Factor Optional Optional...
  • Page 197 Configuring the Path Cost for a Port The path cost parameter reflects the rate of the link connected to the port. For a port on an MSTP-enabled switch, the path cost may be different in different MSTIs. You can enable flows of different VLANs to travel along different physical links by configuring appropriate path costs on ports, so that VLAN-based load balancing can be implemented.
  • Page 198 When calculating the path cost of an aggregated link, the 802.1D-1998 standard does not take the number of the ports on the aggregated link into account, whereas the 802.1T standard does. The following formula is used to calculate the path cost of an aggregated link: Path cost = 200,000,000 / link transmission rate Where, “link transmission rate”...
  • Page 199: Configuring Port Priority

    [Sysname] stp pathcost-standard dot1d-1998 Perform this configuration in Ethernet port view <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo stp instance 1 cost [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [Sysname] stp pathcost-standard dot1d-1998 Configuring Port Priority Port priority is an important criterion on determining the root port. In the same condition, the port with the smallest port priority value becomes the root port.
  • Page 200: Performing Mcheck Operation

    [Sysname] stp interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 instance 1 port priority 16 Perform this configuration in Ethernet port view <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] stp instance 1 port priority 16 Specifying Whether the Link Connected to a Port Is a Point-to-point Link Refer to Specifying Whether the Link Connected to a Port Is Point-to-point Link.
  • Page 201: Configuring Guard Functions

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Perform the mCheck operation Required stp mcheck Configuration Example # Perform the mCheck operation on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1. Perform this configuration in system view <Sysname>...
  • Page 202 Loop guard A switch maintains the states of the root port and other blocked ports by receiving and processing BPDUs from the upstream switch. These BPDUs may get lost because of network congestions or unidirectional link failures. If a switch does not receive BPDUs from the upstream switch for certain period, the switch selects a new root port;...
  • Page 203 Configuration Prerequisites MSTP runs normally on the switch. Configuring BPDU Guard Configuration procedure Follow these steps to configure BPDU guard: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Enable the BPDU guard stp bpdu-protection The BPDU guard function is function disabled by default.
  • Page 204: Configuring Loop Guard

    [Sysname] stp interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 root-protection Perform this configuration in Ethernet port view <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 [Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] stp root-protection Configuring Loop Guard Configuration procedure Follow these steps to configure loop guard: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view —...
  • Page 205: Configuring Digest Snooping

    MST region. This problem can be overcome by implementing the digest snooping feature. If a port on a 3com switch 4200G is connected to another manufacturer's switch that has the same MST region-related configuration as its own but adopts a proprietary spanning tree protocol, you can enable digest snooping on the port.
  • Page 206: Configuring Rapid Transition

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Enable the digest snooping stp config-digest-snooping The digest snooping feature is feature disabled on a port by default. Return to system view —...
  • Page 207 Proposal packets: Packets sent by designated ports to request rapid transition Agreement packets: Packets used to acknowledge rapid transition requests Both RSTP and MSTP specify that the upstream switch can perform rapid transition operation on the designated port only when the port receives an agreement packet from the downstream switch. The difference between RSTP and MSTP are: For MSTP, the upstream switch sends agreement packets to the downstream switch;...
  • Page 208 3com switch operating as the downstream switch. Among these ports, those operating as the root ports will then send agreement packets to their upstream ports after they receive proposal packets from the upstream designated ports, instead of waiting for agreement packets from the upstream switch.
  • Page 209: Stp Maintenance Configuration

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Enable the rapid transition stp no-agreement-check By default, the rapid transition feature feature is disabled on a port. The rapid transition feature can be enabled on only root ports or alternate ports. If you configure the rapid transition feature on a designated port, the feature does not take effect on the port.
  • Page 210: Displaying And Maintaining Mstp, Mstp Configuration Example

    Enabling Trap Messages Conforming to 802.1d Standard A switch sends trap messages conforming to 802.1d standard to the network management device in the following two cases: The switch becomes the root bridge of an instance. Network topology changes are detected. Configuration procedure Follow these steps to enable trap messages conforming to 802.1d standard: To do...
  • Page 211 All switches in the network belong to the same MST region. Packets of VLAN 10, VLAN 30, VLAN 40, and VLAN 20 are forwarded along MSTI 1, MSTI 3, MSTI 4, and MSTI 0 respectively. In this network, Switch A and Switch B operate on the convergence layer; Switch C and Switch D operate on the access layer.
  • Page 212 [Sysname] stp region-configuration # Configure the region name, VLAN-to-MSTI mapping table, and revision level for the MST region. [Sysname-mst-region] region-name example [Sysname-mst-region] instance 1 vlan 10 [Sysname-mst-region] instance 3 vlan 30 [Sysname-mst-region] instance 4 vlan 40 [Sysname-mst-region] revision-level 0 # Activate the settings of the MST region manually. [Sysname-mst-region] active region-configuration # Specify Switch B as the root bridge of MSTI 3.
  • Page 213 Table of Contents 1 802.1x Configuration ·································································································································1-1 Introduction to 802.1x······························································································································1-1 Architecture of 802.1x Authentication······························································································1-1 The Mechanism of an 802.1x Authentication System ·····································································1-3 Encapsulation of EAPoL Messages ································································································1-3 802.1x Authentication Procedure ····································································································1-5 Timers Used in 802.1x·····················································································································1-9 Additional 802.1x Features on Switch 4200G ···············································································1-10 Introduction to 802.1x Configuration ·····································································································1-13 Basic 802.1x Configuration ···················································································································1-14 Configuration Prerequisites ···········································································································1-14...
  • Page 214 Displaying and Maintaining System-Guard·····························································································4-1...
  • Page 215 802.1x Configuration When configuring 802.1x, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to 802.1x Introduction to 802.1x Configuration Basic 802.1x Configuration Advanced 802.1x Configuration Displaying and Maintaining 802.1x Configuration Configuration Example Introduction to 802.1x The 802.1x protocol (802.1x for short) was developed by IEEE802 LAN/WAN committee to address security issues of wireless LANs.
  • Page 216 The authenticator system, residing at the other end of the LAN segment, is the entity that authenticates the connected supplicant system. The authenticator system is usually an 802.1x-supported network device, such as a 3Com series switch. It provides the port (physical or logical) for the supplicant system to access the LAN.
  • Page 217 By default, a controlled port is a unidirectional port. The way a port is controlled A port of an 3COM series switch can be controlled in the following two ways. Port-based control. When a port is under port-based control, all the supplicant systems connected to the port can access the network without being authenticated after one supplicant system among them passes the authentication.
  • Page 218 Figure 1-3 The format of an EAPoL packet In an EAPoL packet: The PAE Ethernet type field holds the protocol identifier. The identifier for 802.1x is 0x888E. The Protocol version field holds the version of the protocol supported by the sender of the EAPoL packet.
  • Page 219: X Authentication Procedure

    The Length field indicates the size of an EAP packet, which includes the Code, Identifier, Length, and Data fields. The Data field carries the EAP packet, whose format differs with the Code field. A Success or Failure packet does not contain the Data field, so the Length field of it is 4. Figure 1-5 shows the format of the Data field of a Request packet or a Response packet.
  • Page 220 EAP relay mode This mode is defined in 802.1x. In this mode, EAP packets are encapsulated in higher level protocol (such as EAPoR) packets to enable them to successfully reach the authentication server. Normally, this mode requires that the RADIUS server support the two newly-added fields: the EAP-message field (with a value of 79) and the Message-authenticator field (with a value of 80).
  • Page 221 Figure 1-8 802.1x authentication procedure (in EAP relay mode) EAPOL EAPOR Authenticator system RADUIS Supplicant system server EAPOL - Start EAP- Request / Identity RADIUS Access - Request EAP- Response / Identity (EAP- Response / Identity) RADIUS Access -Challenge EAP- Request / MD5 challenge ( EAP- Request / MD5 challenge) RADIUS Access - Request EAP- Response / MD5 challenge...
  • Page 222 feedbacks (through a RADIUS access-accept packet and an EAP-success packet) to the switch to indicate that the supplicant system is authenticated. The switch changes the state of the corresponding port to accepted state to allow the supplicant system to access the network. The supplicant system can also terminate the authenticated state by sending EAPoL-Logoff packets to the switch.
  • Page 223 Figure 1-9 802.1x authentication procedure (in EAP terminating mode) Supplicant RADIUS EAPOL Authenticator system RADIUS server system PAE EAPOL- Start EAP- Request /Identity EAP- Response/Identity EAP- Request/ MD5 Challenge EAP- Response/MD5 Challenge RADIUS Access-Request ( CHAP- Response/MD5 Challenge) RADIUS Access - Accept ( CHAP-Success) EAP- Success Port...
  • Page 224 Re-authentication timer (reauth-period). The switch initiates 802.1x re-authentication at the interval set by the re-authentication timer. RADIUS server timer (server-timeout). This timer sets the server-timeout period. After sending an authentication request packet to the RADIUS server, the switch sends another authentication request packet if it does not receive the response from the RADIUS server when this timer times out.
  • Page 225 Only disconnects the supplicant system but sends no Trap packets. Sends Trap packets without disconnecting the supplicant system. This function needs the cooperation of 802.1x client and a CAMS server. The 802.1x client needs to be capable of detecting multiple network adapters, proxies, and IE proxies.
  • Page 226 After the maximum number retries have been made and there are still ports that have not sent any response back, the switch will then add these ports to the guest VLAN. Users belonging to the guest VLAN can access the resources of the guest VLAN without being authenticated.
  • Page 227 The RADIUS server has the switch perform 802.1x re-authentication of users. The RADIUS server sends the switch an Access-Accept packet with the Termination-Action attribute field of 1. Upon receiving the packet, the switch re-authenticates the user periodically. You enable 802.1x re-authentication on the switch. With 802.1x re-authentication enabled, the switch re-authenticates users periodically.
  • Page 228 Basic 802.1x Configuration Configuration Prerequisites Configure ISP domain and the AAA scheme to be adopted. You can specify a RADIUS scheme or a local scheme. Ensure that the service type is configured as lan-access (by using the service-type command) if local authentication scheme is adopted.
  • Page 229 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Enable online user dot1x handshake enable By default, online user handshaking handshaking is enabled. interface interface-type — Enter Ethernet port view interface-number 802.1x configurations take effect only after you enable 802.1x both globally and for specified ports. The settings of 802.1x and MAC address learning limit are mutually exclusive.
  • Page 230 To do… Use the command... Remarks Optional The settings of 802.1x timers are as follows. dot1x timer { handshake-period handshake-period-value: handshake-period-value | 15 seconds quiet-period quiet-period-value | quiet-period-value: server-timeout seconds Set 802.1x timers server-timeout-value | server-timeout-value: supp-timeout seconds supp-timeout-value | tx-period supp-timeout-value: tx-period-value | ver-period seconds...
  • Page 231 To do... Use the command... Remarks Required Enable proxy checking function dot1x supp-proxy-check By default, the 802.1x proxy globally { logoff | trap } checking function is globally disabled. dot1x supp-proxy-check In system { logoff | trap } [ interface view interface-list ] Enable proxy...
  • Page 232 As for the dot1x version-user command, if you execute it in system view without specifying the interface-list argument, the command applies to all ports. You can also execute this command in port view. In this case, this command applies to the current port only and the interface-list argument is not needed.
  • Page 233 The guest VLAN function is available only when the switch operates in the port-based access control mode. Only one guest VLAN can be configured for each switch. The guest VLAN function cannot be implemented if you configure the dot1x dhcp-launch command on the switch to enable DHCP-triggered authentication.
  • Page 234 During re-authentication, the switch always uses the latest re-authentication interval configured, no matter which of the above-mentioned two ways is used to determine the re-authentication interval. For example, if you configure a re-authentication interval on the switch and the switch receives an Access-Accept packet whose Termination-Action attribute field is 1, the switch will ultimately use the value of the Session-timeout attribute field as the re-authentication interval.
  • Page 235 a real-time accounting packet to the RADIUS servers once in every 15 minutes. A user name is sent to the RADIUS servers with the domain name truncated. The user name and password for local 802.1x authentication are “localuser” and “localpass” (in plain text) respectively.
  • Page 236 [Sysname-radius-radius1] secondary authentication 10.11.1.2 [Sysname-radius-radius1] secondary accounting 10.11.1.1 # Set the password for the switch and the authentication RADIUS servers to exchange messages. [Sysname-radius-radius1] key authentication name # Set the password for the switch and the accounting RADIUS servers to exchange messages. [Sysname-radius-radius1] key accounting money # Set the interval and the number of the retries for the switch to send packets to the RADIUS servers.
  • Page 237: Quick Ead Deployment Configuration, Introduction To Quick Ead Deployment

    Quick EAD Deployment Configuration When configuring quick EAD deployment, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to Quick EAD Deployment Configuring Quick EAD Deployment Displaying and Maintaining Quick EAD Deployment Quick EAD Deployment Configuration Example Troubleshooting Introduction to Quick EAD Deployment Quick EAD Deployment Overview As an integrated solution, an Endpoint Admission Defense (EAD) solution can improve the overall...
  • Page 238: Mac Address Authentication

    Configuring Quick EAD Deployment Configuration Prerequisites Enable 802.1x on the switch. Set the port authorization mode to auto for 802.1x-enabled ports using the dot1x port-control command. Configuration Procedure Configuring a free IP range A free IP range is an IP range that users can access before passing 802.1x authentication. Follow these steps to configure a free IP range: To do...
  • Page 239: Quick Ead Deployment Configuration Example

    large number of users log in but cannot pass authentication, the switch may run out of ACL resources, preventing other users from logging in. A timer called ACL timer is designed to solve this problem. You can control the usage of ACL resources by setting the ACL timer. The ACL timer starts once a user gets online.
  • Page 240 Network diagram Figure 2-1 Network diagram for quick EAD deployment IP network Switch GE1/0/1 Web Server 192.168.0.110/24 192.168.0.111/24 Host 192.168.0.109/24 Configuration procedure Before enabling quick EAD deployment, make sure sure that: The Web server is configured properly. The default gateway of the PC is configured as the IP address of the Layer-3 virtual interface of the VLAN to which the port that is directly connected with the PC belongs.
  • Page 241: Troubleshooting

    Troubleshooting Symptom: A user cannot be redirected to the specified URL server, no matter what URL the user enters in the IE address bar. Solution: If a user enters an IP address in a format other than the dotted decimal notation, the user may not be redirected.
  • Page 242: Introduction To Habp, Habp Server Configuration

    HABP Configuration When configuring HABP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to HABP HABP Server Configuration HABP Client Configuration Displaying and Maintaining HABP Configuration Introduction to HABP When a switch is configured with the 802.1x function, 802.1x will authenticate and authorize 802.1x-enabled ports and allow only the authorized ports to forward packets.
  • Page 243: Habp Client Configuration

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Required By default, a switch operates as an HABP client after you Configure the current switch enable HABP on the switch. If habp server vlan vlan-id to be an HABP server you want to use the switch as a management switch, you need to configure the switch to be an HABP server.
  • Page 244: System Guard Configuration

    System Guard Configuration System-Guard Overview At first, you must determine whether the CPU is under attack to implement system guard for the CPU. You should not determine whether the CPU is under attack just according to whether congestion occurs in a queue. Instead, you must do that in the following ways: According to the number of packets processed in the CPU in a time range.
  • Page 245 Table 4-2 Display and maintain system-guard Operation Command Display the record of detected attacks display system-guard attack-record Display the state of the system-guard display system-guard state feature...
  • Page 246 Table of Contents 1 AAA Overview ············································································································································1-1 Introduction to AAA ·································································································································1-1 Authentication··································································································································1-1 Authorization····································································································································1-1 Accounting·······································································································································1-1 Introduction to ISP Domain ·············································································································1-2 Introduction to AAA Services ··················································································································1-2 Introduction to RADIUS ···················································································································1-2 Introduction to HWTACACS ············································································································1-6 2 AAA Configuration ····································································································································2-1 AAA Configuration Task List ···················································································································2-1 Creating an ISP Domain and Configuring Its Attributes ··································································2-2 Configuring an AAA Scheme for an ISP Domain ············································································2-3 Configuring Dynamic VLAN Assignment·························································································2-6...
  • Page 247 Local Authentication of FTP/Telnet Users·····················································································2-28 HWTACACS Authentication and Authorization of Telnet Users ···················································2-30 Troubleshooting AAA ····························································································································2-31 Troubleshooting RADIUS Configuration························································································2-31 Troubleshooting HWTACACS Configuration ················································································2-31 3 EAD Configuration·····································································································································3-1 Introduction to EAD ·································································································································3-1 Typical Network Application of EAD ·······································································································3-1 EAD Configuration ··································································································································3-1 EAD Configuration Example ···················································································································3-2...
  • Page 248: Aaa Overview, Introduction To Aaa

    Remote authentication: Users are authenticated remotely through RADIUS or HWTACACS protocol. This device (for example, a 3Com switch) acts as the client to communicate with the RADIUS or TACACS server. Remote authentication allows convenient centralized management and is feature-rich.
  • Page 249: Introduction To Aaa Services

    None accounting: No accounting is performed for users. Remote accounting: User accounting is performed on a remote RADIUS or TACACS server. Introduction to ISP Domain An Internet service provider (ISP) domain is a group of users who belong to the same ISP. For a username in the format of userid@isp-name or userid.isp-name, the isp-name following the "@"...
  • Page 250 Figure 1-1 Databases in a RADIUS server In addition, a RADIUS server can act as a client of some other AAA server to provide authentication or accounting proxy service. Basic message exchange procedure in RADIUS The messages exchanged between a RADIUS client (a switch, for example) and a RADIUS server are verified through a shared key.
  • Page 251 The RADIUS client accepts or denies the user depending on the received authentication result. If it accepts the user, the RADIUS client sends a start-accounting request (Accounting-Request, with the Status-Type attribute value = start) to the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server returns a start-accounting response (Accounting-Response). The user starts to access network resources.
  • Page 252 Code Message type Message description Direction: client->server. The client transmits this message to the server to request the server to start or end the accounting Accounting-Request (whether to start or to end the accounting is determined by the Acct-Status-Type attribute in the message). This message carries almost the same attributes as those carried in the Access-Request message.
  • Page 253: Introduction To Hwtacacs

    Type field Type field Attribute type Attribute type value value Framed-Routing NAS-Identifier Filter-ID Proxy-State Framed-MTU Login-LAT-Service Framed-Compression Login-LAT-Node Login-IP-Host Login-LAT-Group Login-Service Framed-AppleTalk-Link Login-TCP-Port Framed-AppleTalk-Network (unassigned) Framed-AppleTalk-Zone Reply-Message 40-59 (reserved for accounting) Callback-Number CHAP-Challenge Callback-ID NAS-Port-Type (unassigned) Port-Limit Framed-Route Login-LAT-Port The RADIUS protocol has good scalability. Attribute 26 (Vender-Specific) defined in this protocol allows a device vendor to extend RADIUS to implement functions that are not defined in standard RADIUS.
  • Page 254 Compared with RADIUS, HWTACACS provides more reliable transmission and encryption, and therefore is more suitable for security control. Table 1-3 lists the primary differences between HWTACACS and RADIUS. Table 1-3 Differences between HWTACACS and RADIUS HWTACACS RADIUS Adopts TCP, providing more reliable network Adopts UDP.
  • Page 255 Figure 1-6 AAA implementation procedure for a telnet user The basic message exchange procedure is as follows: A user sends a login request to the switch acting as a TACACS client, which then sends an authentication start request to the TACACS server. The TACACS server returns an authentication response, asking for the username.
  • Page 256 After receiving the response indicating an authorization success, the TACACS client pushes the configuration interface of the switch to the user. 10) The TACACS client sends an accounting start request to the TACACS server. 11) The TACACS server returns an accounting response, indicating that it has received the accounting start request.
  • Page 257: Aaa Configuration, Aaa Configuration Task List

    AAA Configuration AAA Configuration Task List You need to configure AAA to provide network access services for legal users while protecting network devices and preventing unauthorized access and repudiation behavior. Complete the following tasks to configure AAA (configuring a combined AAA scheme for an ISP domain): Task Remarks...
  • Page 258 Task Remarks Creating an ISP Domain and Configuring Its Required Attributes Configuring separate AAA schemes Required Required With separate AAA schemes, you can specify authentication, authorization and accounting Configuring an AAA Scheme for an ISP schemes respectively. Domain configuration You need to configure RADIUS or HWATACACS before performing RADIUS or HWTACACS authentication.
  • Page 259: Configuring An Aaa Scheme For An Isp Domain

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the accounting-optional By default, the accounting optional switch accounting-optional switch is off. Optional messenger time { enable limit Set the messenger function By default, the messenger interval | disable } function is disabled. Note that: On a Switch 4200G, each access user belongs to an ISP domain.
  • Page 260 You can execute the scheme radius-scheme radius-scheme-name command to adopt an already configured RADIUS scheme to implement all the three AAA functions. If you adopt the local scheme, only the authentication and authorization functions are implemented, the accounting function cannot be implemented. If you execute the scheme radius-scheme radius-scheme-name local command, the local scheme is used as the secondary scheme in case no RADIUS server is available.
  • Page 261 To do… Use the command… Remarks authentication Optional { radius-scheme Configure an authentication radius-scheme-name [ local ] | By default, no separate scheme for the ISP domain hwtacacs-scheme authentication scheme is hwtacacs-scheme-name configured. [ local ] | local | none } Optional Configure a HWTACACS authentication super...
  • Page 262 for authentication, it also does so for authorization and accounting, even if authorization and accounting fail. Configuring Dynamic VLAN Assignment The dynamic VLAN assignment feature enables a switch to dynamically add the switch ports of successfully authenticated users to different VLANs according to the attributes assigned by the RADIUS server, so as to control the network resources that different users can access.
  • Page 263: Configuring The Attributes Of A Local User

    In string mode, if the VLAN ID assigned by the RADIUS server is a character string containing only digits (for example, 1024), the switch first regards it as an integer VLAN ID: the switch transforms the string to an integer value and judges if the value is in the valid VLAN ID range; if it is, the switch adds the authenticated port to the VLAN with the integer value as the VLAN ID (VLAN 1024, for example).
  • Page 264 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view Optional By default, the password local-user display mode of all access Set the password display mode password-display-mode users is auto, indicating the of all local users { cipher-force | auto } passwords of access users are displayed in the modes set by the password command.
  • Page 265: Radius Configuration Task List

    RADIUS Configuration Task List 3Com’s Ethernet switches can function not only as RADIUS clients but also as local RADIUS servers. Complete the following tasks to configure RADIUS (the switch functions as a RADIUS client):...
  • Page 266 Task Remarks Creating a RADIUS Scheme Required Configuring RADIUS Authentication/Authorization Servers Required Configuring RADIUS Accounting Servers Required Configuring Shared Keys for RADIUS Messages Optional Configuring the Maximum Number of RADIUS Request Optional Transmission Attempts Configuring the Configuring the Type of RADIUS Servers to be Supported Optional RADIUS client Configuring the Status of RADIUS Servers...
  • Page 267 creating a new RADIUS scheme, you should configure the IP address and UDP port number of each RADIUS server you want to use in this scheme. These RADIUS servers fall into two types: authentication/authorization, and accounting. And for each type of server, you can configure two servers in a RADIUS scheme: primary server and secondary server.
  • Page 268 To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Create a RADIUS scheme and radius scheme By default, a RADIUS scheme enter its view radius-scheme-name named "system" has already been created in the system. Required Set the IP address and port By default, the IP address and number of the primary RADIUS primary authentication UDP port number of the...
  • Page 269 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the IP address and By default, the IP address and UDP port port number of the secondary accounting number of the secondary accounting secondary RADIUS ip-address [ port-number ] server are 0.0.0.0 and 1813 for a newly accounting server created RADIUS scheme.
  • Page 270 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Create a RADIUS scheme and radius scheme By default, a RADIUS scheme enter its view radius-scheme-name named "system" has already been created in the system. Required Set a shared key for RADIUS authentication/authorization key authentication string By default, no shared key is...
  • Page 271: Configuring The Status Of Radius Servers

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Create a RADIUS scheme and radius scheme By default, a RADIUS scheme enter its view radius-scheme-name named "system" has already been created in the system. Configure the type of RADIUS server-type { extended | Optional servers to be supported standard }...
  • Page 272 To do… Use the command… Remarks Set the status of the secondary state secondary RADIUS authentication { block | authentication/authorization active } server Set the status of the secondary state secondary accounting RADIUS accounting server { block | active } Configuring the Attributes of Data to be Sent to RADIUS Servers Follow these steps to configure the attributes of data to be sent to RADIUS servers: To do…...
  • Page 273 Generally, the access users are named in the userid@isp-name or userid.isp-name format. Here, isp-name after the “@” or “.” character represents the ISP domain name, by which the device determines which ISP domain a user belongs to. However, some old RADIUS servers cannot accept the usernames that carry ISP domain names.
  • Page 274: Configuring Timers For Radius Servers

    adopt local RADIUS server function, port number authentication/authorization server must be 1645, the UDP port number of the accounting server must be 1646, and the IP addresses of the servers must be set to the addresses of this switch. The message encryption key set by the local-server nas-ip ip-address key password command must be identical with the authentication/authorization message encryption key set by the key authentication command in the RADIUS scheme view of the RADIUS scheme on the specified NAS that uses this switch as its authentication server.
  • Page 275 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the response timeout time timer response-timeout By default, the response of RADIUS servers seconds timeout time of RADIUS servers is three seconds. Optional Set the time that the switch waits before it try to By default, the switch waits five re-communicate with primary timer quiet minutes...
  • Page 276 online when the user re-logs into the network before the CAMS performs online user detection, and the user cannot get authenticated. In this case, the user can access the network again only when the CAMS administrator manually removes the user's online information. The user re-authentication at restart function is designed to resolve this problem.
  • Page 277: Hwtacacs Configuration Task List

    HWTACACS Configuration Task List Complete the following tasks to configure HWTACACS: Task Remarks Creating a HWTACACS Scheme Required Configuring TACACS Authentication Servers Required Configuring TACACS Authorization Servers Required Configuring the Configuring TACACS Accounting Servers Optional TACACS client Configuring Shared Keys for RADIUS Messages Optional Configuring the Attributes of Data to be Sent to TACACS Optional...
  • Page 278 To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Set the IP address and port By default, the IP address of primary authentication number of the primary the primary authentication ip-address [ port ] TACACS authentication server server is 0.0.0.0, and the port number is 0.
  • Page 279 You are not allowed to configure the same IP address for both primary and secondary authorization servers. If you do this, the system will prompt that the configuration fails. You can remove a server only when it is not used by any active TCP connection for sending authorization messages.
  • Page 280 The TACACS client and server adopt MD5 algorithm to encrypt HWTACACS messages before they are exchanged between the two parties. The two parties verify the validity of the HWTACACS messages received from each other by using the shared keys that have been set on them, and can accept and respond to the messages only when both parties have the same shared key.
  • Page 281 Generally, the access users are named in the userid@isp-name or userid.isp-name format. Where, isp-name after the “@” or “.” character represents the ISP domain name. If the TACACS server does not accept the usernames that carry ISP domain names, it is necessary to remove domain names from usernames before they are sent to TACACS server.
  • Page 282 Displaying and Maintaining AAA Configuration Displaying and Maintaining AAA Configuration To do… Use the command… Remarks Display configuration information about one specific display domain [ isp-name ] or all ISP domains display connection [ access-type { dot1x | mac-authentication } | domain isp-name | interface interface-type interface-number | ip Display information about user ip-address | mac mac-address | radius-scheme...
  • Page 283: Aaa Configuration Examples

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Display buffered display stop-accounting-buffer non-response { hwtacacs-scheme stop-accounting requests hwtacacs-scheme-name Clear HWTACACS message reset hwtacacs statistics { accounting | statistics authentication | authorization | all } Available in user reset stop-accounting-buffer view Delete buffered non-response hwtacacs-scheme stop-accounting requests hwtacacs-scheme-name...
  • Page 284 Network diagram Figure 2-1 Remote RADIUS authentication of Telnet users RADIUS server 10.110.91.164/16 Internet Telnet user Configuration procedure # Enter system view. <Sysname> system-view # Adopt AAA authentication for Telnet users. [Sysname] user-interface vty 0 4 [Sysname-ui-vty0-4] authentication-mode scheme [Sysname-ui-vty0-4] quit # Configure an ISP domain.
  • Page 285 The configuration procedure for local authentication of FTP users is similar to that for Telnet users. The following text only takes Telnet users as example to describe the configuration procedure for local authentication. Network requirements In the network environment shown in Figure 2-2, you are required to configure the switch so that the Telnet users logging into the switch are authenticated locally.
  • Page 286: Hwtacacs Authentication And Authorization Of Telnet Users

    Enable the local RADIUS server function, set the IP address and shared key for the network access server to 127.0.0.1 and aabbcc, respectively. Configure local users. HWTACACS Authentication and Authorization of Telnet Users Network requirements You are required to configure the switch so that the Telnet users logging into the switch are authenticated and authorized by the TACACS server.
  • Page 287: Troubleshooting Aaa

    Troubleshooting AAA Troubleshooting RADIUS Configuration The RADIUS protocol operates at the application layer in the TCP/IP protocol suite. This protocol prescribes how the switch and the RADIUS server of the ISP exchange user information with each other. Symptom 1: User authentication/authorization always fails. Possible reasons and solutions: The username is not in the userid@isp-name or userid.isp-name format, or the default ISP domain is not correctly specified on the switch —...
  • Page 288 EAD Configuration Introduction to EAD Endpoint Admission Defense (EAD) is an attack defense solution. Using this solution, you can enhance the active defense capability of network endpoints, prevents viruses and worms from spreading on the network, and protects the entire network by limiting the access rights of insecure endpoints. With the cooperation of switch, AAA sever, security policy server and security client, EAD is able to evaluate the security compliance of network endpoints and dynamically control their access rights.
  • Page 289: Ead Configuration Example

    Configuring the IP address of the security policy server. Associating the ISP domain with the RADIUS scheme. EAD is commonly used in RADIUS authentication environment. This section mainly describes the configuration of security policy server IP address. For other related configuration, refer to Overview.
  • Page 290 Network diagram Figure 3-2 EAD configuration Configuration procedure # Configure 802.1x on the switch. Refer to “Configuring 802.1x” in 802.1x and System Guard Configuration. # Configure a domain. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] domain system [Sysname-isp-system] quit # Configure a RADIUS scheme. [Sysname] radius scheme cams [Sysname-radius-cams] primary authentication 10.110.91.164 1812 [Sysname-radius-cams] accounting optional...
  • Page 291 Table of Contents 1 MAC Address Authentication Configuration ··························································································1-1 MAC Address Authentication Overview ··································································································1-1 Performing MAC Address Authentication on a RADIUS Server ·····················································1-1 Performing MAC Address Authentication Locally ···········································································1-1 Related Concepts····································································································································1-2 MAC Address Authentication Timers ······························································································1-2 Quiet MAC Address·························································································································1-2 Configuring Basic MAC Address Authentication Functions ····································································1-2 MAC Address Authentication Enhanced Function Configuration ···························································1-3 MAC Address Authentication Enhanced Function Configuration Task List ····································1-3 Configuring a Guest VLAN ··············································································································1-4...
  • Page 292: Mac Address Authentication Configuration, Mac Address Authentication Overview

    MAC Address Authentication Configuration When configuring MAC address authentication, go to these sections for information you are interested: MAC Address Authentication Overview Related Concepts Configuring Basic MAC Address Authentication Functions MAC Address Authentication Enhanced Function Configuration Displaying and Maintaining MAC Address Authentication Configuration MAC Address Authentication Configuration Examples MAC Address Authentication Overview MAC address authentication provides a way for authenticating users based on ports and MAC...
  • Page 293: Related Concepts, Configuring Basic Mac Address Authentication Functions

    format configured with mac-authentication authmode usernameasmacaddress usernameformat command; otherwise, the authentication will fail. In fixed mode, all users’ MAC addresses are automatically mapped to the configured local passwords and usernames. The service type of a local user needs to be configured as lan-access. Related Concepts MAC Address Authentication Timers The following timers function in the process of MAC address authentication:...
  • Page 294: Mac Address Authentication Enhanced Function Configuration

    To do... Use the command... Remarks quit Optional Set the user name in mac-authentication authmode By default, the MAC MAC address mode usernameasmacaddress [ usernameformat address of a user is for MAC address { with-hyphen | without-hyphen } { lowercase | used as the user authentication uppercase } | fixedpassword password ]...
  • Page 295 Task Remarks Configuring a Guest VLAN Optional Configuring the Maximum Number of MAC Address Authentication Users Optional Allowed to Access a Port Configuring a Guest VLAN Different from Guest VLANs described in the 802.1x and System-Guard manual, Guest VLANs mentioned in this section refer to Guests VLANs dedicated to MAC address authentication. After completing configuration tasks in Configuring Basic MAC Address Authentication Functions for a...
  • Page 296 After a port is added to a Guest VLAN, the switch will re-authenticate the first access user of this port (namely, the first user whose unicast MAC address is learned by the switch) periodically. If this user passes the re-authentication, this port will exit the Guest VLAN, and thus the user can access the network normally.
  • Page 297 If more than one client are connected to a port, you cannot configure a Guest VLAN for this port. When a Guest VLAN is configured for a port, only one MAC address authentication user can access the port. Even if you set the limit on the number of MAC address authentication users to more than one, the configuration does not take effect.
  • Page 298: Displaying And Maintaining Mac Address Authentication Configuration, Mac Address Authentication Configuration Examples

    If both the limit on the number of MAC address authentication users and the limit on the number of users configured in the port security function are configured for a port, the smaller value of the two configured limits is adopted as the maximum number of MAC address authentication users allowed to access this port.
  • Page 299 # Set the user name in MAC address mode for MAC address authentication, requiring hyphened lowercase MAC addresses as the usernames and passwords. [Sysname] mac-authentication authmode usernameasmacaddress usernameformat with-hyphen lowercase # Add a local user. Specify the user name and password. [Sysname] local-user 00-0d-88-f6-44-c1 [Sysname-luser-00-0d-88-f6-44-c1] password simple 00-0d-88-f6-44-c1 Set the service type to lan-access.
  • Page 300 Table of Contents 1 IP Addressing Configuration····················································································································1-1 IP Addressing Overview··························································································································1-1 IP Address Classes ·························································································································1-1 Special IP Addresses ······················································································································1-2 Subnetting and Masking ··················································································································1-2 Protocols and Standards ·················································································································1-3 Configuring IP Addresses ·······················································································································1-3 Displaying IP Addressing Configuration··································································································1-4 VLAN Interface IP Address Configuration Examples··············································································1-4 2 IP Performance Optimization Configuration···························································································2-1 IP Performance Overview ·······················································································································2-1 Introduction to IP Performance Configuration ·················································································2-1...
  • Page 301: Ip Addressing Overview

    IP Addressing Configuration The term IP address used throughout this chapter refers to IPv4 address. For details about IPv6 address, refer to IPv6 Management. When configuring IP addressing, go to these sections for information you are interested in: IP Addressing Overview Configuring IP Addresses Displaying IP Addressing Configuration VLAN Interface IP Address Configuration Examples...
  • Page 302 Table 1-1 IP address classes and ranges Class Address range Remarks The IP address 0.0.0.0 is used by a host at bootstrap for temporary communication. This address is never a valid destination address. 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 Addresses starting with 127 are reserved for loopback test.
  • Page 303: Dhcp

    subnetting. When designing your network, you should note that subnetting is somewhat a tradeoff between subnets and accommodated hosts. For example, a Class B network can accommodate 65,534 – 2. Of the two deducted Class B addresses, one with an all-ones host ID is the broadcast address and the other with an all-zero host ID is the network address) hosts before being subnetted.
  • Page 304: Displaying Ip Addressing Configuration

    For saving IP address resources, the IP address of a Loopback interface is automatically configured with a 32-bit mask. Displaying IP Addressing Configuration To do… Use the command… Remarks Display information about a display ip interface specified or all Layer 3 [ interface-type interfaces interface-number ]...
  • Page 305: Ip Performance Overview

    IP Performance Optimization Configuration When optimizing IP performance, go to these sections for information you are interested in: IP Performance Overview Configuring IP Performance Optimization Displaying and Maintaining IP Performance Optimization Configuration IP Performance Overview Introduction to IP Performance Configuration In some network environments, you can adjust the IP parameters to achieve best network performance.
  • Page 306 synwait timer: When sending a SYN packet, TCP starts the synwait timer. If no response packet is received within the synwait timer interval, the TCP connection cannot be created. finwait timer: When a TCP connection is changed into FIN_WAIT_2 state, the finwait timer is started.
  • Page 307: Displaying And Maintaining Ip Performance Optimization Configuration

    If the destination of a packet is local while the transport layer protocol of the packet is not supported by the local device, the device sends a “protocol unreachable” ICMP error packet to the source. When receiving a packet with the destination being local and transport layer protocol being UDP, if the packet’s port number does not match the running process, the device will send the source a “port unreachable”...
  • Page 308 To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the forwarding information base (FIB) display fib entries display fib ip_address1 [ { mask1 | mask-length1 } Display the FIB entries matching the [ ip_address2 { mask2 | destination IP address mask-length2 } | longer ] | longer ] Display the FIB entries permitted by a display fib acl number...
  • Page 309 Table of Contents ARP Configuration ····································································································································1-1 Introduction to ARP ·································································································································1-1 ARP Function ··································································································································1-1 ARP Message Format ·····················································································································1-1 ARP Table ·······································································································································1-3 ARP Process ···································································································································1-3 Introduction to Gratuitous ARP········································································································1-4 Configuring ARP ·····································································································································1-4 Configuring Gratuitous ARP····················································································································1-5 Displaying and Debugging ARP··············································································································1-5 ARP Configuration Examples ·················································································································1-6...
  • Page 310: Arp Configuration, Introduction To Arp

    ARP Configuration When configuring ARP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to ARP Configuring ARP Configuring Gratuitous ARP Displaying and Debugging ARP ARP Configuration Examples Introduction to ARP ARP Function Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is used to resolve an IP address into a data link layer address. An IP address is the address of a host at the network layer.
  • Page 311 Figure 1-1 ARP message format Hardware type (16 bits) Hardware type (16 bits) Hardware type (16 bits) Protocol type (16 bits) Protocol type (16 bits) Length of hardware address Length of protocol address Length of hardware address Length of protocol address Operator (16 bits) Operator (16 bits) Hardware address of the sender...
  • Page 312: Arp Table, Arp Process

    Value Description Chaos IEEE802.X ARC network ARP Table In an Ethernet, the MAC addresses of two hosts must be available for the two hosts to communicate with each other. Each host in an Ethernet maintains an ARP table, where the latest used IP address-to-MAC address mapping entries are stored.
  • Page 313: Configuring Arp

    mode, all hosts on this subnet can receive the request, but only the requested host (namely, Host B) will process the request. Host B compares its own IP address with the destination IP address in the ARP request. If they are the same, Host B saves the source IP address and source MAC address into its ARP mapping table, encapsulates its MAC address into an ARP reply, and unicasts the reply to Host A.
  • Page 314: Configuring Gratuitous Arp, Displaying And Debugging Arp

    Static ARP entries are valid as long as the Ethernet switch operates normally. But some operations, such as removing a VLAN, or removing a port from a VLAN, will make the corresponding ARP entries invalid and therefore removed automatically. As for the arp static command, the value of the vlan-id argument must be the ID of an existing VLAN, and the port identified by the interface-type and interface-number arguments must belong to the VLAN.
  • Page 315: Arp Configuration Examples

    To do… Use the command… Remarks reset arp [ dynamic | static | interface Available in Clear specific ARP entries interface-type interface-number ] user view ARP Configuration Examples Network requirements Disable ARP entry check on the switch. Set the aging time for dynamic ARP entries to 10 minutes. Add a static ARP entry, with the IP address being 192.168.1.1, the MAC address being 000f-e201-0000, and the outbound port being GigabitEthernet 1/0/10 of VLAN 1.
  • Page 316 Table of Contents 1 DHCP Overview··········································································································································1-1 Introduction to DHCP ······························································································································1-1 DHCP IP Address Assignment ···············································································································1-1 IP Address Assignment Policy ········································································································1-1 Obtaining IP Addresses Dynamically ······························································································1-2 Updating IP Address Lease·············································································································1-3 DHCP Packet Format······························································································································1-3 Protocol Specification······························································································································1-4 2 DHCP Relay Agent Configuration ············································································································2-1 Introduction to DHCP Relay Agent ·········································································································2-1 Usage of DHCP Relay Agent ··········································································································2-1 DHCP Relay Agent Fundamentals··································································································2-1...
  • Page 317: Dhcp Overview, Introduction To Dhcp, Dhcp Ip Address Assignment

    DHCP Overview When configuring DHCP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to DHCP DHCP IP Address Assignment DHCP Packet Format Protocol Specification Introduction to DHCP With networks getting larger in size and more complicated in structure, lack of available IP addresses becomes the common situation the network administrators have to face, and network configuration becomes a tough task for the network administrators.
  • Page 318 Manual assignment. The administrator configures static IP-to-MAC bindings for some special clients, such as a WWW server. Then the DHCP server assigns these fixed IP addresses to the clients. Automatic assignment. The DHCP server assigns IP addresses to DHCP clients. The IP addresses will be occupied by the DHCP clients permanently.
  • Page 319: Updating Ip Address Lease, Dhcp Packet Format

    Updating IP Address Lease After a DHCP server dynamically assigns an IP address to a DHCP client, the IP address keeps valid only within a specified lease time and will be reclaimed by the DHCP server when the lease expires. If the DHCP client wants to use the IP address for a longer time, it must update the IP lease.
  • Page 320: Protocol Specification

    siaddr: IP address of the DHCP server. giaddr: IP address of the first DHCP relay agent that the DHCP client passes after it sent the request packet. chaddr: Hardware address of the DHCP client. sname: Name of the DHCP server. file: Path and name of the boot configuration file that the DHCP server specifies for the DHCP client.
  • Page 321: Dhcp Relay Agent Configuration, Introduction To Dhcp Relay Agent

    DHCP Relay Agent Configuration When configuring the DHCP relay agent, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to DHCP Relay Agent Configuring the DHCP Relay Agent Displaying and Maintaining DHCP Relay Agent ConfigurationDHCP Relay Agent Configuration Example Troubleshooting DHCP Relay Agent Configuration Currently, the interface-related DHCP relay agent configurations can only be made on VLAN interfaces.
  • Page 322 Figure 2-1 Typical DHCP relay agent application In the process of dynamic IP address assignment through the DHCP relay agent, the DHCP client and DHCP server interoperate with each other in a similar way as they do without the DHCP relay agent. The following sections only describe the forwarding process of the DHCP relay agent.
  • Page 323: Configuring The Dhcp Relay Agent

    Figure 2-2 Padding contents for sub-option 1 of Option 82 Figure 2-3 Padding contents for sub-option 2 of Option 82 Mechanism of Option 82 supported on DHCP relay agent The procedure for a DHCP client to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server through a DHCP relay agent is similar to that for the client to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server directly.
  • Page 324 Task Remarks Correlating a DHCP Server Group with a Relay Agent Interface Required Configuring DHCP Relay Agent Security Functions Optional Configuring the DHCP Relay Agent to Support Option 82 Optional Correlating a DHCP Server Group with a Relay Agent Interface To enhance reliability, you can set multiple DHCP servers on the same network.
  • Page 325 You can configure up to eight DHCP server IP addresses in a DHCP server group. You can map multiple VLAN interfaces to one DHCP server group. But one VLAN interface can be mapped to only one DHCP server group. If you execute the dhcp-server groupNo command repeatedly, the new configuration overwrites the previous one.
  • Page 326: Configuring The Dhcp Relay Agent To Support Option

    The address-check enable command is independent of other commands of the DHCP relay agent. That is, the invalid address check takes effect when this command is executed, regardless of whether other commands (such as the command to enable DHCP) are used. Before executing the address-check enable command on the interface connected to the DHCP server, you need to configure the static binding of the IP address to the MAC address of the DHCP server.
  • Page 327: Displaying And Maintaining Dhcp Relay Agent Configuration, Dhcp Relay Agent Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Enable Option 82 support on dhcp relay information the DHCP relay agent enable Disabled by default. Configure the strategy for the Optional dhcp relay information DHCP relay agent to process strategy { drop | keep | By default, the replace strategy request packets containing...
  • Page 328: Troubleshooting Dhcp Relay Agent Configuration

    Network diagram Figure 2-4 Network diagram for DHCP relay agent DHCP client DHCP client Vlan-int1 Vlan-int2 10.10.1.1/24 10.1.1.2/24 Vlan-int2 10.1.1.1/24 Switch A Switch B DHCP relay DHCP server DHCP client DHCP client Configuration procedure # Create DHCP server group 1 and configure an IP address of 10.1.1.1 for it. <SwitchA>...
  • Page 329 Check if an address pool that is on the same network segment with the DHCP clients is configured on the DHCP server. Check if a reachable route is configured between the DHCP relay agent and the DHCP server. Check the DHCP relay agent. Check if the correct DHCP server group is configured on the interface connecting the network segment where the DHCP client resides.
  • Page 330: Introduction To Dhcp Client, Introduction To Bootp Client

    DHCP/BOOTP Client Configuration When configuring the DHCP/BOOTP client, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to DHCP Client Introduction to BOOTP Client Configuring a DHCP/BOOTP Client Displaying DHCP/BOOTP Client Configuration Introduction to DHCP Client After you specify a VLAN interface as a DHCP client, the device can use DHCP to obtain parameters such as IP address dynamically from the DHCP server, which facilitates user configuration and management.
  • Page 331 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view interface vlan-interface Enter VLAN interface view — vlan-id Required Configure the VLAN interface ip address { bootp-alloc | By default, no IP address is to obtain IP address through dhcp-alloc } configured for the VLAN DHCP or BOOTP...
  • Page 332: Bootp Client Configuration Example

    Network diagram Figure 3-1 A DHCP network Client WINS server DHCP server Vlan-int1 DNS server Switch A Client Configuration procedure The following describes only the configuration on Switch A serving as a DHCP client. # Configure VLAN-interface 1 to dynamically obtain an IP address by using DHCP. <SwitchA>...
  • Page 333 Table of Contents 1 DNS Configuration·····································································································································1-1 DNS Overview·········································································································································1-1 Static Domain Name Resolution ·····································································································1-1 Dynamic Domain Name Resolution ································································································1-1 Configuring Domain Name Resolution····································································································1-2 Configuring Static Domain Name Resolution ··················································································1-2 Configuring Dynamic Domain Name Resolution·············································································1-3 Displaying and Maintaining DNS ············································································································1-3 DNS Configuration Examples ·················································································································1-4 Static Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example································································1-4 Dynamic Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example···························································1-5 Troubleshooting DNS······························································································································1-6...
  • Page 334: Dns Configuration, Dns Overview

    DNS Configuration When configuring DNS, go to these sections for information you are interested in: DNS Overview Configuring Domain Name Resolution Displaying and Maintaining DNS DNS Configuration Examples Troubleshooting DNS This chapter covers only IPv4 DNS configuration. For details about IPv6 DNS, refer to IPv6 Management Operation.
  • Page 335: Configuring Domain Name Resolution

    2) The DNS resolver looks up the local domain name cache for a match. If a match is found, it sends the corresponding IP address back. If not, it sends the query to the DNS server. 3) The DNS server looks up its DNS database for a match. If no match is found, it sends a query to a higher-level DNS server.
  • Page 336: Displaying And Maintaining Dns

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Configure a mapping ip host hostname between a host name and No IP address is assigned ip-address an IP address to a host name by default. The IP address you assign to a host name last time will overwrite the previous one if there is any.
  • Page 337: Dns Configuration Examples, Static Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks nslookup type { ptr ip-address | Display the DNS resolution result a domain-name } Clear the information in the Available in reset dns dynamic-host dynamic domain name cache user view DNS Configuration Examples Static Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example Network requirements The switch uses static domain name resolution to access host 10.1.1.2 through domain name host.com.
  • Page 338: Dynamic Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example

    Dynamic Domain Name Resolution Configuration Example Network requirements As shown in Figure 1-3, the switch serving as a DNS client uses dynamic domain name resolution to access the host at 3.1.1.1/16 through its domain name host. The DNS server has the IP address 2.1.1.2/16. The DNS suffix is com. Network diagram Figure 1-3 Network diagram for dynamic DNS configuration Configuration procedure...
  • Page 339: Troubleshooting Dns

    Reply from 3.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=125 time=4 ms Reply from 3.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=125 time=4 ms Reply from 3.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=125 time=4 ms Reply from 3.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=125 time=4 ms Reply from 3.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=125 time=5 ms --- host.com ping statistics --- 5 packet(s) transmitted 5 packet(s) received...
  • Page 340 Table of Contents 1 ACL Configuration·····································································································································1-1 ACL Overview ·········································································································································1-1 ACL Matching Order························································································································1-1 Ways to Apply an ACL on a Switch·································································································1-2 Types of ACLs Supported by Switch 4200G Series········································································1-3 ACL Configuration···································································································································1-3 Configuring Time Range··················································································································1-3 Configuring Basic ACL ····················································································································1-4 Configuring Advanced ACL ·············································································································1-5 Configuring Layer 2 ACL ·················································································································1-7 ACL Assignment ·····································································································································1-8 Assigning an ACL Globally··············································································································1-9...
  • Page 341 ACL Configuration ACL Overview As the network scale and network traffic are increasingly growing, security control and bandwidth assignment play a more and more important role in network management. Filtering data packets can prevent a network from being accessed by unauthorized users efficiently while controlling network traffic and saving network resources.
  • Page 342 Depth-first match order for rules of an advanced ACL Protocol range: A rule which has specified the types of the protocols carried by IP is prior to others. Range of source IP address: The smaller the source IP address range (that is, the more the number of zeros in the wildcard mask), the higher the match priority.
  • Page 343: Configuring Time Range

    When an ACL is directly applied to hardware for packet filtering, the switch will permit packets if the packets do not match the ACL. When an ACL is referenced by upper-layer software to control Telnet, SNMP and Web login users, the switch will deny packets if the packets do not match the ACL.
  • Page 344: Configuring Basic Acl

    If only a periodic time section is defined in a time range, the time range is active only when the system time is within the defined periodic time section. If multiple periodic time sections are defined in a time range, the time range is active only when the system time is within one of the periodic time sections.
  • Page 345: Configuring Advanced Acl

    Configuration Procedure Table 1-2 Define a basic ACL rule Operation Command Description Enter system view system-view — Required Create an ACL and acl number acl-number [ match-order enter basic ACL view { auto | config } ] config by default Required rule [ rule-id ] { deny | permit } For information about...
  • Page 346 Advanced ACLs support analysis and processing of three packet priority levels: type of service (ToS) priority, IP priority and differentiated services codepoint (DSCP) priority. Using advanced ACLs, you can define classification rules that are more accurate, more abundant, and more flexible than those defined for basic ACLs. Configuration Prerequisites To configure a time range-based advanced ACL rule, you need to create the corresponding time ranges first.
  • Page 347: Configuring Layer 2 Acl

    [Sysname] acl number 3000 [Sysname-acl-adv-3000] rule permit tcp source 129.9.0.0 0.0.255.255 destination 202.38.160.0 0.0.0.255 destination-port eq 80 # Display the configuration information of ACL 3000. [Sysname-acl-adv-3000] display acl 3000 Advanced ACL 3000, 1 rule Acl's step is 1 rule 0 permit tcp source 129.9.0.0 0.0.255.255 destination 202.38.160.0 0.0.0.255 destination-port eq www Configuring Layer 2 ACL Layer 2 ACLs filter packets according to their Layer 2 information, such as the source and destination...
  • Page 348: Acl Assignment

    The content of a modified or created rule cannot be identical with the content of any existing rules; otherwise the rule modification or creation will fail, and the system prompts that the rule already exists. Configuration Example # Configure ACL 4000 to deny packets sourced from the MAC address 000d-88f5-97ed, destined for the MAC address 0011-4301-991e, and with their 802.1p priority being 3.
  • Page 349 Assigning an ACL Globally Configuration prerequisites Before applying ACL rules to a VLAN, you need to define the related ACLs. For information about defining an ACL, refer to section Configuring Basic ACL, section Configuring Advanced ACL, section Configuring Layer 2 ACL.
  • Page 350: Assigning An Acl To A Port Group, Assigning An Acl To A Port

    Configuration example # Apply ACL 2000 to VLAN 10 to filter the inbound packets of VLAN 10 on all the ports. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] packet-filter vlan 10 inbound ip-group 2000 Assigning an ACL to a Port Group Configuration prerequisites Before applying ACL rules to a VLAN, you need to define the related ACLs. For information about defining an ACL, refer to section Configuring Basic ACL, section...
  • Page 351: Displaying Acl Configuration

    Configuration procedure Table 1-8 Apply an ACL to a port Operation Command Description — Enter system view system-view interface interface-type — Enter Ethernet port view interface-number Required For description on the acl-rule Apply an ACL to the port packet-filter inbound acl-rule argument, refer to ACL Command.
  • Page 352: Example For Controlling Telnet Login Users By Source Ip

    Example for Upper-layer Software Referencing ACLs Example for Controlling Telnet Login Users by Source IP Network requirements Apply an ACL to permit users with the source IP address of 10.110.100.52 to telnet to the switch. Network diagram Figure 1-1 Network diagram for controlling Telnet login users by source IP Internet Switch 10.110.100.52...
  • Page 353: Basic Acl Configuration Example

    Configuration procedure # Define ACL 2001. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] acl number 2001 [Sysname-acl-basic-2001] rule 1 permit source 10.110.100.46 0 [Sysname-acl-basic-2001] quit # Reference ACL 2001 to control users logging in to the Web server. [Sysname] ip http acl 2001 Example for Applying ACLs to Hardware Basic ACL Configuration Example Network requirements PC 1 and PC 2 connect to the switch through GigabitEthernet 1/0/1.
  • Page 354: Advanced Acl Configuration Example, Layer 2 Acl Configuration Example

    Advanced ACL Configuration Example Network requirements Different departments of an enterprise are interconnected through a switch. The IP address of the wage query server is 192.168.1.2. The R&D department is connected to GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 of the switch. Apply an ACL to deny requests from the R&D department and destined for the wage server during the working hours (8:00 to 18:00).
  • Page 355: Example For Applying An Acl To A Vlan

    Network diagram Figure 1-5 Network diagram for Layer 2 ACL Configuration procedure # Define a periodic time range that is active from 8:00 to 18:00 everyday. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] time-range test 8:00 to 18:00 daily # Define ACL 4000 to filter packets with the source MAC address of 0011-0011-0011 and the destination MAC address of 0011-0011-0012.
  • Page 356 Network diagram Figure 1-6 Network diagram for applying an ACL to a VLAN Database server 192.168.1.2 GE1/0/1 GE1/0/3 GE1/0/2 VLAN 10 PC 1 PC 2 PC 3 Configuration procedure # Define a periodic time range that is active from 8:00 to 18:00 in working days. <Sysname>...
  • Page 357 Table of Contents 1 QoS Configuration······························································································&#x