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HP SureStore Optical Jukebox
160ex/320ex/400ex/300mx/600mx/700mx
Service Manual
Edition 1
Manufacturing Part Number: HP Part No. C1160-90031
Greeley, CO USA
© Copyright August 2000

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   Summary of Contents for HP SureStore Optical Jukebox 160ex

  • Page 1

    HP SureStore Optical Jukebox 160ex/320ex/400ex/300mx/600mx/700mx Service Manual Edition 1 Manufacturing Part Number: HP Part No. C1160-90031 Greeley, CO USA © Copyright August 2000...

  • Page 2

    Notice This document contains information that is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated to another language without the prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Company. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.

  • Page 3

    Typographical Conventions The following typographical conventions are used in this manual: Emphasis: Denotes important information. : Keys on the control panel. Keycap Computer Output: Information displayed in the display window and menu items that you can select. Warnings call attention to a procedure or practice that could WARNING result in personal injury if not correctly performed.

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    In This Manual This user’s guide includes: Chapter 1 Product Information Chapter 2 Installation Chapter 3 Operation and Configuration Chapter 4 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Chapter 5 Removal and Replacement Chapter 6 Theory of Operation Appendix A Safety and Regulatory Information Index...

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents 1. Product Information Overview ....................1-2 Technical Specifications ............... 1-3 Environmental Specifications .............. 1-6 Clearance Requirements..............1-9 Location Requirements ..............1-10 Responsibilities ................1-11 2. Installation Overview ....................2-2 Identifying Controls and Features ............2-3 Connecting SCSI Cables to the Jukebox ..........2-6 Connecting the Jukebox as the Only Peripheral ........

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Contents Using Selection Buttons............... 3-7 Understanding Display Window Messages......... 3-8 Top Level Menus ................3-8 Second Level Menus ..............3-8 Loading a Disk..................3-10 Ejecting a Disk ..................3-11 Entering the Administration Menu Password........3-12 Changing the Administration Menu Password ........3-13 Setting the SCSI IDs................

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Contents 5. Removal and Replacement Overview ....................5-2 Protecting Yourself and the Product............ 5-3 Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions ........5-3 Required Tools ................5-3 Service Access ..................5-5 Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels ..... 5-5 Removing the Left and Right Front Panels ........5-6 Replacing a Power Supply ..............

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    Contents Replacing the Controller PCA ............. 5-50 Replacing the Interface PCA ............... 5-52 Replacing the SCSI Cable ..............5-55 Checking the RFI Adjustments ............5-56 Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level ......5-58 What is Needed ................5-58 Check the Firmware Revision Level ..........5-59 Download Firmware as Necessary..........

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Contents Controller..................6-21 Central Processing Unit (CPU) ............. 6-22 Gate Array ..................6-22 DSP (Digital Signal Processor)............6-22 Read / Write Channel Electronics ..........6-22 Loading Motor ................6-22 Bias Magnet..................6-23 Optical Head................... 6-23 Errors ....................6-23 A. Safety and Regulatory Information Overview of this Appendix ..............

  • Page 10

    Contents TOC-x...

  • Page 11

    Figures Figure 1-1. Clearance Requirements ........1-10 Figure 2-1.

  • Page 12

    Figures Figure 5-21. Raising the Translate Frame and Holding the Frame in Position. . . 5-34 Figure 5-22. Releasing the Lower End of the Vertical Encoder Strip ... 5-35 Figure 5-23. The Visual Locator Bracket ....... . . 5-36 Figure 5-24.

  • Page 13

    Tables Table 1-1. Technical Specifications ........1-3 Table 1-2.

  • Page 14

    Tables TOC-xiv...

  • Page 15: Product Information

    Product Information Chapter 1...

  • Page 16: Overview

    Product Information Overview Overview This chapter gives information on the following topics: • technical specifications • environmental specifications • replacing the control panel assembly • other documents that apply to this product Chapter 1...

  • Page 17: Technical Specifications

    Product Information Technical Specifications Technical Specifications Table 1-1 Technical Specifications Characteristics Description 5.2-GB Drive Characteristics Rotational speed (rpm) • 3000 (5.2 Gb media) • 3600 (650 Mb, 1.2 Gb, 2.6 Gb media) Average seek, typical (ms) 25.0 Average access time, typical (ms) Write transfer rate - max •...

  • Page 18

    Product Information Technical Specifications Table 1-1 Technical Specifications Characteristics Description 9.1-Gb Drive Rotational speed (rpm) • 3000 (9.1 Gb media) • 3300 (5.2 Gb media) • 3600 ( 2.6 Gb media) Average seek, typical (ms) 25.0 Average access time, typical (ms) Write transfer rate - max •...

  • Page 19

    Product Information Technical Specifications Table 1-1 Technical Specifications Characteristics Description Physical Characteristics Height (cm, inches) 180.8, 71.2 Width (cm, inches) 87.6, 34.5 Depth (cm, inches) 73.4, 28.9 Net weight (kg, lbs)) 226.3, 498.8 Packaged weight (kg, lbs) 301.6, 665 Chapter 1...

  • Page 20: Environmental Specifications

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Environmental Specifications Table 1-2 Environmental Specifications Characteristics Robotics Drive Media Temperature (o C) Operating 10 to 40 5 to 45 10 to 60 Non-operating w/o disk - 40 to 70 - 40 to 60 10 to 60 Max.

  • Page 21

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Table 1-2 Environmental Specifications Characteristics Robotics Drive Media Shock , non-operating (g/ms) End use, handling, 150 / 3 25 / 11 760 mm half-sine drop to vinyl-cover ed concrete Transportation, 30 / 523 30 / 742 trapezoidal (g/cm/s) Vibration, 5-500 Hz range (g rms) Operating, maximum...

  • Page 22

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Table 1-2 Environmental Specifications Characteristics Robotics Drive Media Particulates (µg/cm3) <200 Electrostatic discharge (kV) Airgap (operating) 5 to 15 0 to 10 Airgap (non-operating 0 to 25 0 to 25 survival) Direct contact (operating) 0 to 4 0 to 4 Cooling requirements (CFM) (bidirection...

  • Page 23: Clearance Requirements

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Table 1-4 Reliability Mean time between 100,000 failure (MTBF) - robotics (power-on hours Mean time between 100,000 failure (MTBF) - drive (power-on hours) Mean time to repair (hours) Preventive maintenance none required* * for high-usage or zero downtime installations, see the Product Support Plan for special preventative...

  • Page 24: Location Requirements

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Figure 1-1 Clearance Requirements Mailslot • Figure A is usually in a row of peripheral cabinets. — Rear (w) requires 56 cm (18 in.) for cooling and service. — Front (z) requires 86 cm (34 in.) for operator access. —...

  • Page 25: Responsibilities

    Product Information Environmental Specifications Responsibilities Customer site preparation/verification and installation are the customer’s or reseller’s responsibility; HP will perform the site preparation/verification and/or installation on a time-and-materials basis. Chapter 1 1-11...

  • Page 26

    Product Information Environmental Specifications 1-12 Chapter 1...

  • Page 27

    Installation Chapter 2...

  • Page 28

    Installation Overview Overview This chapter gives information on the following topics: • identifying controls and features • connecting SCSI cables to the jukebox • connecting the jukebox as the only peripheral • connecting the jukebox with other peripherals • connecting power •...

  • Page 29: Identifying Controls And Features

    Installation Identifying Controls and Features Identifying Controls and Features Figure 2-1 Right Side Control Used to manually control and monitor panel operation of the jukebox. A full description of the controls and indicators is in Chapter 3. Mailslot Used to load and eject optical disks. Power switch Used to power the jukebox on and off.

  • Page 30

    Installation Identifying Controls and Features Figure 2-2 Left Side Chapter 2...

  • Page 31

    Installation Identifying Controls and Features Active bus Lit when the SCSI bus is active. There are indicator indicators on the single-ended and differential interfaces. SCSI Used to select either the single-ended or interface differential SCSI interface. selection switch SCSI ports Used for attaching the SCSI cable from the jukebox to the host computer.

  • Page 32: Connecting Scsi Cables To The Jukebox

    Installation Connecting SCSI Cables to the Jukebox Connecting SCSI Cables to the Jukebox The following is general cabling information. Interface types Single-ended or differential SCSI, available selected by the interface selection switch on the top of the interface module (see “6” on Figure 2-2). Number of hosts This jukebox may be used in high availability environments.

  • Page 33

    Installation Connecting SCSI Cables to the Jukebox between the cable and the studs may result. SCSI cables are listed in the replaceable parts list at the end of Chapter 5. Chapter 2...

  • Page 34: Connecting The Jukebox As The Only Peripheral

    Installation Connecting the Jukebox as the Only Peripheral Connecting the Jukebox as the Only Peripheral NOTE This following configuration is the recommended configuration for this jukebox. Figure 2-3 Connecting the Jukebox as the Only Peripheral Refer to Figure 2-1and Figure 2-2 for the locations of the following switches and connectors.

  • Page 35

    Installation Connecting the Jukebox as the Only Peripheral 3. Select either the single-ended or differential SCSI interface using the SCSI interface selection switch on the top of the interface assembly (under the left access cover (see “6” on Figure 2-2). 4.

  • Page 36: Connecting The Jukebox With Other Scsi Peripherals

    Installation Connecting the Jukebox With Other SCSI Peripherals Connecting the Jukebox With Other SCSI Peripherals NOTE Operating this jukebox with other peripherals on the same bus is supported, but not recommended. In most circumstances, the recommended configuration for this jukebox is as the only device on a SCSI bus.

  • Page 37: Connecting Power

    Installation Connecting Power Connecting Power 1. Ensure the power switch on the jukebox is off (see #3 Figure 2-1). 2. Plug the socket end of the power cord into the power port on the bottom of the interface enclosure (see “8” on Figure 2-2). NOTE Use the power cord shipped with the jukebox.

  • Page 38: Configuring Write Verify

    Installation Configuring Write Verify Configuring Write Verify The write verify configuration ensures that data is written reliably to an optical disk. The jukebox ships with write verify enabled. Many software applications also default to this method of writing. Writing data on a magneto-optical disk requires two passes. The first pass erases the data in the sector to which data will be written.

  • Page 39: Default Scsi Ids In The Jukebox When Using Basic Scsi Addressing And When Using Lun Mode

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Table 2-2 Default SCSI and LUN Settings LUN Mode OFF LUN Mode ON JKBX ID...

  • Page 40

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Table 2-3 LUN Mapping if “DRVs” SCSI ID is Changed to an ID Different Than the Jukebox (IDs used here are an example) LUN Mode ON JKBX ID DRV 1 ID...

  • Page 41

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Figure 2-4 Two or Four Drives, Basic SCSI Addressing Displays on the Control Panel Under CHOOSE LUN MODE * menu >> LUN MODE OFF Under SCSI IDs * menu >>...

  • Page 42

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Figure 2-5 Two or Four Drives, LUN Addressing, Controller/Drives Use Same ID Displays on the Control Panel Under CHOOSE LUN MODE * menu >> LUN MODE ON Under SCSI IDs * menu >>...

  • Page 43

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Figure 2-6 Two or Four Drives, LUN Addressing, Controller/Drives Use Different IDs Displays on the Control Panel Under CHOOSE LUN MODE * menu >> LUN MODE ON Under SCSI IDs * menu >>...

  • Page 44

    Installation Default SCSI IDs in the Jukebox When Using Basic SCSI Addressing and When Using LUN Mode Table 2-4 Possible Additional SCSI Addresses Available No. of LUN mode LUN Mode ON - LUN Mode ON Drives (drives & - (drives & (Basic SCSI jukebox jukebox...

  • Page 45: Moving Or Shipping The Jukebox

    Installation Moving or Shipping the Jukebox Moving or Shipping the Jukebox Moving the Jukebox a Short Distance 1. If removing the disks from the jukebox, follow the jukebox application software instructions for unmounting, ejecting, and labeling disks to ensure that the jukebox can be brought online again easily. Ensure that there are no disks in the drives.

  • Page 46: Shipping The Jukebox

    Installation Moving or Shipping the Jukebox 9. Bring the jukebox online according to the customer’s system requirements. Shipping the Jukebox 1. Follow the jukebox application software instructions for unmounting and ejecting disks. Ensure that there are no disks in the drives. If manually ejecting disks, refer to “Ejecting Disks”...

  • Page 47: Operation And Configuration

    Operation and Configuration Chapter 3...

  • Page 48

    Operation and Configuration Overview Overview This chapter gives information in the following topics: • operating the control panel • using the selection buttons • interpreting messages in the display window • loading optical disks into the jukebox • ejecting optical disks from the jukebox •...

  • Page 49: Operating The Control Panel

    Operation and Configuration Operating the Control Panel Operating the Control Panel The control panel enables manual control of all jukebox operations using four buttons and an LED display. The SCSI IDs of the jukebox and its optical drives can be set and changed, disks may be loaded and ejected, configurations can be monitored and changed, performance information can be viewed, internal tests can be run, and the jukebox can be secured from...

  • Page 50

    Operation and Configuration Operating the Control Panel Figure 3-1 The Jukebox Control Panel Chapter 3...

  • Page 51

    Operation and Configuration Operating the Control Panel The numbers below refer to the numbers in Figure 3-1 on the previous page. Swivel feature The control panel assembly may be rotated to face the display (#3 below) toward the front or right side of the jukebox.

  • Page 52

    Operation and Configuration Operating the Control Panel Figure 3-2 Jukebox Display Menu Tree Chapter 3...

  • Page 53: Using Selection Buttons

    Operation and Configuration Using Selection Buttons Using Selection Buttons Use the , and buttons to select LOAD EJECT NEXT PREV CANCEL ENTER tasks. When you push these buttons, the message in the display window changes. See the next section for a list of messages. Each time you push the button, a task choice appears.

  • Page 54: Understanding Display Window Messages

    Operation and Configuration Understanding Display Window Messages Understanding Display Window Messages The display window shows the operations you may select. Instructions for selecting or changing choices follows the explanation of the messages. Top Level Menus The jukebox is ready for operation. READY ADMIN * Select to access second-level choices.

  • Page 55

    Operation and Configuration Understanding Display Window Messages NOTE When a menu selection flashes, press to choose that selection, or ENTER press to display other choices that available in that part of PREV NEXT the menu. You can display the selections listed in boxes below the shaded choices in Figure 3-2 by pressing when one of the shaded choices displays.

  • Page 56: Loading A Disk

    Operation and Configuration Loading a Disk Loading a Disk Start with READY or LOAD in the display. Figure 3-3 Loading a Disk 1. Insert a disk into the mailslot with Side A of the disk facing up. The shutter end of the disk goes in the mailslot first. When the disk is inserted, it is automatically pulled into the mailslot.

  • Page 57: Ejecting A Disk

    Operation and Configuration Ejecting a Disk Ejecting a Disk Start with READY in the display. 1. Press until EJECT * displays and then press NEXT ENTER 2. EJECT SLOT # displays. (“#” is flashing and the number of the first storage slot in the jukebox that contains an optical disk.) 3.

  • Page 58: Entering The Administration Menu Password

    Operation and Configuration Entering the Administration Menu Password Entering the Administration Menu Password READY > ADMIN * > PSWD 000 000 000 A numeric password is required to access choices in the ADMIN * menu (see Figure 3-2). A three-part password of 000-000-000 was set at the factory.

  • Page 59: Changing The Administration Menu Password

    Operation and Configuration Changing the Administration Menu Password Changing the Administration Menu Password READY > ADMIN * > PSWD 000 000 000 >CONFIG * NOTE The following procedure is normally not used by service. 1. Follow the steps on the previous page to enter the customer’s password (or the default, factory-set password 000 000 000).

  • Page 60

    Operation and Configuration Changing the Administration Menu Password flash ROM. 3-14 Chapter 3...

  • Page 61: Setting The Scsi Ids

    Operation and Configuration Setting the SCSI IDs Setting the SCSI IDs Tables showing default SCSI IDs for basic SCSI addressing and LUN addressing are in Chapter 2, “Installation.” Setting the LUN Mode READY > ADMIN * > SCSI ID’S * > CHOOSE LUN MODE * NOTE LUN mode can only be configured if the host system and jukebox application software support the use of LUNs.

  • Page 62

    Operation and Configuration Setting the SCSI IDs You may have to coordinate with the system administrator to enter the password. 3. Press until SCSI ID’S displays, and then press NEXT ENTER 4. VIEW ID’S displays. Press ENTER 5. JKBX ID # LUN # or DRV # ID # LUN # displays. (JKBX ID # stands for the current ID of the jukebox controller, DRV # ID # is the current ID setting of the displayed drive number, and “LUN #”...

  • Page 63: Changing The Current Scsi Ids

    Operation and Configuration Setting the SCSI IDs Changing the Current SCSI IDs READY > ADMIN * > SCSI ID’S * > SET ID’S * Start with READY in the display. 1. Press until ADMIN * displays, and then press NEXT ENTER 2.

  • Page 64

    Operation and Configuration Setting the SCSI IDs This jukebox, by default, assigns ID 6 to the jukebox controller. When in NOTE LUN mode, the jukebox controller ID uses LUN 0 for itself and assigns the drives on Bus 1 to LUNs 1 to 2 or LUNs 1 to 4 depending on whether there are two or four drives.

  • Page 65

    Operation and Configuration Setting the SCSI IDs If the new ID chosen results in the IDs for the jukebox controller and the drives being more than one digit apart, the jukebox displays CONFLICT and rejects the ID. 9. Press until READY displays. CANCEL CAUTION Turning off the jukebox in the next step could cause data loss if not done...

  • Page 66: Setting An Operating Configuration

    Operation and Configuration Setting an Operating Configuration Setting an Operating Configuration READY > ADMIN * > CONFIG * Configurations customize the way the jukebox operates. Start with READY in the display. 1. Press until ADMIN * displays. NEXT 2. Enter the administration password. You may have to coordinate with the system administrator to enter the password.I 3.

  • Page 67

    Operation and Configuration Setting an Operating Configuration Configurations are described in the following table. Table 3-1 Configuration Choices Configuration Description Name Toggles between ON and OFF. If set to ON, the RECOVERY jukebox attempts to recover from errors. If set ON/OFF to OFF, the jukebox immediately stops moving if an error condition occurs.

  • Page 68

    Operation and Configuration Setting an Operating Configuration Table 3-1 Configuration Choices Configuration Description Name Toggles between ON and OFF. If set to ON, SCSI SCSI LOG states are tracked and saved to a log. If set to ON/OFF OFF, SCSI states are not tracked or saved. The default configuraion is OFF and should remain OFF during normal operation.

  • Page 69

    Operation and Configuration Setting an Operating Configuration Table 3-1 Configuration Choices Configuration Description Name Toggles between ON and OFF. If set to ON, write WRITE VERIFY verify is forced. When set to OFF, the drives ON/OFF may write verify or not, depending on how they are manually configured or how they are configured by the jukebox application software.

  • Page 70: Retrieving Log History

    Operation and Configuration Retrieving Log History Retrieving Log History READY > ADMIN * > INFO * Information stored in the jukebox operating logs is displayed by using * menu. INFO Start with READY in the display. 1. Press until ADMIN * displays. NEXT 2.

  • Page 71

    Operation and Configuration Retrieving Log History Table 3-2 Information Logs Log Name Description Number of available storage slots in the unit. SLOTS # Press to select the odometer logs JKBX ODOMETERS * ENTER described in the next five rows. Number of operation hours (time the power HOURS was on).

  • Page 72

    Operation and Configuration Retrieving Log History Table 3-2 Information Logs Log Name Description Log of unrecoverable errors (commands that HARD ERROR * did not successfully complete). Returns either NO HARD ENTRIES or ENTRY #. (There may be multiple hard error numbers.) Press to view the log for the currently ENTER...

  • Page 73

    Operation and Configuration Retrieving Log History Table 3-2 Information Logs Log Name Description *FRU 3 # Field replaceable unit third most likely to be at fault. MOTION <name> <name> indicates one of the following types of movements taking place in the jukebox at the time of the failure: •...

  • Page 74

    Operation and Configuration Retrieving Log History Table 3-2 Information Logs Log Name Description Fourth jukebox micro-move for the original *MICROMOVE 4 # move command issued prior to the failure. *MICROMOVE 5 # Fifth jukebox micro-move for the original move command issued prior to the failure. *MICROMOVE 6 # Sixth jukebox micro-move for the original move command issued prior to the failure.

  • Page 75: Troubleshooting And Diagnostics

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Chapter 4...

  • Page 76

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Overview Overview This chapter gives information in the following topics: • Troubleshooting using the control panel • Recovery procedures for operating/installation errors • Recovery procedures for specific hardware errors • Micro-move error codes • Description of robotic micro-moves •...

  • Page 77: Troubleshooting Using The Control Panel

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel When there are errors in robotic movements, use these approaches to get information and to run exerciser tests: • Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel and Observation - used in situations where you have a hard error.

  • Page 78

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel Figure 4-1 Suspect FRUs How Suspect FRUs Are Evaluated Similar to treating symptoms rather than the real problem, the suspect FRUs given by the FRU isolation procedure may actually mask the root cause of the problem.

  • Page 79: Recovery Procedures For Operation/installation Errors

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors CAUTION Do not cycle power until you are sure the system SCSI bus is inactive and will remain inactive. Removing power while the bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus states.

  • Page 80

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do Host computer power Usually you will not have to intervene unless fails or is interrupted, the customer’s jukebox application specifies but the jukebox power some action. remains on.

  • Page 81

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do • Ensure that only one SCSI device type DEVICE FAILED displays. (single-ended OR differential) exists on the SCSI bus. Hardware Error #61 (External SCSI cables) •...

  • Page 82

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do No display messages. • Ensure that the power cord is connected. • Ensure that the power switch is on. • Ensure that the power supply and fans are operating.

  • Page 83

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do Disk inserted in the • Press . Insert the disk in the CANCEL mailslot but LOAD mailslot again. See “Loading an Optical ERROR or FAILED Disk into the Jukebox”...

  • Page 84

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do Disk inserted in the The jukebox moved a disk into the slot you mailslot but DEST NOW chose before your load command executed. FULL displays •...

  • Page 85

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do Disk eject attempted • Press . Attempt to eject the disk CANCEL but an EJECT ERROR again. message displays. • If the light bar on the front panel is orange, cycle power to the jukebox* and try to eject the disk again when READY displays.

  • Page 86

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do Disk eject attempted The application software moved the disk from but SOURCE NOW the slot you chose before your eject command EMPTY displays. executed. • Press .

  • Page 87

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Operation/Installation Errors Table 4-1 Troubleshooting Problem What to do RUN ISTAT TEST initializes the element RUN ISTAT TEST displays (this status. initializes the element • Power cycle the jukebox.* status) • Run the INIT ELEM STATUS test from the TEST *menu..

  • Page 88: Recovery Procedures For Specific Hardware Errors

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors When a hardware failure occurs, a message displays on the control panel. If the failure occurs during the poweron sequence,DEVICE FAILED displays. If the failure occurs when loading a disk you may see LOAD ERROR, or FULL.

  • Page 89

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures See error 01.. SCSI chip error See error 01. Jukebox controller chip error 1. Check that the drive communication cable to the interposer PCA is firmly Drive serial connected.

  • Page 90

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Occurs when trying to sense a move of the carriage assembly. Vertical motor error 1. If the translate assembly moves -- and you get a failure -- that means that we’re not reading the encoder strip.

  • Page 91

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures 1. Change the picker. Top thumb sensor 2. Change the umbilical cable. error 3. Change the controller PCA. 1. Change the picker. Bottom thumb sensor 2.

  • Page 92

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Vertical motion failed in the middle of a move or exchange Move to 1. Look at the micro-move error of the failure in the error log (under INFO *, and Hardware Error in the control panel display).

  • Page 93

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Failed extracting a cartridge from a slot. Get cartridge out 1. Look at the micro-move error of the failure in the error log (under INFO * and Hardware Error in the control panel display).

  • Page 94

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Failed inserting a cartridge into a drive. Put cartridge in a 1. Look at the micro-move error of the drive failure in the error log (under INFO * and Hardware Error in the control panel display).

  • Page 95

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures 1. Cycle power to the jukebox to initiate a poweron test sequence. Put mailslot in 2. Check to see if mailslot rotation works. If the mailslot rotates in, change the picker.

  • Page 96

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures This may appear when testing for a cartridge in the picker during an ISTAT. Test picker Replace the picker. 1. Check for loose cables Switch active picker 2.

  • Page 97

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Because a motor test is called before a “find vertical home” is attempted, the vertical Find vertical home motor is assumed to be at least minimally functional 1.

  • Page 98

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures Change the picker. Finish switching the picker Change the picker. Wait plunge Vertical motion failed in the middle of a move or exchange. Wait vertical 1.

  • Page 99

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware Errors Table 4-2 Hardware Errors Verification/Recovery Error Code (hex) Verification/Recovery Procedures 1. Check cables between the controller PCA and the SCSI repeater PCA. Repeater Controller 2. Check the external cables. 3. Change repeater PCA. 4.

  • Page 100: Micro-move Error Codes

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Micro-Move Error Codes Micro-Move Error Codes Table 4-3 Micro-Move Error Codes Micro-Move Description Error Code (hex) Vertical over voltage exceeded limit set by firmware Vertical over force exceeded limit set by firmware Vertical servo error Vertical time-out Vertical open path Vertical closed path Plunge over voltage exceeded limit set by firmware...

  • Page 101

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Micro-Move Error Codes Table 4-3 Micro-Move Error Codes Micro-Move Description Error Code (hex) Translate over force exceeded limits set by firmware Translate servo error No load complete Unexpected load complete Unexpected cartridge in drive No cartridge in drive Drive put in accept failed Drive get out accept failed Drive eject failed...

  • Page 102

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Micro-Move Error Codes Table 4-3 Micro-Move Error Codes Micro-Move Description Error Code (hex) Clear magazine path Mailslot put in saturate failed Mailslot get out saturate failed Mailslot put in accept failed Mailslot get out accept failed Measurement of mailslot depth failed Recovery did not clear vertical path Rotate mailslot in failed Rotate mailslot out failed...

  • Page 103

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Micro-Move Error Codes Table 4-3 Micro-Move Error Codes Micro-Move Description Error Code (hex) Rotate in catch error (not used) Rotate in push out error (not used) Rotate in armed failed (not used) Did not detect hard stop on a rotate in Rotate in was too much distance Engaging the mailslot failed on a rotate out Disengaging the mailslot failed on a rotate out...

  • Page 104: Description Of Micro-moves

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Move picker transport up. Fast. Move picker transport down. Fast. Move picker transport up slowly, checking for resistance. Used in the vertical find home sequence. Move picker transport down slowly, checking for resistance.

  • Page 105

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Move slowly to the flip clear area (determined in micro-moves 11 and 12). Used in the plunge find home sequence. Also used in power fail recovery to move the picker off of a cartridge that was between the picker and the magazines when the power failed and the picker settled.

  • Page 106

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Retract the plunge assembly on the picker all the way back and then flip the picker. Used to find “home” in the plunge axis. Second flip of the sequence.

  • Page 107

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) First time “get” plunge into a drive. Slow. Feels for resistance to learn the distance to the cartridge when it is seated. Fast “put” plunge into a drive (distance has been previously learned).

  • Page 108

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Short plunge out to test for a cartridge in the picker. If a cartridge is in the picker, the path clear beam will be interrupted. Used in an ISTAT. Short plunge out to test for a cartridge in a magazine when the picker contains a cartridge.

  • Page 109

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Retract picker fingers all the way back. Trips the mechanism that makes the opposite thumb “active.” Move picker plunge assembly forward, away from the full retracted position.

  • Page 110

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Second part of a two-step move to fully retract the picker plunge assembly. Continues movement of micro-move A5 and brings picker plunge assembly all the way back.

  • Page 111

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) First of two moves to move the thumb to the magazine during an ISTAT when no cartridge is in the picker. Next move is micro-move B0. Second of two moves to move the thumb to the magazine during an ISTAT when no cartridge is in the picker.

  • Page 112

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Pull picker plunge assembly fully back to rearm a “put.” Enable the picker to replace the cartridge it picked up during an ISTAT. First of two moves that put a cartridge back into the magazine after the cartridge is detected during an...

  • Page 113

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Quickly retract the picker plunge assembly if an error occurred while inserting a cartridge into a drive. Retract picker plunge assembly to a point where the thumbs are released and go to an unsplayed position.

  • Page 114

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Retract picker to rearm position to splay the fingers. Used when an error in the drive acknowledge signal is seen and a drive eject will be done and the thumbs must be in the splayed position.

  • Page 115

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) Short plunge during a mailslot “get”. Ducks under the mailslot rotation mechanism and positions the picker so it can move up all the way to the mailslot “get”...

  • Page 116

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Description of Micro-Moves Table 4-4 Micro-Move IDs and Expanded Descriptions Micro-Move Description ID (hex) First of two moves rotating the mailslot in. Quickly retract the picker plunge assembly, pulling the mailslot most of the way in. Followed by micro-move Plunge out to rotate the mailslot almost all the way out.

  • Page 117: Running An Internal Test

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test Running an Internal Test READY > ADMIN * >TEST * Start with READY in the display. 1. Press until ADMIN * displays. NEXT 2. Enter the administration password. You may have to coordinate with the system administrator to enter the password.I 3.

  • Page 118

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test Table 4-5 Internal Tests Test Name Description INIT ELEM Physically scans the entire unit to determine STATUS which storage slots contain disks and if the drives contain disks. NOTE: This test appears as “ISTAT TEST” in all control panel error messages.

  • Page 119

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test Table 4-5 Internal Tests Test Name Description TRANSLATE Moves the disk transport mechanism from side TEST to side. No disks are required. FLIP TEST Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL result. Flips the disk transport mechanism at various locations.

  • Page 120

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test Table 4-5 Internal Tests Test Name Description EMPTY PICKER Do not run this test if the jukebox contains disks with customer data. Moves a disk from the disk transport mechanism to its home storage slot location if that location is known, otherwise the disk is placed into the first available empty storage slot.

  • Page 121

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test Table 4-5 Internal Tests Test Name Description STARWARS The display shows 0 0 0. Each “0" indicates one of the paths that the disk transport mechanism follows in front of each stack of optical disks. If the path is clear, a “0” displays;...

  • Page 122

    Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Running an Internal Test 4-48 Chapter 4...

  • Page 123: Removal And Replacement

    Removal and Replacement Chapter 5...

  • Page 124

    Removal and Replacement Overview Overview This chapter gives information on the following topics: • replacing a power supply • replacing the mailslot assembly • replacing the control panel assembly • replacing an optical drive with the jukebox offline • replacing an optical drive while the jukebox is online •...

  • Page 125: Protecting Yourself And The Product

    Removal and Replacement Protecting Yourself and the Product Protecting Yourself and the Product Do not disassemble the optical drive mechanism. The optical WARNING drive mechanism becomes a Class 3B laser device when disassembled. If the drive is disassembled, exposure to the invisible laser beam and hazardous invisible laser radiation could result in blindness.

  • Page 126

    Removal and Replacement Protecting Yourself and the Product • Torx® driver with the following bits: T-10, T-15, extended T-15, T-20 Chapter 5...

  • Page 127: Service Access

    Removal and Replacement Service Access Service Access Disconnect the power cord before taking the jukebox apart to WARNING prevent possible electrical shock. Do not switch off power to the jukebox until you are sure the SCSI bus is CAUTION inactive. Switching off the jukebox when the SCSI bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus states.

  • Page 128: Removing The Left And Right Front Panels

    Removal and Replacement Service Access Figure 5-1 Mounting Screws on the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels Removing the Left and Right Front Panels 1. Remove the rear panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2.

  • Page 129

    Removal and Replacement Service Access Front Panel Chapter 5...

  • Page 130

    Removal and Replacement Service Access 3. Depending on which panel you are removing, remove the T-20 screws labeled #2 on the front and back of the left front panel or the T-20 screws labeled #3 on the front and back of the right front panel. (See Figure 1).

  • Page 131: Replacing A Power Supply

    Removal and Replacement Replacing a Power Supply Replacing a Power Supply 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Remove the power plug from the bottom of the power supply (see #1 on Figure 5-3).

  • Page 132

    Removal and Replacement Replacing a Power Supply Figure 5-3 Cables and Mounting Screws on the Power Supplies 5-10 Chapter 5...

  • Page 133: Replacing The Mailslot Assembly

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Mailslot Assembly Replacing the Mailslot Assembly 1. Remove the right front panel (refer to“Removing the Left and Right Front Panels” on page 6). 2. Remove the two T-15 mailslot mounting screws from the upper left side of the chassis(see arrows on the left side of Figure 5-4).

  • Page 134: Reassembly Notes

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Mailslot Assembly Reassembly Notes Thread the mailslot cable down through the slot on the top of the PCA enclosure while inserting the mailslot into the chassis. After mailslot is installed, connect the mailslot cable to the interposer PCA. 5-12 Chapter 5...

  • Page 135: Replacing The Control Panel Assembly

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Control Panel Assembly Replacing the Control Panel Assembly 1. Remove the right front panel (see “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5 and “Removing the Left and Right Front Panels” on page 6). 2.

  • Page 136

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Control Panel Assembly oriented incorrectly. 5-14 Chapter 5...

  • Page 137: Replacing An Optical Drive — Jukebox Offline

    Firmware for all models and options of this jukebox is available for download at: www.hp.com 1. Remove the right side panel (see “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5 ). 2. Remove the drive cables for the failed drive from the interposer PCA.

  • Page 138

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Offline 4. Carefully slide the drive enclosure back and out of the chassis. Avoid catching the enclosure on cables connected to the other drive enclosures. 5. Remove the T-10 screws that hold the small cable access panel on the top of the drive enclosure.

  • Page 139

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Offline Figure 5-8 Removing Cables From a Drive 7. Remove the four T-10 screws that hold the drive in the drive enclosure and slide the drive out of the enclosure. 8. If there is a disk in the drive, use a disk eject tool to remove the disk from the drive.

  • Page 140

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Offline Figure 5-9 Disk Eject Hole 9. Slide the replacement drive into the enclosure nearly all the way. Leave room to connect the drive cables to the rear of the drive. 10.

  • Page 141: Replacing An Optical Drive — Jukebox Online

    Firmware for all models and options of this jukebox is available for download at: www.hp.com 1. Remove the right side panel (see “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5 ). 2. On the interposer PCA, note which drive shows a blinking status LED.

  • Page 142

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online Drive Cables 4. Remove the two drive power connectors from the interposer PCA (see #2 on Figure 5-10). 5-20 Chapter 5...

  • Page 143

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online 5. Remove all other drive cables to the failed drive : • #3 - SCSI • #4 - drive interface cable • #5 - drive fan power cable 6. Remove the T-20 screw holding the drive enclosure to the chassis for the enclosure holding the failed drive.

  • Page 144

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online Figure 5-11 Disk Eject Hole 9. Remove the T-10 screws on that hold the small cable access panel on the top of the drive enclosure. Remove the panel (see Figure 5-12). Figure 5-12 Unmounting a Drive From an Enclosure 10.

  • Page 145

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online Figure 5-13 Disconnecting the Cables 11. Remove the four T-10 screws that hold the drive in the drive enclosure and remove the drive from the enclosure. CAUTION To provide proper ground and power sequencing, it is important to power the replacemnent drive in the next steps through the connections on the interposer PCA.

  • Page 146

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online c. Press to display DRIVE POWER *. Press NEXT PREV ENTER d. Press to display DRV<x> POWER OFF, (where NEXT PREV DRV<x> is the number of the drive you are replacing). e.

  • Page 147

    Removal and Replacement Replacing an Optical Drive — Jukebox Online #3, #2, and #5). Connect the drive power cables last, over the SCSI cable (see #2 on Figure 5-10). 6. Slide the communication slide switch over to the right for both drives to signal the jukebox that drive replacement is complete (see #1 on Figure 5-10).

  • Page 148: Replacing The Interposer Pca

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Interposer PCA Replacing the Interposer PCA 1. Remove the right side panel (see “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5 ). 2. Disconnect all cables to the interposer PCA (see Figure 5-14). 3.

  • Page 149: Replacing The Picker

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker Replacing the Picker 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Pull the tab on the end of the picker umbilical cable to disconnect the cable from the bottom of the picker (see Figure 5-15).

  • Page 150

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker 3. Release the translate cable from the side of the translate frame nearest the front of the jukebox (see Figure 5-16): a. Depress the tension spring (#1) on the side of the translate frame to release the tension on the cable and allow you to pass the cable up through the slotted hole (#2).

  • Page 151

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker Placing the cable in the pinch slot prevents the cable from unraveling from the central picker hub. CAUTION Raise the translate frame only by pulling on the vertical drive rope (see top arrow in Figure 5-17). The frame can be twisted by pulling it by the sides.

  • Page 152

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker Figure 5-17 Holding the Translate Frame in Position 6. Remove the T-10 sheet metal screw that holds the capture spring down (see Figure 5-18). 5-30 Chapter 5...

  • Page 153

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker Figure 5-18 Releasing the the Picker Capture Bracket 7. Remove the capture spring by pulling it up and out of the unit. 8. Rotate the capture bracket 90 degrees and pull the bracket down and out (see Figure 5-19).

  • Page 154

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Picker 9. Remove the tool you inserted into the rear of the vertical motor gear box and lower the translate frame and picker to the bottom of the jukebox. 10. Tilt up the rear end of the picker and left it out of the frame (see Figure 5-20).

  • Page 155: Removing/replacing The Translate Frame (including The Picker)

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). CAUTION Raise the translate frame only by pulling on the vertical drive rope (see the top arrow on Figure 5-21).

  • Page 156

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Figure 5-21 Raising the Translate Frame and Holding the Frame in Position 5-34 Chapter 5...

  • Page 157

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Figure 5-22 Releasing the Lower End of the Vertical Encoder Strip 3. Unhook the encoder strip and hang it out of the way (see Figure 5-22). Pull down on the bottom of the encoder strip to release the strip from its retaining peg.

  • Page 158

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) BE EASILY DAMAGED. 4. Remove the “visual locator” bracket on the (front) side of the picker translate frame (see Figure 5-23). Remove the two T-20 screws holding the bracket and rotate the bracket off.

  • Page 159

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Frame 6. Remove the tool you inserted into vertical motor gear box and move the translate frame down to the bottom of the jukebox. 7. Remove the three rope tensioners from the frame (#1, #2, and #3 on Figure 5-25).

  • Page 160

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Figure 5-25 Removing the Tensioners From the Translate Frame 5-38 Chapter 5...

  • Page 161

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) CAUTION In the next step, ensure that the plastic rail guides are not damaged when the translate frame is removed. 8. Rotate the rear of the translate frame up and then remove the frame out to the side (see Figure 5-26).

  • Page 162

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) The following steps explain proper mounting of the frame. 1. Place the frame back in the chassis. Let it rest on its support points. The rear of the frame rests on a ledge on the vertical motor. 2.

  • Page 163

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker) Move the translate frame up and lock it while reinstalling the encoder strip. Ensure that the encoder strip passes through the sensor slot on the sensor PCA mounted on the side of the picker frame (see Figure 5-22). The strip may be moved off its mounting peg while you are replacing the translate frame in the chassis.

  • Page 164: Removing/replacing The Vertical Encoder Strip

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Vertical Encoder Strip Removing/Replacing the Vertical Encoder Strip 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). WARNING The edges of the vertical encoder are sharp. Be careful. CAUTION Handle the encoder strip with care and ONLY BY THE SOLID SIDE .

  • Page 165

    Removal and Replacement Removing/Replacing the Vertical Encoder Strip Figure 5-28 Releasing the Ends of the Vertical Encoder Strip Chapter 5 5-43...

  • Page 166: Replacing The Vertical Motion Motor

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motion Motor Replacing the Vertical Motion Motor 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Disconnect the two power cables to the vertical motor (see Figure 5-29).

  • Page 167

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motion Motor Figure 5-29 Cables and Mounting Screws on the Vertical Motion Motor Chapter 5 5-45...

  • Page 168: Replacing The Vertical Motor Gear Box

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motor Gear Box Replacing the Vertical Motor Gear Box 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Remove the translate frame (refer to “Removing/Replacing the Translate Frame (Including the Picker)”...

  • Page 169

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motor Gear Box plastic section. 5. Take the drive rope off the upper pulleys (see #3 on Figure 5-30). 6. Remove the drive rope from the rear tensioner (see #2 on Figure 5-30). a. Unfasten the spring. b.

  • Page 170

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motor Gear Box 9. Remove the drive motor and gear box (see Figure 5-32). a. Remove the T-25 screw from the base of the gear box. b. Tip the gear box forward and lift it out. Figure 5-32 Vertical Motor Gear Box Mounting Screw Reassembly Notes...

  • Page 171

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Vertical Motor Gear Box Figure 5-33 Positioning the Tensioner to Mount on the Translate Frame Figure 5-34 Placement of the Ropes in the Rope Coupler Chapter 5 5-49...

  • Page 172: Replacing The Controller Pca

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Controller PCA Replacing the Controller PCA 1. Remove the rear access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Remove the six T-20 screws on the controller PCA cover (see Figure 5-35).

  • Page 173

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Controller PCA Figure 5-36 Controller PCA Cables and Screws 3. Disconnect the following cablesfrom the controller PCA (see Figure 5-35): • SCSI cable (#1) • Power cable (#2) • Motor encoder and power cables (#3) •...

  • Page 174: Replacing The Interface Pca

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Interface PCA Replacing the Interface PCA 1. Remove the left access panel (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Remove thefour T-20 screws holding the interface module cover (see Figure 5-38).

  • Page 175

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Interface PCA 3. Disconnect the cables to the interface PCA (see Figure 5-39). Figure 5-38 Removing the SCSI Interface PCA 4. Remove the six T-15 PCA screws and remove the PCA (see Figure 5-38). Chapter 5 5-53...

  • Page 176

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the Interface PCA 5. When reassembling put the cables on the interface PCA as follows: • #1 - SCSI cable • #2 - interface PCA power cable • #4 - GPIO cable Figure 5-39 Cables on the Interface PCA 5-54 Chapter 5...

  • Page 177: Replacing The Scsi Cable

    Removal and Replacement Replacing the SCSI Cable Replacing the SCSI Cable 1. Remove the right and rear access panels (refer to “Removing the Right, Left, and Rear Access Panels” on page 5). 2. Remove the SCSI cable from the interface PCA. Do Steps 2 and 3 of “Replacing the Interface PCA”...

  • Page 178: Checking The Rfi Adjustments

    Removal and Replacement Checking the RFI Adjustments Checking the RFI Adjustments NOTE The following RFI adjustments must be maintained after servicing the jukebox. Depending on the service performed, these configurations may be altered. The purpose of this section is to remind you of the RFI adjustments that must remain in place.

  • Page 179

    Removal and Replacement Checking the RFI Adjustments Figure 5-41 Cable Clamps on the GPIO and SCSI Cables Figure 5-42 EMI Strip on the Right-Side Panel Chapter 5 5-57...

  • Page 180: Upgrading Firmware To The Current Revision Level

    Removal and Replacement Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level What is Needed PC Tool hardware The following hardware and software is required: • IBM AT-compatible computer • Adaptec interface board • Cables and adapters that will enable you to connect the SCSI port of your PC tool to a high-density SCSI port on the jukebox.

  • Page 181: Check The Firmware Revision Level

    Removal and Replacement Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level download at: www.hp.com Tools • T-10 and T-20 Torx® drivers Check the Firmware Revision Level 1. Ensure the jukebox is powered on. 2. Press to select INFO *, then press...

  • Page 182

    Removal and Replacement Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level customer’s default configurations should be recorded so that the jukebox can be correctly restored. Go to the CONF * menu on the control panel to access and display the current jukebox configurations. 1.

  • Page 183

    Removal and Replacement Upgrading Firmware to the Current Revision Level menu and reset any customer configuration that is not default. The default configurations are as follows: Table 5-1 Default Configuration Settings Configuration Default Value RECOVERY DUAL PICKER STARWARS SCSI LOG SECURE SECURE MAIL POWER SECURE...

  • Page 184: Replaceable Parts

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Replaceable Parts NOTE The “x” in the part numbers listed in the following parts tables represents a number from “0” to “9” depending on the revision of the part. For example, if the part is newly released, the number will be “0”. The first time the part is revised, the number increments to “1”;...

  • Page 185

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Table 5-3 Non-Exchange Assemblies FRU No. Part Number Description C1160-60x25 idler pulley kit C1100-60x26 magazine (pair) 8-slots C1160-60x27 dual-cartridge picker C1100-60x29 mailslot assembly C1160-60x30 encoder strip C1160-60x26 magazine (pair) 6-slots C1160-60x28 power supply (200w, 5/12v) C1160-60x33 power supply (120w, 24v) C1160-60x34...

  • Page 186

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Table 5-3 Non-Exchange Assemblies FRU No. Part Number Description C1160-60x57 vertical path-clear sensor cable C1173-60x59 drive SCSI cable C1170-60x62 drive I/Ocable C1160-60x65 control panel cable C1170-60x66 GPIO Cable C1160-60x78 cover window C1160-60x80 right panel standby power switch cable C1160-60x86 AC switch PCA...

  • Page 187

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Table 5-3 Non-Exchange Assemblies FRU No. Part Number Description C1160-00211 panel - rear, parchment white C1160-00606 panel - top, RFI C1160-00607 panel -side, RFI C1160-00608 cover, corner C1160-00617 cover, bottom center, flint grey C1160-00618 cover, bottom center, parchment white C1160-60199 packaging kit (for reshipment) 9170-1736...

  • Page 188

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Figure 5-43 Exploded View (1 of 3) 5-66 Chapter 5...

  • Page 189

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Figure 5-44 Exploded View (2 of 3) Chapter 5 5-67...

  • Page 190

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Figure 5-45 Exploded View (3 of 3) 5-68 Chapter 5...

  • Page 191

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Figure 5-46 Power Cabling Chapter 5 5-69...

  • Page 192

    Removal and Replacement Replaceable Parts Figure 5-47 Rope and Pulley System 5-70 Chapter 5...

  • Page 193: Theory Of Operation

    Theory of Operation Chapter 6...

  • Page 194

    Theory of Operation Overview Overview This chapter gives information in the following topics: • jukebox robotics • robotics controller PCA • interposer PCA • configuration module • power supplies • the SCSI interface on this jukebox • SCSI interface PCA •...

  • Page 195: Jukebox Robotics

    Theory of Operation Jukebox Robotics Jukebox Robotics Movements The mechanism code of the jukebox accepts high-level SCSI commands from the interface, translates these commands into servo code for the jukebox, executes the command, and reports status. When a SCSI command is received, it is translated into a series of smaller submoves in the servo code of the jukebox and executed.

  • Page 196

    Theory of Operation Jukebox Robotics assembly/leadscrew nut to rotate the mailslot assembly toward and away from the user. Macro-moves consist of one or more combinations of position or saturation type micro-moves. There are two types of micro-moves: • Position move: Moves the driving motors a given distance at peak speed and is used for high-speed, unobstructed movements of known distances.

  • Page 197: The Robotics Controller Pca

    Theory of Operation The Robotics Controller PCA The Robotics Controller PCA The robotics controller PCA contains the following major components, which are illustrated in Figure 6-2 on page 5-6: • Microprocessor: The MICROPROCESSOR is a Motorola MC68EC000 running at 12.288 MHz. This microprocessor controls all processes on the controller PCA such as servos, SCSI interface, and commands to the control panel.

  • Page 198

    Theory of Operation The Robotics Controller PCA generate a vacuum filament display using a 7.5-volt supply tied to a 5-volt reference, which results in an excitation voltage of from two to three volts. The grids of the display are at approximately 20 volts. Buffers for incoming control panel switch signals and signals from the mailslot sensor are also handled by the control panel drivers.

  • Page 199: Interposer Pca

    Theory of Operation Interposer PCA Interposer PCA The interposer PCA is an extension of the controller PCA. Figure 6-3 Interposer PCA Block Diagram Chapter 6...

  • Page 200

    Theory of Operation Interposer PCA (Use the top portion of the diagram for the following explanation.) The single, GPIO and power connection from the controller PCA is J20. Address decode and data buffering takes addresses from the controller PCA and sends the data to proper locations and takes received data and routes the data to the proper destination.

  • Page 201

    Theory of Operation Interposer PCA computer, is buffered on the interposer PCA, and sent to each drive individually. Req signals come from the drives and are buffered into one signal going back to the host computer. If a drive problem occurs, there is a possibility that this problem could be from the interposer’s buffering of the Req and Ack signals.

  • Page 202: Configuration Module

    Theory of Operation Configuration Module Configuration Module The configuration module is a “key” that enables activation of the full complement of slots in the jukebox. The module is plugged into a connector on the interposer PCA (see #1 on Figure 5-14). All jukeboxes are shipped with a full complement of slots installed.

  • Page 203: Power Supplies

    Theory of Operation Power Supplies Power Supplies There are two autoranging power supplies. • One supplies +5 volts at 15 amperes and +12 volts at 10 amperes, which powers the drives and the jukebox logic. • The other supply provides +24 volts at 5 amperes, which powers the motors.

  • Page 204: Scsi Interface Pca

    Theory of Operation SCSI Interface PCA SCSI Interface PCA The SCSI interface PCA has two major functions: • Logically connect the active host SCSI bus (single-ended or differential) to the internal single-ended SCSI device bus. • Operate in a LUN mapping mode. Internally, the jukebox has a single-ended SCSI bus.

  • Page 205

    Theory of Operation SCSI Interface PCA Figure 6-6 SCSI Interface PCA The jukebox communicates to the PCA through a GPIO bus. The differential and single-ended connectors are on the top of the PCA and the single-ended bus connection to the jukebox is on the bottom. A slider switch between the two external connectors selects which type of input will be accepted.

  • Page 206

    Theory of Operation SCSI Interface PCA The two large components on the PCA are the Field-Programmable Gate Array and the microprocessor. The microprocessor is an 80C52 that has flash-programmable memory on board. (There are no boot ROMs on this PCA). After the jukebox runs it selftest on wakeup, in instructs the PCA to come up in whichever mode has been selected by the user.

  • Page 207: Configuring This Jukebox On A Scsi Bus

    Theory of Operation Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus This jukebox is a “fast and narrow” SCSI device with the capability to connect to either a narrow single-ended bus or a wide differential bus. In the diagram below, note that the single-ended (50-line) bus is brought directly onto the jukebox internal narrow bus.

  • Page 208: Adding Devices To The Bus

    Theory of Operation Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus Adding Devices to the Bus When considering adding other devices to the jukebox bus, consider the following: • Will adding a device onto a bus with this jukebox interfere or degrade the performance of the jukebox or the device that is added? •...

  • Page 209

    Theory of Operation Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus would be lost if the devices were set up as depicted in the figure below. Because a narrow device only has a 50-pin connector, it will not transmit the eight extra bits of data needed for the wide device on the end of the bus.

  • Page 210

    Theory of Operation Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus It is very important that the 68-pin to 50-pin cable is properly configured to assure that the eighteen truncated lines are properly terminated. Cable Lengths Observe SCSI cable maximum lengths; - 3 meters (9.8 feet) for the single-ended bus (remember, this is a fast device) - 25 meters (82 feet) for the differential bus.

  • Page 211

    Theory of Operation Configuring This Jukebox on a SCSI Bus General • Do not connect a single-ended bus to a differential bus. Damage can occur. Chapter 6 6-19...

  • Page 212: Picker

    Theory of Operation Picker Picker The picker in this jukebox is capable of holding two disk cartridges at once. Its two thumbs can be addressed in two ways: • Address the picker in single-picker mode, • Address the picker in dual-picker mode. Single-picker Mode In single-picker mode, the picker is addressed as a single element number.

  • Page 213: Optical Drive Mechanism

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism Optical Drive Mechanism Figure 6-8 provides an overview of the optical drive mechanism. Figure 6-8 Optical Drive Functional Diagram Controller The controller is a highly-specialized integrated circuit that handles SCSI control, data buffering, and encode/decode. The data buffer function provides a buffer to match transfers to and from the host computer and the optical disk.

  • Page 214: Central Processing Unit (cpu)

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism decodes the various commands and messages on the SCSI bus and instructs the drive to take appropriate action. The encode/decode function encodes and decodes data for read and write transfers. During a write function, user data is sent via the SCSI bus. The encoder converts the parallel data into an encoded serial bit stream that includes all the format and error correction features required to meet the ANSI and ISO specifications.

  • Page 215: Bias Magnet

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism the cartridge shuttle to raise and lower the cartridge within the loader housing. Bias Magnet The bias magnet subassembly sits on top of the cartridge shuttle and provides the correct polarity for erasing or writing data. Optical Head The optical head assembly contains both mechanical and electronic components and is a “split optics”...

  • Page 216

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism number, and a Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). The error threshold is determined by the number of sectors found “good.” The other error threshold of interest pertains to the degree of error correction required on the data. The error correction code (ECC) used causes parity bytes to be written following the user data.

  • Page 217

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism After an overforce shutdown occurs, the jukebox analyzes the situation, self-calibrates, and attempts a retry • Sense of touch: Sense of touch is the process where actual force used is compared to the recommended force for each move. The jukebox uses this information to detect errors or qualify moves.

  • Page 218

    Theory of Operation Optical Drive Mechanism 6-26 Chapter 6...

  • Page 219

    Safety and Regulatory Information Appendix A...

  • Page 220: Overview Of This Appendix

    Safety and Regulatory Information Overview of this Appendix Overview of this Appendix This appendix contains important safety and regulatory information for the United States, Finland, Sweden, Germany, United Kingdom, European Union, and Japan. Appendix A...

  • Page 221: Cdrh Regulations (usa Only)

    Safety and Regulatory Information CDRH Regulations (USA Only) CDRH Regulations (USA Only) The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration implemented regulations for laser products on August 2, 1976. These regulations apply to laser products manufactured from August 1, 1976.

  • Page 222: United Kingdom Telecommunications Act 1984

    Safety and Regulatory Information United Kingdom Telecommunications Act 1984 United Kingdom Telecommunications Act 1984 The HP SureStore Optical 160ex/320ex/400ex/300mx/600mx/700mx jukeboxes are approved under Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect connection to Public Telecommunication Systems within the United Kingdom. Appendix A...

  • Page 223: Declaration Of Conformity

    Safety and Regulatory Information Declaration of Conformity Declaration of Conformity Appendix A...

  • Page 224: Herstellerbescheinigung

    Safety and Regulatory Information Herstellerbescheinigung Herstellerbescheinigung Diese Information steht im Zusammenhang mit den Anforderungen der Maschinenlärn information sverordnung vom 18 Januar 1991. Schalldruckpegel Lp < 70 dB(A) • am arbeitsplatz • normaler betrieb • nach ISO 7779:1988/EN 27779:1991 (Typprüfung) English Translation of German Sound Emission Directive This statement is provided to comply with the requirements of the German Sound Emission Directive, from 18 January 1991.

  • Page 225: Turvallisuusyhteenveto

    Turvallisuusyhteenveto Turvallisuusyhteenveto Laserturvallisuus LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE KLASS 1 LASER APPARAT HP SureStore Optical 160ex/320ex/400ex/300mx/600mx/700mx optiset levymuistiasemat ovat käyttäjän kannalta turvallisia luokan 1 laserlaitteita. Normaalissa käytössä levymuistiaseman kotelointi estää lasersäteen pääsyn laitteen ulkopuolelle. Laitteen turvallisuusluokka on määritetty standardin EN 60825 mukaisesti.

  • Page 226

    Safety and Regulatory Information Turvallisuusyhteenveto Om skyddshöljet av den optiska drivmodulen öppnas och spärren urkopplas då apparaten är i funktion, utsättas användaren för laserstrålning. Betrakta ej strålen. Tiedot luku-/kirjoitusyksikössä käytettävän laserdiodin säteilyominaisuuksista: Aallonpituus 680 nm (5.2-Gb drv.) 660 nm (9.1-Gb drv.) Teho 60 mW Turvallisuusluokka 3B...

  • Page 227: English Translation Of Finland Regulatory Information

    LASER SAFETY SUMMARY LASER SAFETY CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT (The same in Swedish.) HP SureStore Optical 160ex/320ex/400ex/300mx/600mx/700mx jukeboxes are for user safe class 1 laser products. In normal use the enclosure of the optical drives prevents the laser beam from escaping outside of the product.

  • Page 228: Japanese Vcci Statement

    Safety and Regulatory Information Japanese VCCI Statement Japanese VCCI Statement This equipment is in the Class A category information technology equipment based on the rules of Voluntary Control Council For Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). When used in a residential area, radio interference may be caused. In this case, user may be required to take appropriate corrective actions.

  • Page 229

    Index changing the administration password German sound emission 3-13 changing the SCSI IDs 3-17 characteristics drive installation error recovery jukebox installation responsibilities 1-11 configuration module 6-10 internal tests configurations descriptions 4-43 listing of 3-21 listing of 4-43 setting 3-20 running 4-43 connecting used by service...

  • Page 230

    Index entering SCSI bus 3-12 active bus indicator picker 6-20 power interface selection switch connecting 2-11 ports power receptacle SCSI cables power supplies 6-11 connecting power switch maximum length precautions SCSI IDs disassembling the optical drive changing 3-17 conflict 3-18 product certifications must be one digit apart 3-18...

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