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   Also See for NEC POWERMATE 8100

   Summary of Contents for NEC POWERMATE 8100

  • Page 1

    High Performance With Manageability For The Networked Enterprise P P P P M M M M 8100 S 8100 S 8100 S 8100 S ® ® ® ® O W E R O W E R A T E A T E E R I E S E R I E S O W E R...

  • Page 2

    NECC is prohibited. As an ENERGY star partner, NEC Computers Inc. (NECC) has determined that this product meets the ENERGY star guidelines for energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR is a U.S. registered trademark. NEC and PowerMate are registered trademarks of NEC Corporation, used under license.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Storage Device Support ..............1-15 Intellicase Chassis................. 1-15 Stand ....................1-15 Speakers ....................1-16 System Features..................1-17 Hardware..................1-17 Software ..................1-18 Preloaded Operating System ..........1-18 NEC Select Install CD ............1-18 NEC Driver CD..............1-20 Security ..................1-20 Contents iii...

  • Page 4

    Auto Rebuild and Restore............3-29 Custom Rebuild and Restore..........3-32 Restoring the Operating System .............3-36 Installing Applications..............3-38 Using the NEC Select Install CD with a SCSI Drive.......3-40 Using the Selective Application Restore Program on a Remote CD................3-40 NEC Help Center Online Documentation ..........3-43 Installing the NEC Help Center Online Documentation ....3-43...

  • Page 5

    Installing the NEC SNMP Agent........... 4-11 Configuring the NEC SNMP Agent for Windows 95 or Windows 98................4-11 Configuring the NEC SNMP Agent for Windows NT ....4-12 NEC WebTelligent ................4-13 NEC WebTelligent Features............4-14 NEC WebTelligent Requirements ..........4-15 NEC WebTelligent Installation .............

  • Page 6

    5 Installing Options General Rules ..................5-2 Safety Precautions ...................5-2 System Unit Cover...................5-4 Removing the Desktop Cover ............5-4 Replacing the Desktop Cover............5-6 Removing the Minitower Cover ............5-7 Replacing the Minitower Cover ............5-9 Chassis Floor ..................5-11 Removing the Chassis Floor ............5-11 Replacing the Chassis Floor ............5-12 Removing the Stand...............5-13 Replacing the Stand...............5-14 System Board Options ................5-15...

  • Page 7

    Diskette Drive Cabling ............5-47 PC Card Adapter Cabling ............. 5-48 Internal SCSI Device Cabling ..........5-48 Network Board Wake-On LAN Cabling........ 5-49 Installing Storage Devices............. 5-49 Removing the Desktop Front Panel ..........5-50 Replacing the Desktop Front Panel..........5-52 Removing the Minitower Front Panel..........

  • Page 8

    Adjust Your Monitor ................A-7 Vary Your Workday ................A-8 Pre-existing Conditions and Psychosocial Factors........A-10 Checking Your Comfort: How Do You Measure Up? ......A-10 Checking Your Chair..............A-10 Checking Your Keyboard .............A-10 Checking Your Mouse ..............A-11 Checking Your Monitor..............A-11 Checking You................A-11 B System Specifications System Processor ..................

  • Page 9

    C Questions and Answers Boot Questions ..................C-2 BIOS Questions ..................C-4 Monitor Questions ..................C-5 Multimedia Questions ................C-6 CD-ROM Drive or DVD-ROM Drive Questions ........C-7 Mouse Questions..................C-7 Power Management Questions ..............C-8 System Security Questions ..............C-9 Memory Questions................C-11 Modem Questions .................C-11 Miscellaneous Questions...............C-11 Glossary Index Regulatory Statements...

  • Page 10: Using This Guide

    T Chapter 3, Configuring the System, describes how to use the software utilities shipped with your system, including the BIOS Setup Utility, the NEC Select Install CD, and the NEC Driver CD. It also provides detailed information on jumpering devices in the system.

  • Page 11: Text Conventions

    T Appendix A, Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment, contains guidelines to help you use your computer productively and safely. This appendix also instructs you on how to set up and use your computer to reduce your risk of developing nerve, muscle, or tendon disorders.

  • Page 12: Related Documents

    Your system comes with the following online documentation on the NEC Select Install CD: T NEC Help Center The NEC Help Center is an online version of the printed user’s guide. It provides information about your system under the following topics: System Tour, System Information, System Upgrades, Service and Support, and Reference.

  • Page 13

    To purchase the service and reference manual, call NECC at 1-800-632-4525 (in the U.S. and Canada) or your local NECC sales provider (outside the U.S. and Canada). Service and reference manuals are also available from the NECC website (see Chapter 7). xiv Using This Guide...

  • Page 14: Reviewing System Features

    Reviewing System Features Front Features Inside Features Rear Features Stand Speakers System Features...

  • Page 15

    Prolonged or improper use of a computer workstation may pose a risk of serious injury. To reduce your risk of injury, set up and use the computer in the manner described in Appendix A, “Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment.” This chapter highlights system hardware and software, and describes the security features of the system.

  • Page 16: System Controls And Lamps

    Front features - minitower models A – Diskette Drive F – Disk Lamp B – CD-ROM Drive G – Disk Lamp C – Stand H – Reset Button D – IR Window I – Power Button E – Suspend Button System Controls and Lamps System controls let you select specific system operations.

  • Page 17

    Suspend button Press this button to suspend system operation when you plan to be away from your computer for a short time. Press any key or move your mouse to resume system operation at the point where you stopped it. An amber system unit power lamp indicates that the system is in a power-saving mode.

  • Page 18: Ir Window

    IR Window The IR (infrared) window is the system's IR port. The IR port supports two-way wireless communications. The interface uses infrared as the transmission medium instead of a traditional cable. The IR port lets you transfer files to or from portable devices such as laptops and personal digital assistant (PDA) products using application software supporting IrDA data transfer.

  • Page 19: Dvd-rom Drive

    DVD-ROM Drive Some models come with a 5X digital video disc (DVD)-ROM drive. The drive offers many improvements over the standard CD-ROM technology, including superior video and audio playback, faster data access, and greater storage capacities. The DVD-ROM drive uses DVD technology to read DVD discs as well as standard audio and video CDs.

  • Page 20: Rear Features

    Rear Features On the back of your computer, you'll find external connectors, power supply features, and expansion board slots. The following figures show these features. Rear features - desktop models A – Expansion Slots F – Audio Connectors B – Network Board G –...

  • Page 21: External Connectors

    Rear features - minitower models A – LAN Connector F – Mouse Port B – Audio Connectors G – Serial Port C – USB Ports H – Printer Port D – Serial Port 2 I – Expansion Slots E – Keyboard Port J –...

  • Page 22

    VGA monitor connector The system comes with an AGP board connected to the system board. The AGP board provides an external VGA connector. AGP boards ® available from NECC support an NEC MultiSync monitor, NEC ™ VistaScan monitor, or other video graphics array (VGA)-compatible monitor with a 15-pin connector.

  • Page 23

    Audio connectors - desktop models A – Line Out Jack C – Line In Jack B – Microphone In jack Audio connectors - minitower models A – Line In Jack C – Line Out Jack B – Microphone In Jack 1-10 Reviewing System Features...

  • Page 24: Power Supply Features

    Universal Serial Bus ports The Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports allow you to add new plug and play serial devices without opening up the system. You simply plug the devices into the ports. The USB determines system resources for each peripheral and assigns them without user intervention. Up to 127 devices can be daisy chained to the USB ports.

  • Page 25: Inside Features

    Inside Features See the following figures for the location of features within the system. Feature descriptions follow. Inside the system - desktop models A – System Board D – Riser Board B – AGP Board E – Internal Device Slot C –...

  • Page 26: System Board

    Inside the system - minitower models A – Expansion Slots D – AGP Board B – Internal Device Slots E – System Board C – Riser Board F – Accessible Device Slots System Board System memory, the processor, the AGP board, and the system battery reside on the system board.

  • Page 27: Riser Board

    Riser Board Most of the cable connectors in the system reside on the riser board. Riser board connectors include: primary and secondary IDE connectors diskette drive connector front panel connector for lamp and infrared signals the NLX connector for the system board additional connectors including the CD Audio In, Modem In, Wake- On LAN connector, the minitower chassis intrusion connector (hardware monitor), speaker connector (minitower models), and fan...

  • Page 28: Network Board

    Intellicase Chassis The NEC Intellicase chassis conforms to the NLX form factor. With the NLX form factor, the system has the following features: standardized chassis size and dimensions...

  • Page 29: Speakers

    Minitower chassis stand Speakers Some systems come with a pair of high-quality stereo speakers that you can arrange to suit your work environment. An AC adapter comes with the speakers if you ordered speakers. Set up the speakers with the AC adapter. Adjust the speaker volume by using the volume control on the front of the right speaker or by using the Windows sound software.

  • Page 30: System Features

    Your computer hardware and software deliver the performance and technologies you need for all your challenging tasks today and into the future. Hardware The PowerMate 8100 Series includes the following hardware features: PC98 Compliance ® All the hardware in the system has been certified by Microsoft to be PC98 compliant.

  • Page 31: Software

    Install the software and documentation provided by NECC from the NEC Select Install CD. The NEC Select Install CD can also be used to restore any of the software and documentation, or to restore the entire operating system. Each item on the CD is selectable from a straightforward graphical interface.

  • Page 32

    Protect the system from viruses by running VirusScan. The following online documentation is provided on the NEC Select Install NEC Help Center The NEC Help Center is an online version of the printed user's guide. It provides extensive information about the PowerMate system. Healthy Environment This is an online version of the printed brochure, Setting up a Healthy Environment.

  • Page 33: Nec Driver Cd

    NEC Driver CD The NEC Driver CD contains a wide selection of drivers for hardware that is compatible with PowerMate series computers. These drivers are provided with the original manufacturer's installation wizards to ensure correct installation. Security The system has hardware, software, and mechanical security features that offer protection against unauthorized access to your system and data.

  • Page 34

    Security slot The security slot on the back of the minitower chassis accepts a ® Kensington Security Standard connector or other locking device. Secure the locking device to the security slot and to an immovable object to protect your system from theft. Locking tab The minitower system also has a locking tab on the rear of the chassis.

  • Page 35: Setting Up The System

    Setting Up the System Cable Connections Startup Shutdown Power-Saving Operation System Care More Information...

  • Page 36

    This chapter provides the information you need to set up and use the PowerMate 8100 Series computer. Some of the information provided includes cable connections, system startup procedures, system shutdown procedures, and system care. It also provides a matrix showing where to find additional information about the computer.

  • Page 37

    Connect the printer cable to the printer port on the rear of the system unit. Secure the cable with the screws provided. Connect the other end to the printer. Connect one end of the serial cable to one of the two serial ports on the rear of the computer.

  • Page 38: Startup

    Startup Press the power button to start up your system. The power lamp lights green to indicate that the system is on. The NEC startup screen appears. At the bottom of this screen, messages like the following appear: Press <F2> key if you want to run Setup...

  • Page 39: Power-saving Operation

    Wait until a program is finished running before powering off the system. Unless absolutely necessary, never power off the system when the system power lamp is amber or when either the hard drive lamp, diskette drive, or other device lamp is lit. Information on the device might be lost or damaged.

  • Page 40: System Care

    An amber power lamp indicates that the system is in Suspend mode. Press the suspend button, press a key, or move the mouse to resume system operation where you left off. System Care Your system is a durable, dependable computer built for heavy use. With protective measures and proper care, you can prevent problems and promote the successful operation and long life span of your computer.

  • Page 41: Keeping Your System In Good Condition

    If you plan to use software programs other than NECC supplied software, NECC strongly recommends that you take the necessary steps, such as virus checks, to protect your system. Place your computer away from direct sunlight and extreme hot and cold temperatures.

  • Page 42: Moving Or Shipping Your System

    If these are not available, be sure to use adequate packing materials to protect the components. To set up your system, follow the steps on the PowerMate 8100 Series Quick Setup poster that comes with the computer. More Information...

  • Page 43

    Uninstalling the NEC Help Center “Uninstalling the NEC Help Center” in Chapter 3 Basic information about the computer System Tour in the online NEC Help Center or Chapter 1 Setting a password Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 Playing a music CD (multimedia...

  • Page 44: Configuring The System

    Configuring the System Configuration Tools and Utilities BIOS Setup Utility Flash Utility NEC Select Install CD NEC Help Center Online Documentation NEC Driver CD Jumper Settings...

  • Page 45

    This chapter provides information on configuring your computer. It includes information about the BIOS Setup utility for configuring hardware and the system, the Flash utility for BIOS updates, the NEC Select Install CD for software reinstalls, the NEC Driver CD for installing optional drivers, and jumper settings for physically configuring devices in the system.

  • Page 46

    L2 Cache ECC Support, enabling BIOS Setup (Main menu) memory, checking BIOS Setup (Main menu) NEC Help Center online NEC Select Install CD (see “Installing documentation, installing the NEC Help Center Online Documentation”) NEC Help Center online see “Uninstalling the NEC Help Center”...

  • Page 47

    BIOS Setup (Boot menu) reminders to run virus scan BIOS Setup (Boot menu) serial ports, enabling BIOS Setup (Advanced menu) software provided through NEC, NEC Select Install CD installing time and date, setting BIOS Setup (main menu) upper memory for a legacy ISA device,...

  • Page 48: How To Start Bios Setup

    System configuration information is stored in nonvolatile memory. A nonvolatile memory device retains its data when system power is turned off. Nonvolatile memory in your system is stored in a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip backed up by a battery on the system board.

  • Page 49: How To Use Bios Setup

    Setup Main menu How to Use BIOS Setup Use the keys shown on the bottom of the Setup menu to make your selections or exit the current menu. The following table describes the navigation keys. Navigation Keys Function Provides help for the parameter field being displayed.

  • Page 50: Maintenance Menu

    Navigation Keys Function Loads the Default Configuration values for this menu. Saves changes and Exits the BIOS Setup utility. Change values Menu items preceded by > contain a submenu of selectable fields for setting system parameters. To display a submenu, use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the submenu you want.

  • Page 51: Main Menu

    Maintenance Menu Items Menu Item Settings and Description Processor Speed 233 MHz, 266 MHz, 300 MHz, 333 MHz, 366 MHz, 350 MHz, 400 MHz, 450 MHz, 500 MHz, 600 MHz Sets processor speed. Clear All Passwords [Enter] Clears the User and Supervisor passwords. Press Enter to bring up dialog box asking for confirmation to clear passwords.

  • Page 52

    Main Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Processor Speed This field is read-only and cannot be changed from the BIOS Setup utility. Example: 233 MHz Cache RAM This field is read-only and cannot be changed from the BIOS Setup utility.

  • Page 53: Advanced Menu

    Main Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Set system time in this field. Press Tab or Enter to System Time move between hour, minute, and second fields. The clock keeps time even after the system power is turned off.

  • Page 54

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Plug and Play O/S No, Yes The default for systems running Windows NT operating system is No and for systems running Windows 95 operating system is Yes. With a No setting, BIOS configures all devices. With a Yes setting, the operating system configures any Plug and Play device not required when the system boots (presumes a Plug and Play operating system).

  • Page 55

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description IRQ3, IRQ4 Interrupt An asterisk (‘*’) displayed next to an interrupt indicates a conflict with another device. Only appears if Serial Port A is Enabled. Serial Port B: Enabled, Auto, IrDA, Disabled The default setting for Serial Port B supports the hardware shipped in your system (i.e., if your system shipped with a fax/modem board, Serial Port B...

  • Page 56

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description 278, 378, 3BC, 228 Base I/O Address An asterisk (‘*’) displayed next to an address indicates a conflict with another device. Only appears if Parallel Port is Enabled. IRQ7, IRQ5 Interrupt An asterisk (‘*’) displayed next to an interrupt indicates a conflict with another device.

  • Page 57

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Disabled, 3 seconds, 6 seconds, Hard Disk Pre-Delay 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 15 seconds, 21 seconds, 30 seconds The hard disk pre-delay gives the hard drive time to spin up before the system boots. Set a hard disk pre- delay if your hard drive needs more time to spin up.

  • Page 58

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Heads When Type is Auto, value in Heads field is auto- detected and field is read only. Sectors When Type is Auto, value in Sectors field is auto- detected and field is read only. Maximum Capacity Displays capacity in MB.

  • Page 59

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Disabled, Mode 0, Mode 1, Mode 2 Ultra DMA When Type is set to Auto, the value in the Ultra DMA field is auto-detected and the field is read only. Floppy Options Bring up submenu by pressing Enter.

  • Page 60

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Disabled, Enabled Event logging Enabled allows the logging of DMI events. Prompt on POST Enabled, Disabled errors When this field is set to Enabled and errors are detected during POST, the POST pauses and prompts the user for input.

  • Page 61

    Advanced Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and Description Bring up the submenu by pressing Enter. Resource Configuration IRQ3 Available, Reserved IRQ4 An Available setting for any IRQ indicates that that IRQ5 IRQ is available on the system. A Reserved setting IRQ7 indicates that that IRQ is reserved for use by Legacy IRQ10...

  • Page 62: Security Menu

    Security Menu The Security Menu is a top-level menu in the BIOS Setup utility. Choose the Security Menu by selecting Security in the legend bar. Security Menu options are available by selecting submenus. Use the arrow keys to select a Security Menu option. Press Enter to display the submenu.

  • Page 63

    Security Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and description Set Supervisor [Enter] Password Use this field to set or change the supervisor password. Press Enter to bring up a dialog box where the password can be entered and confirmed. Clear User Password [Enter] Press Enter to clear the user password when logged on...

  • Page 64: Power Menu

    Power Menu The Power Menu is a top-level menu in the BIOS Setup utility. Choose the Power Menu by selecting Power in the legend bar. Power Menu options are available by selecting submenus. Use the arrow keys to select a Power Menu option. Press Enter to display the submenu. Items with grayed-out text are not changeable from the submenu.

  • Page 65: Boot Menu

    Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and description Boot Time Diagnostic Disabled, Enabled Screen (Quiet Boot) The Disabled setting causes the NEC splash screen to display instead of the POST screen during the boot. Quick Boot Mode Enabled, Disabled The Enabled setting causes certain tests to be skipped during the boot, to decrease the time it takes to boot.

  • Page 66

    Boot Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and description Power On, Stay Off, Last State After Power Failure When After Power Failure is set to Power On, the system powers on after a power failure. With the Stay Off setting, the system does not power on after a power failure.

  • Page 67

    Boot Menu Items Menu Item Settings (default is bold) and description First Boot Device Select a boot device from the option list with the up Second Boot Device or down arrow; press the plus (+) or minus (-) key to Third Boot Device change the device’s boot order.

  • Page 68: Exit Menu

    Exit Menu The Exit Menu is a top-level menu in the BIOS Setup utility. Choose the Exit Menu by selecting Exit in the legend bar. Exit Menu options are available by selecting submenus. Use the arrow keys to select an Exit Menu option. Press Enter to display the submenu. Items with grayed-out text are not changeable from the submenu.

  • Page 69: Nec Select Install Cd

    See Chapter 7 for information about using the website. NEC Select Install CD The following procedures describe how to use the NEC Select Install CD that ships with your system. Please read the following sections in their entirety before using the NEC Select Install CD to install or restore any software on your system.

  • Page 70: Choosing A Program

    “NEC Driver CD” for information about installing or restoring drivers. Choosing a Program It’s important to use the NEC Select Install CD in a way that is appropriate to your needs. In some uses, the program on the CD can delete all the data from your hard drive, as well as your operating system and/or applications.

  • Page 71: Rebuilding The Hard Drive And Restoring The Operating System

    Use this program to restore selected applications from the CD after rebuilding your hard drive, or at any time to install a software package that came on the NEC Select Install See the section called “Installing Applications.”...

  • Page 72: Auto Rebuild And Restore

    The following sections explain how to use the NEC Select Install CD to rebuild and restore the system. See “Auto Rebuild and Restore” to repartition and reformat your hard drive with the OS restore. See “Custom Rebuild and Restore” for more options when you repartition and/or reformat your hard drive with the OS restore.

  • Page 73

    Welcome screen Click Continue to continue (or Exit to exit the program). A License Agreement screen appears with three options: Back, Reject, and Accept. Read the license agreement and click Accept to continue. The Restore Mode screen appears with four options: Back, Auto, Custom, and Fix OS.

  • Page 74

    The Partition Information screen that appears in Windows 95 or Windows 98 has three options (Back, FAT 16, and FAT 32) and lets you select the File Allocation Table (FAT) type you want to use for the operating system restore: Click Back to return to the Operating Mode screen.

  • Page 75: Custom Rebuild And Restore

    Install disc into the CD-ROM drive. For systems with a SCSI hard drive, a bootable diskette is included with the NEC Select Install CD. In SCSI systems, first boot the system from the bootable diskette. After the system boots, proceed with the NEC Select Install procedure described below.

  • Page 76

    Welcome screen Click Continue to continue (or Exit to exit the program). A License Agreement screen appears with three options: Back, Reject, and Accept. Read the license agreement and click Accept to continue. The Restore Mode screen appears with four options: Back, Auto, Custom, and Fix OS.

  • Page 77

    If you want to partition the hard drive, go to step 7. Otherwise, click Skip on the Partitioning the Hard Drive screen to retain the present partition structure on the hard drive. The Format Mode screen appears with four options: Back, Quick, Full, and Exit.

  • Page 78

    To install device drivers that did not come with your computer, follow the procedures in “NEC Driver CD.” Restore the applications or drivers that were not provided by NEC by using the vendor diskette(s) or CD-ROM(s) included in its original packaging.

  • Page 79: Restoring The Operating System

    If possible, back up your data before performing an OS Restore with these options. Power on or restart the system and immediately insert the NEC Select Install CD into the CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 80

    Click Continue to continue (or Exit to exit the program). A License Agreement screen appears with three options: Back, Reject, and Accept. Read the license agreement and click Accept to continue. The Restore Mode screen appears with four options: Back, Auto, Custom, and Fix OS.

  • Page 81: Installing Applications

    Using the Fix OS option repetitively without using the Auto or Custom option afterward might cause unpredictable results. See the next section, “Installing Applications” for instructions on using the NEC Selective Application Install program. See “NEC Driver CD” to install other applications and drivers. Installing Applications Use the following procedure to install most applications and the NEC Help Center with the Selective Application Restore program.

  • Page 82

    Repeat steps 2 through 5 for each option or set of options to be installed. This completes the Selective Application Restore procedure. After the Selective Application Restore process completes, you can install optional device drivers using the NEC Driver CD. See the following section, “NEC Driver CD.” Configuring the System 3-39...

  • Page 83: Using The Nec Select Install Cd With A Scsi Drive

    Using the NEC Select Install CD with a SCSI Drive If a situation arises in SCSI configurations where a full operating system restore must be performed using the NEC Select Install CD, first boot the system from the bootable diskette. (This might be necessary, for example, if the system does not boot from the hard drive.) The bootable diskette...

  • Page 84

    Double click the name of the shared CD-ROM drive. To install the operating system files, or any of the device drivers or applications that NECC provided with the system, double click the setup.exe program. The NEC Selective Restore window appears. Configuring the System 3-41...

  • Page 85

    NEC Selective Restore window Note To install additional drivers, see “NEC Driver CD.” Select the applications or drivers you want to install by double clicking on the item box or line. A check mark appears in the box. To unselect an item, double click it again so that the check mark disappears.

  • Page 86: Nec Help Center Online Documentation

    NEC Help Center Online Documentation NECC has provided an online version of this user’s guide with the NEC Help Center. The Help Center comes on the NEC Select Install CD. It’s easy to install using the Selective Application Restore program, and it provides immediate access to all the information provided with your computer.

  • Page 87: Uninstalling The Nec Help Center

    NEC Driver CD to install the drivers required for system operation. Please read a section in its entirety before using the NEC Driver CD to install any optional drivers on your system. Installing Drivers with the NEC Driver CD Follow these steps to install optional drivers that have not been factory- installed on the hard drive.

  • Page 88: Installing Drivers From A Remote Cd

    If the computer is connected to a network and set up to access a shared CD-ROM drive, a System Administrator can install the optional drivers from the NEC Driver CD in the remote CD-ROM drive. The following procedure applies for both Windows 95 and Windows NT systems.

  • Page 89

    Click OK. The driver installs and the system reboots. Insert the NEC Driver CD into the shared CD-ROM drive. Do a map connection to the shared CD-ROM drive. From the system with the shared CD-ROM drive, double click My Computer and right click on the CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 90: Jumper Settings

    When you run a setup.exe program, do not select and install drivers for any hardware that is not currently installed on the system. Doing so can damage the operating system. Follow the prompts in the installation wizard to install the driver. Restart the computer to ensure that the installation process completes successfully.

  • Page 91: Changing The Processor Speed

    Jumpers are set correctly at the factory for your configuration. If your system requires a jumper change, change only the setting for that condition. Otherwise, keep the jumpers at their factory settings. The following figure shows jumper locations on the system board. Locating system board jumper Changing the Processor Speed To change the processor speed in the BIOS Setup utility, the system must...

  • Page 92

    Access the BIOS Setup utility and record your customized settings. See “BIOS Setup Utility.” Starting the system in Configure mode resets BIOS settings to their factory defaults. Before jumpering the system for Configure mode, write down any customized BIOS settings. When the system is started in Normal mode, press F2 to bring up the BIOS Setup utility.

  • Page 93: Clearing A Password

    Move the J5G1 jumper back to pins 1 and 2 so the system can restart in normal operation mode. Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Connect system power cables and external options. Power on the system and launch the BIOS Setup utility before POST and recustomize your BIOS settings.

  • Page 94: Minitower Riser Board Jumper Settings

    Locate the J5G1 jumper block on the system board (see “System Board Jumper Settings”). Move the jumper to pins 2 and 3. This jumper setting brings the system up in Configure mode when it is rebooted. Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Connect system power cables and external options.

  • Page 95: Enabling Lan On The Minitower Riser Board

    Locating minitower riser board jumpers Enabling LAN on the Minitower Riser Board The minitower riser board supports LAN with the 3Com ASIC chip and an external LAN connector. Jumpers on block JP7 of the riser board control riser board LAN as follows: Enabled, pins 1-2 jumpered (the default) Disabled, pins 2-3 jumpered.

  • Page 96: Configuring The System Fan

    Configuring the System Fan The minitower system can be configured for a 2-wire or 3-wire fan by jumpering block JP3 as follows: 2-wire fan, pins 1-2 jumpered (the default) 3-wire fan, pins 2-3 jumpered. Hard Drive Jumper Settings Hard drive jumpering varies according to the particular model in the system and how that model is configured.

  • Page 97: Quantum Viking

    SCSI ID=14, A3, A2, and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=15, A3, A2, A1, and A0 jumpered NEC 32X CD-ROM Drive The NEC 32X CD-ROM drive CDR-1900A/PBM uses a three-position jumper block to configure the master/slave and cable select options. The user-selectable jumper settings are as follows.

  • Page 98: Zip Drive Jumpers

    MA: Master Select jumper — Enabled, pin 3 jumpered (factory default) — Disabled, pin 3 open Zip Drive Jumpers The three-position jumper block for the Zip drive is located on the rear of the drive. This description applies when the rear of the drive is viewed with the IDE connector to the left of the jumper block, and the power connector to the right.

  • Page 99: Managing System Resources

    Managing System Resources System Management Tools LANDesk Client Manager Cheyenne Backup NEC Security NEC SNMP Agent NEC WebTelligent NEC Configuration Change Notification NEC Auto Backup Utility...

  • Page 100

    This chapter provides information about the software tools and utility programs on the system that can be used to manage local or networked resources. These include LANDesk Client Manager, the NEC SNMP ™ Agent, NEC Security, and NEC WebTelligent for managing networked systems.

  • Page 101

    System Management Tools and Utilities Management Activity Method, Tool, or Utility hard drive, monitoring NEC Configuration Change Notification (CCN) hardware monitoring (for chassis LANDesk Client Manager intrusion) IRQs, setting remotely LANDesk Client Manager logging events NEC WebTelligent memory, displaying, monitoring...

  • Page 102

    Note Parallel and serial ports can only be controlled from LANDesk Client Manager if they are also enabled in NEC Security. LANDesk Client Manager settings cannot override the settings established in NEC Security. back up and restore system configuration files...

  • Page 103: Pc Health Indicator

    detect changes to CPU, memory, and hard drive characteristics and alert you to these changes (Configuration Change Notification) transfer files to and from client workstations remotely reboot client workstations. There are two main components of Client Manager: PC Health Indicator and Inventory.

  • Page 104: Monitoring Pc Health

    Monitoring PC Health PC health can be determined by monitoring various system components for threshold levels. Some of the components that are monitored include: drive space prediction of hard drive failure (Smart Hard Drive failure prediction) free virtual memory temperatures power supplies chassis opened GDI used...

  • Page 105: Dmi

    network applications system files user information. You can also view the current system configuration, edit user information, and create or restore file snapshots. As a part of the LANDesk Client Manager, the Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is the standard interface used to manage system components on the computer.

  • Page 106: Using The Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature

    Current readings are displayed for temperature, power supply voltages, and chassis state. Interrupts can be detected when “out of range” conditions occur. User prompts are displayed to alert the user to a potentially harmful condition. Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature LANDesk Client Manager allows you to monitor your system against chassis intrusion.

  • Page 107: Ldcm Admin Function

    Cheyenne Backup can also do regularly scheduled backups and scan files for viruses during a backup operation. Install the Cheyenne Backup utility from the NEC Select Install CD. For installation information, see “Installing Applications” in Chapter 3. Managing System Resources 4-9...

  • Page 108: Nec Security

    NEC SNMP Agent The NEC Desktop Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Agent is an extension to the Microsoft SNMP Agent. The NEC SNMP Agent permits a network administrator to manage NEC PowerMate clients. The NEC SNMP Agent performs the following major functions: Assets Management —...

  • Page 109: Installing The Nec Snmp Agent

    Installing the NEC SNMP Agent Install the NEC SNMP Agent software on a system with the Windows 98, Windows 95, or Windows NT operating system as follows. Do not install both the NEC SNMP Agent and LANDesk Client Manager on a computer that is running the Windows NT operating system.

  • Page 110: Configuring The Nec Snmp Agent For Windows Nt

    157.123.176.100) must be entered in the Traps for “Public Community” to receive traps from the NEC SNMP agents. For the NEC SNMP Agent to send a trap to the NEC SNMP Desktop Manager, the port number can be configured from the registry: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\...

  • Page 111: Nec Webtelligent

    157.123.176.100) must be entered in the Traps for “Public Community” to receive traps from the NEC SNMP agents. For the NEC SNMP Agent to send a trap to the NEC SNMP Desktop Manager, the port number can be configured from the registry: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\...

  • Page 112: Nec Webtelligent Features

    The administrator can perform WebTelligent account and asset management, monitor the “health” of networked systems, and receive alert notifications from managed clients. NEC WebTelligent is an easy-to-use web-based graphical user interface that runs on the Netscape and Microsoft Internet Explorer browsers (see the following figure).

  • Page 113: Nec Webtelligent Requirements

    Security — Intranet user authentication — Chassis intrusion monitoring Reduced Costs — WebTelligent is free with the purchase of an NEC PowerMate Managed desktop computer — WebTelligent is available as a free download from the NECC website (www.nec-computers.com). NEC WebTelligent Requirements...

  • Page 114: Nec Webtelligent Installation

    NEC Auto-Discovery Agent TCP/IP. NEC WebTelligent Installation Install the NEC WebTelligent software and the NEC Auto Discovery Agent software on a Windows 98, Windows 95, or Windows NT web server as follows. Close all open applications before installing WebTelligent and Auto Discovery Agent.

  • Page 115

    Look for the following directory: C:\Program files\PBNEC\WebTelligent Discovery Agent If it is not there, install the software from the NEC Select Install CD following the procedure in “Selective Application Restore Program.” Managing System Resources 4-17...

  • Page 116

    Open and configure WebTelligent as follows. Note LDCM 3.32027 must be installed on every client. At a managed desktop computer, start a web browser. Set the URL to the web server’s machine name (for example: http://PowerMate-A). At the Login screen (see the following screen), enter the username and password as follows.

  • Page 117: Nec Configuration Change Notification

    Windows screen. NEC WebTelligent Control Screen NEC Configuration Change Notification NEC Configuration Change Notification is an application that runs as Windows starts. It works with the LANDesk application and DMI (Desktop Management Interface) software to determine if there has been a change in the processor, main memory, or hard drive since the last startup.

  • Page 118: Nec Auto Backup Utility

    The Auto Backup utility runs from the Startup group on the Windows Start menu. The utility has some configuration options that are accessible through the system tray icon. The NEC Tools group on the Start menu includes a ReadMe file containing recent information about the utility as well as access to a Help document.

  • Page 119: Installing Options

    Installing Options General Rules Safety Precautions System Unit Cover Chassis Floor System Board Options Expansion Boards Data Storage Devices...

  • Page 120

    Your computer supports a variety of industry-standard and NECC expansion options. This chapter provides installation instructions for system board upgrades including a memory module upgrade, AGP board replacement, and a processor upgrade. In addition, it provides instructions for adding expansion boards and installing data storage devices. All options require that the system cover be removed.

  • Page 121

    Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged. Static electricity and improper installation procedures can damage computer components. Protect computer components by following these safety instructions.

  • Page 122: Removing The Desktop Cover

    System Unit Cover The following sections describe how to remove and replace the system unit cover. Removing the Desktop Cover The following procedure describes how to remove the desktop cover. Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged.

  • Page 123

    Loosening desktop cover screws A – Thumbscrews From the rear of the system, grasp the sides and slide the cover about an inch away from the front. Note The cover fits tightly. Press the front edge of the cover to release it from the front panel.

  • Page 124: Replacing The Desktop Cover

    Replacing the Desktop Cover Replace the desktop cover as follows. To prevent damage to system cables, carefully tuck the cables out of the path of the cover. Position the cover over the chassis with its front edge about one inch behind the front of the chassis.

  • Page 125: Removing The Minitower Cover

    Removing the Minitower Cover The following procedure describes how to remove the minitower cover. Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged. Note If the cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports it in a screen message the next time the system is...

  • Page 126

    Loosening minitower cover screws A – Thumbscrews Slide the cover back about one-half inch; if necessary, anchor one hand on the rear of the system unit as you slide the cover. Lift up at the top of the cover to release the cover tabs from the chassis.

  • Page 127: Replacing The Minitower Cover

    Releasing the minitower cover Pull the cover up until it comes free of the chassis. Replacing the Minitower Cover Replace the minitower cover as follows. Position the cover over the system unit. The front edge of the cover should be about one-half inch behind the front edge of the chassis. Fit the cover into the chassis, making sure that the tabs along the lower left edge of the cover are aligned with the securing rail on the edge of the chassis.

  • Page 128

    Replacing the minitower cover A – Cover Tabs (under cover) C – Cover Tabs (under cover) B – Securing Rail (behind D – Securing Rail (behind panel) panel) Slide the cover forward to meet the securing rail behind front panel. Note The cover fits tightly.

  • Page 129: Chassis Floor

    Chassis Floor Before replacing the system board or expansion boards, remove the minitower chassis floor. The chassis floor and the stand are usually removed as a unit. Removing the Chassis Floor To remove the minitower chassis floor, perform the following steps. (Do not remove the stand from the floor before removing the floor.

  • Page 130: Replacing The Chassis Floor

    Slide the floor back about one-half inch along the chassis. Once the floor tabs are free of the slots in the chassis, lift the floor away from the chassis. Removing the chassis floor A – Slots C – Tabs (behind chassis floor) B –...

  • Page 131: Removing The Stand

    Removing the Stand Unless there is a specific need to remove the stand from the minitower chassis floor (if the system is being packed for shipment, for example), keep the stand attached to the chassis floor. To remove the stand, use the following steps. Keep the system unit in the stand unless the computer is being prepared for shipment.

  • Page 132: Replacing The Stand

    Replacing the Stand To replace the stand, use the following steps. To prevent tipping, always place the system unit back in its stand before using the computer. Place the system unit over the stand with its front edge about one-half inch behind the front of the stand.

  • Page 133: System Board Options

    System Board Options This section describes how to remove and replace the system board. It also describes how to change options on the system board. Procedures described in this chapter include: adding an AGP board adding memory modules upgrading the processor replacing the system board.

  • Page 134: Agp Board

    AGP Board The system board contains one accelerated graphics port (AGP) for installing AGP-compatible graphics boards. The following sections describe how to remove and replace an AGP board in your system. Removing the AGP Board To remove an AGP board option in your system, use the following steps. Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”).

  • Page 135: Replacing The Agp Board

    Removing the AGP board in the minitower A – AGP Board Screw B – AGP Board Replacing the AGP Board To replace an AGP board option in your system, use the following steps. Note If you are installing a PCI video board, use the installation procedures for an expansion board (see “Expansion Board Installation”).

  • Page 136: Adding Video Memory

    Adding Video Memory Some AGP boards can be upgraded from 4 MB to 8 MB with the addition of a 4-MB video memory module. Use the following guidelines to upgrade video memory. If upgrading an existing graphics board, remove the board. See “Removing the AGP Board.”...

  • Page 137

    DIMM Speed to Processor Speed Processor Speed DIMM Speed and Processor Bus Speed 333 MHz and below 66 MHz 350 MHz and above 100 MHz Supported DIMMs DIMM Size Non-ECC Configuration ECC Configuration 32 MB 4 Mbit x 64 4 Mbit x 72 64 MB 8 Mbit x 64 8 Mbit x 72...

  • Page 138: Checking System Memory

    Sample DIMM Upgrade Paths* Total DIMM 1 DIMM 2 DIMM 3 Memory 16 MB 32 MB 128 MB 166 MB 16 MB 32 MB 128 MB 176 MB 64 MB 64 MB 64 MB 192 MB 32 MB 32 MB 128 MB 192 MB 32 MB...

  • Page 139: Removing A Dimm

    Removing a DIMM If your memory configuration requires the removal of a module, perform the following steps: Before opening the computer and before handling boards or memory modules, reduce static discharge by touching the system's metal chassis. Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Locate the system memory upgrade sockets on the system board (see “System Board Options”).

  • Page 140

    If you need to remove a currently installed memory module, see “Removing a DIMM.” Before you install a module, reduce static discharge by touching the system's metal chassis. Align the new module with an empty memory socket. Make sure the notches on the module align with the keys in the socket.

  • Page 141: Processor Upgrade

    Processor Upgrade The system has an S.E.C. cartridge Slot 1 242-pin edge connector. The processor is secured to the connector in a retention mechanism. When the processor is inserted in this connector the VID pins program the voltage regulator on the system board to the required voltage for the processor. Incorrect installation of the processor can damage the processor, system board, or both.

  • Page 142

    Removing the processor A – Locking Tab D – Retention Mechanism B – CPU/Heat sink E – System Board C – Locking Tab F – Top Bar Before picking up the processor, reduce static discharge by touching the metal frame of the system unit. Release the locking tabs holding the processor in the retention mechanism by pressing them toward the processor.

  • Page 143: Installing An Upgrade Processor

    Installing an Upgrade Processor Install a processor by following these steps: If you are replacing the processor currently in your system, remove the processor (see “Removing the Processor”). Before picking up the processor, reduce static discharge by touching the metal chassis of the system unit. Line the processor up with the guides in the retention mechanism.

  • Page 144

    Slide the processor into the retention mechanism until it is seated firmly in the processor socket. Inserting the processor in the retention mechanism A – CPU/Heat sink C – Bottom Bar B – Retention Mechanism D – System Board Secure the processor by locking the tabs at both ends of the processor in the retention mechanism.

  • Page 145: System Board

    Securing the processor in the retention mechanism A – Locking Tabs D – System Board B – CPU/Heat sink E – Bottom Bar C – Retention Mechanism F – Top Bar The processor speed must be set correctly in BIOS. For detailed instructions on changing the processor speed, start with step 2 of “Changing the Processor Speed”...

  • Page 146: Removing The System Board

    Removing the System Board Use this procedure to remove the system board: Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Remove the AGP board (see “Removing an AGP Board”). Lift the insertion/extraction latch slightly and pull it away from the system unit.

  • Page 147: Replacing The System Board

    Insertion/extraction latch in the minitower A – System Board B – Insertion/Extraction Latch Carefully slide the board the rest of the way out, taking care not to lift the board before it is free of the chassis. Replacing the System Board Take care when replacing the system board.

  • Page 148

    Correct alignment of the system board A – Edge of Chassis C – Rail B – Latch Open D – Edge of System Board 5-30 Installing Options...

  • Page 149

    Incorrect alignment of the system board A – Edge of Chassis C – Edge of System Board B – Latch Open To prevent damage to the latch, align the system board with the outside edge of the chassis before closing the latch. Push the latch closed.

  • Page 150: Expansion Boards

    Secured position of latch A – Latch Closed C – Edge of System Board B – Edge of Chassis Replace the graphics board in the AGP slot (see “Replacing the AGP Board”). Replace the minitower stand and chassis floor (see “Replacing the Chassis Floor”).

  • Page 151: Locating Expansion Slots

    Locating Expansion Slots ISA expansion slots support industry-standard 8-bit or 16-bit expansion boards. The PCI/ISA slot also supports PCI expansion boards. The PCI slots support bus mastering and accept PCI expansion boards that run at half the system board's bus speed. The PCI bus handles 32 bits of data at a time, being wider as well as faster than the standard ISA bus.

  • Page 152: Installing An Expansion Board

    Locating minitower expansion board slots A – ISA Slot C – PCI Slots B – PCI/ISA Slot Installing an Expansion Board To install an expansion board in the system, perform the following steps. Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Follow any preinstallation instructions that come with the expansion board (such as setting switches or jumpers on the board).

  • Page 153

    A slot cover can damage the system board or any option board if it falls into the system. Take care to keep the slot cover from falling when removing the screw. If the slot cover does fall into the unit, remove it before replacing the cover. Removing a desktop slot cover A –...

  • Page 154

    Removing a minitower slot cover A – Screw B – Slot Cover Holding the board by its edges or its bracket, insert the board into the expansion slot (see the following figure). Press the board firmly into the expansion slot connector on the riser board.

  • Page 155

    Installing an expansion board in the desktop Installing an expansion board in the minitower Use the slot cover screw removed earlier to secure the expansion board. Installing Options 5-37...

  • Page 156: Removing An Expansion Board

    Attach any signal cables required by the expansion board. Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Removing an Expansion Board To remove an expansion board, perform the following steps: Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Note Before removing the expansion board, you must remove the AGP board (if installed) and the chassis floor (see the sections “Removing the...

  • Page 157: Locating Device Slots

    Locating Device Slots The desktop system has four slots and the minitower has six slots as described below (see the figures on the following page): a 3 1/2-inch accessible device slot that contains the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive 3 1/2-inch internal hard drive slots (1-inch high, thin-height) —...

  • Page 158

    Locating desktop device slots A – 3 1/2-Inch Internal Slot C – 5 1/4-Inch Accessible Slots B – 3 1/2-Inch Accessible Slot Locating minitower device slots A – 3 1/2-Inch Internal Slot C – 5 1/4-Inch Accessible Slots B – 3 1/2-Inch Accessible Slot 5-40 Installing Options...

  • Page 159: Preparing The Device

    Preparing the Device Before installing a storage device in the system, follow any preinstallation instructions that come with the device. For example, check the following information: Diskette drive — remove any termination on the optional diskette drive. See the documentation that comes with the drive. IDE drive —...

  • Page 160

    Riser board cable connectors (desktop) A – CD Audio In D – Diskette Drive Cable B – Modem In E – Secondary IDE Cable C – Primary IDE Cable Riser board cable connectors (minitower) A – Primary IDE Cable C – Diskette Drive Cable B –...

  • Page 161

    Riser board auxiliary cable connectors (minitower) A – CD Audio In F – Speaker B – Modem In G – Fan C – Wake-On LAN H – NLX D – Chassis Intrusion I – LAN E – Front Panel/IRDA Use the following table when configuring IDE drives on the primary and secondary IDE connectors on the riser board.

  • Page 162

    IDE Connector Configuration Configuration Primary connector Secondary connector 1 device (hard drive) Master — hard drive Master — none Slave — none Slave — none 2 devices (hard drive, Master — hard drive Master — CD-ROM CD-ROM) Slave — none Slave —...

  • Page 163: Diskette Drive Signal Cable

    Diskette Drive Signal Cable A diskette drive signal cable comes attached to the riser board and to the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive. The colored edge of the cable goes to pin 1 on the cable connector. Align the red edge of the cable with pin 1 (the notched end) on the drive connector.

  • Page 164: System Power Cables

    System Power Cables Power cables come from the power supply and are attached to the standard storage devices. System power cables vary in length and provide connector sizes to accommodate a variety of supported storage configurations. Power cable connectors are keyed to fit only in the correct position.

  • Page 165: Diskette Drive Cabling

    Connecting IDE drive cables A – IDE Cable B – Power Cable If you are installing a CD-ROM drive or DVD-ROM drive and your system has speakers, connect the audio cable to the CD In connector on the riser board or an audio board (see the instructions that come with the drive).

  • Page 166: Pc Card Adapter Cabling

    PC Card Adapter Cabling The following procedure describes how to cable a PC card adapter. Connect the connectors at one end of the cable set to the PC adapter board. (The PC adapter board is installed in one of the expansion slots.

  • Page 167: Network Board Wake-on Lan Cabling

    Connect the power cable to the power connector on the SCSI device (see “System Power Cables”). Configure the device according to the SCSI utility in BIOS. See the documentation that comes with the device for information on terminating and jumpering the device. Network Board Wake-On LAN Cabling If the computer has an Intel PRO LAN 100 M2 network board, your system can be readied for “Wake-On LAN”...

  • Page 168: Removing The Desktop Front Panel

    Removing the Desktop Front Panel Remove the desktop front panel before installing a device in one of the 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots. If you are installing an accessible 5 1/4-inch device, you also need to remove the blank panel that covers the slot on the front panel. Remove the front panel and blank panel as follows.

  • Page 169

    Removing the desktop front panel A – Tabs (behind front panel) C – Front Panel B – Blank Panel D – Tabs (behind front panel) If you are installing an accessible device, such as a Zip drive or tape drive, remove the blank panel. Remove the blank panel from the slot by pressing the panel tabs from inside the front panel and pushing the blank panel out.

  • Page 170: Replacing The Desktop Front Panel

    Remove the perforated metal plate from the selected slot on the chassis by pulling the plate back and forth until it releases (see the following figure). Locating the breakaway panel A – Breakaway Blank Panel Install the device (see “Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device”). Replacing the Desktop Front Panel If a 5 1/4-inch device has been removed from your system, you need to replace the blank panel before replacing the front panel.

  • Page 171: Removing The Minitower Front Panel

    Aligning the desktop front panel Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Removing the Minitower Front Panel Remove the front panel before installing a device in one of the 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots. The front panel does not need to be removed if you are installing an internal 3 1/2-inch hard drive.

  • Page 172

    Removing the front panel A – Pop-In Tabs C – Pop-In Tabs (behind front B – Locking Tabs (behind front panel) panel) Identify the slot on the front panel for the device being installed. Remove the blank plastic panel from the selected slot by pressing the panel tabs from inside the front panel and pushing the blank panel out (see the following figure).

  • Page 173: Replacing The Minitower Front Panel

    Locating blank panel tabs A – Blank Panel Tabs Replacing the Minitower Front Panel If you remove a 5 1/4-inch device from your system, you need to cover the opening in the front panel with a blank panel. Do this before replacing the front panel.

  • Page 174: Installing A 5 1/4-inch Device

    Replacing the front panel A – Pop-In Tabs C – Pop-In Tabs (behind front B – Locking Tabs (behind front panel) panel) Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device Use the following procedure to install a 5 1/4-inch device into a 5 1/4- inch accessible device slot: Note A 3 1/2-inch hard drive can also be installed in a 5 1/4-inch...

  • Page 175

    Remove the front panel. Locate the device rails that ship with your system. Attach the rails to the sides of the device with the four screws that come with the device. Note To order a rail kit, call the NECC Technical Support Center at 1- 800-632-4525 and order kit number OP-540-22401.

  • Page 176

    Inserting a device in the desktop Inserting a device in the minitower Connect the device cables (see “Connecting Device Cables” and “Cabling an IDE drive” or “Cabling an Internal SCSI Device”). Insert the device the rest of the way into the device slot, making sure that the locking tabs at the ends of the device rails snap into the brackets on each side of the device slot.

  • Page 177: Installing A 3 1/2-inch Hard Drive

    Replace the system unit front panel. Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Run the Setup program to set the new configuration (see “BIOS Setup Utility” in Chapter 3). Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Hard Drive Your desktop system has one internal drive slot located near the rear of the chassis.

  • Page 178

    Insert the new hard drive into the drive slot with the cable connectors toward the front of the system and the four holes toward the outer wall of the chassis (see the following figure). Align the four holes on the hard drive with the holes in the chassis. Secure the device to the chassis with the four screws that came with the device or the screws from the old device.

  • Page 179

    Remove the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). If a currently installed hard drive is being replaced: Label the IDE drive signal and power cables connected to the drive and then disconnect them. Remove the four screws securing the drive to the internal bracket or the chassis wall.

  • Page 180

    Securing a hard drive to the chassis wall A – Hard Drive Connect the device cables (see “Connecting Device Cables” and “Cabling an IDE drive” or “Cabling an Internal SCSI Device”). Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”). Run the Setup program to set the new configuration (see “BIOS Setup Utility”...

  • Page 181: Solving System Problems

    Solving System Problems Solutions to Common Problems How to Clean the Mouse Battery Replacement How to Get Help...

  • Page 182: Cd-rom/dvd-rom Drive Problems

    Occasionally, you may encounter a problem with your computer. In most cases, the problem is one that you can solve yourself. Your system has a built-in program that automatically checks its components when the system is powered on. If there is a problem, the system displays an error message.

  • Page 183

    The CD-ROM drive does not automatically start when a CD is inserted. If you have just enabled the “Auto insert notification” feature, you must reboot the system to have the new setting take effect. If the “Auto insert notification” feature has been disabled you can enable it by following these steps.

  • Page 184: Diskette Drive Problems

    The CD does not eject due to a power failure or software error. Turn off the system and use the CD-ROM emergency eject feature. Insert the end of a paper clip into the eject hole. Press inward on the clip to open the door. The CD-ROM drive plays the disc but no sound is heard.

  • Page 185: Keyboard Problems

    If you were trying to reboot the system from a bootable diskette (a “boot disk”) but got one of these messages, the diskette might not be bootable. Insert a diskette you know is bootable in drive A and reboot the system. If the system boots from this diskette, your other diskette was not bootable.

  • Page 186: Monitor Problems

    Some keys don’t always work on the keyboard. Your keyboard may need cleaning. See the user's guide for information on cleaning the keyboard. Monitor Problems Check the following problems to see the possible causes and solutions. Monitor screen is dark or the display is hard to read. Check that the monitor is on.

  • Page 187: Mouse Problems

    Mouse Problems Check the following problem to see the possible causes and solutions. Mouse does not respond. You may have connected the mouse after turning on your system. Turn the system off, make sure the mouse is connected, and turn the system back on.

  • Page 188: Speaker Problems

    The system times out sooner/later than the time specified as the “inactivity timeout.” Power management can be enabled or disabled, and the inactivity timeouts specified, through the BIOS. There are also settings for power management features through Windows. Check that the settings in Windows do not conflict with the settings in BIOS.

  • Page 189: System Problems

    System Problems Check the following list to match your problem and see the possible causes and solutions. No power and power lamp not lit. Check that all power switches are on. Check that the power cable is plugged into the system power socket and that the other end is plugged into a live, properly grounded AC power outlet or surge protector.

  • Page 190

    System does not maintain date, time, or system configuration information. Change the battery (see “Battery Replacement” in this chapter). For assistance, call your NECC dealer or the NECC Technical Support Center. System does not boot from hard drive. The system usually tries to start from the diskette drive before it starts from the hard drive.

  • Page 191: How To Clean The Mouse

    BIOS changes have not taken effect. It is possible that the changes were not saved before exiting the setup utility. Go into the BIOS setup utility and make the changes again, save them, and exit the utility. All system boards use a battery to maintain system configuration information.

  • Page 192

    Mouse ball cover A – Mouse Ball Cover Clean the mouse as follows. Use tap water, or tap water and a mild detergent, to clean the mouse ball. Use a clean, lint-free cloth to dry the ball. Blow into the mouse socket to remove remaining dust or lint. Gently put the ball back into the mouse.

  • Page 193: Battery Replacement

    Battery Replacement All system boards use a battery to maintain system configuration information. Your system uses a coin-cell battery mounted on the system board (see the following figure). If it fails to maintain system configuration information, replace it with an identically rated battery from the same manufacturer.

  • Page 194

    Locating the battery socket on the system board A – Battery Carefully lift the battery clip until there is enough space to slide the battery out of the socket. To maintain a tight battery contact with the socket, do not over-bend the battery clip. Remove the battery and discard in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Page 195: How To Get Help

    Carefully lift the clip on the battery socket. With the positive (+) side facing up, slide the new battery into the socket. If necessary, slide the system board back into the chassis (see “Replacing the System Board” in Chapter 5). Replace the system unit cover (see “System Unit Cover”...

  • Page 196: Help From Your Necc Dealer

    Help From Your NECC Dealer The NECC dealer from whom you purchased your system is a good source of help and should be contacted. The dealer is backed by complete support resources and programs within NECC. Help From NECC Technical Support Center Help is available to you through the NECC Technical Support Center.

  • Page 197

    If your system requires repair service from NECC, call 1-800-632-4525 (United States and Canada only). If you are outside the U.S. and Canada, please contact your local NECC sales provider. Solving System Problems 6-17...

  • Page 198: Getting Services And Support

    Getting Services and Support NECC Website NECC FTP Site Email/Fax Technical Support Service NECC Technical Support Services NECC Customer Assistance Center...

  • Page 199: Necc Website

    Support and links to vendor websites T automated email form for your technical support questions T Reseller’s area (password accessible). To access the NECC Home Page, enter the following Internet Uniform Resource Locator (URL) in your browser: www.nec-computers.com 7-2 Getting Services and Support...

  • Page 200: Necc Ftp Site

    NECC FTP Site You can use the Internet to access the NECC FTP (file transfer protocol) site to download various files (video drivers, printer drivers, BIOS updates, and Setup Disk files). To access the NECC FTP site, enter the following Internet ftp address through your service: ftp.neccsdeast.com Once in the file menu, follow the prompts to choose and download the...

  • Page 201: Necc Technical Support Services

    NECC Technical Support Services NECC also offers direct technical support through its Technical Support Center. (NECC technical support is for U.S. and Canadian customers only; international customers should check with their sales provider.) Direct assistance is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call the NECC Technical Support Center, toll free, at 1-800-632-4525 (U.S.

  • Page 202: Setting Up A Healthy Work Environment

    Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment Making Your Computer Work for You Arrange Your Equipment Adjust Your Chair Adjust Your Input Devices Adjust Your Monitor Vary Your Workday Pre-existing Conditions and Psychosocial Factors Checking Your Comfort: How Do You Measure Up?

  • Page 203: Making Your Computer Work For You

    Prolonged or improper use of a computer workstation may pose a risk of serious injury. To reduce your risk of injury, set up and use your computer in the manner described in this appendix. Contact a doctor if you experience pain, tenderness, swelling, burning, cramping, stiffness, throbbing, weakness, soreness, tingling and/or numbness in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, and/or legs.

  • Page 204: Arrange Your Equipment

    Arrange Your Equipment Arrange your equipment so that you can work in a natural and relaxed position. Place items that you use frequently within easy reach. Adjust your workstation setup to the proper height (as described in this appendix) by lowering the table or stand that holds your computer equipment or raising the seat height of your chair.

  • Page 205: Adjust Your Chair

    Adjust Your Chair Your chair should be adjustable and stable. Vary your posture throughout the day. Check the following: T Keep your body in a relaxed yet upright position. The backrest of your chair should support the inward curve of your back. T Use the entire seat and backrest to support your body.

  • Page 206: Adjust Your Input Devices

    T Extend your lower legs slightly so that the angle between your thighs and lower legs is 90° or more. T Place your feet flat on the floor. Only use a footrest when attempts to adjust your chair and workstation fail to keep your feet flat. T Be sure that you have adequate clearance between the top of your thighs and the underside of your workstation.

  • Page 207

    T Adjust the keyboard height so that your elbows are near your body and your forearms are parallel to the floor, with your forearms resting on either armrests or forearm supports, in the manner described previously. If you do not have armrests or forearm supports, your upper arms should hang comfortably at your sides.

  • Page 208: Adjust Your Monitor

    T Type with your hands and wrists floating above the keyboard. Use a wrist pad only to rest your wrists between typing. Avoid resting your wrists on sharp edges. T Type with your wrists straight. Instead of twisting your wrists sideways to press hard-to-reach keys, move your whole arm.

  • Page 209: Vary Your Workday

    T Adjust the monitor height so that the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye level. Your eyes should look slightly downward when viewing the middle of the screen. T Position your monitor no closer than 12 inches and no farther away than 28 inches from your eyes.

  • Page 210

    T Use a timer or reminder software to remind you to take breaks. T To enhance blood circulation, alter your sitting posture periodically and keep your hands and wrists warm. Note For more information on workstation setup, see the American National Standard for Human Factors Engineering of Visual Display Terminal Workstations.

  • Page 211: Pre-existing Conditions And Psychosocial Factors

    Pre-existing Conditions and Psychosocial Factors Pre-existing conditions that may cause or make some people more susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders include the following: hereditary factors, vascular disorders, obesity, nutritional deficiencies (e.g., Vitamin B deficiency), endocrine disorders (e.g., diabetes), hormonal imbalances, connective tissue disorders (e.g., arthritis), prior trauma (to the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, or legs), prior musculoskeletal disorders, aging, fluid retention due to pregnancy, poor physical conditioning and dietary habits, and other conditions.

  • Page 212: Checking Your Mouse

    Checking Your Mouse T Is your mouse at the same height as the keyboard and next to the keyboard? T Are your wrists straight and your touch light when moving the mouse? Checking Your Monitor T Did you adjust your monitor so that the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye level? T Do you periodically rest your eyes by blinking often or looking away from the screen?

  • Page 213: System Specifications

    System Specifications System Processor Memory (RAM, Cache, ROM) Calendar Clock Input/Output (I/O) Facilities Video Memory Sound System Fax/Modem Board Network Board Peripherals Power Operating Environment Dimensions and Weight Compliance...

  • Page 214: System Processor

    System Processor Celeron Processor T 300-MHz processor — 300 MHz internally, 66-MHz front-side bus T 333-MHz processor — 333 MHz internally, 66-MHz front-side bus T 433-MHz processor — 433 HMz internally, 66-MHz front-side bus Pentium II Processor T 266-MHz processor — 266 MHz internally, 66-MHz front-side bus T 300-MHz processor —...

  • Page 215: Processor Support

    Processor Support T 32-bit addressing T 64-bit data Processor Socket T One S.E.C. cartridge Slot 1, 242-pin edge connector T Processor VID pins program the voltage regulator on system board to the required voltage for the processor T Secured to connector on system board in retention mechanism Random Access Memory (RAM) Standard RAM —...

  • Page 216: Calendar Clock

    Calendar Clock Year/month/day/hour/minute/second/.01 second; maintained by battery backup module Battery type — Lithium coin cell Input/Output (I/O) Facilities Industry-standard interfaces integrated on system board: T Parallel — bi-directional, ECP/EPP support; one 25-pin connector T Serial — two high-speed RS-232C ports using 16550 UART, support transfer rates up to 115.2 KB per second;...

  • Page 217: Video Memory

    T Diskette drive — supports one diskette drive, 1.2-MB or 1.44-MB; 34- pin connector T CD Audio In connector T Modem In connector T Wake-On LAN T Chassis intrusion (minitower) T I/O bus expansion slots Desktop — One 32-bit PCI slot —...

  • Page 218: Sound System

    Sound System Systems come with audio on the system board; based on Crystal CS4235B hardware. T 3-D enhanced stereo controller with analog components T Compatible with Sound Blaster Pro ™ ™ ™ , Sound Blaster 2.0, Ad Lib ® ™ MPU-401, and Microsoft Windows Sound System for PC sound...

  • Page 219: Fax/modem Board

    Fax/Modem Board Systems might come with one of the following fax/modem boards. 3Com Sportster V.34 (Akita) 56.6 Kbps T Data (maximum speed): x2 ™ technology, ITU-T V.34+, ITU-T V.34 , ITU-T V.32bis, ITU-T V.32, ITU-T V.23, ITU-T V.22bis, ITU-T V.22, Bell 212A, Bell 103 T Error Control and Data Compression: ITU-T V.42, ITU-T V.42bis, MNP5 T Fax Modulation Schemes: ITU-T V.17, ITU-T V.29,...

  • Page 220: Network Board

    T Fax Modulation Schemes ITU-T V.17, ITU-T V.29 , ITU-T V.27ter, ITU-T V.21 channel 2, Group III 14,400 and 9,600 bps T Fax Standards TIA/EIA 578 Class 1 Fax, TIA/EIA 592 Class 2.0 Fax T Transmission: Asynchronous ® PCI V90 56.6 Kbps T Data Transmission: 56K, 33,600, 28,800, 14,400, 9600, 4800, 2400, 1200, 300 bps (asynchronous) T Fax Transmission: 14,400, 9600, 4800 bps send/receive, Group III,...

  • Page 221: Peripherals

    Peripherals Specifications for the following peripherals are given in the following sections. Note Your system may have the following peripherals, depending on your model and the peripherals you ordered. T Hard Drive T Diskette Drive T CD-ROM Drive T DVD-ROM Drive T Zip Drive T Tape Backup Unit T PC Card Adapter...

  • Page 222: Diskette Drive

    Diskette Drive NEC Diskette Drive FD1231H-013, 3 1/2-inch, 1.44 MB T Recording capacity — High density mode: Unformatted: 2.00/1.00 MB Formatted: 1440 KB (512B 18 Sec) 720 KB (256B 18 Sec) — Normal density mode: Unformatted: 1.00/0.50 MB Formatted: 640 KB (256B 16 Sec)

  • Page 223: Cd-rom Drive

    CD-ROM Drive One of the following CD-ROM drives comes in the system. Lucky Goldstar 32X CD-ROM drive T Model — LG Electronics CD-ROM drive CRD-8240B T Applicable Disc Format — Mixed Mode (Audio and Data Combined) — CD-DA, Mode 1 (basic format), Mode 2 form 1 and 2 —...

  • Page 224

    — non-operating: 5% to 90% (non-condensing) T Dimensions — H x W x L: 41.5 x 146 x 201 mm max T Weight — 0.958 Kg NEC 32X CD-ROM drive T Model CDR-1900A/PBM T Capacity — 656 Mbytes (Mode 1), 748 MBytes (Mode 2) T Blocks per disk —...

  • Page 225

    T Block rate — 75 blocks/second (Normal Speed) — 900 — 2460 blocks/second — Speed: 12X — 32.8X CAV T Scanning velocity — 1.2 ~ 1.4 meters/sec (Normal Speed) T Rotation speed — ~539 to 198 rpm (Normal Speed), variable T Latency (average) —...

  • Page 226

    T Sustained Data Transfer Rate: CD-ROM outside: — 4,700 KB/sec (min.), 4,800 KB/sec (typical) CD-ROM inside: — 2,150 KB/sec (min.), 2,350 KB/sec (typical) T Access Time: Random Access: — 100 ms (typical), 140 ms (max.) 1/3 Stroke: — 90 ms (typical), 140 ms (max.) Full Stroke: —...

  • Page 227: Dvd-rom Drive

    T Humidity — Operating: 20% to 80% RH — Non-Operating: 20% to 900% RH T Dimensions — Height 41.3 mm — Width 145.8 mm — Depth 192.9 mm — Weight 1.2 Kg DVD-ROM Drive T Interface — IDE/ATAPI T Buffer memory size — 512 Kb T Maximum data transfer rate —...

  • Page 228: Zip Drive

    Zip Drive Iomega Zip 100 ATA Drive Performance: T Sustained data transfer rate up to 11.2 Mbits/sec T Burst transfer rate up to 26.7 Mbits/sec T Minimum seek — 4.0 ms T Average seek — 29.0 ms T Maximum seek — 55.0 ms T Average latency —...

  • Page 229: Tape Backup Unit

    Tape Backup Unit Seagate STT8000 ATAPI minicartridge drive T Capacity/900 Oe 740' Travan cartridge — 4.0 GB (uncompressed) — 8.0 GB (compressed) T Effective backup rate: — 30 MB/min typical native — 45 MB/min typical compressed T Data transfer rate: 300/450/600 KB/second FastSense Speakers Harmon/Kardon 10-watt stereo speakers T Magnetically shielded...

  • Page 230: Dimensions And Weights

    Dimensions and Weights Desktop System Unit T Width — 18.5 in. T Depth — 16.4 in. T Height — 4.5 in. T Weight — starting at 26 lb. Minitower System Unit T Height — 17 in. (431.8 mm) T Width — 8.5 in. (215.9 mm) T Depth —...

  • Page 231: Questions And Answers

    Questions and Answers Boot Questions BIOS Questions Monitor Questions Multimedia Questions CD-ROM Drive or DVD-ROM Drive Questions Mouse Questions Power Management Questions System Security Questions Memory Questions Modem Questions Miscellaneous Questions...

  • Page 232: Boot Questions

    Boot Questions What is the meaning of the boot message that appears when I turn on the computer? Boot messages, such as “Escape to view POST, F2 to enter BIOS Setup,” or “Press F2 to run SETUP,” indicate the following startup options: T Wait while the system loads the operating system.

  • Page 233

    Why won’t my computer boot from the CD-ROM drive when I try to reload software from the NEC Select Install CD? Restart your computer and press F2 when you see the boot message (such as “Escape to view POST, F2 to enter BIOS Setup,” or “Press F2 to run SETUP”).

  • Page 234: Bios Questions

    Note When starting, the system looks for the operating system files. It looks at the boot devices in your system, in the order that is specified in the BIOS. If the diskette drive comes before the hard drive in boot order and you do not have a diskette in drive A, the system boots from the hard drive.

  • Page 235: Monitor Questions

    Note See Chapter 7 in this guide for information on accessing the NECC website and the FTP site, or for information on obtaining service and support from the NECC Technical Support Center. Monitor Questions Why doesn’t anything display on my monitor screen when I boot my system? If the monitor power indicator is not lit, turn on the monitor power.

  • Page 236: Multimedia Questions

    Multimedia Questions Does audio come standard on my system? Depending on your system, sound components are installed on the system board or on an audio board option that you may order from NECC. Refer to Appendix B, “System Specifications” for information about the system’s audio features and capabilities.

  • Page 237: Cd-rom Drive Or Dvd-rom Drive Questions

    What is the advantage of AGP? Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) is a dedicated, high-bandwidth port on the system board that improves graphics performance. AGP operates at bus frequencies up to 133 MHz versus 33 MHz for PCI. The system board contains a dedicated AGP slot that accepts compatible AGP boards.

  • Page 238: Power Management Questions

    How can I change my mouse buttons for left-handed use? You can switch the right and left buttons on your mouse in Windows. Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar. Point to Settings and click Control Panel. From the Control Panel, double click the Mouse icon. A menu provides options, which include Swap Left/Right buttons.

  • Page 239: System Security Questions

    The system also provides the following security features: T NEC Security The NEC Security utility provides password protection and allows you to disable access to the diskette drive, COM ports, or a printer port. T Windows network security features...

  • Page 240

    T Chassis intrusion notification Whenever the chassis cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the incident and then reports it onscreen the next time the system is rebooted. T Security slot The security slot on the back of the minitower chassis accepts a Kensington Security Standard connector or other locking device.

  • Page 241: Memory Questions

    ® ™ The computer comes with the McAfee VirusScan software, a powerful and advanced system designed to detect, remove, and prevent computer viruses. See the online help in the VirusScan program. Memory Questions What is the maximum amount of memory I can install in the computer? The maximum amount of memory that you can install depends on the number of memory sockets on the system board, as well as the memory...

  • Page 242

    I get a message that Windows files are missing. How do I get these files back? Insert the NEC Select Install CD into the CD-ROM drive, press the Start button and select Shutdown. Select Restart the Computer? and click Yes.

  • Page 243: Glossary

    Glossary access time The time period between the supply of an access signal and the output or acceptance of the data by the addressed system. Examples are the access times for DRAMs, SRAMs, hard drives, and CD-ROM drives. Hard drive access time is the time it takes for a computer to get data from the drive.

  • Page 244

    algorithm Any set of instructions to be followed in order. anti-aliasing Making jagged edges look smoother by filling in the jags with an intermediate color. Usually used in reference to the edges of shapes, especially letters, on a computer screen. Application Programming Interface.

  • Page 245

    ASIC Application Specific Integrated Circuit. A chip designed for use on a particular circuit board, or for a very narrow range of use. The digital signal processor chip on a modem is an ASIC. asynchronous Refers to operations that do not require the clocks of communicating devices to be coordinated.

  • Page 246

    bandwidth A measure of how much information something can carry. Specifically, data path times frequency. For example, the ISA bus has a data path of 16 bits (it can send 16 bits at a time) and typically operates at 8.33 MHz, so it has a bandwidth of 133.28 megabits per second (Mbps).

  • Page 247

    Binary digit. The smallest unit of computer data. A single digital piece of information, generally represented by the numeral 0 or 1. Usually the transition between the states of +5V and -5V within a computer, the charge of a transistor in an integrated circuit, or the change in polarity of a magnetic region on a disk.

  • Page 248

    boot To start up a computer. The computer is generally booted in one of three ways: by turning on the power switch (cold boot), by pressing the reset switch, or by simultaneously pressing the Ctrl, Alt, and Del keys (warm boot). Booting the system after it has already been powered up and booted is referred to as rebooting.

  • Page 249

    A parallel electrical pathway on the system board, connecting and shared by the parts of a computer system (especially the CPU, its support circuitry, memory, and expansion cards), used for transmitting data or electrical power from one device to another. Typically the lines in a bus are dedicated to specific functions, such as control lines, address lines, and data lines.

  • Page 250

    checksum A number, calculated from a block of data, used to verify the integrity of that data. For example, a modem could send a block of data and include the number of 1’s that occur in the block. The receiving modem could count the number of 1’s it receives and compare its own number with the transmitted number.

  • Page 251

    default The system’s factory setting for a specific device feature or system function. A setting that a computer uses if it has not been modified by a user. DIMM Dual Inline Memory Module. Circuit board with pins connecting to different memory chips on both sides of the board, which allows for wider and faster data transfer (128-bit).

  • Page 252

    ECC memory Error Checking and Correcting memory. Advanced type of memory that can find and correct certain types of single-bit memory errors, providing greater data integrity. Advanced ECC can correct some double-bit errors. Extended Capabilities Port. A parallel-port standard for PCs that supports bidirectional communication between the PC and attached devices (such as a printer).

  • Page 253

    File Allocation Table. A table near the beginning of a drive that identifies the location of everything on the drive. flash ROM Method in which a computer’s BIOS ROM can be upgraded without replacing the ROM BIOS chip. File Transfer Protocol. A method of transferring files between two computers on a TCP/IP network (such as the Internet).

  • Page 254

    hexadecimal A number system that uses 16 as the base. (Place value indicates powers of 16.) It uses the digits 0-9 and A-F. Used around computers because a byte (eight binary digits) easily converts to a two digit hexadecimal number. Hexadecimal numbers are often indicated with the letter H, a dollar sign, or a subscripted 16 after the number.

  • Page 255

    I/O address Input-Output address. How the CPU sees an I/O port. It puts data into this address or reads the data in it. The device at the other end of the I/O port gets the data from that address or puts the data there, respectively.

  • Page 256

    Local Area Network. LPT1 Name assigned to the parallel port by the Windows operating system. A second parallel device is assigned LPT2 (if there is another parallel port). Also called the printer port. master Part of a two-sided communication that initiates commands (to a “slave”...

  • Page 257

    A processor architecture that enhances multimedia and communications. This technology processes multiple data elements in parallel, speeding up such things as image processing, motion video, speech synthesis, telephony, and 3-D graphics. modem MOdulator-DEModulator. A device that links computers over a telephone line.

  • Page 258

    page A type of message transmission in which a message is sent or received via modem to a paging device from a computer (with paging communications software) or telephone. parallel interface Interface that communicates eight bits at a time. parallel printer A printer with a parallel interface.

  • Page 259

    plug and play Refers to the ability of a computer system to automatically configure expansion boards and other devices. This enables you to plug in a device and use it, without worrying about setting DIP switches, jumpers, and other configuration elements. port Any connection by which data can enter or leave a computer or peripheral.

  • Page 260

    reset The process of returning a device to zero or to an initial or arbitrarily selected condition. resolution The degree of screen image clarity. Video display resolution is determined by the number of pixels on the screen. Resolution is usually specified in pixels by scan lines, for example, 640 by 480. See pixels.

  • Page 261

    Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology. A hard drive feature that works in conjunction with system software (for example, LANDesk Client Manager, NEC Auto Backup) for identifying a potential problem on the hard drive and automatically backing up system files to a user-specified device, such as a tape or Zip drive.

  • Page 262

    system board The main printed circuit board inside the system unit into which other boards and major chip components, such as the system microprocessor, are connected. Tracks per inch. track Any of many concentric circular regions on a disk for storing data. Tracks are divided into sectors.

  • Page 263

    virus Software that copies itself onto hard drives and diskettes without user intervention, usually when a diskette is placed into the drive of a computer. Viruses usually trigger a harmless or destructive occurrence on the system, activated by some preset condition. Viruses are frequently written with antisocial intent.

  • Page 264

    write To record or store information to a storage device. write-back Also called copy back. A cache strategy where write operations to data stored in the internal microprocessor L1 cache aren’t copied to system memory until absolutely necessary. In contrast, a write- through cache performs all write operations in parallel —...

  • Page 265: Index

    Booting problems, 6-4, 6-9, 6-10 Buttons power, 1-3 Backing up reset, 1-4 Cheyenne Backup utility, 4-9 suspend, 1-4 NEC Auto Backup, 4-20 reminder, 3-22 when shipping the system, 2-8 Cables, 5-41 Battery CD-ROM drive. See Cables; IDE discarding, 6-14 drive.

  • Page 266

    3-53 drive. installing applications, 3-38 Zip drive. See Cables; IDE drive. LANDesk Client Manager, 4-4 Cabling, 5-46 NEC Auto Backup utility, 4-20 CD-ROM drive. See Cabling; IDE NEC Configuration Change drive. Notification, 4-19 diskette drive, 5-46, 5-47...

  • Page 267

    Controller, motion video playback, Drive rails, 5-57 1-18 Drive slot, 5-57 Controls, system unit, 1-3 Driver CD. See NEC Driver CD. Cover, 5-4 Drivers, Installing, 3-44 CPU. See Processor. Drives Customer Assistance Center, 7-4 CD-ROM, 1-5 diskette, 1-5 DVD-ROM, 1-6...

  • Page 268

    1-11 Healthy Environment online setup, 2-2 brochure, 3-38, 3-43 Features NEC Auto Backup utility, 4-20 front, 1-2 NEC Help Center, 3-38, 3-43 hardware, 1-17 NEC Security, 4-10 internal, 1-12 NEC SNMP Agent, 4-11 rear, 1-7 NEC WebTelligent, 4-16 security, 1-20...

  • Page 269

    Master device, 5-44 setup, 2-2 McAfee VirusScan, 1-19 Moving preparations, 2-8 Memory, 1-17 checking, 5-20 DIMMs, 1-17, 3-9, 5-18 NEC Auto Backup utility, 1-19, 4-20 specifications, cache, B-3 installing, 4-20 specifications, RAM, B-3 NEC Configuration Change specifications, ROM, B-3 Notification, 1-19, 4-19...

  • Page 270

    Performance problems, 6-10 PME wakeup event, BIOS setting, 3-23 Power Online documentation button, 1-3 Healthy Environment, 1-19, 3-43 cables, 5-41, 5-46 NEC Help Center, 1-19, 3-43, 3-44 cabling, 5-46 Operating environment lamp, 1-4 specifications, B-17 management, 1-18 Operating system, 1-18 problems, 6-9...

  • Page 271

    SCSI port, 1-11 Removing Secondary device, 5-44 battery, 6-14 Security, 1-20 expansion board, 5-38 chassis intrusion notification, 1-20, stand, 5-13 system board, 5-28 chassis locking tab, 1-21, 5-7, 5-10 Kensington Security Standard connector, 1-21, 5-7, 5-10 NEC Security, 1-20, 4-10 Index-7...

  • Page 272

    1-20 Random Access Memory (RAM), Windows, 1-20 Security menu (BIOS), 3-19 read only memory (ROM), B-3 Select Install CD. See NEC Select sound system, B-4, B-6 Install CD. system unit dimensions, B-18 Serial port, 1-9 tape backup unit, B-17...

  • Page 273

    System features, 1-17 system problems, 6-9 System management, 4-2 time, incorrect, 6-10 Cheyenne Backup utility, 4-9 LANDesk Client Manager, 4-4 NEC Auto Backup utility, 4-20 Uninstalling, NEC Help Center, 3-44 NEC Configuration Change Upgrading Notification, 4-19 AGP board, 5-15 NEC Security, 4-10...

  • Page 274

    Wake-On LAN BIOS setting, 3-23 cabling, 5-49 Website, 7-2 WebTelligent. See NEC WebTelligent. Windows 95 installing, 3-28 Windows 95 or Windows 98, 1-18 Windows NT, 1-18 installing, 3-28 Zip drive, 1-6 cables. See IDE drive; cables. cabling. See IDE drive; cabling.

  • Page 275: Regulatory Statements

    Regulatory Statements The following regulatory statements include the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Radio Frequency Interference Statement, the Note for Canada, CMOS battery replacement information, and the Declaration of Conformity. FCC Statement for United States Only Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.

  • Page 276: Cmos Battery Replacement

    A lithium battery in some computers maintains system configuration information. In the event that the battery fails to maintain system configuration information, NEC recommends that you replace the battery. For battery replacement information, see “Battery Replacement” in Chapter 6 of this guide or call your NECC dealer or the NECC Technical Support Center.

  • Page 277: Declaration Of Conformity

    Sacramento, CA 95826 (916) 388-0101 declare that the product POWERMATE 8100 SERIES is in conformity with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation of this product is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful...

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