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2810
ProCurve Series 2810 Switches
N.11.XX
www.procurve.com
Advanced Traffic
Management Guide

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   Summary of Contents for HP ProCurve Series 2810

  • Page 1

    Advanced Traffic Management Guide 2810 ProCurve Series 2810 Switches N.11.XX www.procurve.com...

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    ProCurve Series 2810 Switches July 2007 Advanced Traffic Management Guide...

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    ProCurve Switch 2810-48G - (J9022A) not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein. Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or Trademark Credits reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are US registered by Hewlett-Packard.

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents, Getting Started, Static Virtual Lans (vlans), Static Virtual Lans (vlans)

    Contents Product Documentation About Your Switch Manual Set ........xi Feature Index .

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Multiple VLAN Considerations ....... . 2-9 Single-Forwarding Database Operation ....2-11 Example of an Unsupported Configuration and How to Correct It .

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents, Multiple Instance Spanning-tree Operation

    Configuring GVRP On a Switch ....... 3-11 Menu: Viewing and Configuring GVRP ..... 3-12 CLI: Viewing and Configuring GVRP .

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    Overview ............5-2 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) .

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    QoS Types for Prioritizing Outbound Packets ....6-9 Packet Types and Evaluation Order ..... . . 6-10 Preparation for Configuring QoS .

  • Page 10: Table Of Contents, Procurve Stack Management

    QoS Messages in the CLI ........6-65 QoS Operating Notes and Restrictions .

  • Page 11

    Web: Viewing and Configuring Stacking ..... . . 7-47 Status Messages ..........7-48 Index...

  • Page 13: Product Documentation

    Product Documentation About Your Switch Manual Set The switch manual set includes the following: Read Me First - a printed guide shipped with your switch. Provides ■ software update information, product notes, and other information. ■ Installation and Getting Started Guide - a printed guide shipped with your switch.

  • Page 14

    Product Documentation Feature Index For the manual set supporting your switch model, the following feature index indicates which manual to consult for information on a given software feature. Feature Management and Advanced Traffic Access Security Configuration Management Guide 802.1Q VLAN Tagging 802.1p Priority 802.1X Authentication Authorized IP Managers...

  • Page 15

    Product Documentation Feature Management and Advanced Traffic Access Security Configuration Management Guide LLDP MAC Address Management MAC Lockdown MAC Lockout MAC-based Authentication Monitoring and Analysis Multicast Filtering Network Management Applications (LLDP, SNMP) Passwords Ping Port Configuration Port Security Port Status Port Trunking (LACP) Port-Based Access Control Port-Based Priority (802.1Q)

  • Page 16

    Product Documentation Feature Management and Advanced Traffic Access Security Configuration Management Guide Stack Management (Stacking) Syslog System Information TACACS+ Authentication Telnet Access TFTP Time Protocols (TimeP, SNTP) Traffic/Security Filters Troubleshooting VLANs Web-based Authentication Xmodem...

  • Page 17: Contents

    Getting Started Contents Introduction ........... 1-2 Conventions .

  • Page 18: Introduction, Conventions, Feature Descriptions By Model, Command Syntax Statements

    Getting Started Introduction Introduction This Advanced Traffic Management Guide describes how to manage and configure advanced traffic management features on your switch. It supports the following switches: ProCurve Switch 2810 ■ For an overview of other product documentation for the above switches, refer to “Product Documentation”...

  • Page 19: Command Prompts, Screen Simulations

    Getting Started Conventions Braces within square brackets ( [ < > ] ) indicate a required element ■ within an optional choice. Boldface indicates use of a CLI command, part of a CLI command ■ syntax, or other displayed element in general text. For example: “Use the copy tftp command to download the key from a TFTP server.”...

  • Page 20: Port Identity Examples, Sources For More Information

    Getting Started Sources for More Information In some cases, brief command-output sequences appear outside of a numbered figure. For example: ProCurve(config)# ip default-gateway 18.28.152.1/24 ProCurve(config)# vlan 1 ip address 18.28.36.152/24 ProCurve(config)# vlan 1 ip igmp Port Identity Examples This guide describes software applicable to both chassis-based and stackable ProCurve switches.

  • Page 21

    Getting Started Sources for More Information Online Help for Menu Figure 1-2. Getting Help in the Menu Interface ■ For information on a specific command in the CLI, type the command name followed by “help”. For example: Figure 1-3. Getting Help in the CLI ■...

  • Page 22: Need Only A Quick Start?, Ip Addressing

    Getting Started Need Only a Quick Start? Need Only a Quick Start? IP Addressing If you just want to give the switch an IP address so that it can communicate on your network, or if you are not using multiple VLANs, ProCurve recommends that you use the Switch Setup screen to quickly configure IP addressing.

  • Page 23

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Contents Overview ............2-2 Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) .

  • Page 24: Overview

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Overview Overview This chapter describes how to configure and use static, port-based VLANs on the switches covered by this manual. For general information on how to use the switch’s built-in interfaces, refer to these chapters in the Management and Configuration Guide for your switch: ■...

  • Page 25: Port-based Virtual Lans (static Vlans), Port-based Virtual Lans (static Vlans), Port-based Virtual Lans (static Vlans)

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) VLAN Features Feature Default Menu view existing VLANs n/a page 2-14 page 2-20 page 2-25 thru 2-19 configuring static default VLAN with page 2-14 page 2-19 page 2-25 VLANs VID = 1 thru 2-19...

  • Page 26

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) bandwidth is saved by not allowing packets to flood out all ports. Separate VLANs on the switch can communicate with each other through an external router. For example, referring to figure 2-1, if ports A1 through A4 belong to VLAN_1 and ports A5 through A8 belong to VLAN_2, traffic from end-node stations on ports A2 through A4 is restricted to only VLAN_1, while traffic from ports A5 through A7 is restricted to only VLAN_2.

  • Page 27

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) ProCurve Switch Figure 2-2. Example of Overlapping VLANs Using the Same Server Similarly, using 802.1Q-compliant switches, you can connect multiple VLANs through a single switch-to-switch link. ProCurve ProCurve Switch Switch Figure 2-3. Example of Connecting Multiple VLANs Through the Same Link Introducing Tagged VLAN Technology into Networks Running Legacy (Untagged) VLANs.

  • Page 28: Overview Of Using Vlans, Vlan Support And The Default Vlan, The Primary Vlan

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Switch 2524 ProCurve ProCurve Switch Switch Switch Tagged VLAN Link Untagged VLAN Links Non-802.1Q- compliant switch Figure 2-4. Example of Tagged and Untagged VLAN Technology in the Same Network For more information on VLANs, refer to: “Overview of Using VLANs”...

  • Page 29

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) features and ensure that multiple instances of DHCP or Bootp on different VLANs do not result in conflicting configuration values for the switch. The primary VLAN is the VLAN the switch uses to run and manage these features and data.

  • Page 30: Per-port Static Vlan Configuration Options

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Per-Port Static VLAN Configuration Options The following figure and table show the options you have for assigning individual ports to a static VLAN. Note that GVRP, if configured, affects these options and VLAN behavior on the switch. The display below shows the per- port VLAN configuration options.

  • Page 31: General Steps For Using Vlans, Vlan Operating Notes, Multiple Vlan Considerations

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) General Steps for Using VLANs Plan your VLAN strategy and create a map of the logical topology that will result from configuring VLANs. Include consideration for the interaction between VLANs and other features such as Spanning Tree Protocol, load balancing, and IGMP.

  • Page 32

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) showing the (different) source VLAN and source port. Other switch models have a single-forwarding database, which means they allow only one data- base entry of a unique MAC address, along with the source VLAN and source port on which it is found (see Table 2-6).

  • Page 33: Single-forwarding Database Operation, To Correct It

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Single-Forwarding Database Operation When a packet arrives with a destination MAC address that matches a MAC address in the switch’s forwarding table, the switch tries to send the packet to the port listed for that MAC address. But, if the destination port is in a different VLAN than the VLAN on which the packet was received, the switch drops the packet.

  • Page 34

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) The packet enters VLAN 1 in the Switch 8000 with the multiple-forwarding database switch MAC address in the destination field. Because the 8000M has not yet learned this MAC address, it does not find the address in its address table, and floods the packet out all ports, including the VLAN 1 link (port “A1”) to the multiple-forwarding database switch.

  • Page 35: Multiple-forwarding Database Operation

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Now, the 8000M forwarding database always lists the multiple-forwarding database switch MAC address on port A1, and the 8000M will send traffic to either VLAN on the multiple-forwarding database switch. To increase the network bandwidth of the connection between the devices, you can use a trunk of multiple physical links rather than a single physical link.

  • Page 36: Menu: Configuring Vlan Parameters, To Change Vlan Support Settings

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Menu: Configuring VLAN Parameters In the factory default state, support is enabled for up to eight VLANs. (You can change the switch VLAN configuration to support additional VLANs. Also, all ports on the switch belong to the default VLAN (DEFAULT_VLAN) and are in the same broadcast/multicast domain.

  • Page 37

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) To enable or disable dynamic VLANs, select the GVRP Enabled field and ■ use the Space bar to toggle between options. (For GVRP information, see chapter 3, “GVRP”.) N o t e For optimal switch memory utilization, set the number of VLANs at the number you will likely be using or a few more.

  • Page 38: Adding Or Editing Vlan Names

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Adding or Editing VLAN Names Use this procedure to add a new VLAN or to edit the name of an existing VLAN. From the Main Menu select: 2. Switch Configuration 8. VLAN Menu . . . 2.

  • Page 39: Adding Or Changing A Vlan Port Assignment

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Example of a New VLAN and ID Figure 2-11. Example of VLAN Names Screen with a New VLAN Added Repeat steps 2 through 5 to add more VLANs. Remember that you can add VLANs until you reach the number specified in the Maximum VLANs to support field on the VLAN Support screen (see figure 2-8 on page 2-14).

  • Page 40

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Default: In this example, the “VLAN-22” has been defined, but no ports have yet been assigned to it. (“No” means the port is not assigned to that VLAN.) Using GVRP? If you plan on using GVRP, any ports you don’t want to join should be changed...

  • Page 41: Cli: Configuring Vlan Parameters

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Ports A4 and A5 are assigned to both VLANs. Ports A6 and A7 are assigned only to VLAN-22. All other ports are assigned only to the Default VLAN. Figure 2-13. Example of VLAN Assignments for Specific Ports For information on VLAN tags (“Untagged”...

  • Page 42

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) VLAN Commands Used in this Section show vlans below show vlan <vlan-id> page 2-21 max-vlans page 2-22 primary-vlan <vlan-id> page 2-22 [no] vlan <vlan-id> page 2-23 name <vlan-name> page 2-24 [no] tagged <port-list> page 2-24 [no] untagged <port-list>...

  • Page 43

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Displaying the Configuration for a Particular VLAN. This command uses the VID to identify and display the data for a specific static or dynamic VLAN. Syntax: show vlan <vlan-id> Figure 2-15. Example of “Show VLAN” for a Specific Static VLAN Show VLAN lists this data when GVRP is enabled and at least...

  • Page 44

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Changing the Number of VLANs Allowed on the Switch. By default, the switch allows a maximum of 8 VLANs. You can specify any value from 1 to the upper limit for the switch. If GVRP is enabled, this setting includes any dynamic VLANs on the switch.

  • Page 45

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Creating a New Static VLAN Changing the VLAN Context Level. With this command, entering a new VID creates a new static VLAN. Entering the VID or name of an existing static VLAN places you in the context level for that VLAN.

  • Page 46

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) want to make the VLAN permanent. After you convert a dynamic VLAN to static, you must configure the switch’s per-port participation in the VLAN in the same way that you would for any static VLAN. Syntax: static-vlan <vlan-id>...

  • Page 47: Web: Viewing And Configuring Vlan Parameters

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) For example, if you have a VLAN named VLAN100 with a VID of 100, and all ports are set to No for this VLAN. To change the VLAN name to “Blue_Team” and set ports 1-5 to Tagged, you could do so with these commands: ProCurve(config)# vlan 100 name Blue_Team ProCurve(config)# vlan 100 tagged 1-5...

  • Page 48: Q Vlan Tagging

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) 802.1Q VLAN Tagging VLAN tagging enables traffic from more than one VLAN to use the same port. (Even when two or more VLANs use the same port they remain as separate domains and cannot receive traffic from each other without going through an external router.) As mentioned earlier, a “tag”...

  • Page 49

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) In switch X: ■ • VLANs assigned to ports X1 - X6 can all be untagged because there is only one VLAN assignment per port. Red VLAN traffic will go out only the Red ports;...

  • Page 50

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) VLAN tagging gives you several options: ■ Since the purpose of VLAN tagging is to allow multiple VLANs on the same port, any port that has only one VLAN assigned to it can be configured as “Untagged”...

  • Page 51

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) The VLANs assigned to ports X3, X4, Y2, Y3, and Y4 can all be untagged because there is only one VLAN assigned per port. Port X1 has multiple VLANs assigned, which means that one VLAN assigned to this port can be untagged and any others must be tagged.

  • Page 52: The Secure Management Vlan

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) The Secure Management VLAN Configures a secure Management VLAN by creating an isolated network for managing the following ProCurve switches that support this feature: • Series 2600 switches • Series 4200vl switches •...

  • Page 53

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) • Switches “A”, “B”, and Server “C” are connected by Switch B Switch A ports belonging to the management VLAN. • Hub “X” is connected Hub X to a switch port that Hub Y belongs to the management VLAN.

  • Page 54: Preparation

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Figure 2-23. Example of Management VLAN Control in a LAN Table 2-2. VLAN Membership in Figure 2-23 Switch Management VLAN (VID = 7) Marketing VLAN (VID = 12) Shipping Dept. VLAN (VID = 20) DEFAULT-VLAN (VID = 1) Preparation Determine a VID and VLAN name suitable for your Management VLAN.

  • Page 55: Configuration, Operating Notes For Management Vlans

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Configuration Syntax: [ no ] management-vlan < vlan-id | vlan-name > Default: Disabled To confirm the Management VLAN configuration, use the show running-config command. For example, suppose you have already configured a VLAN named My_VLAN with a VID of 100.

  • Page 56: Effect Of Vlans On Other Switch Features, Spanning Tree Operation With Vlans

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) During a Telnet session to the switch, if you configure the Management- ■ VLAN to a VID that excludes the port through which you are connected to the switch, you will continue to have access only until you terminate the session by logging out or rebooting the switch.

  • Page 57: Ip Interfaces, Vlan Mac Addresses, Port Trunks

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) links are in separate VLANs. However, you can use port trunking to prevent Spanning Tree from unnecessarily blocking ports (and to improve overall network performance). Note that Spanning Tree operates differently in different devices. For exam- ple, in the (obsolete, non-802.1Q) ProCurve Switch 2000 and the ProCurve Switch 800T, Spanning Tree operates on a per-VLAN basis, allowing redundant physical links as long as they are in separate VLANs.

  • Page 58: Port Monitoring, Vlan Restrictions, Jumbo Packet Support

    Static Virtual LANs (VLANs) Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) Port Monitoring If you designate a port on the switch for network monitoring, this port will appear in the Port VLAN Assignment screen and can be configured as a member of any VLAN. For information on how broadcast, multicast, and unicast packets are tagged inside and outside of the VLAN to which the monitor port is assigned, see the appendix on troubleshooting in the Manage- ment and Configuration Guide.

  • Page 59

    GVRP Contents Overview ............3-2 Introduction .

  • Page 60

    GVRP Overview Overview This chapter describes GVRP and how to configure it with the switch’s built- in interfaces, and assumes an understanding of VLANs, which are described in Chapter 2, “Static Virtual LANs (VLANs)”. For general information on how to use the switch’s built-in interfaces, refer to these chapters in the Management and Configuration Guide for your switch: ■...

  • Page 61

    GVRP Introduction Introduction Feature Default Menu view GVRP configuration page 3-12 page 3-13 page 3-16 list static and dynamic VLANs — page 3-15 page 3-16 on a GVRP-enabled switch enable or disable GVRP disabled page 3-12 page 3-14 page 3-16 enable or disable GVRP on enabled page 3-12...

  • Page 62: General Operation

    GVRP Introduction General Operation When GVRP is enabled on a switch, the VID for any static VLANs configured on the switch is advertised (using BPDUs—Bridge Protocol Data Units) out all ports, regardless of whether a port is up or assigned to any particular VLAN. A GVRP-aware port on another device that receives the advertisements over a link can dynamically join the advertised VLAN.

  • Page 63

    GVRP Introduction Note that if a static VLAN is configured on at least one port of a switch, and that port has established a link with another device, then all other ports of that switch will send advertisements for that VLAN. For example, in the following figure, Tagged VLAN ports on switch “A”...

  • Page 64: Per-port Options For Handling Gvrp "unknown Vlans", Per-port Options For Handling Gvrp "unknown Vlans

    GVRP Introduction If the switch already has a static VLAN assignment with the same VID as ■ in the advertisement, and the port is configured to Auto for that VLAN, then the port will dynamically join the VLAN and begin moving that VLAN’s traffic.

  • Page 65

    GVRP Introduction Table 3-1. Options for Handling “Unknown VLAN” Advertisements: Unknown VLAN Operation Mode Learn Enables the port to become a member of any unknown VLAN for which it (the Default) receives an advertisement. Allows the port to advertise other VLANs that have at least one other port on the same switch as a member.

  • Page 66: Per-port Options For Dynamic Vlan Advertising And Joining

    GVRP Introduction Per-Port Options for Dynamic VLAN Advertising and Joining Initiating Advertisements. As described in the preceding section, to enable dynamic joins, GVRP must be enabled and a port must be configured to Learn (the default). However, to send advertisements in your network, one or more static (Tagged, Untagged, or Auto) VLANs must be configured on one or more switches (with GVRP enabled), depending on your topology.

  • Page 67

    GVRP Introduction Per-Port Static VLAN Options—Per VLAN Specified on Each Port “Unknown VLAN” Port Activity: Port Activity: Port Activity: Forbid (Per VLAN) (GVRP) Auto (Per VLAN) Tagged or Untagged (Per VLAN) Configuration Block The port: The port: The port: • Belongs to the specified VLAN. •...

  • Page 68: Gvrp And Vlan Access Control, Port-leave From A Dynamic Vlan, Planning For Gvrp Operation

    GVRP Introduction GVRP and VLAN Access Control When you enable GVRP on a switch, the default GVRP parameter settings allow all of the switch’s ports to transmit and receive dynamic VLAN adver- tisements (GVRP advertisements) and to dynamically join VLANs. The two preceding sections describe the per-port features you can use to control and limit VLAN propagation.

  • Page 69: Configuring Gvrp On A Switch

    GVRP Introduction Determine security boundaries and how the individual ports in the seg- ment will handle dynamic VLAN advertisements. (See table 3-1 on page 3-7 and table 3-2 on page 3-8.) Enable GVRP on all devices you want to use with dynamic VLANs and configure the appropriate “Unknown VLAN”...

  • Page 70: Menu: Viewing And Configuring Gvrp

    GVRP Introduction Menu: Viewing and Configuring GVRP From the Main Menu, select: 2. Switch Configuration . . . 8. VLAN Menu . . . 1. VLAN Support Figure 3-4. The VLAN Support Screen (Default Configuration) Do the following to enable GVRP and display the Unknown VLAN fields: Press [E] (for Edit).

  • Page 71: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Gvrp

    GVRP Introduction Use the arrow keys to select the port you want, and the Space bar to select Unknown VLAN option for any ports you want to change. When you finish making configuration changes, press [Enter], then [S] (for Save) to save your changes to the Startup-Config file. CLI: Viewing and Configuring GVRP GVRP Commands Used in This Section show gvrp...

  • Page 72

    GVRP Introduction This example includes non-default settings for the Unknown VLAN field for some ports. Figure 3-7. Example of Show GVRP Listing with GVRP Enabled Enabling and Disabling GVRP on the Switch. This command enables GVRP on the switch. Syntax: gvrp This example enables GVRP: ProCurve(config)# gvrp...

  • Page 73

    GVRP Introduction Figure 3-8. Example of Preventing Specific Ports from Joining Dynamic VLANs Displaying the Static and Dynamic VLANs Active on the Switch. The show vlans command lists all VLANs present in the switch. Syntax: show vlans For example, in the following illustration, switch “B” has one static VLAN (the default VLAN), with GVRP enabled and port 1 configured to Learn for Unknown VLANs.

  • Page 74: Web: Viewing And Configuring Gvrp

    GVRP Introduction Dynamic VLANs Learned from Switch “A” through Port 1 Figure 3-10. Example of Listing Showing Dynamic VLANs Converting a Dynamic VLAN to a Static VLAN. If a port on the switch has joined a dynamic VLAN, you can use the following command to convert that dynamic VLAN to a static VLAN: Syntax: static <dynamic-vlan-id>...

  • Page 75: Gvrp Operating Notes

    GVRP Introduction GVRP Operating Notes A dynamic VLAN must be converted to a static VLAN before it can have ■ an IP address. ■ The total number of VLANs on the switch (static and dynamic combined) cannot exceed the current Maximum VLANs setting. For example, in the factory default state, the switch supports eight VLANs.

  • Page 76

    GVRP Introduction 3-18...

  • Page 77

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Contents Overview ............4-2 General Operation and Features .

  • Page 78

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Overview Overview This chapter describes Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP), and explains how to configure IGMP controls to reduce unnecessary bandwidth usage on a per-port basis. For the latest information on IGMP, see the software release notes posted on the ProCurve Networking support web site at http://www.procurve.com.

  • Page 79: General Operation And Features, Igmp Features

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) General Operation and Features General Operation and Features IGMP Features Feature Default Menu view igmp configuration — page 4-6 — show igmp status for multicast — — groups used by the selected VLAN enabling or disabling IGMP disabled —...

  • Page 80: Igmp Terms

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) General Operation and Features Enabling IGMP allows detection of IGMP queries and report packets in order to manage IP multicast traffic through the switch. If no other querier is detected, the switch will then also function as the querier. (If you need to disable the querier feature, you can do so through the IGMP configuration MIB.

  • Page 81: Igmp Operating Features, Basic Operation, Enhancements

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) General Operation and Features IGMP Operating Features Basic Operation In the factory default configuration, IGMP is disabled. If multiple VLANs are not configured, you must configure IGMP on the default VLAN (DEFAULT_VLAN; VID = 1). If multiple VLANs are configured, you must configure IGMP on a per-VLAN basis for every VLAN where this feature is desired.

  • Page 82: Cli: Configuring And Displaying Igmp

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP N o t e s Whenever IGMP is enabled, the switch generates an Event Log message indicating whether querier functionality is enabled. IP multicast traffic groups are identified by IP addresses in the range of 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255.

  • Page 83

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP Viewing the Current IGMP Configuration. This command lists the IGMP configuration for all VLANs configured on the switch or for a specific VLAN. Syntax: show ip igmp config IGMP configuration for all VLANs on the switch.

  • Page 84

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP IGMP Configuration for the Selected VLAN IGMP Configuration On the Individual Ports in the VLAN Figure 4-2. Example Listing of IGMP Configuration for A Specific VLAN Enabling or Disabling IGMP on a VLAN. You can enable IGMP on a VLAN, along with the last-saved or default IGMP configuration (whichever was most recently set), or you can disable IGMP on a selected VLAN.

  • Page 85

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP You can also combine the command with other IGMP-related ip igmp commands, as described in the following sections. Configuring Per-Port IGMP Packet Control. Use this command in the VLAN context to specify how each port should handle IGMP traffic.

  • Page 86

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP The following command displays the VLAN and per-port configuration resulting from the above commands. ProCurve> show ip igmp 1 config Configuring IGMP Traffic Priority. This command allows you to prioritize IGMP traffic as either “high”...

  • Page 87: Web: Enabling Or Disabling Igmp, How Igmp Operates

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Web: Enabling or Disabling IGMP Web: Enabling or Disabling IGMP In the web browser interface you can enable or disable IGMP on a per-VLAN basis. To configure other IGMP features, telnet to the switch console and use the CLI.

  • Page 88: Igmp Operating Notes, Displaying Igmp Data

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates from the hosts on the network. (If you need to disable the querier feature, you can do so through the CLI, using the IGMP configuration MIB. See “Configuring the Querier Function” on page 4-10.) ■...

  • Page 89: Supported Standards And Rfcs, Operation With Or Without Ip Addressing

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Supported Standards and RFCs ProCurve’s implementation of IGMP supports the following standards and operating capabilities: • RFC2236 (IGMP V.2, with backwards support for IGMP V.1) • IETF draft for IGMP and MLD snooping switches (for IGMP V1, V2 V3) •...

  • Page 90: Automatic Fast-leave Igmp

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Table 4-1.Comparison of IGMP Operation With and Without IP Addressing IGMP Function Available With IP Addressing Available Operating Differences Configured on the VLAN Without IP Without an IP Address Addressing? Forward multicast group traffic to any port on None the VLAN that has received a join request for...

  • Page 91

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Table 4-2.IGMP: Data-Driven and Non-Data Driven Behavior Switch Model or Data- IGMP Fast- Default IGMP Behavior Series Driven Leave Setting IGMP Included? Switch 5300 Always Drops unjoined multicast traffic except for Switch 2800 Enabled always-forwarded traffic toward the Querier...

  • Page 92

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Automatic Fast-Leave Operation. If a switch port is: Connected to only one end node b. The end node currently belongs to a multicast group; i.e. is an IGMP client The end node subsequently leaves the multicast group Then the switch does not need to wait for the Querier status update interval, but instead immediately removes the IGMP client from its IGMP table and ceases transmitting IGMP traffic to the client.

  • Page 93: Using Delayed Group Flush, Forced Fast-leave Igmp, Setting Fast-leave And Forced Fast-leave From The Cli

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Using Delayed Group Flush This feature continues to filter IGMP-Left groups for a specified additional period of time. The delay in flushing the group filter prevents stale traffic from being forwarded by the server. Delayed Group Flush is enabled or disabled for the entire switch.

  • Page 94: Setting Forced Fast-leave Using The Mib, Listing The Mib-enabled Forced Fast-leave Configuration

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Syntax: [no] ip igmp fastleave <port-list> Enables IGMP Fast-Leaves on the specified ports in the VLAN (the default setting). In the Config context, use the VLAN specifier, for example, vlan < vid > ip igmp fastleave <port-list>. The “no”...

  • Page 95

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates Enter either of the following walkmib command options: walkmib hpSwitchIgmpPortForcedLeaveState - OR - walkmib 1.3.6.1.4.1.11.2.14.11.5.1.7.1.15.3.1.5 The resulting display lists the Forced Fast-Leave state for all ports in the switch, by VLAN. (A port belonging to more than one VLAN will be listed once for each VLAN, and if multiple VLANs are not configured, all ports will be listed as members of the default VLAN.) The following command produces a listing such as that shown in figure 4-4:...

  • Page 96: Configuring Per-port Forced Fast-leave Igmp

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) How IGMP Operates shows that Fast Forced-Leave is disabled on the selected port. specifies port A6. indicates the default VLAN. (See the “Note on VLAN Numbers” on page 4-18.) Figure 4-5. Example Listing the Forced Fast-Leave State for a Single Port on the Default VLAN Configuring Per-Port Forced Fast-Leave IGMP In the factory-default configuration, Forced Fast-Leave is disabled for all ports...

  • Page 97: Using The Switch As Querier, Querier Operation

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Using the Switch as Querier Verifies Forced Fast-Leave enabled. indicates port C1. indicates the default VLAN. (See the note on page 4-18.) Figure 4-6. Example of Changing the Forced Fast-Leave Configuration on Port 49 Using the Switch as Querier Querier Operation The function of the IGMP Querier is to poll other IGMP-enabled devices in an...

  • Page 98: Excluding Multicast Addresses From Ip Multicast Filtering

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Excluding Multicast Addresses from IP Multicast Filtering In the above scenario, if the other device ceases to operate as a Querier on the default VLAN, then the switch detects this change and can become the Querier as long as it is not pre-empted by some other IGMP Querier on the VLAN.

  • Page 99

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Excluding Multicast Addresses from IP Multicast Filtering N o t e s : IP Multicast Filters. This operation applies to the ProCurve Switch 1600M, 2400M, 2424M, 4000M, and 8000M, but not to the Switch 2500, 2600, 2600-PWR, 2800, 2810, 4100, and 5300 Series devices or the Switch 6108 (which do not have static multicast traffic/security filters).

  • Page 100

    Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) Excluding Multicast Addresses from IP Multicast Filtering 4-24...

  • Page 101

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation Contents Overview ............5-2 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) .

  • Page 102

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation Overview Overview MSTP Features 802.1s Spanning Tree Default Menu Protocol Viewing the MSTP Status — page 5-40 — and Configuration Enable/Disable MSTP and Disabled — page 5-19 — Configure Global Parameters Configuring Basic Port admin-edge-port: No-disabled —...

  • Page 103

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation Overview instance spanning-tree network enables blocking of redundant links in one instance while allowing forwarding over the same links for non-redundant use by another instance. For example, suppose you have three switches in a region configured with VLANs grouped into two instances, as follows: VLANs Instance 1 Instance 2...

  • Page 104

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation Overview The logical and physical topologies resulting from these VLAN/Instance groupings result in blocking on different links for different VLANs: Region “A”: Logical Topology Path blocked for VLANs in instance 2. Switch “A” Switch “A” Instance 2 Root for Instance 1 VLANs: 20, 21, 22 VLANs: 10, 11, 12...

  • Page 105

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation Overview Note on Path Cost RSTP and MSTP implements a greater range of path costs and new default path cost values to account for higher network speeds. These values are different than the values defined by 802.1D STP as shown below. Port Type 802.1D STP Path Cost RSTP and MSTP Path Cost...

  • Page 106: S Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (mstp)

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) The 802.1D and 802.1w spanning tree protocols operate without regard to a network’s VLAN configuration, and maintain one common spanning tree throughout a bridged network. Thus, these protocols map one loop-free, logical topology on a given physical topology.

  • Page 107: Mstp Structure

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) MSTP Structure MSTP maps active, separate paths through separate spanning tree instances and between MST regions. Each MST region comprises one or more MSTP switches. Note that MSTP recognizes an STP or RSTP LAN as a distinct spanning-tree region.

  • Page 108

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) MST Region: An MST region comprises the VLANs configured on physically connected MSTP switches. All switches in a given region must be configured with the same VLANs and Multiple Spanning Tree Instances (MSTIs). Internal Spanning Tree (IST): The IST administers the topology within a given MST region.

  • Page 109: How Mstp Operates, Mst Regions

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) C a u t i o n When you enable MSTP on the switch, the default MSTP spanning tree configuration settings comply with the values recommended in the IEEE 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) standard. Note that inappro- priate changes to these settings can result in severely degraded network performance.

  • Page 110

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) How Separate Instances Affect MSTP Operation. Assigning different groups of VLANs to different instances ensures that those VLAN groups use independent forwarding paths. For example, in figure 5-3 each instance has a different forwarding path.

  • Page 111: Spanning Tree (cst), Mstp Operation With 802.1q Vlans

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Within a region, traffic routed between VLANs in separate instances can take only one physical path. To ensure that traffic in all VLANs within a region can travel between regions, all of the boundary ports for each region should belong to all VLANs configured in the region.

  • Page 112: Terminology

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) an instance by using a port trunk. The following example shows how you can use a port trunk with 802.1Q (tagged) VLANs and MSTP without unnecessarily blocking any links or losing any bandwidth. Problem: Solution: An MST instance with two...

  • Page 113

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) and designated port for each region. The CIST includes the Common Spanning Tree (CST), the Internal Spanning Tree (IST) within each region, and any multiple spanning-tree instances (MSTIs) in a region. Common Spanning Tree (CST): Refers to the single forwarding path the switch calculates for STP (802.1D) and RSTP (802.1w) topologies, and for inter-regional paths in MSTP (802.1s) topologies.

  • Page 114: Operating Rules

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Operating Rules All switches in a region must be configured with the same set of VLANs, ■ as well as the same MST configuration name and MST configuration number. ■ Within a region, a VLAN can be allocated to either a single MSTI or to the region’s IST instance.

  • Page 115: Transitioning From Stp Or Rstp To Mstp

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) the same instance, all but one of those paths will be blocked for that instance. However, if there are different paths in different instances, all such paths are available for traffic. Separate forwarding paths exist through separate spanning tree instances.

  • Page 116: Tips For Planning An Mstp Application

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) incompatibility between devices running the older 802.1D STP and your switch running MSTP or RSTP. Please see the “Note on Path Cost” on page 5-5 for more information on adjusting to this incompatibility. Tips for Planning an MSTP Application ■...

  • Page 117: Steps For Configuring Mstp

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) N o t e o n M S T P Under some circumstances the rapid state transitions employed by MSTP (and R a p i d S t a t e RSTP) can increase the rates of frame duplication and misordering in the Tr a n s i t i o n s switched LAN.

  • Page 118

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) – Hello Time (used if the switch operates as the root device.) spanning-tree hello-time – Maximum age to allow for STP packets before discarding spanning-tree maximum-age – Device spanning-tree priority. Specifies the priority value used along with the switch MAC address to determine which device is root.

  • Page 119: Configuring Mstp Operation Mode And Global Parameters

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Configuring MSTP Operation Mode and Global Parameters Command Page spanning-tree config-name < ascii-string > page 5-20 spanning-tree config-revision < revision-number > page 5-20 spanning-tree max-hops < hop-count > page 5-21 spanning-tree maximum-age page 5-21...

  • Page 120

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: [no] spanning-tree config-name < ascii-string > This command resets the configuration name of the MST region in which the switch resides. This name can include up to 32 non-blank characters and is case-sensitive. On all switches within a given MST region, the configuration names must be identical.

  • Page 121

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree max-hops < hop-count > This command resets the number of hops allowed for BPDUs in an MST region. When an MSTP switch receives a BPDU, it decrements the hop-count setting the BPDU carries. If the hop- count reaches zero, the receiving switch drops the BPDU.

  • Page 122: Configuring Mstp Per Port

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree hello-time < 1..10 > If MSTP is running and the switch is operating as the CIST root for your network, this command specifies the time in seconds between transmissions of BPDUs for all ports on the switch configured with Use Global (the default).

  • Page 123: Configuring Per Port Parameters

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Command Page spanning-tree priority page 5-25 root-guard tcn-guard loop-protect Configuring Per Port Parameters Syntax: [no] spanning-tree <port-list> admin-edge-port Enable admin-edge-port on ports connected to end nodes. During spanning tree establishment, ports with admin- edge-port enabled transition immediately to the forwarding state.

  • Page 124

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: [no] spanning-tree < port-list > mcheck Forces a port to send RSTP BPDUs for 3 seconds. This allows for another switch connected to the port and running RSTP to establish its connection quickly and for identifying switches running 802.1D STP.

  • Page 125

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree < port-list > point-to-point-mac < force-true | force-false | auto > This parameter informs the switch of the type of device to which a specific port connects. Force-True (default): Indicates a point-to-point link to a device such as a switch, bridge, or end-node.

  • Page 126: Configuring Bpdu Filtering

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree < port-list > tcn-guard When tcn-guard is enabled for a port, it causes the port to stop propagating received topology change notifications and topology changes to other ports. (Default: No - disabled) Configuring BPDU Filtering The STP BPDU filter feature allows control of spanning-tree participation on...

  • Page 127: Configuring Bpdu Protection

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) For example, to configure BPDU filtering on port a9, enter: ProCurve(config)# spanning-tree a9 bpdu-filter Viewing BPDU Filtering. The spanning-tree show < port> configuration command displays the BPDU’s filter state. ProCurve(config)# show spanning-tree a9 config Column showing BPDU filter status BPDU Port Type...

  • Page 128

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) STP Domain SNMP Trap Management Station SNMP Trap SNMP Trap Switch Event Log: port X is disable by STP BPDU protection Fake STP BPDU End User Figure 5-7. Example of BPDU Protection Enabled at the Network Edge The following commands allow you to configure BPDU protection.

  • Page 129

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) The following steps will then be set in process: When an STP BPDU packet is received on ports 1-10, STP treats it as an unauthorized transmission attempt and shuts down the port that the BPDU came in on.

  • Page 130: Configuring Loop Protection

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Configuring Loop Protection You can use BPDU protection for systems that have spanning tree enabled (See “Configuring BPDU Protection” on page 5-27), however, the BPDU protection feature cannot detect the formation of loops when an unmanaged device on the network drops spanning tree packets.

  • Page 131

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) [disable-timer <0-604800>] How long (in seconds) a port is disabled when a loop has been detected. A value of zero disables the auto re-enable function- ality. Default: Timer is disabled [transmit-interval <1-10>] Allows you to configure the time in seconds between the transmission of loop protection packets.

  • Page 132: Configuring Mst Instance Parameters

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Configuring MST Instance Parameters Command Page spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > vlan < vid> [ vid..vid ] page no spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > 5-32 spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > priority < 0..15 > page 5-33 spanning-tree priority <...

  • Page 133

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > priority < 0 .. 15 > This command sets the switch (bridge) priority for the desig- nated instance. This priority is compared with the priorities of other switches in the same instance to determine the root switch for the instance.

  • Page 134

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree priority < 0 .. 15 > Every switch running an instance of MSTP has a Bridge Identifier, which is a unique identifier that helps distinguish this switch from all others. The switch with the lowest Bridge Identifier is elected as the root for the tree.

  • Page 135: Configuring Mst Instance Per-port Parameters

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Configuring MST Instance Per-Port Parameters Command Page spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > < port-list > path-cost page < auto | 1..200000000 > 5-35 spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > < port-list > priority < priority-multiplier > page 5-36 spanning-tree <...

  • Page 136

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree instance < 1..16 > [e] < port-list > priority <priority-multiplier> This command sets the priority for the specified port(s) in the specified MST instance. (For a given port, the priority setting can be different for different MST instances to which the port may belong.) The priority range for a port in a given MST instance is 0-255.

  • Page 137

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Syntax: spanning-tree [e] < port-list > priority < priority-multiplier > This command sets the priority for the specified port(s) for the IST (that is, Instance 0) of the region in which the switch resides.

  • Page 138: Enabling Or Disabling Spanning Tree Operation

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Enabling or Disabling Spanning Tree Operation This command enables or disables spanning tree operation for any spanning tree protocol enabled on the switch. Before using this command to enable spanning tree, ensure that the version you want to use is active on the switch. Syntax: [no] spanning-tree Enabling spanning tree with MSTP configured implements MSTP for all physical ports on the switch, according to the...

  • Page 139

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Configure the VLANs you want included in any instances in the new region. When you create the pending region, all VLANs configured on the switch will be assigned to the pending IST instance unless assigned to other, pending MST instances.

  • Page 140: Displaying Mstp Statistics And Configuration, Displaying Mstp Statistics

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) To view the current pending MSTP configuration, use the show spanning- tree pending command (page page 5-46). Displaying MSTP Statistics and Configuration Command Page MSTP Statistics: show spanning-tree [< port-list >] below show spanning-tree instance <...

  • Page 141

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Switch’s Spanning Tree Configuration and Identity of VLANs Configured in the Switch for the IST Instance Identifies the overall spanning-tree root for the network. Lists the switch’s MSTP root data for connectivity with other regions and STP or RSTP devices.

  • Page 142

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying Switch Statistics for a Specific MST Instance. Syntax: show spanning-tree instance < ist | 1..16 > This command displays the MSTP statistics for either the IST instance or a numbered MST instance running on the switch. Figure 5-12.

  • Page 143: Displaying The Mstp Configuration

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying the MSTP Configuration Displaying the Global MSTP Configuration. This command displays the switch’s basic and MST region spanning-tree configuration, including basic port connectivity settings. Syntax: show spanning-tree config The upper part of this output shows the switch’s global spanning-tree configuration that applies to the MST region.

  • Page 144

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying Per-Instance MSTP Configurations. These commands dis- plays the per-instance port configuration and current state, along with instance identifiers and regional root data. Syntax: show spanning-tree config instance < ist | 1..16 > The upper part of this output shows the instance data for the specified instance.

  • Page 145

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying the Region-Level Configuration in Brief. This command output is useful for quickly verifying the allocation of VLANs in the switch’s MSTP configuration and for viewing the configured region identifiers. Syntax: show spanning-tree mst-config This command displays the switch’s regional configuration.

  • Page 146

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying the Pending MSTP Configuration. This command displays the MSTP configuration the switch will implement if you execute the span- ning-tree pending apply command (Refer to “Enabling an Entire MST Region at Once or Exchanging One Region Configuration for Another”...

  • Page 147

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Displaying the Root History. This command displays the spanning-tree root changes history information. Syntax: show spanning-tree root-history < cst | ist | msti> Displays the CST root changes history. Displays the IST root changes history. msti Displays the MSTI root changes history.

  • Page 148: Operating Notes, Troubleshooting

    Multiple Instance Spanning-Tree Operation 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) Operating Notes SNMP MIB Support for MSTP. MSTP is a superset of the STP/802.1D and RSTP/802.1w protocols and uses the MIB objects defined for these two protocols. Also, as of December, 2003, there has been no formal MIB definition published for 802.1s MSTP managed objects.

  • Page 149

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Contents Introduction ........... 6-3 Terminology .

  • Page 150: Table Of Contents

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Contents QoS VLAN-ID (VID) Priority ....... . . 6-46 Assigning a Priority Based on VLAN-ID .

  • Page 151

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Introduction QoS Feature Default Menu UDP/TCP Priority Disabled — page 6-20 Refer to the Online Help. IP-Device Priority Disabled — page 6-27 “ IP Type-of-Service Priority Disabled — page 6-33 “ VLAN-ID Priority Disabled —...

  • Page 152

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Quality of Service is a general term for classifying and prioritizing traffic throughout a network. That is, QoS enables you to establish an end-to-end traffic priority policy to improve control and throughput of important data. You can manage available bandwidth so that the most important traffic goes first.

  • Page 153

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction At the edge switch, QoS classifies certain traffic types and in some cases applies a DSCP policy. At the next hop (downstream switch) QoS honors the policies established at the edge switch. Further downstream, another switch may reclassify some traffic by applying new policies, and yet other downstream switches can be configured to honor the new policies.

  • Page 154

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Terminology Term Use in This Document 802.1p priority A traffic priority setting carried by a VLAN-tagged packet moving from one device to another through ports that are tagged members of the VLAN to which the packet belongs. This setting can be from 0 - 7.

  • Page 155

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Term Use in This Document outbound port For any port, a buffer that holds outbound traffic until it can leave the switch through that port. There queue are four outbound queues for each port in the switch: high, medium, normal, and low. Traffic in a port’s high priority queue leaves the switch before any traffic in the port’s medium priority queue, and so-on.

  • Page 156

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Configuring a priority for outbound packets and a service (prior- ■ ity) policy for use by downstream devices: • DSCP Policy: This feature enables you to set a priority policy in outbound IP packets.

  • Page 157: Qos Types For Prioritizing Outbound Packets

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction If a packet is not in a VLAN-tagged port environment, then the QoS settings in table 6-2 control only to which outbound queue the packet goes. Without VLAN tagging, no 802.1p priority is added to the packet for downstream device use. But if the packet is in a VLAN-tagged environment, then the above setting is also added to the packet as an 802.1p priority for use by downstream devices and applications (shown in table 6-3).

  • Page 158: Packet Types And Evaluation Order

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Packet Types and Evaluation Order The switches covered by this chapter provide five QoS types (packet-matching criteria) you can use to configure QoS priority. Table 6-4. Switch Type Search Order and Precedence Search Order Precedence QoS type Interface - Incoming source-port on the switch VLAN Priority...

  • Page 159

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction precedence supersedes VLAN precedence, all TCP port 80 packets on VLAN 100 will be set to normal priority. For a type precedence listing, see table 6-4, ‘‘Switch Type Search Order and Precedence’’, on page 6-10. Table 6-5.

  • Page 160

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Introduction Precedence Criteria Overview Interface Takes precedence based on the Interface (that is, the port on which the packet entered the (Source- switch). Port) If a packet does not meet the criteria for source-port priority, then precedence defaults to Incoming 802.1p criteria, below Incoming Where a VLAN-tagged packet enters the switch through a port that is a tagged member of that...

  • Page 161: Preparation For Configuring Qos, Steps For Configuring Qos On The Switch

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Preparation for Configuring QoS Preparation for Configuring QoS QoS operates in VLAN-tagged and VLAN-untagged environments. If your network does not use multiple VLANs, you can still implement the 802.1Q VLAN capability for packets to carry their 802.1p priority to the next downstream device.

  • Page 162

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Preparation for Configuring QoS Select the QoS option you want to use. Table 6-7 lists the traffic types (QoS types) and the QoS options you can use for prioritizing or setting a policy on these traffic types: Table 6-7.

  • Page 163: Planning A Qos Configuration, Prioritizing And Monitoring Qos Configuration Options, Qos Resource Usage And Monitoring

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Preparation for Configuring QoS Planning a QoS Configuration QoS uses resources in a way that requires attention to rule usage when planning a QoS configuration. Otherwise, there is an increased possibility of oversubscribing resources, which means that at some point the switch would not support further QoS configuration.

  • Page 164: Planning And Monitoring Rule Usage, Managing Qos Resource Consumption

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Preparation for Configuring QoS Planning and Monitoring Rule Usage The following two CLI commands are useful for planning and monitoring rule usage in a QoS configuration. Syntax qos resources help Provides a quick reference on how QoS uses rule resources for each configuration option.

  • Page 165: Troubleshooting A Shortage Of Resources

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Preparation for Configuring QoS Troubleshooting a Shortage of Resources The inability to configure more rules is caused by: ■ existing QoS configurations consuming all the rules ■ all the QoS resources being used. Do the following to enable configuration of the desired policy: Use the show qos resources command to view your current rule and resource usage.

  • Page 166: Using Qos Types To Configure Qos For Outbound Traffic, Viewing The Qos Configuration

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS Feature Default Menu UDP/TCP Priority Disabled — page 6-20 Refer to Online Help. IP-Device Priority Disabled —...

  • Page 167: No Override

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic vlan-priority Displays the current VLAN priority configuration. Refer to figure 6-22 on page 6-48. port-priority Displays the current Interface (source-port) priority configuration. Refer to figure 6-27 on page 6-53. No Override By default, the IP ToS, VLAN-ID, and interface show outputs automatically list No-override for priority options that have not been configured.

  • Page 168: Qos Udp/tcp Priority

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS UDP/TCP Priority QoS Type Precedence: 1 When you use UDP or TCP (Layer 4) as a QoS type, traffic carrying the specified UDP/TCP port number(s) is marked with the UDP/TCP type’s configured priority level.

  • Page 169: Assigning 802.1p Priority Based On Tcp Or Udp Port Number

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For more information, including a listing of UDP/TCP port numbers, go to the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) website at: http://www.iana.org Then click on: Protocol Number Assignment Services P (Under “Directory of General Assigned Numbers”...

  • Page 170: Assigning A Dscp Policy Based On Tcp Or Udp Port Number

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, configure and list 802.1p priority for the following UDP and TCP port prioritization: TCP/UDP Port 802.1p Priority 802.1p Priority for TCP for UDP TCP Port 23 (Telnet) UDP Port 23 (Telnet)

  • Page 171

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Overwrites (re-marks) the packet’s DSCP with the DSCP configured in the switch for such packets. Assigns the 802.1p priority configured in the switch for the new DSCP. (Refer to “Differentiated Services Codepoint (DSCP) Mapping”...

  • Page 172

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Syntax: qos dscp-map < codepoint > priority < 0 - 7 > This command is optional if a priority has already been assigned to the < codepoint >. The command creates a DSCP policy by assigning an 802.1p priority to a specific DSCP.

  • Page 173

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, suppose you wanted to assign these DSCP policies to the packets identified by the indicated UDP and TDP port applications: Port Applications DSCP Policies DSCP Priority...

  • Page 174

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Configure the DSCP policies for the codepoints you want to use. DSCP Policies Configured in this Step Figure 6-7. Assign Priorities to the Selected DSCPs Assign the DSCP policies to the selected UDP/TCP port applications and display the result.

  • Page 175: Qos Ip-device Priority

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS IP-Device Priority QoS Type Precedence: 2 The IP device-priority option, which applies only to IPv4 packets, uses two resources instead of one—one resource for the source IP address and one for the destination IP address.

  • Page 176: Assigning A Priority Based On Ip Address

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Assigning a Priority Based on IP Address This option assigns an 802.1p priority to all IPv4 packets having the specified IP address as either a source or destination. (If both match, the priority for the IP destination address has precedence.

  • Page 177: Assigning A Dscp Policy Based On Ip Address

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Figure 6-9. Example of Configuring and Listing 802.1p Priority Assignments for Packets Carrying Specific IP Addresses Assigning a DSCP Policy Based on IP Address This option assigns a previously configured DSCP policy (codepoint and 802.1p priority) to outbound IP packets having the specified IP address (either source or destination).

  • Page 178

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Determine the DSCP policy for packets carrying the selected IP address: Determine the DSCP you want to assign to the selected packets. (This codepoint will be used to overwrite the DSCP carried in packets received from upstream devices.) b.

  • Page 179

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic no qos device-priority < ip-address > Deletes the specified IP address as a QoS type. show qos device-priority Displays a listing of all QoS Device Priority types currently in the running-config file.

  • Page 180

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Configure the priorities for the DSCPs you want to use. DSCP Policies Configured in this step. Figure 6-11. Assigning 802.1p Priorities to the Selected DSCPs Assign the DSCP policies to the selected device IP addresses and display the result.

  • Page 181: Qos Ip Type-of-service (tos) Policy And Priority

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS IP Type-of-Service (ToS) Policy and Priority QoS Type Precedence: 3 This feature applies only to IPv4 traffic and performs either of the following: ToS IP-Precedence Mode: All IP packets generated by upstream devices ■...

  • Page 182: Of The Tos Precedence Bits

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Assigning an 802.1p Priority to IPv4 Packets on the Basis of the ToS Precedence Bits If a device or application upstream of the switch sets the precedence bits in the ToS byte of IPv4 packets, you can use this feature to apply that setting for prioritizing packets for outbound port queues.

  • Page 183: Of Incoming Dscp

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic ProCurve(config)# no qos type-of-service Assigning an 802.1p Priority to IPv4 Packets on the Basis of Incoming DSCP One of the best uses for this option is on an interior switch where you want to honor (continue) a policy set on an edge switch.

  • Page 184

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Note on DSCP Use Different applications may use the same DSCP in their IP packets. Also, the same application may use multiple DSCPs if the application originates on different clients, servers, or other devices.

  • Page 185

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Syntax: qos type-of-service diff-services < codepoint > Causes the switch to read the < codepoint > (DSCP) of an incoming IPv4 packet and, when a match occurs, assign a corresponding 802.1p priority, as configured in the switch’s DSCP table (page 6-59).

  • Page 186

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, an edge switch “A” in an untagged VLAN assigns a DSCP of 000110 on IP packets it receives on port A6, and handles the packets with high priority (7).

  • Page 187: Assigning A Dscp Policy On The Basis Of The Dscp In Ipv4 Packets Received From Upstream Devices

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Outbound IP packets with a DSCP of 000110 will have a priority of 7. Notice that codepoints 000000 and 001001 are named as DSCP policies by other codepoints (000001 and 000110 respectively).

  • Page 188

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Use qos type-of-service diff-services < incoming-DSCP > dscp < outgoing- DSCP > to change the policy on packets coming from the edge or upstream switch with the specified incoming DSCP.

  • Page 189

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, suppose you want to configure the following two DSCP policies for packets received with the indicated DSCPs. Received Policy 802.1p Policy Name DSCP DSCP Priority...

  • Page 190

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Configure the policies in the DSCP table: Figure 6-18. Example of Policies Configured (with Optional Names) in the DSCP Table Assign the policies to the codepoints in the selected packet types. The specified DSCP policies overwrite the original DSCPs on the selected packets, and...

  • Page 191: Details Of Qos Ip Type-of-service

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Details of QoS IP Type-of-Service IP packets include a Type of Service (ToS) byte. The ToS byte includes: ■ A Differentiated Services Codepoint (DSCP): This element is com- prised of the upper six bits of the ToS byte).

  • Page 192

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Figure 6-20 shows an example of the ToS byte in the header for an IPv4 packet, and illustrates the diffserv bits and precedence bits in the ToS byte. (Note that the Precedence bits are a subset of the Differentiated Services bits.) Field: Destination...

  • Page 193

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic ToS Option: Outbound Port IP Precedence Differentiated Services (Value = 0 - 7) IP Packet Sent Out Same as above, plus the IP Prece- Same as above, plus the Priority value (0 - 7) will be used to set an Untagged Port dence value (0 - 7) will be used to...

  • Page 194: Qos Vlan-id (vid) Priority, Assigning A Priority Based On Vlan-id

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS VLAN-ID (VID) Priority QoS Type Precedence: 5 The VLAN QoS type allows you to configure one rule for each VLAN, up to a maximum of 120 VLANs.

  • Page 195

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Syntax: vlan < vid > qos priority < 0 - 7 > Configures an 802.1p priority for outbound packets belonging to the specified VLAN. This priority determines the packet’s queue in the outbound port to which it is sent.

  • Page 196: Assigning A Dscp Policy Based On Vlan-id (vid)

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic You would then execute the following commands to prioritize the VLANs by VID: Figure 6-22. Configuring and Displaying QoS Priorities on VLANs If you then decided to remove VLAN_20 from QoS prioritization: In this instance, No- override indicates that VLAN 20 is not prioritized by QoS.

  • Page 197

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic N o t e “Mixing” ToS DSCP policies and 802.1p priorities is not recommended. Refer to the Note on page 6-10. For more on DSCP, refer to “Terminology” on page 6-6. Steps for Creating a Policy Based on VLAN-ID Type.

  • Page 198

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Syntax: vlan < vid > qos dscp < codepoint > Assigns a DSCP policy to packets carrying the specified IP address, and overwrites the DSCP in these packets with the assigned <...

  • Page 199

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Configure the priorities for the DSCPs you want to use. Priorities Configured in this step. Figure 6-25. Assign Priorities to the Selected DSCPs Assign the DSCP policies to the selected VIDs and display the result.

  • Page 200: Qos Interface (source-port) Priority, Assigning A Priority Based On Source-port

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic QoS Interface (Source-Port) Priority QoS Type Precedence: 6 The QoS Interface option enables you to use a packet’s source-port on the switch as a QoS type. Where a particular source-port type has the highest precedence in the switch for traffic entering through that port, then traffic received from the port is marked with the source-port type’s configured priority level.

  • Page 201

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, suppose that you want to prioritize inbound traffic on the following source-ports: Interface Priority (Source Port) 1 - 3 5, 8 9 - 11 You would then execute the following commands to prioritize traffic received on the above ports:...

  • Page 202: Assigning A Dscp Policy Based On The Source-port

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Assigning a DSCP Policy Based on the Source-Port This option assigns a previously configured DSCP policy (codepoint and 802.1p priority) to outbound IP packets (received from the specified source- ports).

  • Page 203

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic N o t e A codepoint must have an 802.1p priority assignment (0 - 7) before you can configure that codepoint as a criteria for prioritizing packets by source-port. If a codepoint shows No-override in the Priority column of the DSCP Policy Table (show qos dscp-map), then you must assign a 0 - 7 priority before proceeding.

  • Page 204

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic For example, suppose you wanted to assign this set of priorities: Source-Port DSCP Priority 000111 5 - 7 000101 8, 10 000010 Determine whether the DSCPs already have priority assignments, which could indicate use by existing applications.

  • Page 205

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Assign the DSCP policies to the selected source-ports and display the result. Figure 6-31. The Completed Source-Port DSCP-Priority Configuration 6-57...

  • Page 206: Differentiated Services Codepoint (dscp) Mapping

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Differentiated Services Codepoint (DSCP) Mapping The DSCP Policy Table associates an 802.1p priority with a specific ToS byte codepoint in an IPv4 packet. This enables you to set a LAN policy that operates independently of 802.1Q VLAN-tagging.

  • Page 207: Default Priority Settings For Selected Codepoints

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Table 6-11. The Default DSCP Policy Table DSCP 802.1p Priority DSCP 802.1p Priority DSCP 802.1p Priority Policy Policy Policy 000000 No-override 010110 101011 No-override No-override 000001...

  • Page 208: Quickly Listing Non-default Codepoint Settings

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Quickly Listing Non-Default Codepoint Settings Table 6-11 lists the switch’s default codepoint/priority settings. If you change the priority of any codepoint setting to a non-default value and then execute write memory, the switch will list the non-default setting in the show config display.

  • Page 209: Note On Changing A Priority Setting

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic affect the packet queuing priority or VLAN tagging. In this case, the packets are handled as follows (as long as no other QoS feature creates priority assignments for them): 802.1Q Status Outbound 802.1p...

  • Page 210: Example Of Changing The Priority Setting On A Policy When One Or More Qos Types Are Currently Using The Policy

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Example of Changing the Priority Setting on a Policy When One or More QoS Types Are Currently Using the Policy Suppose that codepoint 000001 is in use by one or more types. If you try to change its priority, you see a result similar to the following: Figure 6-33.

  • Page 211

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Three types use the codepoint that is to be changed. Two types do not use the codepoint that is to be changed. Figure 6-34. Example of a Search to Identify QoS Types Using a Codepoint You Want To Change 6-63...

  • Page 212

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively Using QoS Types To Configure QoS for Outbound Traffic Change the type configurations by assigning them to a different DSCP policy, or to an 802.1p priority, or to No-override. For example: Delete the policy assignment for the device-priority type. (That is, assign it to No-override.) b.

  • Page 213: Ip Multicast (igmp) Interaction With Qos, Qos Messages In The Cli

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively IP Multicast (IGMP) Interaction with QoS IP Multicast (IGMP) Interaction with IGMP high-priority-forward causes the switch to service the subscribed IP multicast group traffic at high priority, even if QoS on the switch has relegated the traffic to a lower priority.

  • Page 214: Qos Operating Notes And Restrictions

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively QoS Operating Notes and Restrictions QoS Operating Notes and Restrictions Table 6-12. Details of Packet Criteria and Restrictions for QoS Support Packet Criteria or QoS Types DSCP Overwrite Restriction UDP/TCP Device IP Type-of- VLAN Source Incoming...

  • Page 215

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively QoS Operating Notes and Restrictions RADIUS Authentication: RADIUS authentication allowing traffic ■ through a given port may override the port’s QoS configuration, which generates an Event Log message. When the authenticated host discon- nects, the port returns to the static QoS configuration.

  • Page 216

    Quality of Service (QoS): Managing Bandwidth More Effectively QoS Operating Notes and Restrictions 6-68...

  • Page 217

    ProCurve Stack Management Contents Overview ............7-3 Operation .

  • Page 218: Table Of Contents

    ProCurve Stack Management Contents Using the CLI To Disable or Re-Enable Stacking ....7-46 Transmission Interval ........7-46 Stacking Operation with Multiple VLANs Configured .

  • Page 219

    ProCurve Stack Management Overview Overview This chapter describes how to use your network to stack switches without the need for any specialized cabling. For an overview of stacking features, refer to the table on page 7-4. For general information on how to use the switch’s built-in interfaces, see: ■...

  • Page 220: Operation

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Operation Stacking Features Feature Default Menu view stack status view status of a single switch page 7-28 page 7-33 page 7-47 thru page 7-30 view candidate status page 7-33 view status of commander and its page 7-34 stack view status of all stacking-enabled page 7-34...

  • Page 221: Which Devices Support Stacking?, Which Devices Support Stacking

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Simplify management of small workgroups or wiring closets while ■ scaling your network to handle increased bandwidth demand. Eliminate any specialized cables for stacking connectivity and ■ remove the distance barriers that typically limit your topology options when using other stacking technologies.

  • Page 222: Components Of Procurve Stack Management, General Stacking Operation

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Components of ProCurve Stack Management Table 7-1. Stacking Definitions Stack Consists of a Commander switch and any Member switches belonging to that Commander’s stack. Commander A switch that has been manually configured as the controlling device for a stack. When this occurs, the Commander switch’s stacking configuration appears as Candidate...

  • Page 223

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Use the Commander’s console or web Wiring Closet "A" browser interface to access the user Member Switch 1 Candidate Switch interface on any Member switch in IP Address: None Assigned IP Address: None Assigned the same stack. Network Manager Password: leader Manager Password: francois...

  • Page 224: Operating Rules For Stacking, General Rules

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Operating Rules for Stacking General Rules ■ Stacking is an optional feature (enabled in the default configuration) and can easily be disabled. Stacking has no effect on the normal operation of the switch in your network. ■...

  • Page 225: Specific Rules

    ProCurve Stack Management Operation Specific Rules Table 7-2. Specific Rules for Commander, Candidate, and Member Switch IP Addressing and Number Allowed Passwords SNMP Communities Stack Name Per Stack Commander IP Addr: Requires an Only one The Commander’s Manager Standard SNMP community assigned IP address Commander and Operator passwords are...

  • Page 226: Configuring Stack Management, Overview Of Configuring And Bringing Up A Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management N o t e In the default stack configuration, the Candidate Auto Join parameter is enabled, but the Commander Auto Grab parameter is disabled. This prevents Candidates from automatically joining a stack prematurely or joining the wrong stack (if more than one stack Commander is configured in a subnet or broadcast domain).

  • Page 227

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Options for Configuring a Commander and Candidates. Depending on how Commander and Candidate switches are configured, Candidates can join a stack either automatically or by a Commander manually adding (“pulling”) them into the stack. In the default configuration, a Candidate joins only when manually pulled by a Commander.

  • Page 228: General Steps For Creating A Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Default stacking configuration (Stack State set to Candidate, and Auto ■ Join set to Yes) Same subnet (broadcast domain) and default VLAN as the ■ Commander (If VLANs are used in the stack environment, see “Stacking Operation with a Tagged VLAN”...

  • Page 229

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Configure the Commander switch. Doing this first helps to establish consistency in your stack configuration, which can help prevent startup problems. • A stack requires one Commander switch. If you plan to implement more than one stack in a subnet (broadcast domain), the easiest way to avoid unintentionally adding a Candidate to the wrong stack is to manually control the joining process by leaving the Commander’s Auto Grab parameter set to No (the default).

  • Page 230: And Configure Stacking, A Commander Switch

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the Menu Interface To View Stack Status and Configure Stacking Using the Menu Interface To View and Configure a Commander Switch Configure an IP address and subnet mask on the Commander switch. (See the chapter on IP addressing in the Management and Configuration Guide.) Display the Stacking Menu by selecting Stacking in the Main Menu.

  • Page 231

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Display the Stack Configuration menu by pressing to select Stack Configuration. Figure 7-6. The Default Stack Configuration Screen (for Edit). Then Move the cursor to the Stack State field by pressing use the Space bar to select the Commander option. Press the downarrow key to display the Commander configuration fields in the Stack Configuration screen.

  • Page 232: Using The Menu To Manage A Candidate Switch

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Ensure that the Commander has the desired Auto Grab setting, then press the downarrow key: No (the default) prevents automatic joining of Candidates that • have their Auto Join set to Yes. Yes enables the Commander to automatically take a Candidate •...

  • Page 233

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the Menu To “Push” a Switch Into a Stack, Modify the Switch’s Configuration, or Disable Stacking on the Switch. Use Telnet or the web browser interface to access the Candidate if it has an IP address. Other- wise, use a direct connection from a terminal device to the switch’s console port.

  • Page 234: Using The Commander To Manage The Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management • To change Auto Join or Transmission Interval, use to select the [Tab] desired parameter, and: To change Auto Join, use the Space bar. – To change Transmission Interval, type in the new value in the –...

  • Page 235

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the Commander’s Menu To Manually Add a Candidate to a Stack. In the default configuration, you must manually add stack Members from the Candidate pool. Reasons for a switch remaining a Candidate instead of becoming a Member include any of the following: Auto Grab in the Commander is set to No (the default).

  • Page 236

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management The Commander automatically selects an available switch number (SN). You have the option of assigning any other available number. Candidate List Figure 7-10. Example of Candidate List in Stack Management Screen Either accept the displayed switch number or enter another available number.

  • Page 237

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management For status descriptions, see the table on page 7-48. New Member added in step 6. Figure 7-11. Example of Stack Management Screen After New Member Added Using the Commander’s Menu To Move a Member From One Stack to Another.

  • Page 238

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management You will then see the Stacking Status (All) screen: For status descriptions, see the table on page 7-48. This column lists the MAC Addresses for switches Using the MAC addresses for these discovered (in the local Members, you can move them between subnet) that are configured stacks in the same subnet.

  • Page 239

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Do one of the following: • If the stack containing the Member you are moving has a Manager password, press the downarrow key to select the Candidate Password field, then type the password. • If the stack containing the Member you want to move does not have a password, go to step 9.

  • Page 240

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management To remove a Member from a stack, use the Stack Management screen. From the Main Menu, select: 9. Stacking... 4. Stack Management You will then see the Stack Management screen: For status descriptions, see the table on page 7-48.

  • Page 241: Using The Commander To Access Member Switches For Configuration Changes And Monitoring Traffic

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management To continue deleting the selected Member, press the Space bar once to select Yes for the prompt, then press to complete the deletion. The [Enter] Stack Management screen updates to show the new stack Member list. Using the Commander To Access Member Switches for Configuration Changes and Monitoring Traffic After a Candidate becomes a stack Member, you can use that stack’s...

  • Page 242: Of Another Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Main Menu for stack Member named “Coral Sea” (SN = 1 from figure 7-16) Figure 7-17. The eXecute Command Displays the Console Main Menu for the Selected Stack Member You can now make configuration changes and/or view status data for the selected Member in the same way that you would if you were directly connected or telnetted into the switch.

  • Page 243: Monitoring Stack Status

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Press (for Back) to return to the Stacking Menu. To display Stack Configuration menu for the switch you are moving, select 3. Stack Configuration Press (for Edit) to select the Stack State parameter. Use the Space bar to select Member, then press [v] to move to the Com- mander MAC Address field.

  • Page 244

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using Any Stacked Switch To View the Status for All Switches with Stacking Enabled. This procedure displays the general status of all switches in the IP subnet (broadcast domain) that have stacking enabled. Go to the console Main Menu for any switch configured for stacking and select: 9.

  • Page 245

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Figure 7-19. Example of the Commander’s Stacking Status Screen Viewing Member Status. This procedure displays the Member’s stacking information plus the Commander’s status, IP address, and MAC address. To display the status for a Member: Go to the console Main Menu of the Commander switch and select 9.

  • Page 246

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Figure 7-20. Example of a Member’s Stacking Status Screen Viewing Candidate Status. This procedure displays the Candidate’s stacking configuration. To display the status for a Candidate: Use Telnet (if the Candidate has a valid IP address for your network) or a direct serial port connection to access the menu interface Main Menu for the Candidate switch and select 9.

  • Page 247: Using The Cli To View Stack Status And Configure Stacking

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the CLI To View Stack Status and Configure Stacking The CLI enables you to do all of the stacking tasks available through the menu interface.) Table 7-6. CLI Commands for Configuring Stacking on a Switch CLI Command Operation show stack...

  • Page 248

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management CLI Command Operation [no] stack member Commander: Adds a Candidate to stack membership. “No” form removes a Member from stack membership. To easily determine the MAC address of a <switch-num> Candidate, use the show stack candidates command. To determine the MAC mac-address <mac-addr>...

  • Page 249: Using The Cli To View Stack Status

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the CLI To View Stack Status You can list the stack status for an individual switch and for other switches that have been discovered in the same subnet. Syntax: show stack [candidates | view | all] Viewing the Status of an Individual Switch.

  • Page 250

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Viewing the Status of all Stack-Enabled Switches Discovered in the IP Subnet. The next example lists all the stack-configured switches discovered in the IP subnet. Because the switch on which the show stack all command was executed is a candidate, it is included in the “Others”...

  • Page 251: Using The Cli To Configure A Commander Switch

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the CLI To Configure a Commander Switch You can configure any stacking-enabled switch to be a Commander as long as the intended stack name does not already exist on the broadcast domain. (When you configure a Commander, you automatically create a corresponding stack.) Before you begin configuring stacking parameters: Configure IP addressing on the switch intended for stack commander and,...

  • Page 252

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management The stack commander command configures the Commander and names the stack. The Commander appears in the stack as Switch Number (SN) 0. Figure 7-26. Example of the Commander’s Show Stack Screen with Only the Commander Discovered Using a Member’s CLI to Convert the Member to the Commander of a New Stack.

  • Page 253: Adding To A Stack Or Moving Switches Between Stacks

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management The output from this command tells you the MAC address of the current stack Commander. Removes the Member from the “Big_Waters” stack. Converts the former Member to the Com- mander of the new “Lakes” stack. Figure 7-27.

  • Page 254

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using the Commander’s CLI To Manually Add a Candidate to the Stack. To manually add a candidate, you will use: ■ A switch number (SN) to assign to the new member. Member SNs range from 1 to 15.

  • Page 255

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management For example, if the ProCurve 8000M in the above listing did not have a Manager password and you wanted to make it a stack Member with an , you would execute the following command: ProCurve(config)# stack member 2 mac-address 0060b0- dfla00 The show stack view command then lists the Member added by the above...

  • Page 256

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Using a Candidate CLI To Manually “Push” the Candidate Into a Stack . Use this method if any of the following apply: The Candidate’s Auto Join is set to Yes (and you do not want to enable Auto ■...

  • Page 257

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Syntax: stack member < switch-number > mac-address < mac-addr > [ password < password-str >] In the destination Commander, use show stack all to find the MAC address of the Member you want to pull into the destination stack. For example, suppose you created a new Commander with a stack name of “Cold_Waters”...

  • Page 258: Using The Cli To Remove A Member From A Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Syntax: no stack name < stack name> stack join < mac-address > If you don’t know the MAC address of the destination Commander, you can use show stack all to identify it. For example, suppose you have a switch operating as the Commander for a temporary stack named “Test”.

  • Page 259

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Use show stack view to list the stack Members. For example, suppose that you wanted to use the Commander to remove the “North Sea” Member from the following stack: Remove this Member from the stack. Figure 7-34.

  • Page 260: Changes And Traffic Monitoring

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management You would then execute this command in the “North Sea” switch’s CLI to remove the switch from the stack: North Sea(config)# no stack join 0030c1-7fec40 Using the CLI To Access Member Switches for Configuration Changes and Traffic Monitoring After a Candidate becomes a Member, you can use the telnet command from the Commander to access the Member’s CLI or console interface for the same...

  • Page 261: Snmp Community Operation In A Stack

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management SNMP Community Operation in a Stack Community Membership In the default stacking configuration, when a Candidate joins a stack, it automatically becomes a Member of any SNMP community to which the Commander belongs, even though any community names configured in the Commander are not propagated to the Member’s SNMP Communities listing.

  • Page 262: Using The Cli To Disable Or Re-enable Stacking, Transmission Interval

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Note that in the above example (figure 7-37) you cannot use the public community through the Commander to access any of the Member switches. For example, you can use the public community to access the MIB in switches 1 and 3 by using their unique IP addresses.

  • Page 263: Web: Viewing And Configuring Stacking

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Stacking uses only the primary VLAN on each switch in a stack. ■ The primary VLAN can be tagged or untagged as needed in the ■ stacking path from switch to switch. ■ The same VLAN ID (VID) must be assigned to the primary VLAN in each stacked switch.

  • Page 264: Status Messages

    ProCurve Stack Management Configuring Stack Management Status Messages Stacking screens and listings display these status messages: Message Condition Action or Remedy Candidate Auto-join Indicates a switch configured with Stack State set to None required Candidate, Auto Join set to Yes (the default), and no Manager password.

  • Page 265

    Index Numerics dedicated management VLAN … 2-6 DHCP 802.1p priority (QoS) gateway ignored … 2-7 definition … 6-6 disclaimer … 1-ii 802.1w as a region … 5-14 domain … 2-14, 2-19 downstream device (QoS) definition … 6-6 effect of priority settings … 6-9 advertisement …...

  • Page 266

    configuring learn, block, disable … 3-7 operation … 4-11, 4-12 convert dynamic to static … 3-6 port states … 4-5 converting to static VLAN … 3-3 query … 4-11 disable … 3-7 report … 4-12 dynamic VLAN and reboots … 3-17 status …...

  • Page 267

    See IGMP. VLAN ID priority … 6-46, 6-52 multimedia priority QoS) See IGMP. device priority screen … 6-27 multiple … 2-9 IP address, source and destination match … 6-28 multiple forwarding database … 2-9 publication data … 1-ii notes on using VLANs … 2-9 Quality of Service notices …...

  • Page 268

    configuration, exchanging … 5-38 configuration, MST instance … 5-32 setup screen … 1-6 configuration, MSTI per-port … 5-35 single forwarding database … 2-9 configuration, port … 5-22 spanning tree CST … 5-7, 5-11, 5-13 802.1s CST and legacy devices … 5-11 See spanning tree, 802.1s.

  • Page 269

    maximum-age … 5-21 root port per-instance … 5-11 mesh environment … 5-6, 5-15 root switch, instance … 5-33 MIB … 5-48 root switch, IST instance … 5-8, 5-13 MST region root switch, MST instance … 5-14 See region. root switch, regional … 5-13, 5-14 MSTI …...

  • Page 270

    trunk, spanning-tree example … 5-12 restrictions … 2-36 Type of Service See also GVRP. using to prioritize IP traffic … 6-33 single forwarding database … 2-9 Type of Service field (IP) stacking, primary VLAN … 2-7 configuring packet priority … 6-33 static …...

  • Page 272

    Technical information in this document is subject to change without notice. © Copyright 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior written permission is prohibited except as allowed under the copyright laws. July 2007 Manual Part Number...

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