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Management and
HP ProCurve
Series 6400cl Switches
Series 5300xl Switches
Series 3400cl Switches
www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve

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   Also See for HP ProCurve 6400cl Series

   Related Manuals for HP ProCurve 6400cl Series

   Summary of Contents for HP ProCurve 6400cl Series

  • Page 1

    Management and Configuration Guide HP ProCurve Series 6400cl Switches Series 5300xl Switches Series 3400cl Switches www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve...

  • Page 3

    HP ProCurve Series 6400cl Switches Series 5300xl Switches Series 3400cl Switches January 2005 E.09.xx or Greater M.08.6x or Greater Management and Configuration Guide...

  • Page 4

    Publication Number performance, or use of this material. 5990-6050 The only warranties for HP products and services are set January 2005 forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty.

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Information on Using the CLI ......2-4 Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface ....2-5 Advantages of Using HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus .

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    3 Using the Menu Interface Contents ............3-1 Overview .

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    If You Lose the Password ....... . 5-10 Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface ....5-11 Support/Mgmt URLs Feature .

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    6 Switch Memory and Configuration Contents ............6-1 Overview .

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Xmodem: Copying a Configuration File to a Serially Connected Host ........6-36 Xmodem: Copying a Configuration from a Serially Connected Host .

  • Page 10: Table Of Contents

    9 Time Protocols Contents ............9-1 Overview .

  • Page 11: Table Of Contents

    Configuring a Broadcast Limit on the Switch ....10-14 Configuring HP Auto-MDIX ......10-15 Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters .

  • Page 12: Table Of Contents

    Planning and Implementing a PoE Configuration ....11-19 Assigning PoE Ports to VLANs ......11-19 Applying Security Features to PoE Configurations .

  • Page 13: Table Of Contents

    Configuring Inbound Rate-Limiting ......13-4 Displaying the Current Rate-Limit Configuration ... . 13-5 Operating Notes for Rate-Limiting .

  • Page 14: Table Of Contents

    Menu: Viewing and Configuring non-SNMP version 3 Communities ......... . 14-14 CLI: Viewing and Configuring SNMP Community Names .

  • Page 15: Table Of Contents

    Outgoing Packets ......... 14-55 Incoming CDP Packets .

  • Page 16: Table Of Contents

    CLI: Switch-To-Switch Downloads ..... . . A-15 Using HP PCM+ to Update Switch Software ....A-17 Troubleshooting TFTP Downloads .

  • Page 17: Table Of Contents

    Port Status ..........B-8 Menu: Displaying Port Status .

  • Page 18: Table Of Contents

    LACP-Related Problems ........C-14 Mesh-Related Problems ........C-14 Port-Based Access Control (802.1x)-Related Problems .

  • Page 19: Table Of Contents

    CLI: Viewing the Port and VLAN MAC Addresses ....D-4 Viewing the MAC Addresses of Connected Devices ....D-7 E Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches Index...

  • Page 20

    — This page is intentionally unused. — xviii...

  • Page 21: Contents

    Getting Started Contents 1 Getting Started Overview ............1-2 Conventions .

  • Page 22: Overview

    The Product Documentation CD-ROM shipped with the switch includes a copy of this guide. You can also download a copy from the HP ProCurve website. (See “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6, below.) For information on other product documentation for your switch, refer to “Related Publications”...

  • Page 23: Command Prompts

    Port Numbering Conventions. HP ProCurve stackable switches designate individual ports with sequential numbers (1, 2, 3, etc.) HP ProCurve chassis switches designate individual ports with a letter/number combination to show the slot in which the port is found and the sequential number the port has in that slot (A1, A2, B1, B2, etc.) Examples that include port numbering informa­...

  • Page 24: Keys

    A PDF version of this guide is also provided on the Product Documentation CD-ROM shipped with the switch. And you can download a copy from the HP ProCurve website. (See “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6.) Advanced Traffic Management Guide.

  • Page 25

    HP provides PDF versions of switch guides on the Product Documentation CD-ROM shipped with the switch. You can also download the latest version of any HP ProCurve switch manual (in PDF format) from the HP ProCurve website. (Refer to “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6.)

  • Page 26: Getting Documentation From The Web

    1. Go to the HP ProCurve website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve Click on technical support. Click on manuals. Click on the product for which you want to view or download a manual. Figure 1-2. Example of How To Locate Product Manuals on the HP ProCurve Website...

  • Page 27: Sources For More Information

    Interface (hereafter referred to as the “web browser interface”), use the online help available for the web browser interface. For more information on web browser Help options, refer to “Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface” on page 5-11.

  • Page 28: Need Only A Quick Start?

    If you just want to give the switch an IP address so that it can communicate on your network, or if you are not using VLANs, HP recommends that you use the Switch Setup screen to quickly configure IP addressing. To do so, do one of the following: Enter setup at the CLI Manager level prompt.

  • Page 29

    Information on Using the CLI ......2-4 Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface ....2-5 Advantages of Using HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus .

  • Page 30

    VLAN management. (HP includes a copy of PCM+ in-box for a 30-day trial.) This manual describes how to use the menu interface (chapter 2), the CLI (chapter 3), the web browser interface (chapter 4), and how to use these interfaces to configure and monitor the switch.

  • Page 31: Advantages Of Using The Menu Interface

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the Menu Interface To use HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus, refer to the Getting Started Guide and the Administrator’s Guide, which are available electronically with the software for these applications. For more information, visit the HP ProCurve website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve.

  • Page 32: Advantages Of Using The Cli

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the CLI Enables Telnet (in-band) access to the menu functionality. ■ ■; Allows faster navigation, avoiding delays that occur with slower display of graphical objects over a web browser interface. Provides more security; configuration information and passwords are ■;...

  • Page 33: Advantages Of Using The Hp Web Browser Interface

    ■; online Help provided in the CLI interface. Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface Figure 2-3. Example of the HP Web Browser Interface Easy access to the switch from anywhere on the network ■ ■; Familiar browser interface--locations of window objects consistent...

  • Page 34

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface Many features have all their fields in one screen so you can view all ■; values at once ■; More visual cues, using colors, status bars, device icons, and other...

  • Page 35: Manager Plus

    Advantages of Using HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus You can operate HP ProCurve Manager and HP ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM and PCM+) from a PC on the network to monitor traffic, manage your hubs and switches, and proactively recommend network changes to increase network uptime and optimize performance.

  • Page 36

    Features and benefits of HP ProCurve Manager Plus: ■ • All of the Features of HP ProCurve Manager: Refer to the above listing. • In-Depth Traffic Analysis: An integrated, low-overhead traffic mon­ itor interface shows detailed information on traffic throughout the network.

  • Page 37

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus • Device Software Updates: This feature automatically obtains new device software images from HP and updates devices, allowing users to download the latest version or choose the desired version. Updates can be scheduled easily across large groups of devices, all at user- specified times.

  • Page 38

    Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using HP ProCurve Manager or HP ProCurve Manager Plus — This page is intentionally unused. — 2-10...

  • Page 39

    Using the Menu Interface Contents Overview ............3-2 Starting and Ending a Menu Session .

  • Page 40

    Reboot the switch For a detailed list of menu features, see the “Menu Features List” on page 3-14. Privilege Levels and Password Security. HP strongly recommends that you configure a Manager password to help prevent unauthorized access to your network. A Manager password grants full read-write access to the switch.

  • Page 41: Starting And Ending A Menu Session

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session N o t e If the switch has neither a Manager nor an Operator password, anyone having access to the console interface can operate the console with full manager privileges. Also, if you configure only an Operator password, entering the Operator password enables full manager privileges.

  • Page 42: How To Start A Menu Interface Session

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session How To Start a Menu Interface Session In its factory default configuration, the switch console starts with the CLI prompt. To use the menu interface with Manager privileges, go to the Manager level prompt and enter the command.

  • Page 43: How To End A Menu Session And Exit From The Console:

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session Stacking is available on Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches. Figure 3-1. Example of the Main Menu with Manager Privileges For a description of Main Menu features, see “Main Menu Features” on page 3-7.

  • Page 44

    Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session Asterisk indicates a configuration change that requires a reboot to activate. Stacking is available on Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches. Figure 3-2. Example Indication of a Configuration Change Requiring a Reboot 1. In the current session, if you have not made configuration changes that require a switch reboot to activate, return to the Main Menu and press (zero) to log out.

  • Page 45: Main Menu Features

    Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features Main Menu Features Figure 3-3. The Main Menu View with Manager Privileges The Main Menu gives you access to these Menu interface features: ■ Status and Counters: Provides access to display screens showing switch information, port status and counters, port and VLAN address tables, and spanning tree information.

  • Page 46

    Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features Command Line (CLI): Selects the Command Line Interface at the same ■ level (Manager or Operator) that you are accessing in the Menu interface. (Refer to chapter 3, “Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)”.) ■...

  • Page 47: Screen Structure And Navigation

    Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Screen Structure and Navigation Menu interface screens include these three elements: ■ Parameter fields and/or read-only information such as statistics Navigation and configuration actions, such as Save, Edit, and Cancel ■ ■ Help line to describe navigation options, individual parameters, and read- only data For example, in the following System Information screen:...

  • Page 48

    Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Table 3-1. How To Navigate in the Menu Interface Task: Actions: Execute an action Use either of the following methods: from the “Actions –>” • Use the arrow keys ( [<] ,or [>] ) to highlight the action you want list at the bottom of to execute, then press [Enter].

  • Page 49

    Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation To get Help on individual parameter descriptions. In most screens there is a Help option in the Actions line. Whenever any of the items in the Actions line is highlighted, press , and a separate help screen is displayed. For example: Pressing [H] or highlighting Help and pressing [Enter] displays Help for the...

  • Page 50: Rebooting The Switch

    Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Rebooting the Switch Rebooting the switch from the menu interface ■ Terminates all current sessions and performs a reset of the operating system Activates any menu interface configuration changes that require a reboot ■...

  • Page 51

    Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes. Configuration changes for most parameters in the menu interface become effective as soon as you save them. However, you must reboot the switch in order to implement a change in the .

  • Page 52: Menu Features List

    Using the Menu Interface Menu Features List Menu Features List Status and Counters • General System Information • Switch Management Address Information • Port Status • Port Counters • Address Table • Port Address Table • Spanning Tree Information Switch Configuration •...

  • Page 53: Where To Go From Here

    Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here Where To Go From Here This chapter provides an overview of the menu interface and how to use it. The following table indicates where to turn for detailed information on how to use the individual features available through the menu interface.

  • Page 54

    Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here — This page is intentionally unused. — 3-16...

  • Page 55

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Contents Overview ............4-2 Accessing the CLI .

  • Page 56

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Overview Overview The CLI is a text-based command interface for configuring and monitoring the switch. The CLI gives you access to the switch’s full set of commands while providing the same password protection that is used in the web browser interface and the menu interface.

  • Page 57: Privilege Levels At Logon

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI When you use the CLI to make a configuration change, the switch writes the change to the Running-Config file in volatile memory. This allows you to test your configuration changes before making them permanent. To make changes permanent, you must use the write memory command to save them to the Startup-Config file in non-volatile memory.

  • Page 58: Privilege Level Operation

    Using the CLI C a u t i o n HP strongly recommends that you configure a Manager password. If a Man­ ager password is not configured, then the Manager level is not password- protected, and anyone having in-band or out-of-band access to the switch may be able to reach the Manager level and compromise switch and network security.

  • Page 59: Manager Privileges

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Manager Privileges Manager privileges give you three additional levels of access: Manager, Global Configuration, and Context Configuration. (See figure.) A “#” character delim­ its any Manager prompt. For example: HPswitch#_ Example of the Manager prompt. ■...

  • Page 60

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Table 4-1. Privilege Level Hierarchy Privilege Example of Prompt and Permitted Operations Level Operator Privilege Operator Level HPswitch> show < command > View status and configuration information. setup ping < argument > Perform connectivity tests.

  • Page 61: How To Move Between Levels

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI How To Move Between Levels Change in Levels Example of Prompt, Command, and Result Operator level HPswitch> enable Password:_ Manager level enable After you enter , the Password prompt appears. After you enter the Manager password, the system prompt appears with the # symbol: HPswitch#_...

  • Page 62: Listing Commands And Command Options

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI For example, if you use the menu interface to configure an IP address of “X” for VLAN 1 and later use the CLI to configure a different IP address of “Y” for VLAN 1, then “Y”...

  • Page 63

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Typing ? at the Manager level produces this listing: When - - MORE - - appears, use the Space bar or [Return] to list additional commands. Figure 4-4.Example of the Manager-Level Command Listing When - - MORE - - appears, there are more commands in the listing.

  • Page 64: Listing Command Options

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI As mentioned above, if you type part of a command word and press , the [Tab] CLI completes the current word (if you have typed enough of the word for the CLI to distinguish it from other possibilities), including hyphenated exten­...

  • Page 65: Displaying Cli "help"

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Displaying CLI “Help” CLI Help provides two types of context-sensitive information: ■ Command list with a brief summary of each command’s purpose Detailed information on how to use individual commands ■ Displaying Command-List Help.

  • Page 66

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Figure 4-7.Example of How To Display Help for a Specific Command Note that trying to list the help for an individual command from a privilege level that does not include that command results in an error message. For example, trying to list the help for the interface command while at the global configuration level produces this result: HPswitch# speed-duplex help...

  • Page 67: Configuration Commands And The Context Configuration Modes

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Configuration Commands and the Context Configuration Modes You can execute any configuration command in the global configuration mode or in selected context modes. However, using a context mode enables you to execute context-specific commands faster, with shorter command strings.

  • Page 68

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI In the port context, the first block of commands in the “?” listing show the context-specific commands that will affect only ports C3-C6. The remaining commands in the listing are Manager, Operator, and context commands.

  • Page 69

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI VLAN Context . Includes VLAN-specific commands that apply only to the selected VLAN, plus Manager and Operator commands. The prompt for this mode includes the VLAN ID of the selected VLAN. For example, if you had already configured a VLAN with an ID of 100 in the switch: HPswitch(config)# vlan 100 Command executed at configuration level to enter VLAN 100 context.

  • Page 70: Cli Control And Editing

    Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) CLI Control and Editing CLI Control and Editing Keystrokes Function [Ctrl] [A] Jumps to the first character of the command line. or [<] Moves the cursor back one character. [Ctrl] [B] [Ctrl] [C] Terminates a task and displays the command prompt. [Ctrl] [D] Deletes the character at the cursor.

  • Page 71

    If You Lose the Password ....... . 5-10 Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface ....5-11 Support/Mgmt URLs Feature .

  • Page 72

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Overview Overview The HP web browser interface built into the switch lets you easily access the switch from a browser-based PC on your network. This lets you do the following: Optimize your network uptime by using the Alert Log and other diagnostic ■...

  • Page 73: General Features

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface General Features General Features The Web Browser Interface includes these features: Switch Identity and Status: • General system data • Software version • IP address • Status Overview • Port utilization • Port counters •...

  • Page 74: Starting An Hp Web Browser Interface Session With The Switch

    Location or Address field instead of the IP address. Using DNS names typically improves browser performance. Contact your network adminis­ trator to enquire about DNS names associated with your HP switch. Type the IP address (or DNS name) of the switch in the browser Location or Address (URL) field and press .

  • Page 75: Plus (pcm+)

    (optionally) a DNS name, and has been discovered by PCM or PCM+. (For more on assigning an IP address, refer to “IP Configuration” on page 8-3.) To establish a web browser session with HP PCM or PCM+ running, do the following on the network management station: 1. Make sure the Java applets are enabled for your web browser.

  • Page 76

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch First-Time Alert Install Alert Figure 5-1. Example of Status Overview Screen 5-6...

  • Page 77: Tasks For Your First Hp Web Browser Interface Session

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session The first time you access the web browser interface, there are three tasks you should perform: ■...

  • Page 78: Interface

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session This window is the launching point for the basic configuration you need to perform to set web browser interface passwords for maintaining security and a fault detection policy, which determines the types of messages that the Alert Log displays.

  • Page 79

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Figure 5-3. The Device Passwords Window To set the passwords: Access the Device Passwords screen by one of the following methods: • If the Alert Log includes a “First Time Install” event entry, double click on this event, then, in the resulting display, click on the secure access to the device link.

  • Page 80: Entering A User Name And Password

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Entering a User Name and Password Figure 5-4. Example of the Password Prompt in the Web Browser Interface The manager and operator passwords are used to control access to all switch interfaces.

  • Page 81: Online Help For The Hp Web Browser Interface

    Context-sensitive help is provided for the screen you are on. N o t e To access the online Help for the HP web browser interface, you need either HP ProCurve Manager (version 1.5 or greater) installed on your network or an active connection to the World Wide Web.

  • Page 82: Support/mgmt Urls Feature

    Support tab. The default is the URL for the HP ProCurve Networking home page. – The URL of a PCM (HP ProCurve Network Manager) workstation or other server for the online Help files for this web browser interface. (The default setting accesses the switch’s browser-based Help on the HP ProCurve...

  • Page 83: Support Url

    As an alternative, you can replace the HP URL with the URL for a local site used for logging reports on network performance or other support activities.

  • Page 84: Status Reporting Features

    Alert Log Control Bar Figure 5-8. The Status Overview Window Policy Management and Configuration. HP PCM can perform network- wide policy management and configuration of your switch. The Management Server URL field (page 5-13) shows the URL for the management station performing that function.

  • Page 85: The Port Utilization And Status Displays

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Port Utilization and Status Displays The Port Utilization and Status displays show an overview of the status of the switch and the amount of network activity on each port. The following figure shows a sample reading of the Port Utilization and Port Status.

  • Page 86

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Maximum Activity Indicator: As the bars in the graph area change ■ height to reflect the level of network activity on the corresponding port, they leave an outline to identify the maximum activity level that has been observed on the port.

  • Page 87: Port Status

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Port Status Port Status Indicators Legend Figure 5-12. The Port Status Indicators and Legend The Port Status indicators show a symbol for each port that indicates the general status of the port. There are four possible statuses: Port Connected –...

  • Page 88: The Alert Log

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Alert Log The web browser interface Alert Log, shown in the lower half of the screen, shows a list of network occurrences, or alerts, that were detected by the switch. Typical alerts are Broadcast Storm, indicating an excessive number of broadcasts received on a port, and Problem Cable, indicating a faulty cable.

  • Page 89: Alert Types And Detailed Views

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Alert Types and Detailed Views As of April, 2004, the web browser interface generates the following alert types: • Auto Partition • High collision or drop rate • Backup Transition • Loss of Link •...

  • Page 90: The Status Bar

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Figure 5-14. Example of Alert Log Detail View The Status Bar The Status Bar appears in the upper left corner of the web browser interface window. Figure 5-15 shows an expanded view of the status bar.

  • Page 91

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Status bar includes four objects: ■ Status Indicator. Indicates, by icon, the severity of the most critical alert in the current display of the Alert Log. This indicator can be one of four shapes and colors, as shown below.

  • Page 92: Setting Fault Detection Policy

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Setting Fault Detection Policy One of the powerful features in the web browser interface is the Fault Detection facility. For your switch, this feature controls the types of alerts reported to the Alert Log based on their level of severity.

  • Page 93

    ■ management server (in cases where a network management tool such as HP ProCurve Manager is in use). Use this option when you don’t want to use the Alert Log. The Fault Detection Window also contains three Change Control Buttons: Apply Changes.

  • Page 94

    Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features — This page is intentionally unused. — 5-24...

  • Page 95

    Switch Memory and Configuration Contents Overview ............6-2 Overview of Configuration File Management .

  • Page 96

    Switch Memory and Configuration Overview Overview This chapter describes: ■ How switch memory manages configuration changes How the CLI implements configuration changes ■ ■ How the menu interface and web browser interface implement configu­ ration changes ■ How the switch provides software options through primary/secondary flash images How to use the switch’s primary and secondary flash options, including ■...

  • Page 97

    Switch Memory and Configuration Overview of Configuration File Management Running Config File: Exists in volatile memory and controls switch ■ operation. If no configuration changes have been made in the CLI since the switch was last booted, the running-config file is identical to the startup-config file.

  • Page 98

    Switch Memory and Configuration Overview of Configuration File Management “permanent”. When you are satisfied that the change is satisfactory, you can make it permanent by executing the command. For example, write memory suppose you use the following command to disable port 5: HPswitch(config)# interface ethernet 5 disable The above command disables port 5 in the running-config file, but not in the startup-config file.

  • Page 99: Using The Cli To Implement Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes The CLI offers these capabilities: Access to the full set of switch configuration features ■ ■ The option of testing configuration changes before making them perma­ nent How To Use the CLI To View the Current Configuration Files.

  • Page 100

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes 3. Observe the switch’s performance with the new parameter settings to verify the effect of your changes. 4. When you are satisfied that you have the correct parameter settings, use command to copy the changes to the startup-config file.

  • Page 101

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes Disables port 1 in the running configuration, which causes port 1 to block all traffic. HPswitch(config)# interface e 1 disable HPswitch(config)# boot Device will be rebooted, do you want to continue [y/n]? y Press [Y] to continue the rebooting process.

  • Page 102: Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes How To Reset the startup-config and running-config Files to the Factory Default Configuration. This command reboots the switch, replacing the contents of the current startup-config and running-config files with the factory-default startup configuration.

  • Page 103

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes N o t e The only exception to this operation are two VLAN-related parameter changes that require a reboot—described under “Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes” on page 6-10. Using in the Menu Interface Save...

  • Page 104: Rebooting From The Menu Interface

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes Rebooting from the Menu Interface Terminates the current session and performs a reset of the operating ■ system ■ Activates any configuration changes that require a reboot ■...

  • Page 105: Web: Implementing Configuration Changes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes If configuration changes requiring a reboot have been made, the switch displays an asterisk (*) next to the menu item in which the change has been made.

  • Page 106: Using Primary And Secondary Flash Image Options

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options The Series switches covered by this guide feature two flash memory locations for storing switch software image files: ■ Primary Flash: The default storage for a switch software image. ■...

  • Page 107

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options For example, if the switch is using a software version of E.08.22 stored in Primary flash, show version produces the following: Figure 6-6. Example Showing the Identity of the Current Flash Image (5300xl) Determining Whether the Flash Images Are Different Versions.

  • Page 108: Switch Software Downloads

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options 1. In this example show version indicates the switch has version E.08.30 in primary flash. 2. After the boot system command, show version indicates that version E.08.20 is in secondary flash.

  • Page 109: Local Switch Software Replacement And Removal

    If you want to remove an unwanted software version from flash, HP recommends that you do so by overwriting it with the same software version that you are using to operate the switch, or with another acceptable software version.

  • Page 110

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options 1. Verify that there is a valid flash image in the secondary flash location. The following figure indicates that a software image is present in secondary flash. (If you are unsure whether the image is secondary flash is valid, try booting from it before you proceed, by using boot system flash secondary.) The unequal code size, differing dates,...

  • Page 111

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options The prompt shows which flash location will be erased. Figure 6-10. Example of Erase Flash Prompt Type y at the prompt to complete the flash erase. Use show flash to verify erasure of the selected software flash image The “...

  • Page 112

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options Booting from Primary Flash. This command always boots the switch from primary flash, executes the complete set of subsystem self-tests, and gives you the option of saving or discarding any configuration changes in the running­ config file.

  • Page 113: Operating Notes

    Switch Memory and Configuration Using Primary and Secondary Flash Image Options Rebooting from the Current Software Version. Reload reboots the switch from the flash image and startup-config file on which the switch is currently running, and provides the option for saving to the startup-config file any configuration changes currently in the running-config file.

  • Page 114: Multiple Configuration Files On 5300xl Switches

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches This section applies only to 5300xl switches running software release E.09.xx or greater. Action Page Listing and Displaying Startup-Config Files 6-25 Changing or Overriding the Reboot Configuration Policy 6-27 Managing Startup-Config Files Renaming Startup-Config Files...

  • Page 115

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Beginning with software release E.09.xx, the switch allows up to three startup­ config files with options for selecting which startup-config file to use for: ■; A fixed reboot policy using a specific startup-config file for a specific boot path (primary or secondary flash) Overriding the current reboot policy on a per-instance basis ■...

  • Page 116: General Operation

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches General Operation Multiple Configuration Storage in the Switch. The switch uses three memory “slots”, with identitly (id) numbers of 1, 2, and 3. Memory Slots for Different Startup-Config Files A startup-config file stored in a memory slot has a unique, changeable file name.

  • Page 117

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches The result is that the startup-config file used to reboot the switch is modified by the actions in step 2. Boot Command Primary Boot Path Active Startup-Config File: Idle Startup-Config File: backupConfig workingConfig Generated Running-Config File...

  • Page 118: Transitioning To Multiple Configuration Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Transitioning to Multiple Configuration Files If your 5300xl switch was shipped from the factory with software release E.08.xx or earlier installed, you must download software release E.09.xx or greater to use the multiple configuration feature. At the first reboot with a software release supporting multiple configuration, the switch: Assigns the filename oldConfig to the existing startup-config file (which is ■;...

  • Page 119: Listing And Displaying Startup-config Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Listing and Displaying Startup-Config Files Command Page show config files Below show config < filename > 6-27 Viewing the Startup-Config File Status with Multiple Configuration Enabled Rebooting the switch with software release E.09.xx or later automatically enables the multiple configuration feature.

  • Page 120

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches — Continued from the previous page. — In the default configuration : • If the switch was shipped from the factory with software release E.09.xx installed in both the primary and secondary boot paths, then one startup-config file named config1 is used for both paths and is stored in memory slot 1.

  • Page 121: Displaying The Content Of A Specific Startup-config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Displaying the Content of A Specific Startup-Config File With Multiple Configuration enabled, the switch can have up to three startup­ config files. Because the show config command always displays the content of the currently active startup-config file, the command extension shown below is needed to allow viewing the contents of any other startup-config files stored in the switch.

  • Page 122

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches You can use the following command to change the current policy so that the switch automatically boots using a different startup-config file. Syntax: startup-default [ primary | secondary ] config < filename > Specifies a boot configuration policy option: [ primary | secondary ] config <...

  • Page 123: Managing Startup-config Files In The Switch

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Overriding the Default Reboot Configuration Policy. This command provides a method for manually rebooting with a specific startup-config file other than the file specified in the default reboot configuration policy. Syntax: boot system flash <...

  • Page 124: Renaming An Existing Startup-config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Renaming an Existing Startup-Config File Syntax: rename config < current-filename > < newname-str > This command changes the name of an existing startup­ config file. A file name can include up to 63, alphanumeric characters.

  • Page 125

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Figure 6-20. Example of Using One Startup-Config File for Both Primary and Secondary Flash If you wanted to experiment with configuration changes to the software version in secondary flash, you could create and assign a separate startup­ config file for this purpose.

  • Page 126: Erasing A Startup-config File

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Erasing a Startup-Config File You can erase any of the startup-config files in the switch’s memory slots. In some cases, erasing a file causes the switch to generate a new, default- configuration file for the affected memory slot.

  • Page 127: Switch To Its Default Configuration

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Figure 6-22 illustrates using erase config < filename > to remove a startup-config file. Figure 6-22. Example of Erasing a Non-Active Startup-Config File With the same memory configuration as is shown in the bottom portion of figure 6-22, executing erase startup-config boots the switch from primary flash, resulting in a new file named minconfig in the same memory slot.

  • Page 128

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches • Boots the switch from primary flash using the new (default) configu­ ration in the startup-config file in memory slot 1. Since the primary flash in this instance does not support multiple configuration files, the multiple configuration feature does not operate until the switch is booted again using software release E.09.xx or greater.

  • Page 129: Transferring Startup-config Files To Or From A Remote Server

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Transferring Startup-Config Files To or From a Remote Server Command Page copy config < src-file > tftp < ip-addr > < remote-file > < pc | unix > below copy tftp config < dest-file > < ip-addr > < remote-file > < pc | unix > below copy config <...

  • Page 130: Connected Host

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches For example, the following command copies a startup-config file named test- 01.txt from a (UNIX) TFTP server at IP address 10.10.28.14 to the first empty memory slot in the switch: HPswitch(config)# copy tftp config test-01 10.10.28.14 test-01.txt unix...

  • Page 131: Operating Notes For Multiple Configuration Files

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches Operating Notes for Multiple Configuration Files SFTP/SCP: The configuration files are available for sftp/scp transfer as ■ /cfg/< filename >. ■ If you retain a software version earlier than E.09.xx on the switch, always reserve the first config memory slot (id = 1) for a configuration compatible with the earlier version.

  • Page 132

    Switch Memory and Configuration Multiple Configuration Files on 5300xl Switches — This page is intentionally unused. — 6-38...

  • Page 133

    Interface Access and System Information Contents Overview ............7-2 Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet .

  • Page 134

    Chapter 3, “Using the Menu Interface” ■ Chapter 4, “Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)” Chapter 5, Using the HP Web Browser Interface” ■ Why Configure Interface Access and System Information? The inter- face access features in the switch operate properly by default. However, you can modify or disable access features to suit your particular needs.

  • Page 135: Interface Access: Console/serial Link, Web, And Inbound Telnet

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Interface Access Features Feature Default Menu Inactivity Time 0 Minutes page 7-4 page 7-6 — (disabled) Inbound Telnet Access Enabled page 7-4 page 7-5...

  • Page 136: Menu: Modifying The Interface Access

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Menu: Modifying the Interface Access The menu interface enables you to modify these parameters: ■ Inactivity Timeout Inbound Telnet Enabled ■ Web Agent Enabled ■ To Access the Interface Access Parameters: From the Main Menu, Select...

  • Page 137: Cli: Modifying The Interface Access

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet CLI: Modifying the Interface Access Interface Access Commands Used in This Section show console below [no] telnet-server below [no] web-management page 7-6 console page 7-6 Listing the Current Console/Serial Link Configuration. This com­ mand lists the current interface access parameter settings.

  • Page 138

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet Outbound Telnet to Another Device. This feature operates indepen­ dently of the telnet-server status and enables you to Telnet to another device that has an IP address. Syntax: telnet <...

  • Page 139

    Interface Access and System Information Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet For example, to use one command to configure the switch with the following: ■ VT100 operation ■ 19,200 baud No flow control ■ ■ 10-minute inactivity time ■...

  • Page 140: Sessions

    Interface Access and System Information Denying Interface Access by Terminating Remote Management Sessions Denying Interface Access by Terminating Remote Management Sessions The switch supports up to four management sessions. You can use show ip ssh to list the current management sessions, and kill to terminate a currently running remote session.

  • Page 141: System Information

    Configuring system information is optional, but recommended. System Name: Using a unique name helps you to identify individual devices where you are using an SNMP network management tool such as HP ProCurve Manager. System Contact and Location: This information is helpful for identifying the person administratively responsible for the switch and for identifying the locations of individual switches.

  • Page 142: Menu: Viewing And Configuring System Information

    Daylight Time Rule: Specifies the daylight savings time rule to apply for your location. The default is None. (For more on this topic, see appendix D, “Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches.) Time: Used in the CLI to specify the time of day, the date, and other system parameters.

  • Page 143: Cli: Viewing And Configuring System Information

    Interface Access and System Information System Information Press (for Edit). The cursor moves to the System Name field. 3. Refer to the online help provided with this screen for further information on configuration options for these features. 4. When you have finished making changes to the above parameters, press (for Save) and return to the Main Menu.

  • Page 144

    Interface Access and System Information System Information Configure a System Name, Contact, and Location for the Switch. To help distinguish one switch from another, configure a plain-language identity for the switch. Syntax: hostname < name-string > snmp-server [contact <system-contact>] [location <system-location>] Both fields allow up to 48 characters.

  • Page 145

    Interface Access and System Information System Information Reconfigure the MAC Age Time for Learned MAC Addresses. This command corresponds to the MAC Age Interval in the menu interface, and is expressed in seconds. Syntax: mac-age-time < 10 - 1000000 > (seconds) For example, to configure the age time to seven minutes: HPswitch(config)# mac-age-time 420 Configure the Time Zone and Daylight Time Rule.

  • Page 146: Web: Configuring System Parameters

    Interface Access and System Information System Information Web: Configuring System Parameters In the web browser interface, you can enter the following system information: ■ System Name System Location ■ System Contact ■ For access to the MAC Age Interval and the Time parameters, use the menu interface or the CLI.

  • Page 147

    Configuring IP Addressing Contents Overview ............8-2 IP Configuration .

  • Page 148

    Configuring IP Addressing Overview Overview You can configure IP addressing through all of the switch’s interfaces. You can also: ■ Easily edit a switch configuration file to allow downloading the file to multiple switches without overwriting each switch’s unique gateway and VLAN 1 IP addressing.

  • Page 149: Ip Configuration

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration IP Configuration IP Configuration Features Feature Default Menu IP Address and Subnet Mask DHCP/Bootp page 8-5 page 8-7 page 8-11 Multiple IP Addresses on a VLAN — page 8-9 — Default Gateway Address none page 8-5 page 8-7 page 8-11 Packet Time-To-Live (TTL)

  • Page 150: Just Want A Quick Start With Ip Addressing?

    If you just want to give the switch an IP address so that it can communicate on your network, or if you are not using VLANs, HP recommends that you use the Switch Setup screen to quickly configure IP addressing. To do so, do one of the following: Enter setup at the CLI Manager level prompt.

  • Page 151: Menu: Configuring Ip Address, Gateway, And Time-to-live (ttl)

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration use DHCP or BootP to acquire IP addressing. However, the switch’s gateway, TTL, and TimeP or SNTP values, which are applied globally, and not per-VLAN, will be acquired through the primary VLAN only, unless manually set by using the CLI, Menu, or web browser interface.(If these parameters are manually set, they will not be overwritten by alternate values received from a DHCP or Bootp server.) For more on VLANs, refer to the chapter titled “Static Virtual LANs”...

  • Page 152

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration For descriptions of these parameters, see the online Help for this screen. Before using the DHCP/ Bootp option, refer to “DHCP/Bootp Operation” on page 8-13. Figure 8-1. Example of the IP Service Configuration Screen without Multiple VLANs Configured Press (for Edit).

  • Page 153: Cli: Configuring Ip Address, Gateway, And Time-to-live (ttl)

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration CLI: Configuring IP Address, Gateway, and Time-To- Live (TTL) IP Commands Used in This Section Page show ip ip address < mask-length > 8-8, 8-9 ip address /< mask-bits > 8-8, 8-9 ip default-gateway 8-11 ip ttl 8-11 Viewing the Current IP Configuration.

  • Page 154

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration With multiple VLANs and some other features configured, show ip provides additional information: A Switch with IP Addressing and VLANs Configured Figure 8-3. Example of Show IP Listing with Non-Default IP Addressing Configured Configure an IP Address and Subnet Mask. The following command includes both the primary IP address and the subnet mask.

  • Page 155

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration Configure Multiple IP Addresses on a VLAN (Multinetting). You can configure one primary IP address per VLAN and up to seven secondary IP addresses for the same VLAN. That is, the switch enables you to assign up to eight networks to a VLAN.

  • Page 156

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration If you then wanted to multinet the default VLAN, you would do the following: The secondary IP addresses in a VLAN are listed immediately after the primary IP address for the VLAN. Figure 8-5. Example of Multinetting on the Default VLAN N o t e The Internet (IP) Service screen in the Menu interface (figure 8-1 on page 8-6) displays only the primary IP address for each VLAN.

  • Page 157: Web: Configuring Ip Addressing

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration Configure the Optional Default Gateway. Using the Global configura­ tion level, you can manually assign one default gateway to the switch. (The switch does not allow IP addressing received from a DHCP or Bootp server to replace a manually configured default gateway.) Syntax: ip default-gateway <...

  • Page 158: How Ip Addressing Affects Switch Operation

    Console RS-232 port. You can use direct-connect console access to take advantage of features that do not depend on IP addressing. However, to realize the full capabilities HP proactive networking offers through the switch, con- figure the switch with an IP address and subnet mask compatible with your network.

  • Page 159: Dhcp/bootp Operation

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration DHCP/Bootp Operation Overview. DHCP/Bootp is used to provide configuration data from a DHCP or Bootp server to the switch. This data can be the IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, Timep Server address, and TFTP server address. If a TFTP server address is provided, this allows the switch to TFTP a previously saved configuration file from the TFTP server to the switch.

  • Page 160

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration DHCP Operation. A significant difference between a DHCP configuration and a Bootp configuration is that an IP address assignment from a DHCP server is automatic. Depending on how the DHCP server is configured, the switch may receive an IP address that is temporarily leased. Periodically the switch may be required to renew its lease of the IP configuration.

  • Page 161: Network Preparations For Configuring Dhcp/bootp

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Configuration gw=10.66.77.1:\ lg=10.22.33.44:\ T144=”switch.cfg”:\ vm=rfc1048 where: 5300switch is a user-defined symbolic name to help you find the correct section of the bootptab file. If you have multiple switches that will be using Bootp to get their IP configuration, you should use a unique symbolic name for each switch.

  • Page 162: Onfiguration File Downloads

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads N o t e Designating a primary VLAN other than the default VLAN affects the switch’s use of information received via DHCP/Bootp. For more on this topic, refer to the chapter describing VLANs in the Advanced Traffic Management Guide for your switch.

  • Page 163: Enabling Ip Preserve

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads If the switch’s current IP addressing for VLAN 1 is from a DHCP server, ■ IP Preserve is suspended. In this case, whatever IP addressing the config­ uration file specifies is implemented when the switch downloads the file and reboots.

  • Page 164

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads For example, consider Figure 8-7: DHCP TFTP Server Server Management config. Station Address Switch 1 Switch 2 Switch 4 Switch 3 VLAN 1: DHCP VLAN 1: VLAN 1: VLAN 1: 10.31.22.101 10.31.22.102...

  • Page 165

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads If you apply this configuration file to figure 8-7, switches 1 - 3 will still retain their manually assigned IP addressing. However, switch 4 will be configured with the IP addressing included in the file.

  • Page 166

    Configuring IP Addressing IP Preserve: Retaining VLAN-1 IP Addressing Across Configuration File Downloads — This page is intentionally unused. — 8-20...

  • Page 167

    Time Protocols Contents Overview ............9-2 TimeP Time Synchronization .

  • Page 168

    Time Protocols Overview Overview This chapter describes: ■ SNTP Time Protocol Operation Timep Time Protocol Operation ■ Using time synchronization ensures a uniform time among interoperating devices. This helps you to manage and troubleshoot switch operation by attaching meaningful time data to event and error messages. The switch offers TimeP and SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol) and a timesync command for changing the time protocol selection (or turning off time protocol operation).

  • Page 169: Protocol Operation

    Time Protocols Selecting a Time Synchronization Protocol or Turning Off Time Protocol Operation ular server, it ignores time broadcasts from other SNTP servers unless the configurable expires three consecutive times without Poll Interval an update received from the first-detected server. Note To use Broadcast mode, the switch and the SNTP server must be in the same subnet.

  • Page 170: Disabling Time Synchronization

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Note that simply selecting a time synchronization protocol does not enable that protocol on the switch unless you also enable the protocol itself (step 2, above). For example, in the factory-default configuration, TimeP is the selected time synchronization method.

  • Page 171: Menu: Viewing And Configuring Sntp

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Table 9-1. SNTP Parameters SNTP Parameter Operation Time Sync Used to select either SNTP, TIMEP, or None as the time synchronization method. Method SNTP Mode Disabled The Default. SNTP does not operate, even if specified by the Menu interface Time Sync Method parameter or the CLI timesync command.

  • Page 172

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Time Protocol Selection Parameter – TIMEP – SNTP – None Figure 9-1. The System Information Screen (Default Values) Press (for ). The cursor moves to the field. Edit System Name Use [v] to move the cursor to the Time Sync Method field.

  • Page 173

    SNTP server version running on the device you specified in the preceding step (step ii). If you are unsure which version to use, HP recommends leaving this value at the default setting of and testing SNTP operation to determine whether any change is necessary.

  • Page 174: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Sntp

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring CLI: Viewing and Configuring SNTP CLI Commands Described in this Section SNTP Command Page show sntp [no] timesync 9-10 and ff., 9-13 sntp broadcast 9-10 sntp unicast 9-11 sntp server 9-11 and ff. Protocol Version 9-13 poll-interval...

  • Page 175

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-4. Example of SNTP Configuration When SNTP Is the Selected Time Synchronization Method In the factory-default configuration (where TimeP is the selected time synchronization method), still lists the SNTP configuration even show sntp though it is not currently in use.

  • Page 176: Configuring (enabling Or Disabling) The Sntp Mode

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-6. Example of Display Showing IP Addressing for All Configured Time Servers and VLANs Configuring (Enabling or Disabling) the SNTP Mode Enabling the SNTP mode means to configure it for either broadcast or unicast mode.

  • Page 177

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Syntax: sntp broadcast Configures as the SNTP mode. broadcast For example, suppose: ■ Time synchronization is in the factory-default configuration (TimeP is the currently selected time synchronization method). You want to: ■ 1. View the current time synchronization. 2.

  • Page 178

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Syntax: sntp server <ip-addr> [version] Specifies the SNTP server. The default server version is Syntax: no sntp server < ip-addr > Deletes the specified SNTP server. N o t e Deleting an SNTP server when only one is configured disables SNTP unicast operation.

  • Page 179

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Deletes unicast SNTP server entry. Re-enters the unicast server with a non- default protocol version. show sntp displays the result. Figure 9-9. Example of Specifying the SNTP Protocol Version Number Changing the SNTP Poll Interval. Syntax: sntp poll-interval <...

  • Page 180

    Time Protocols SNTP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-10. Example of SNTP with Time Sychronization Disabled Disabling the SNTP Mode. If you want to prevent SNTP from being used even if selected by (or the Menu interface’s param­ timesync Time Sync Method eter), configure the SNTP mode as disabled.

  • Page 181: Timep: Viewing, Selecting, And Configuring

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring TimeP Feature Default Menu view the Timep time synchronization configuration page 9-16 page 9-18 — select Timep as the time synchronization method TIMEP page 9-14 pages 9-20 ff. —...

  • Page 182: Menu: Viewing And Configuring Timep

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Menu: Viewing and Configuring TimeP To View, Enable, and Modify the TimeP Protocol: From the Main Menu, select: 2. Switch Configuration... 1. System Information Time Protocol Selection Parameter – TIMEP (the default) – SNTP –...

  • Page 183

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring • Use the Space bar to select the mode. Manual [>] Press to move the cursor to the field. Server Address ii. Enter the IP address of the TimeP server you want the switch to use for time synchronization.

  • Page 184: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Timep

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring CLI: Viewing and Configuring TimeP CLI Commands Described in this Section Command Page show timep 9-18 [no] timesync 9-20 ff., 9-23 ip timep dhcp 9-20 manual 9-21 server <ip-addr> 9-21 interval 9-22 no ip timep 9-23 This section describes how to use the CLI to view, enable, and configure TimeP parameters.

  • Page 185

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring If SNTP is the selected time synchronization method, still lists the show timep TimeP configuration even though it is not currently in use: Even though, in this example, SNTP is the current time synchronization method, the switch maintains the TimeP configuration.

  • Page 186: Configuring (enabling Or Disabling) The Timep Mode

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Configuring (Enabling or Disabling) the TimeP Mode Enabling the TimeP mode means to configure it for either broadcast or unicast mode. Remember that to run TimeP as the switch’s time synchronization protocol, you must also select TimeP as the time synchronization method by using the CLI timesync command (or the Menu interface Time Sync Method parameter).

  • Page 187

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring show timep displays the TimeP configuration and also shows that SNTP is the currently active time synchronization mode. show timep again displays the TimeP configuration and shows that TimeP is now the currently active time synchronization mode. Figure 9-16.

  • Page 188

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Figure 9-17. Example of Configuring Timep for Manual Operation Changing the TimeP Poll Interval. This command lets you specify how long the switch waits between time polling intervals. The default is 720 minutes and the range is 1 to 9999 minutes. (This parameter is separate from the poll interval parameter used for SNTP operation.) Syntax: ip timep <...

  • Page 189

    Time Protocols TimeP: Viewing, Selecting, and Configuring Disabling Time Synchronization Without Changing the TimeP Configuration. The recommended method for disabling time synchroniza­ tion is to use the command. This halts time synchronization without timesync changing your TimeP configuration. Syntax: no timesync Disables time synchronization by changing the Time Synch Mode configuration to Disabled...

  • Page 190: Sntp Unicast Time Polling With Multiple Sntp Servers

    Time Protocols SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers When running SNTP unicast time polling as the time synchronization method, the switch requests a time update from the server you configured with either the Server Address parameter in the menu interface, or the primary server in a list of up to three SNTP servers configured using the CLI.

  • Page 191: Displaying All Sntp Server Addresses Configured On The Switch

    Time Protocols SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers Displaying All SNTP Server Addresses Configured on the Switch The System Information screen in the menu interface displays only one SNTP server address, even if the switch is configured for two or three servers. The CLI show management command displays all configured SNTP servers on the switch.

  • Page 192

    Time Protocols SNTP Unicast Time Polling with Multiple SNTP Servers Prioritized list of SNTP Server IP Addresses Figure 9-21. Example of SNTP Server Address Prioritization N o t e If there are already three SNTP server addresses configured on the switch, and you want to use the CLI to replace one of the existing addresses with a new one, you must delete the unwanted address before you configure the new one.

  • Page 193: Configured

    Time Protocols SNTP Messages in the Event Log Menu: Operation with Multiple SNTP Server Addresses Configured When you use the Menu interface to configure an SNTP server IP address, the new address writes over the current primary address, if one is configured. If there are multiple addresses configured, the switch re-orders the addresses according to the criteria described under “Address Prioritization”...

  • Page 194

    Time Protocols SNTP Messages in the Event Log — This page is intentionally unused. — 9-28...

  • Page 195

    Configuring a Broadcast Limit on the Switch ....10-14 Configuring HP Auto-MDIX ......10-15 Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters .

  • Page 196

    10-7 page 10-9 page 10-18 10-1 on pages 10-3 thru 10-5 configuring hp auto-mdix page 9-11 Note On Connecting If the switch either fails to show a link between an installed transceiver and Transceivers to another device, or demonstrates errors or other unexpected behavior on the...

  • Page 197

    • Auto-10: Allows the port to negotiate between half-duplex (HDx) and full-duplex (FDx) while keeping speed at 10 Mbps. Also negotiates flow control (enabled or disabled). HP recommends Auto-10 for links between 10/100 auto-sensing ports connected with Cat 3 cabling. (Cat 5 cabling is required for 100 Mbps links.).

  • Page 198

    • Auto-10: Allows the port to negotiate between half-duplex (HDx) and full-duplex (FDx) while keeping speed at 10 Mbps. Also negotiates flow control (enabled or disabled). HP recommends Auto-10 for links between 10/100 auto-sensing ports connected with Cat 3 cabling. (Cat 5 cabling is required for 100 Mbps links.).

  • Page 199

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Status or Description Parameter — Continued From Previous Page — Gigabit Fiber-Optic Ports (Gigabit-SX, Gigabit-LX, and Gigabit-LH): • 1000FDx: 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps), Full Duplex only • Auto (default): The port operates at 1000FDx and auto-negotiates flow control with the device connected to the port.

  • Page 200: Menu: Port Configuration

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Menu: Port Configuration From the menu interface, you can view and change the port configuration. Using the Menu To View Port Configuration. The menu interface dis­ plays the configuration for ports and (if configured) any trunk groups. From the Main Menu, select: 1.

  • Page 201

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Using the Menu To Configure Ports. N o t e The menu interface uses the same screen for configuring both individual ports and port trunk groups. For information on port trunk groups, refer to chapter 12, “Port Trunking”...

  • Page 202: Cli: Viewing Port Status And Configuring Port Parameters

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters CLI: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Port Status and Configuration Commands show interfaces brief page 10-9 show interfaces config page 10-9 interface page 10-9 disable/enable page 10-9 speed-duplex page 10-9 flow-control...

  • Page 203: Port Mode

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters This screen shows current port operating status. Note: The (per-port) Bcast Limit column appears only on the 3400cl and 6400cl switches. (The 5300xl switches apply a global broadcast limit. 3400cl/ 6400cl Switches...

  • Page 204

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Note that in the above syntax you can substitute an “int” for “interface”; that is: int < port-list >. For example, to configure ports C1 through C3 and port C6 for 100Mbps full- duplex, you would enter these commands: HPswitch(config)# int c1-c3,c6 speed-duplex 100-full Similarly, to configure a single port with the above command settings, you...

  • Page 205: Enabling Or Disabling Flow Control

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Enabling or Disabling Flow Control 3400cl/6400cl Switches: Flow-Control on these switches is enabled and ■ disabled on a per-port basis. ■ 5300xl Switches: You must first enable flow-control globally on the switch, and then enable it on the desired ports.

  • Page 206

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters For example, suppose that: You want to enable flow control on ports A1-A6. Later, you decide to disable flow control on ports A5 and A6. As a final step, you want to disable flow control on all ports. Assuming that flow control is currently disabled on the switch, you would use these commands: Enables global flow control.

  • Page 207

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Disables per-port flow control on ports A5 and A6. Figure 10-8. Example Continued from Figure 10-7 Disables per-port flow control on ports A1 through A4 and global flow control. Flow control is now disabled on the switch.

  • Page 208: Configuring A Broadcast Limit On The Switch

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Configuring a Broadcast Limit on the Switch 3400cl/6400cl Switches: Broadcast-Limit on these switches is config­ ■ ured as a percentage on a per-port basis. ■ 5300xl Switches: Broadcast-Limit on these switches is configured glo­ bally (on all ports) as a fixed limit.

  • Page 209: Configuring Hp Auto-mdix

    MDI-X port. HP Auto-MDIX was developed for auto-negotiating devices, and was shared with the IEEE for the development of the IEEE 802.3ab standard. HP Auto- MDIX and the IEEE 802.3ab Auto MDI/MID-X feature are completely compat­ ible. Additionally, HP Auto-MDIX supports operation in forced speed and duplex modes.

  • Page 210

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters For more information on MDI-X, refer to the appendix titled “Switch Ports and Network Cables” in the Installation and Getting Started Guide for your switch. Manual Override. If you require control over the MDI/MDI-X feature you can set the switch to either of two non-default modes: ■...

  • Page 211

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Syntax: show interfaces config Lists the current per-port Auto/MDI/MDI-X configuration. Syntax: show interfaces brief Where a port is linked to another device, this command lists the MDI mode the port is currently using. In the case of ports configured for Auto (auto-mdix), the MDI mode appears as either MDI or MDIX, depending upon which option the port has negotiated with the device on the other end of the link.

  • Page 212: Web: Viewing Port Status And Configuring Port Parameters

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters Per-Port MDI Operating Mode Figure 10-11. Example of Displaying the Current MDI Operating Mode N o t e Upgrading the Switch Series 5300xl Operating System from E_07.XX or earlier: Copper ports in auto-negotiation still default to auto-mdix mode.

  • Page 213: Using Friendly (optional) Port Names

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Feature Default Menu Configure Friendly Port Names Standard Port page 20 Numbering Display Friendly Port Names page 21 This feature enables you to assign alphanumeric port names of your choosing to augment automatically assigned numeric port names.

  • Page 214: Configuring Friendly Port Names

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Configuring Friendly Port Names Syntax: interface < port-list > name < port-name-string > Assigns a port name to port-list. Syntax: no interface < port-list > name Deletes the port name from port-list. Configuring a Single Port Name.

  • Page 215: Displaying Friendly Port Names With Other Port Data

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Displaying Friendly Port Names with Other Port Data You can display friendly port name data in the following combinations: show name: Displays a listing of port numbers with their corresponding ■...

  • Page 216

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names Port Without a “Friendly” Name Friendly port names assigned in previous examples. Figure 10-15. Example of Friendly Port Name Data for Specific Ports on the Switch Including Friendly Port Names in Per-Port Statistics Listings. A friendly port name configured to a port is automatically included when you display the port’s statistics output.

  • Page 217

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names For a given port, if a friendly port name does not exist in the running-config file, the Name line in the above command output appears as: Name not assigned To Search the Configuration for Ports with Friendly Port Names. This option tells you which friendly port names have been saved to the startup­...

  • Page 218

    Port Status and Basic Configuration Using Friendly (Optional) Port Names — This page is intentionally unused. — 10-24...

  • Page 219

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Contents Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Contents PoE Operation on the Series 5300xl Switches ..... . 11-2 Introduction .

  • Page 220: Poe Operation On The Series 5300xl Switches

    PoE technology allows IP telephones, wireless LAN access points, and other appliances to receive power and transfer data over existing LAN cabling. (For more on this topic, refer to edition 2 or later of the HP ProCurve xl Modules Installation Guide shipped with your optional J8161A Switch xl PoE Module (beginning in April, 2004).

  • Page 221: Poe Terminology

    PoE provisioning on a given module becomes oversubscribed. External Power Supply; for example, an HP 600 ProCurve RPS/EPS or an HP ProCurve 610 EPS. An EPS device provides power to provision PoE ports on a module.

  • Page 222: Overview Of Operation

    5300xl device supplies PoE power over the data pin/wire pairs. For more on this topic, refer to the PoE Planning and Imple­ mentation Guide (p/n 5990-6045, Nov. 2003 or later) available on the HP ProCurve website. (See “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6.)

  • Page 223: General Poe Operation

    The HP ProCurve website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve. (Click on technical support, then product manuals.) The latest version of any HP ProCurve product guide is always on the HP ProCurve website. See to “Getting Documentation From the Web” on page 1-6. General PoE Operation...

  • Page 224: Pd Support

    However, if the same EPS is supporting both an xl PoE module and another HP PSE device then, depending on the power demand placed on the module by the PDs you connect, it is possible to oversubscribe the available PoE power on the module.

  • Page 225

    PoE Module” on page 11-21. Switch) If an HP ProCurve EPS device is supplying PoE power to two PSE devices, then both PSE devices receive 204 watts. If an HP ProCurve EPS device is delivering PoE power to only one PSE device, then that device receives 408 watts.

  • Page 226: Power Priority Operation

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches General PoE Operation Power Priority Operation When Does an xl PoE Module Prioritize Power Allocations? If an xl PoE module can provide power for all connected PD demand, it does not use its power priority settings to allocate power.

  • Page 227

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches General PoE Operation Table 11-2. Example of PoE Priority Operation on an xl PoE Module Port Priority Configuration Command and Resulting Operation Setting with PDs connected to Ports C3 Through C24 C3 - C17 Critical In this example, the following CLI command sets ports C3-C17 to Critical:...

  • Page 228: Configuring Poe Operation

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Configuring PoE Operation Configuring PoE Operation In the default configuration, PoE support is enabled on the 10/100Base-TX ports in an xl PoE (J8161A) module installed on the switch. The default priority for all ports is Low and the default power notification threshold is 80 (%).

  • Page 229: Disabling Or Re-enabling Poe Port Operation

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Configuring PoE Operation Disabling or Re-Enabling PoE Port Operation Syntax: [no] interface [e] < port-list > power Re-enables PoE operation on < port-list > and restores the priority setting in effect when PoE was disabled on < port-list >. The [no] form of the command disables PoE operation on <...

  • Page 230: Configuring Optional Poe Port Identifiers

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Configuring PoE Operation Syntax: power [slot < slot-identifier >] threshold < 1 - 99 > (Continued) To continue the preceding example, if the PoE power usage on the xl PoE module in slot B drops below 70%, another SNMP trap is generated and you will see this message in the Event Log: Slot B POE usage is below threshold of 70 %.

  • Page 231

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Configuring PoE Operation 1. Use the walkmib pethPsePortType.< slot-# > command to determine the MIB- based port number for the port to which you want to assign a Configured Type identifier. On the 5300xl switches the slot numbering is as follows: Slot Slot Number Used in the MIB...

  • Page 232

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Configuring PoE Operation Lists port numbers used by the MIB for slot “B”. MIB Designation for Port B1 Command to configure “Wireless-1” as the Configured Type identifier for port B1. CLI response indicates successful command execution.

  • Page 233: Viewing Poe Configuration And Status

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Displaying the Switch’s Global PoE Power Status Syntax: show power-management Displays the switch’s global PoE power status, including: • Maximum Power: Lists the maximum PoE wattage available to provision active PoE ports on the switch.

  • Page 234: Displaying An Overview Of Poe Status On All Ports

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Displaying an Overview of PoE Status on All Ports Syntax: show power-management brief Displays the following port power status: • Port: Lists all PoE-capable ports on the switch. •...

  • Page 235: Displaying The Poe Status On Specific Ports

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Ports C1 through C4 are delivering power. The remaining ports are available to supply power, but currently do not detect a connected PD. Figure 11-3. Example of Show Power-Management Brief Output Displaying the PoE Status on Specific Ports Syntax: show power-management <...

  • Page 236

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Viewing PoE Configuration and Status Syntax: show power-management < port-list > (Continued) Power Denied Cnt: Shows the number of times PDs requesting • power on the port have been denied due to insufficient power available.

  • Page 237: Planning And Implementing A Poe Configuration

    Configuration This section provides an overview of some considerations for planning a PoE application. For additional information on this topic, refer to the HP ProCurve PoE Planning and Implementation Guide. Some of the elements you may want to consider for a PoE installation include: ■...

  • Page 238: Assigning Priority Policies To Poe Traffic

    802.1X Authentication For more information on security options, refer to the latest edition of the Access Security Guide for your switch. (The HP ProCurve website offers the latest version of all HP ProCurve product publications. Refer to “Getting Documentation from the Web” in chapter 1, “Getting Started”.)

  • Page 239: Calculating The Maximum Load For An Xl Poe Module

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches Planning and Implementing a PoE Configuration Calculating the Maximum Load for an xl PoE Module Since the full PoE load on an xl PoE module receiving 408 watts (from an EPS supporting only that module) cannot exceed 369.6 watts (24 ports with a maximum of 15.4 watts per port), there is no concern for overloading the module’s PoE capacity.

  • Page 240: Poe Operating Notes

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches PoE Operating Notes you can still fully populate the module with appliances. In this case, the lowest- priority port will not receive power unless an appliance in a higher-priority port is disconnected. There is also a scenario where a device on a lower-priority port can experience a power cycle (temporarily lose power) while a higher-priority port is bringing up a PoE device.

  • Page 241: Poe Event Log Messages

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches PoE Operating Notes PoE Event Log Messages PoE operation generates these Event Log messages. You can also configure the switch to send these messages to a configured debug destination (terminal device or SyslogD server).

  • Page 242

    < fault-type > is one of the following: • Over Current fault: The external power supply reported a fault condition. Contact your HP ProCurve support representative. • Fan fault: A fan in an external power supply has failed.

  • Page 243

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches PoE Operating Notes Port < port-id > PD Invalid Signature indication. The switch has detected a non-802.3af-compliant device on the indicated port. This message appears for all non-802.3af devices connected to the port, such as other switches, PC-NICs, etc. Port <...

  • Page 244

    Power Over Ethernet (PoE) Operation for the Series 5300xl Switches PoE Operating Notes — This page is intentionally unused. — 11-26...

  • Page 245

    Port Trunking Contents Overview ........... . . 12-2 Port Trunk Features and Operation .

  • Page 246

    Port Trunking Overview Overview This chapter describes creating and modifying port trunk groups. This includes non-protocol trunks, LACP (802.3ad) trunks and, for the Series 5300xl switches only, FEC® trunks. Port Status and Configuration Features Feature Default Menu viewing port trunks page 12-9 page 12-11 page 12-17...

  • Page 247

    Port Trunking Overview Port Connections and Configuration: All port trunk links must be point- to-point connections between a switch covered by this guide and another switch, router, server, or workstation configured for port trunking. No inter­ vening, non-trunking devices are allowed. It is important to note that ports on both ends of a port trunk group must have the same mode (speed and duplex) and flow control settings.

  • Page 248: Port Trunk Features And Operation

    LACP requires full-duplex (FDx) links of the same media type (10/100Base-T, 100FX, etc.) and the same speed, and enforces speed and duplex conformance across a trunk group. For most installations, HP recommends that you leave the port Mode settings at Auto (the default). LACP also operates with Auto-10, Auto-100, and Auto-1000 (if negotiation selects FDx), and 10FDx, 100FDx, and 1000FDx settings.

  • Page 249: Trunk Configuration Methods

    Port Trunking Trunk Configuration Methods Trunk Configuration Methods Dynamic LACP Trunk: The switch automatically negotiates trunked links between LACP-configured ports on separate devices, and offers one dynamic trunk option: LACP. To configure the switch to initiate a dynamic LACP trunk with another device, use the interface command in the CLI to set the default LACP option to Active on the ports you want to use for the trunk.

  • Page 250

    For more information, refer to “Trunk Group Operation Using LACP” on page 12-18. Trunk Provides manually configured, static-only trunking to: (non- • Most HP switches and routing switches not running the 802.3ad LACP protocol. protocol) • Windows NT and HP-UX workstations and servers Use the Trunk option when: –...

  • Page 251

    Port Configuration: The default port configuration is Auto, which enables a port to sense speed and negotiate duplex with an Auto-Enabled port on another device. HP recommends that you use the Auto setting for all ports you plan to use for trunking.

  • Page 252

    Port Trunking Trunk Configuration Methods Spanning Tree: 802.1D (STP) and 802.1w (RSTP) Spanning Tree operate as a global setting on the switch (with one instance of Spanning Tree per switch). 802.1s (MSTP) Spanning Tree operates on a per-instance basis (with multiple instances allowed per switch).

  • Page 253: Menu: Viewing And Configuring A Static Trunk Group

    Port Trunking Menu: Viewing and Configuring a Static Trunk Group Menu: Viewing and Configuring a Static Trunk Group Important Configure port trunking before you connect the trunked links to another switch, routing switch, or server. Otherwise, a broadcast storm could occur. (If you need to connect the ports before configuring them for trunking, you can temporarily disable the ports until the trunk is configured.

  • Page 254

    Port Trunking Menu: Viewing and Configuring a Static Trunk Group • For proper trunk operation, all ports in a trunk must have the same media type and mode (such as 10/100TX set to 100FDx, or 100FX set to 100FDx). The flow control settings must also be the same for all ports in a given trunk.

  • Page 255: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Port Trunk Groups

    Port Trunking CLI: Viewing and Configuring Port Trunk Groups During the Save process, traffic on the ports configured for trunking will be delayed for several seconds. If the Spanning Tree Protocol is enabled, the delay may be up to 30 seconds. 8. Connect the trunked ports on the switch to the corresponding ports on the opposite device.

  • Page 256

    Port Trunking CLI: Viewing and Configuring Port Trunk Groups Using a port list specifies, for switch ports in a static trunk group, only the ports you want to view. In this case, the command specifies ports A5 through A7. However, because port A6 is not in a static trunk group, it does not appear in the resulting listing: Port A5 appears with an example of a name that you can optionally assign using the Friendly Port Names feature.

  • Page 257

    Port Trunking CLI: Viewing and Configuring Port Trunk Groups Listing Static LACP and Dynamic LACP Trunk Data. Syntax: show lacp Lists data for only the LACP-configured ports.. In the following example, ports A1 and A2 have been previously configured for a static LACP trunk. (For more on “Active”, see table 11-12-5 on page 12-21.) Figure 12-8.

  • Page 258: Using The Cli To Configure A Static Or Dynamic Trunk Group

    Port Trunking CLI: Viewing and Configuring Port Trunk Groups “Up” Links Standby Link Figure 12-9. Example of a Dynamic LACP Trunk with One Standby Link Using the CLI To Configure a Static or Dynamic Trunk Group I m p o r t a n t Configure port trunking before you connect the trunked links between switches.

  • Page 259

    Removing a port from a trunk can create a loop and cause a broadcast storm. When you remove a port from a trunk where spanning tree is not in use, HP recommends that you first disable the port or disconnect the link on that port.

  • Page 260

    Port Trunking CLI: Viewing and Configuring Port Trunk Groups Enabling a Dynamic LACP Trunk Group. In the default port configura­ tion, all ports on the switch are set to LACP Passive. However, to enable the switch to automatically form a trunk group that is dynamic on both ends of the link, the ports on one end of a set of links must be LACP Active.

  • Page 261: Web: Viewing Existing Port Trunk Groups

    To help prevent a broadcast storm when you remove a port from a trunk where spanning tree is not in use, HP recommends that you first disable the port or disconnect the link on that port.

  • Page 262: Trunk Group Operation Using Lacp

    LACP requires full-duplex (FDx) links of the same media type (10/100Base-T, 100FX, etc.) and the same speed, and enforces speed and duplex conformance across a trunk group. For most installations, HP recommends that you leave the port Mode settings at Auto (the default). LACP also operates with Auto-10, Auto-100, and Auto-1000 (if negotiation selects FDx), and 10FDx, 100FDx, and 1000FDx settings.

  • Page 263

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using LACP Table 12-4. LACP Trunk Types LACP Port Trunk Operation Configuration 802.3ad-compliant Dynamic LACP This option automatically establishes an trunk group, with LACP for the port Type parameter and DynX for the port Group name, where X is an automatically assigned value from 1 to 36, depending on how many dynamic and static trunks are currently on the switch.

  • Page 264

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using LACP LACP Port Trunk Operation Configuration Static LACP Provides a manually configured, static LACP trunk to accommodate these conditions: • The port on the other end of the trunk link is configured for a static LACP trunk. •...

  • Page 265: Default Port Operation

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using LACP Default Port Operation In the default configuration, all ports are configured for passive LACP. How- ever, if LACP is not configured as Active on at least one end of a link, then the port does not try to detect a trunk configuration and operates as a standard, untrunked port.

  • Page 266: Lacp Notes And Restrictions

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using LACP LACP Notes and Restrictions 802.1x (Port-Based Access Control) Configured on a Port. To main­ tain security, LACP is not allowed on ports configured for 802.1x authenticator operation. If you configure port security on a port on which LACP (active or passive) is configured, the switch removes the LACP configuration, displays a notice that LACP is disabled on the port(s), and enables 802.1x on that port.

  • Page 267

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using LACP Changing Trunking Methods. To convert a trunk from static to dynamic, you must first eliminate the static trunk. Static LACP Trunks. Where a port is configured for LACP (Active or Passive), but does not belong to an existing trunk group, you can add that port to a static trunk.

  • Page 268: Trunk Group Operation Using The "trunk" Option

    Port Trunking Trunk Group Operation Using the “Trunk” Option Half-Duplex and/or Different Port Speeds Not Allowed in LACP Trunks. The ports on both sides of an LACP trunk must be configured for the same speed and for full-duplex (FDx). The 802.3ad LACP standard speci­ fies a full-duplex (FDx) requirement for LACP trunking.

  • Page 269: Trunk Operation Using The "fec" Option On The 5300xl Switches

    Port Trunking Trunk Operation Using the “FEC” Option on the 5300xl Switches Use the Trunk option to establish a trunk group between a 5300xl, 3400cl, or 6400cl switch and another device, where the other device’s trunking operation fails to operate properly with LACP or FEC trunking configured on the 5300xl or LACP trunking configured on the 3400cl or 6400cl.

  • Page 270: How The Switch Lists Trunk Data

    Port Trunking How the Switch Lists Trunk Data How the Switch Lists Trunk Data Static Trunk Group: Appears in the menu interface and the output from the CLI show trunk and show interfaces commands. Dynamic LACP Trunk Group: Appears in the output from the CLI show lacp command.

  • Page 271

    Outbound Traffic Distribution Across Trunked Links the links in a trunk. In actual networking environments, this is rarely a problem. However, if it becomes a problem, you can use the HP ProCurve Manager Plus network management software to quickly and easily identify the sources of heavy traffic (top talkers) and make adjustments to improve performance.

  • Page 272

    Port Trunking Outbound Traffic Distribution Across Trunked Links — This page is intentionally unused. — 12-28...

  • Page 273

    Port Traffic Controls Contents Overview ........... . . 13-2 Rate-Limiting .

  • Page 274

    Port Traffic Controls Overview Overview Feature Default Menu Rate-Limiting None 13-3 Guaranteed Minimum Per Queue: 13-9 Bandwidth 8%-16%-30%-45% Jumbo Packets (3400cl Disabled 13-15 and 6400cl Only) This chapter includes: ■ Rate Limiting: Enables a port to limit the amount of bandwidth a user or device may utilize for inbound traffic on the switch.

  • Page 275: Rate-limiting

    Port Traffic Controls Rate-Limiting Rate-Limiting Feature Default Menu rate-limit < limit-% > none page 13-4 show rate-limit [ port-list ] page 13-5 Introduction Rate-Limiting provides a method for limiting the amount of bandwidth a user or device may utilize inbound on a switch port. This effectively sets an inbound usage level on a given port, and is a tool for enforcing maximum service level commitments granted to network users.

  • Page 276: Configuring Inbound Rate-limiting

    – Configuring a rate limit of 0 (zero) on a port blocks all inbound traffic on that port. However, if this is the de- sired behavior for the port, HP recommends that you use < port-list > disable to disable the port instead of configuring a rate limit of 0.

  • Page 277: Displaying The Current Rate-limit Configuration

    Port Traffic Controls Rate-Limiting Displaying the Current Rate-Limit Configuration This command displays the per-port rate-limit configuration in the running­ config file. Syntax: show rate-limit [ port-list ] Without [ port-list ], this command lists the rate-limit configuration for all ports on the switch. With [ port-list ], this command lists the rate-limit configuration for the specified port(s).

  • Page 278: Operating Notes For Rate-limiting

    Port Traffic Controls Rate-Limiting The outbound port priority queues 1 - 4 for ports A1-A2 are configured with the indicated Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth percentages. Ports A3-A5 are configured with a rate limit of 60 %. (Ports A1 and A2 are not configured for rate-limiting.) Figure 13-2.

  • Page 279

    Port Traffic Controls Rate-Limiting rate limit. In this case, the inbound traffic flow does not reach the configured rate and lower priority traffic is not forwarded into the switch fabric from the rate-limited port. (This behavior is termed “head-of-line blocking” and is a well-known problem with flow-control.) In another type of situation, an outbound port can become oversubscribed by traffic received from multiple rate-limited ports.

  • Page 280

    Port Traffic Controls Rate-Limiting Network Stress Conditions: Under normal network operating condi­ ■ tions, rate-limiting limits inbound traffic on a port to no more than the configured level. However, under network stress conditions, the port may allow occasional bursts of inbound traffic forwarding that exceed the configured rate.

  • Page 281: Switches

    Port Traffic Controls Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches This section applies only to the Series 5300xl switches. Feature Default Menu bandwidth-min output Per-Queue: page 13-11 8%-16%-30%-45% show bandwidth output [ port-list ] page 13-9 Introduction Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) provides a method for ensuring that...

  • Page 282

    Port Traffic Controls Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches Table 13-1. Per-Port Outbound Priority Queues 802.1p Priority Settings in Tagged VLAN Outbound Priority Queue for a Given Port Packets* 1 (low) 2 (low) 0 (normal) 3 (normal) 4 (medium) 5 (medium) 6 (high)

  • Page 283: Outbound Traffic

    For any port or group of ports you can configure either the default minimum bandwidth settings for each outbound priority queue or a customized band- width allocation. For most applications, HP recommends configuring GMB with the same values on all ports on the switch so that the outbound traffic profile is consistent for all outbound traffic.

  • Page 284

    Port Traffic Controls Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches Syntax: [ no ] int < port-list > bandwidth-min output (Continued) [ < queue1% > < queue2% > < queue3% > < queue4% >] For ports in < port-list >, specifies the minimum outbound bandwidth as a percent of the total bandwidth for each outbound queue.

  • Page 285: Configuration

    Port Traffic Controls Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches For example, suppose you wanted to configure the following outbound mini- mum bandwidth availability for ports A1 and A2: Priority of Minimum Effect on Outbound Bandwidth Allocation Outbound Bandwidth Port Queue Queue 4 has the first priority use of all outbound bandwidth not...

  • Page 286: Gmb Operating Notes

    Port Traffic Controls Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth (GMB) on the Series 5300xl Switches For example, to display the GMB configuration resulting from either of the above commands: User-Configured Minimum Bandwidth Settings Default Minimum Bandwidth Settings Figure 13-3. Example of Listing the Guaranteed Minimum Bandwidth Configuration For an example listing the GMB configuration in the startup-config file, refer to figure 13-2 on page 13-6.

  • Page 287: Jumbo Packets On The Series 3400cl And Series 6400cl Switches

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches This section applies only to the HP ProCurve Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches. Feature Default Menu display VLAN jumbo status —...

  • Page 288: Operating Rules

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Operating Rules Required Port Speed: The 3400cl/6400cl switches allow inbound and ■ outbound jumbo packets on ports operating at speeds of 1 gigabit or higher. At lower port speeds, only standard (1522-byte or smaller) packets are allowed, regardless of the jumbo configuration.

  • Page 289: Configuring Jumbo Packet Operation

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Configuring Jumbo Packet Operation Command Page show vlans 13-18 show vlans ports < port-list > 13-19 show vlans < vid > 13-20 jumbo 13-20 Overview 1. Determine the VLAN membership of the ports or trunks through which you want the switch to accept inbound jumbo traffic.

  • Page 290: Viewing The Current Jumbo Configuration

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Viewing the Current Jumbo Configuration Syntax: show vlans Lists the static VLANs configured on the switch and includes a Jumbo column to indicate which VLANs are configured to support inbound jumbo traffic.

  • Page 291

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Indicates which static VLANs are configured to enable jumbo packets. Figure 13-5. Example of Listing the VLAN Memberships for a Range of Ports Syntax: show vlans < vid > This command shows port membership and jumbo configuration for the specified <...

  • Page 292: Enabling Or Disabling Jumbo Traffic On A Vlan

    VLAN.) Operating Notes for Jumbo Traffic-Handling ■ HP does not recommend configuring a voice VLAN to accept jumbo packets. Voice VLAN packets are typically small, and allowing a voice VLAN to accept jumbo packet traffic can degrade the voice transmission performance.

  • Page 293

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches When a port is not a member of any jumbo-enabled VLAN, it drops all ■ jumbo traffic. If the port is receiving “excessive” inbound jumbo traffic, the port generates an Event Log message to notify you of this condition. This same condition generates a Fault-Finder message in the Alert log of the switch’s web browser interface, and also increments the switch’s “Giant Rx”...

  • Page 294

    In this regard, if a mesh domain includes any HP ProCurve Series 5300xl switches and/or HP ProCurve 1600M/2400M/2424M/4000M/8000M switches along with Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches configured to support jumbo traffic, only the 3400cl/6400cl switches will receive jumbo packets.

  • Page 295: Troubleshooting

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches Troubleshooting A VLAN is configured to allow jumbo packets, but one or more ports drops all inbound jumbo packets. The port may not be operating at 1 gigabit or higher.

  • Page 296

    Port Traffic Controls Jumbo Packets on the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl Switches — This page is intentionally unused. — 13-24...

  • Page 297

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Contents Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch ......14-3 Overview .

  • Page 298

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Contents LLDP and CDP Data Management on the Series 3400cl and 6400cl Switches ......... . . 14-32 Disabling CDP Data Collection on 3400cl and 6400cl Switches .

  • Page 299: Using Snmp Tools To Manage The Switch

    You can manage the switch via SNMP from a network management station running an application such as HP ProCurve Manager (PCM) or HP ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM+). For more on PCM and PCM+, visit the HP ProCurve web site at: http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve...

  • Page 300: Snmp Management Features

    The switch SNMP agent also uses certain variables that are included in a Hewlett-Packard proprietary MIB (Management Information Base) file. If you are using HP OpenView, you can ensure that it is using the latest version of the MIB file by downloading the file to the OpenView database. To do so, go to the HP ProCurve website at: http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve...

  • Page 301: Configuring For Snmp Version 3 Access To The Switch

    C a u t i o n The “public” community exists by default and is used by HP’s network man­ agement applications. Deleting the “public” community disables many net- work management functions (such as auto-discovery, traffic monitoring, SNMP trap generation, and threshold setting).

  • Page 302: Snmp Version 3 Commands

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch SNMP Version 3 Commands SNMP version 3 (SNMPv3) adds a new command to the CLI for configuring SNMPv3 functions. To enable SMNPv3 operation on the switch you must: a. Enable SNMPv3 with the snmpv3 enable command.

  • Page 303: Enabling Snmpv3

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Enabling SNMPv3 The snmpv3 enable command starts a dialog that performs three functions: enabling the switch to receive SNMPv3 messages, configuring the initial users, and, optionally, to restrict non-version 3 messages to “read only”. Figure 10-1 shows an example of this dialog.

  • Page 304: Snmpv3 Users

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch SNMPv3 Users The second step to use SNMPv3 on the switch is to configure the users that will be assigned to different groups. To establish users on the switch: 1. Add the users to the User Table.

  • Page 305

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Adding Users. To establish a user you must first add the user names to the list of known users. Add user names with the snmpv3 user CLI command. Add user Network Admin with no Authentication or Privacy...

  • Page 306

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Assigning Users to Groups. Then you must set the group access level for the user by assigning the user to a group. This is done with the snmpv3 group command.

  • Page 307: Group Access Levels

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Group Access Levels The switch supports eight predefined group access levels. There are four levels for use with version 3 users and four are used for access by version 2c or version 1 management applications.

  • Page 308: Snmpv3 Communities

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch SNMPv3 Communities SNMP commuities are supported by the switch to allow management applica­ tion that use version 2c or version 1 to access the switch. The communities are mapped to Group Access Levels that are used for version 2c or version 1 support.

  • Page 309

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Figure 14-4 shows the assigning of Operator community on MgrStation1 to the CommunityOperatorReadWrite group. Any other Operator only has an access level of CommunityOperatorReadOnly Add mapping to allow write access for Operator community MgrStation1 Two Operator Access Levels...

  • Page 310: Communities

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch C a u t i o n Deleting or changing the community named “public” prevents network man­ agement applications (such as auto-discovery, traffic monitoring, SNMP trap generation, and threshold setting) from operating in the switch. (Changing or deleting the “public”...

  • Page 311

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch If you are adding a community, the fields in this screen are blank. If you are editing an existing community, Type the value for this field. the values for the currently selected Use the Space bar to select Community appear...

  • Page 312: Cli: Viewing And Configuring Snmp Community Names

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch CLI: Viewing and Configuring SNMP Community Names Community Name Commands Page show snmp-server [<community-string>] 14-16 [no] snmp-server 14-17 [community <community-str>] 14-17 [host <community-str> <ip-addr>] 14-22 [<none | debug | all | not-info | critical>] [enable traps <authentication>...

  • Page 313

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Configuring Community Names and Values. The snmp-server command enables you to add SNMP communities with either default or specific access attributes, and to delete specific communities. Syntax: [no] snmp-server community < community-name > Configures a new community name.

  • Page 314: Snmpv3 Notification And Traps

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch SNMPv3 Notification and Traps The switches covered by this manual support the SNMPv3 notification pro­ cess. They also support version 1 or version 2c traps. For more information on version 1 or version2c traps, see “SNMPv1 and SNMPv2c Trap Features”...

  • Page 315

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch timeout < value > Specifies how long the switch waits for a response from the target before it retransmits the packet. (Default: 1500) max-msg-size<size> Default:1472 Specifies the maximum number of bytes a message to this target can contain.

  • Page 316: Snmpv1 And Snmpv2c Trap Features

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch SNMPv1 and SNMPv2c Trap Features Feature Default Menu snmp-server host (trap receiver) public — page — 14-22 snmp-server enable (authentication trap) none — page — 14-23 A trap receiver is a management station designated by the switch to receive SNMP traps sent from the switch.

  • Page 317

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch Using the CLI To List Current SNMP Trap Receivers. This command lists the currently configured trap receivers and the setting for authentication traps (along with the current SNMP community name data — see “SNMPv3 Communities”...

  • Page 318

    Table 14-1. Options for Sending Event Log Messages as Traps Event Level Description None (default) Send no log messages. Send all log messages. Not INFO Send the log messages that are not information-only. Critical Send critical-level log messages. Debug Reserved for HP-internal use. 14-22...

  • Page 319: Using The Cli To Enable Authentication Traps

    Configuring for Network Management Applications Using SNMP Tools To Manage the Switch For example, to configure a trap receiver in a community named "red-team" with an IP address of 10.28.227.130 to receive only "critical" log messages: HPswitch(config)# snmp-server trap-receiver red-team 10.28.227.130 critical N o t e s To replace one community name with another for the same IP address, you...

  • Page 320: Advanced Management: Rmon

    HP ProCurve Manager network management software. For more on HP ProCurve Manager, visit the HP’s ProCurve website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve Click on products index, then look for the HP ProCurve Manager topic under the Network Manager bar. 14-24...

  • Page 321: Lldp (link-layer Discovery Protocol)

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Introduction LLDP Features Feature Default Menu View the switch’s LLDP configuration — page 14-35 — Enable or disable LLDP on the switch Enabled — page 14-37 — Change the transmit interval (refresh-interval) for 30 seconds —...

  • Page 322: Lldp Terminology

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Also, by using show commands to access the switch’s neighbor database for information collected by an individual switch, system administrators can learn about other devices connected to the switch, including device type (capabil­ ity) and some configuration information.

  • Page 323: General Lldp Operation

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) General LLDP Operation An LLDP packet contains data about the transmitting switch and port. The switch advertises itself to adjacent (neighbor) devices by transmitting LLDP data packets out all ports on which outbound LLDP is enabled, and reading LLDP advertisements from neighbor devices on ports that are inbound LLDP- enabled.

  • Page 324: Lldp Configuration Options

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) LLDP Configuration Options Enable or Disable LLDP on the Switch. In the default configuration, LLDP is globally enabled on the switch. To prevent transmission or receipt of LLDP traffic, you can disable LLDP operation (page 14-37) Change the Frequency of LLDP Packet Transmission to Neighbor Devices.

  • Page 325

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Per-Port (Outbound) Data Options. The following table lists the informa­ tion the switch can include in the per-port, outbound LLDP packets it gener­ ates. In the default configuration, all outbound LLDP packets include this information in the TLVs transmitted to neighbor devices.

  • Page 326: Options For Reading Lldp Information Collected By The Switch

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Remote Management Address. The switch always includes an IP address in its LLDP advertisements. This can be either an address selected by a default process, or an address configured for inclusion in advertisements. Refer to “IP Address Advertisements”...

  • Page 327: Lldp Operating Rules

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) LLDP Operating Rules Port Trunking. LLDP manages trunked ports individually. That is, trunked ports are configured individually for LLDP operation, in the same manner as non-trunked ports. Also, LLDP sends separate advertisements on each port in a trunk, and not on a per-trunk basis.

  • Page 328: Cl Switches

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) LLDP and CDP Data Management on the Series 3400cl and 6400cl Switches This section applies only to the Series 3400cl and 6400cl switches. LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) operation on the 3400cl and 6400cl switches includes transmitting LLDP packets to neighbor devices and reading LLDP packets received from neighbor devices.

  • Page 329

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) N o t e Because the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches do not generate CDP packets, these switches do not appear in the CDP data collected by any neighbor devices running CDP. A Series 3400cl or 6400cl switch with CDP disabled forwards the CDP packets it receives from other devices, but does not store the CDP information from these packets in its own MIB.

  • Page 330

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Disabling CDP Data Collection on 3400cl and 6400cl Switches Disabling CDP means that the switch forwards all inbound CDP packets it receives from neighbor devices, but does not store CDP neighbor information from these devices.

  • Page 331: Viewing The Current Lldp Configuration

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) In the default configuration, LLDP is enabled and in both transmit and receive mode on all active ports. The LLDP configuration includes global settings that apply to all active ports on the switch, and per-port settings that affect only the operation of the specified ports.

  • Page 332

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) For example, show lldp config produces the following display when the switch is in the default LLDP configuration: Note: This value corresponds to the lldp refresh-interval command (page 14-38). Figure 14-10. Example of Viewing the General LLDP Configuration Displaying Port Configuration Details.

  • Page 333: Configuring Global Lldp Packet Controls

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) The blank IpAddress field indicates that the default IP address will be advertised from this port. (Refer to page 14-42: “Configuring a Remote Management Address for Outbound LLDP Advertisements” Figure 14-11. Example of Per-Port Configuration Display Configuring Global LLDP Packet Controls The commands in this section configure the aspects of LLDP operation that apply the same to all ports in the switch.

  • Page 334

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Note for 3400cl and If the read-only CDP capability in a Series 3400cl or 6400cl switch remains 6400cl Switches enabled when LLDP is disabled, then the switch continues to read CDP packets and update the CDP entries in the Neighbors table.

  • Page 335

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Changing the Delay Interval Between Advertisements Generated by Value or Status Changes to the LLDP MIB. The switch uses a delay- interval setting to delay transmitting successive advertisements resulting from these LLDP MIB changes. If a switch is subject to frequent changes to its LLDP MIB, lengthening this interval can reduce the frequency of successive advertisements.

  • Page 336: Configuring Snmp Notification Support

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Changing the Reinitialization Delay Interval. In the default configura­ tion, a port receiving a disable command followed immediately by a txonly, rxonly, or tx_rx command delays reinitializing for two seconds, during which time LLDP operation remains disabled.

  • Page 337: Configuring Per-port Lldp Transmit And Receive Modes

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) For example, this command enables SNMP notification on ports 1 - 5: HPswitch(config)# lldp enable-notification 1-5 Changing the Minimum Interval for Successive LLDP Data Change Notifications for the Same Neighbor. If LLDP trap notification is enabled on a port, a rapid succession of changes in LLDP information received in advertisements from one or more neighbors can generate a high number of traps.

  • Page 338: Configuring Lldp Per-port Advertisement Content

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Configuring LLDP Per-Port Advertisement Content In the default LLDP configuration, outbound advertisements from each port on the switch include both the mandatory and the optional data listed in the next two subsections. Mandatory Data.

  • Page 339

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) For example, if port 3 belongs to a subnetted VLAN that includes a secondary IP address of 10.10.10.100 and you wanted port 3 to use this secondary address in LLDP advertisements, you would need to execute the following command: HPswitch(config)# lldp config 3 ipAddrEnable 10.10.10.100 Optional Data.

  • Page 340: Displaying Advertisement Data

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) HPswitch(config)# no lldp config 1-24 basicTlvEnable system_name If you later decided to reinstate the system name on ports 1-5, you would use this command: HPswitch(config)# lldp config 1-5 basicTlvEnable system_name Displaying Advertisement Data Command Page show lldp info local-device...

  • Page 341

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) For example, in the default configuration, the switch information currently available for outbound LLDP advertisements appears similar to the display in figure 14-13 on page page 14-45. The Management Address field displays only the LLDP-configurable IP addresses on the switch.

  • Page 342

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Displaying Advertisements Currently in the Neighbors MIB. These commands display the content of the inbound LLDP advertisements received from other LLDP devices. On Series 3400cl/6400cl switches, these commands can also display the content of inbound CDP advertisements. (For more on how the 3400cl/6400cl switches handle data received in CDP advertisements, refer to “LLDP and CDP Data Management on the Series 3400cl and 6400cl Switches”...

  • Page 343

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) The data shown for port 3 was translated from a CDP advertisement from a 5300xl switch with LLDP disabled. (Not all fields expected by the LLDP device are populated with the CDP data.) Note: In software releases earlier than M_08_06x (for the 3400cl switches only), a Port Type column appears with this command instead of the PortId,...

  • Page 344

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Example of the LLDP advertisement received from a 3400cl neighbor on port 1. This example applies to all switches convered by this guide. Figure 14-17. Example of a Per-Port Listing of Advertisements Received from LLDP and CDP-Only Devices Example of the CDP advertisement received from a 5300xl neighbor on port 3 and translated for LLDP use.

  • Page 345: Displaying Lldp Statistics

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Displaying LLDP Statistics LLDP statistics are available on both a global and a per-port levels. Rebooting the switch resets the LLDP statistics counters to zero. Disabling the transmit and/or receive capability on a port “freezes” the related port counters at their current values.

  • Page 346

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) — Continued from the preceding page. — Per-Port LLDP Counters: NumFramesRecvd: Shows the total number of valid, inbound LLDP advertisements received from any neighbor(s) on < port- list >. Where multiple neighbors are connected to a port through a hub, this value is the total number of LLDP advertisements received from all sources.

  • Page 347: Lldp Operating Notes

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) Counters showing frames sent on a port but no frames received on that port indicates an active link with a device that either has LLDP disabled on the link or is not LLDP- aware.

  • Page 348

    Configuring for Network Management Applications LLDP (Link-Layer Discovery Protocol) LLDP Packet Forwarding: If CDP is globally disabled on a switch, the switch forwards CDP packets received from a neighbor CDP device instead of reading and dropping them. However, an 802.1D-compliant switch does not forward LLDP packets, regardless of whether LLDP is globally enabled or disabled on the switch.

  • Page 349: Cdp On The Series 5300xl Switches

    To take advantage of CDP in Series 5300xl switches, you should have a working knowledge of SNMP operation and an SNMP utility capable of polling the switches for CDP data. HP’s implementation of CDP places specific data into the switch’s Management Information Base (MIB). However, retrieval of these data for network mapping is dependent on the operation of your SNMP utility.

  • Page 350: Cdp Terminology

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches An SNMP utility can progressively discover CDP devices in a network by: 1. Reading a given device’s CDP Neighbors Table (in the Management Information Base, or MIB) to learn about other, neighbor CDP devices 2. Using the information learned in step 1 to go to and read the neighbor devices’...

  • Page 351: General Cdp Operation

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches General CDP Operation The switch stores information about CDP neighbors in a CDP Neighbors Table maintained in the switch’s MIB (Management Information Base). This data is available to SNMP-based applications designed to read CDP data from the MIB.

  • Page 352: Incoming Cdp Packets

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Accepts, but does not forward CDP Switch "B" packets describing Switch "A". Also CDP-Aware transmits CDP packets describing itself Switch with (Switch "B") out all ports. CDP Running Forwards CDP packets from Switch "A" Switch "C"...

  • Page 353

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches as if they were transparent to CDP operation. See “CDP-Capable Hubs” on page 14-69.) For example, in figure 14-23, the CDP Neighbor pairs are as follows: A/1, A/2, A/3, A/B, B/C, and B/E. Switch "A"...

  • Page 354

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Using the example in figure 14-23, the CDP Neighbors Table for switches “A” and “B” would appear similar to these: Switch A: Switch B: Figure 14-24. Example of Viewable CDP Neighbors Table for Switches “A” and “B” in Figure 14-20 Thus, based on the CDP packets it receives, each CDP device maintains a per­...

  • Page 355: Viewing And Configuring Cdp On The Switch

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Figure 14-23 (page 14-57) illustrates how multiple CDP Neighbors can appear on a single port. In this case, switch “A” has three CDP Neighbors on port 1 because the intervening devices are not CDP-capable and simply forward CDP Neighbors data out all ports (except the port on which the data was received).

  • Page 356: Viewing The Switch's Current Cdp Configuration

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Viewing the Switch’s Current CDP Configuration Syntax: show cdp Lists the switch’s global and per-port CDP configura­ tion. This example shows the default CDP configuration. CDP Enable/Disable on the Switch Packet Hold Time in CDP Neighbors Table Interval for Transmitting Outbound CDP Packets on All Ports...

  • Page 357

    Figure 14-27 illustrates a topology of CDP-enabled devices for the CDP Neigh­ bors Table listing in figure 14-26. ProCurve Series 5300xl ProCurve Switch 2512 Switch HP J4812A: Accounting 0030c1-7fcc40 ProCurve Switch 4000M Non-CDP-Capable Hub ProCurve Switch 4000M (HP J4121A: Support)

  • Page 358: Clearing (resetting) The Cdp Neighbors Table

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Clearing (Resetting) the CDP Neighbors Table Syntax: cdp clear Removes any records of CDP Neighbor devices from the switch’ s CDP MIB objects. If you execute cdp clear and then execute show cdp neighbors before the switch receives a CDP packet from any neighbor device, the displayed table appears...

  • Page 359

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches For example, to disable CDP on the switch: HPswitch(config) no cdp run When CDP is disabled: displays an empty CDP Neighbors Table ■ show cdp neighbors ■ displays global CDP information and whether CDP is enabled show cdp on the switch.

  • Page 360: Effect Of Spanning Tree (stp) On Cdp Packet Transmission

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches Changing the Transmission Interval for Outbound CDP Packets. Syntax: cdp timer < 5 . . 254 > Changes the interval the switch uses to transmit CDP packets describing itself to neighbor devices. (Default: 60 seconds) For example, if the switch’s transmit interval for CDP packets was set to a non-default value, you would use this command to reset it to one minute: HPswitch(config) cdp timer 60...

  • Page 361: Cdp Packets

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches CDP Packets from Switch "A" to Switch "B" Switch "B" Switch "A" Port A3 CDP Enabled CDP Enabled Port B1 STP Root Device CDP Neighbors Table Port C5 CDP Packets from Port | Data Switch "B"...

  • Page 362: Cdp Neighbor Data And Mib Objects

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches 4. If a CDP switch does not detect an IP address on the connecting port of a CDP Neighbor, then the loopback IP address is used (127.0.0.1). For example, in figure 14-31, port A1 on CDP switch “X” is connected to port C5 on CDP Neighbor switch “Y”, with the indicated VLAN configuration on port C5: VLAN Membership in Port C5 of Switch "Y"...

  • Page 363

    CDP Cache Address IP address of source device. Software Version ASCII String Device Name (ASCII string) In HP ProCurve switches, this is the value configured for the System Name parameter. Device MAC Address Included in the Device Name entry. Destination Port Number On the Series 5300xl switches (the receiving device), the number of the port through which the CDP packet arrived.

  • Page 364

    Figure 14-32. Example of CDP Neighbor Data in a Series 5300xl Switch MIB For the current Series 5300xl switch MIB, go to the HP ProCurve World Wide Web site at: http://ww.hp.com/go/hpprocurve...

  • Page 365

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches CDP-Capable Hubs. Some hubs are capable of running CDP, but also forward CDP packets as if the hub itself were transparent to CDP. Such hubs will appear in the switch’s CDP Neighbors Table and will also maintain a CDP Neighbors Table similar to that for switches.

  • Page 366

    Configuring for Network Management Applications CDP on the Series 5300xl Switches — This page is intentionally unused. — 14-70...

  • Page 367

    Switch-to-Switch Download ....... . A-14 Using HP PCM+ to Update Switch Software ....A-17 Troubleshooting TFTP Downloads .

  • Page 368

    Chapter 6, “Switch Memory and Configuration”. Downloading Switch Software HP periodically provides switch software updates through the HP ProCurve website. For more information, refer to the support and warranty booklet shipped with the switch, or visit http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve and click on software updates.

  • Page 369: Using Tftp To Download Switch Software From A Server

    A software version for the switch has been stored on a TFTP server ■ accessible to the switch. (The software file is typically available from the HP ProCurve website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve.) ■ The switch is properly connected to your network and has already been configured with a compatible IP address and subnet mask.

  • Page 370: Menu: Tftp Download From A Server To Primary Flash

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Menu: TFTP Download from a Server to Primary Flash Note that the menu interface accesses only the primary flash. 1. In the console Main Menu, select Download OS to display the screen in figure A-1. (The term “OS”, or “operating system” refers to the switch software): Figure A-1.

  • Page 371: Cli: Tftp Download From A Server To Flash

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software A “progress” bar indicates the progress of the download. When the entire software file has been received, all activity on the switch halts and you will see Validating and writing system software to FLASH... 7. After the primary flash memory has been updated with the new software, you must reboot the switch to implement the newly downloaded software.

  • Page 372

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Execute copy as shown below: This message means that the image you Dynamic counter continually displays the want to upload will replace the image number of bytes transferred. currently in primary flash. Figure A-3. Example of the Command to Download an OS (Switch Software) 2. When the switch finishes downloading the software file from the server, it displays this progress message: Validating and Writing System Software to FLASH …...

  • Page 373: Using Secure Copy And Sftp

    As described earlier in this chapter you can use a TFTP client on the admin­ istrator workstation to update software images. This is a plain text mechanism and it connects to a standalone TFTP server or another HP ProCurve switch acting as a TFTP server to obtain the software image file(s). Using SCP and SFTP allows you to maintain your switches with greater security.

  • Page 374: How It Works

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Note SFTP over SSH version 1 (SSH v1) is not supported. A request from either the client or the switch (or both) using SSH v1 generates an error message. The actual text of the error message differs, depending on the client software in use.

  • Page 375: The Scp/sftp Process

    As a matter of policy, administrators should not enable the SSHv1-only or the SSHv1-or-v2 advertisement modes. SSHv1 is supported on only some legacy switches (such as the HP ProCurve Series 2500 switches). To confirm that SSH is enabled type in the command HPswitch(config)# show ip ssh 3. Once you have confirmed that you have enabled an SSH session (with the...

  • Page 376: Authentication

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Authentication Switch memory allows up to ten public keys. This means the authentication and encryption keys you use for your third-party client SCP/SFTP software can differ from the keys you use for the SSH session, even though both SCP and SFTP use a secure SSH tunnel.

  • Page 377

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software All files have read-write permission. Several SFTP commands, such as ■ create or remove, are not allowed and return an error message. The switch displays the following files: /� +---cfg � running-config � startup-config � +---log �...

  • Page 378: Workstation

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Using Xmodem to Download Switch Software From a PC or UNIX Workstation This procedure assumes that: The switch is connected via the Console RS-232 port to a PC operating as ■ a terminal. (Refer to the Installation and Getting Started Guide you received with the switch for information on connecting a PC as a terminal and running the switch console interface.) ■...

  • Page 379: Primary Or Secondary Flash

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Continue reboot of system? Press the space bar once to change No to Yes, then press [Enter] to begin the reboot. To confirm that the software downloaded correctly: From the Main Menu, select 1. Status and Counters 1.

  • Page 380: Switch-to-switch Download

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software 3. When the download finishes, you must reboot the switch to implement the newly downloaded software. To do so, use one of the following commands: Syntax: boot system flash <primary | secondary> Reboots from the selected flash. Syntax: reload Reboots from the flash image currently in use.

  • Page 381: Cli: Switch-to-switch Downloads

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software • To download the software in the primary flash of the source switch, type “flash” in lowercase characters. • To download the software in the secondary flash of the source switch, type /os/secondary. (for eXecute) to begin the software download. Press , then [Enter]...

  • Page 382

    File Transfers Downloading Switch Software Downloading from Primary Only. Syntax: copy tftp flash < ip-addr > flash [ primary | secondary ] This command (executed in the destination switch) downloads the software flash in the source switch’s primary flash to either the primary or secondary flash in the destination switch.

  • Page 383: Using Hp Pcm+ To Update Switch Software

    Destination Using HP PCM+ to Update Switch Software HP ProCurve Manager Plus includes a software update utility for updating on HP ProCurve switch products such as the 5300xl. (PCM+ version 1.6 and greater will offer this feature for the 3400cl switches beginning in December, 2004.) For further information, refer to the Getting Started Guide and the...

  • Page 384: Transferring Switch Configurations And Acl Command Files

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files Some of the causes of download failures include: Incorrect or unreachable address specified for the TFTP Server parameter. ■ This may include network problems. Incorrect VLAN. ■ Incorrect name specified for the Remote File Name parameter, or the ■...

  • Page 385: Tftp: Copying A Configuration From A Remote Host

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files Using the CLI commands described in this section, you can copy switch configurations to and from a switch, or copy an ACL command file to configure or replace an ACL in the switch configuration. Note It is useful to note here that you can perform all TFTP operations using SFTP as described in the section on Using Secure Copy and SFTP on page A-7 for...

  • Page 386: Server

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files For example, to upload the current startup configuration to a file named sw5300 in the configs directory on drive “d” in a TFTP server having an IP address of 10.28.227.105: HPswitch# copy startup-config tftp 10.28.227.105 d:\configs\sw5300 TFTP: Uploading an ACL Command File from a TFTP Server This section describes how to upload and execute a command file to the...

  • Page 387

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files Using a PC workstation, you then execute the following from the CLI to upload the file to the switch and implement the ACL commands it contains: HPswitch(config)# copy tftp command-file 18.38.124.16 vlan10_in.txt pc The switch displays this message: Running configuration may change, do you want to continue...

  • Page 388: Xmodem: Copying A Configuration File From The Switch To A Serially Connected Pc Or Unix Workstation

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files Xmodem: Copying a Configuration File from the Switch to a Serially Connected PC or UNIX Workstation To use this method, the switch must be connected via the serial port to a PC or UNIX workstation.

  • Page 389

    File Transfers Transferring Switch Configurations and ACL Command Files Syntax: copy xmodem startup-config < pc | unix > copy xmodem config < filename > < pc | unix > All Switches: Copies a configuration file from a serially connected PC or UNIX workstation to the switch’s startup­ config file.

  • Page 390

    File Transfers Copying Diagnostic Data to a Remote Host, PC, or UNIX Workstation Copying Diagnostic Data to a Remote Host, PC, or UNIX Workstation You can use the CLI to copy the following types of switch data to a text file in a management device: ■...

  • Page 391: Copying Event Log Output To A Destination Device

    File Transfers Copying Diagnostic Data to a Remote Host, PC, or UNIX Workstation Copying Event Log Output to a Destination Device Syntax: copy event-log tftp < ip-address > < filepath_filename > copy event-log xmodem These commands use TFTP or Xmodem to copy the Event Log content to a PC or UNIX workstation on the network.

  • Page 392: Copying Crash Log Data Content To A Destination Device

    File Transfers Copying Diagnostic Data to a Remote Host, PC, or UNIX Workstation At this point, press [Enter] and start the Xmodem command sequence in your terminal emulator. Figure A-10. Example of Copying Switch Crash Data Content to a PC Copying Crash Log Data Content to a Destination Device Syntax: copy crash-log [<slot-id | master>] tftp <ip-address>...

  • Page 393

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Contents Overview ........... . . B-2 Status and Counters Data .

  • Page 394

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Overview Overview The switches covered by this guide have several built-in tools for monitoring, analyzing, and troubleshooting switch and network operation: ■ Status: Includes options for displaying general switch information, man­ agement address data, port status, port and trunk group statistics, MAC addresses detected on each port or VLAN, and STP, IGMP, and VLAN data (page B-3).

  • Page 395: Status And Counters Data

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Status and Counters Data This section describes the status and counters screens available through the switch console interface and/or the web browser interface. N o t e You can access all console screens from the web browser interface via Telnet to the console.

  • Page 396: Menu Access To Status And Counters

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Menu Access To Status and Counters Beginning at the Main Menu, display the Status and Counters menu by select­ ing: 1. Status and Counters Figure B-1. The Status and Counters Menu Each of the above menu items accesses the read-only screens described on the following pages.

  • Page 397: General System Information

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data General System Information Menu Access From the console Main Menu, select: 1. Status and Counters 1. General System Information Figure B-2. Example of General Switch Information This screen dynamically indicates how individual switch resources are being used.

  • Page 398: Switch Management Address Information

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Switch Management Address Information Menu Access From the Main Menu, select: 1 Status and Counters … 2. Switch Management Address Information Figure B-3. Example of Management Address Information with VLANs Configured This screen displays addresses that are important for management of the switch.

  • Page 399: Module Information

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Module Information Use this feature to determine which slots have modules installed and which type(s) of modules are installed. Menu: Displaying Port Status From the Main Menu, select: 1. Status and Counters … 3.

  • Page 400

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Port Status The web browser interface and the console interface show the same port status data. Menu: Displaying Port Status From the Main Menu, select: 1. Status and Counters … 4. Po rt Status Figure B-5.

  • Page 401: Viewing Port And Trunk Group Statistics And Flow Control Status

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Viewing Port and Trunk Group Statistics and Flow Control Status Feature Default Menu viewing port and trunk statistics for all page B-10 page B-11 page B-11 ports, and flow control status viewing a detailed summary for a page B-10 page B-11...

  • Page 402: Menu Access To Port And Trunk Statistics

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Menu Access to Port and Trunk Statistics To access this screen from the Main Menu, select: 1. Status and Counters … 4. Port Counters Figure B-6. Example of Port Counters on the Menu Interface To view details about the traffic on a particular port, use the [v] key to highlight that port number, then select Show Details.

  • Page 403: Cli Access To Port And Trunk Group Statistics

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data CLI Access To Port and Trunk Group Statistics To Display the Port Counter Summary Report. Syntax: show interfaces This command provides an overview of port activity for all ports on the switch. To Display a Detailed Traffic Summary for Specific Ports.

  • Page 404: Menu Access To The Mac Address Views And Searches

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Feature Default Menu searching for a MAC address page B-14 page B-15 — These features help you to view: The MAC addresses that the switch has learned from network devices ■ attached to the switch The port on which each MAC address was learned ■...

  • Page 405

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Figure B-8. Example of the Address Table To page through the listing, use Next page and Prev page. Finding the Port Connection for a Specific Device on a VLAN. This feature uses a device’s MAC address that you enter to identify the port used by that device.

  • Page 406

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Port-Level MAC Address Viewing and Searching. This feature displays and searches for MAC addresses on the specified port instead of for all ports on the switch. From the Main Menu, select: 1.

  • Page 407: Cli Access For Mac Address Views And Searches

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data CLI Access for MAC Address Views and Searches Syntax: show mac-address [ vlan < vlan-id >] [< port-list >] [< mac-addr >] To List All Learned MAC Addresses on the Switch, with The Port Number on Which Each MAC Address Was Learned.

  • Page 408: Spanning Tree Protocol (stp) Information

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) Information Menu Access to STP Data From the Main Menu, select: 1. Status and Counters … 8. Spanning Tree Information STP must be enabled on the switch to display the following data: Figure B-11.

  • Page 409: Cli Access To Stp Data

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Figure B-12. Example of STP Port Information CLI Access to STP Data This option lists the STP configuration, root data, and per-port data (cost, priority, state, and designated bridge). Syntax: show spanning-tree HPswitch>...

  • Page 410: Internet Group Management Protocol (igmp) Status

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) Status The switch uses the CLI to display the following IGMP status on a per-VLAN basis: Show Command Output show ip igmp Global command listing IGMP status for all VLANs configured in the switch: •...

  • Page 411: Vlan Information

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data VLAN Information The switch uses the CLI to display the following VLAN status: Show Command Output show vlan Lists: • Maximum number of VLANs to support • Existing VLANs • Status (static or dynamic) •...

  • Page 412

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Status and Counters Data Listing the VLAN ID (VID) and Status for Specific Ports. Because ports A1 and A2 are not members of VLAN- 44, it does not appear in this listing. Figure B-15. Example of VLAN Listing for Specific Ports Listing Individual VLAN Status.

  • Page 413: Web Browser Interface Status Information

    Alert Log, which informs you of any problems that may have occurred on the switch. For more information on this screen, refer to chapter 5, “Using the HP Web Browser Interface” . Port...

  • Page 414: Interface Monitoring Features

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features Interface Monitoring Features Port Monitoring Features Feature Default Menu display monitoring disabled page B-23 page B-25 page B-28 configuration configure the monitor port(s) ports: none page B-23 page B-26 page B-28 selecting or removing ports none selected page B-23 page B-27 page B-28 You can designate monitoring of inbound and outbound traffic on: Ports and static trunks: Allows monitoring of individual ports, groups...

  • Page 415: Menu: Configuring Port And Static Trunk Monitoring

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features Menu: Configuring Port and Static Trunk Monitoring This procedure describes configuring the switch for monitoring when moni­ toring is disabled. (If monitoring has already been enabled, the screens will appear differently than shown in this procedure.) From the Console Main Menu, Select: 2.

  • Page 416

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features Move the cursor to the Monitoring Port parameter. Inbound Port and Trunk Monitoring (Only) on the Switch 4108 Figure B-19. How To Select a Monitoring Port Use the Space bar to select the port to use for monitoring. 6. Highlight the Monitor field and use the Space bar to select the interfaces to monitor: Ports: Use for monitoring ports, static trunks, or the mesh.

  • Page 417: Cli: Configuring Port, Mesh, And Static Trunk Monitoring

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features ii. Use the Space bar to select the VLAN you want to monitor. iii. Go to step 10. 8. Use the down arrow key to move the cursor to the Action column for the individual ports and position the cursor at a port you want to monitor.

  • Page 418

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features Port receiving monitored traffic. Monitored Ports Figure B-20. Example of Monitored Port Listing Configuring the Monitor Port. Syntax: [no] mirror-port [< port-num >] This command assigns or removes a monitoring port, and must be executed from the global configuration level.

  • Page 419

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features Selecting or Removing Monitoring Source Interfaces. After you con- figure a monitor port you can use either the global configuration level or the interface context level to select ports, static trunks, meshed ports, or (for the 5300xl switches only) VLANs as monitoring sources.

  • Page 420: Web: Configuring Port Monitoring

    Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Interface Monitoring Features To monitor a VLAN (5300xl switches only): Configure monitoring of VLAN 20. Display current monitoring configuration: – Monitor port – Interface Being Monitored Figure B-22. Example of Configuring VLAN Monitoring (5300xl Switches Only) These two commands show how to disable monitoring at the interface...

  • Page 421

    Troubleshooting Contents Overview ........... . . C-3 Troubleshooting Approaches .

  • Page 422

    Troubleshooting Contents Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation ......C-34 Debug Command Operation ....... . C-35 Debug Types .

  • Page 423

    N o t e HP periodically places switch software updates on the HP ProCurve web site. HP recommends that you check this web site for software updates that may have fixed a problem you are experiencing. For information on support and warranty provisions, see the Support and...

  • Page 424: Troubleshooting Approaches

    Troubleshooting Approaches Troubleshooting Approaches Use these approaches to diagnose switch problems: ■ Check the HP ProCurve web site for software updates that may have solved your problem: http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve ■ Check the switch LEDs for indications of proper switch operation: •...

  • Page 425: Browser Or Telnet Access Problems

    Troubleshooting Browser or Telnet Access Problems Browser or Telnet Access Problems Cannot access the web browser interface: Access may be disabled by the Web Agent Enabled parameter in the switch ■ console. Check the setting on this parameter by selecting: 2.

  • Page 426

    Troubleshooting Browser or Telnet Access Problems Cannot Telnet into the switch console from a station on the network: ■ Off subnet management stations can lose Telnet access if you enable routing without first configuring a static (default) route. That is, the switch uses the IP default gateway only while operating as a Layer 2 device.

  • Page 427: Unusual Network Activity

    Unusual network activity is usually indicated by the LEDs on the front of the switch or measured with the switch console interface or with a network management tool such as HP ProCurve Manager. Refer to the Installation Guide you received with the switch for information on using LEDs to identify unusual network activity.

  • Page 428: Q Prioritization Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity This can also happen, for example, if the server is first configured to issue IP addresses with an unlimited duration, then is subsequently configured to issue IP addresses that will expire after a limited duration. One solution is to configure “reservations”...

  • Page 429

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Indicates that routing is enabled; a require­ ment for ACL operation. (There is an exception. See the Note, below.) Figure C-1. Indication that Routing Is Enabled Note If an ACL assigned to a VLAN includes an ACE referencing an IP address on the switch itself as a packet source or destination, the ACE screens traffic to or from this switch address regardless of whether IP routing is enabled.

  • Page 430

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Error (Invalid input) when entering an IP address. When using the “host” option in the command syntax, ensure that you are not including a mask in either dotted decimal or CIDR format. Using the “host” option implies a specific host device and therefore does not permit any mask entry.

  • Page 431

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity to include the switch’s IP address. For an example of this problem, refer to the section titled “General ACL Operating Notes” in the “Access Control Lists (ACLs)” chapter of the Advanced Traffic Management Guide for your switch. Routing Through a Gateway on the Switch Fails Configuring a “deny”...

  • Page 432: Cdp Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity To avoid inadvertently blocking the remote gateway for authorized traffic from another network (such as the 20 Net in this example): 1. Configure an ACE that specifically permits authorized traffic from the remote network. 2. Configure narrowly defined ACEs to block unwanted IP traffic that would otherwise use the gateway.

  • Page 433: Igmp-related Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity One or more CDP neighbors appear intermittently or not at all in the switch’s CDP Neighbors table. On a 5300xl switch, this may be caused by more than 60 neighboring devices sending CDP packets to the switch. (On a 3400cl/6400cl switch with CDP packet-reading enabled, the neighbor limit matches the number of physical ports on the switch.) Exceeding the neighbor limit can occur, for example, where multiple neighbors are connected to the...

  • Page 434: Lacp-related Problems

    Removing a port from a trunk without first disabling the port can create a traffic loop that can slow down or halt your network. Before removing a port from a trunk, HP recommends that you either disable the port or disconnect it from the LAN.

  • Page 435: Port-based Access Control (802.1x)-related Problems

    4000M/8000M switches do not recognize multiple instances of a particular MAC address on different VLANs.) Refer to “The Switch Mesh Does Not Allow An HP ProCurve Switch 1600M/2400M/2424M/4000M/8000M Port To Join the Mesh” on page C-14. Port-Based Access Control (802.1x)-Related Problems Note To list the 802.1x port-access Event Log messages stored on the switch, use...

  • Page 436

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity authentication request. If the RADIUS server configuration for authenti­ cating the client includes a VLAN assignment, ensure that the VLAN exists as a static VLAN on the switch. Refer to “How 802.1x Authentication Affects VLAN Operation” in the Access Security Guide for your switch. During RADIUS-authenticated client sessions, access to a VLAN on the port used for the client sessions is lost.

  • Page 437

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Port A9 shows an “Open” status even though Access Control is set to Unauthorized (Force Auth). This is because the port-access authenticator has not yet been activated. Figure C-6. Authenticator Ports Remain “Open” Until Activated RADIUS server fails to respond to a request for service, even though the server’s IP address is correctly configured in the switch.

  • Page 438: Qos-related Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Also, ensure that the switch port used to access the RADIUS server is not blocked by an 802.1x configuration on that port. For example, show port- access authenticator < port-list > gives you the status for the specified ports. Also, ensure that other factors, such as port security or any 802.1x configura­...

  • Page 439: Spanning-tree Protocol (stp) And Fast-uplink Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Ensure that the radius-server timeout period is long enough for network ■ conditions. ■ Verify that the switch is using the same UDP port number as the server. RADIUS server fails to respond to a request for service, even though the server’s IP address is correctly configured in the switch.

  • Page 440: Ssh-related Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Broadcast Storms Appearing in the Network. This can occur when there are physical loops (redundant links) in the topology.Where this exists, you should enable STP on all bridging devices in the topology in order for the loop to be detected.

  • Page 441

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Executing IP SSH does not enable SSH on the switch. The switch does not have a host key. Verify by executing show ip host-public-key. If you see the message ssh cannot be enabled until a host key is configured (use 'crypto' command).

  • Page 442: Tacacs-related Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity TACACS-Related Problems Event Log. When troubleshooting TACACS+ operation, check the switch’s Event Log for indications of problem areas. All Users Are Locked Out of Access to the Switch. If the switch is func­ tioning properly, but no username/password pairs result in console or Telnet access to the switch, the problem may be due to how the TACACS+ server and/or the switch are configured.

  • Page 443

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity The encryption key configured in the server does not match the ■ encryption key configured in the switch (by using the tacacs-server key command). Verify the key in the server and compare it to the key configured in the switch.

  • Page 444: Timep, Sntp, Or Gateway Problems

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity TimeP, SNTP, or Gateway Problems The Switch Cannot Find the Time Server or the Configured Gateway . TimeP, SNTP, and Gateway access are through the primary VLAN, which in the default configuration is the DEFAULT_VLAN. If the primary VLAN has been moved to another VLAN, it may be disabled or does not have ports assigned to it.

  • Page 445

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity Link supporting VLAN_1 and VLAN_2 Switch “Y” Switch “X” Port Y- 7 Port X-3 VLAN Port Assignment VLAN Port Assignment Port VLAN_1 VLAN_2 Port VLAN_1 VLAN_2 Untagged Tagged Untagged Tagged Figure C-9. Example of Correct VLAN Port Assignments on a Link If VLAN_1 (VID=1) is configured as “Untagged”...

  • Page 446

    Troubleshooting Unusual Network Activity MAC Address “A”; VLAN 1 Server VLAN 1 Switch with 5300xl, 3400cl, or Single 6400cl Switch MAC Address “A”; VLAN 2 Forwarding (Multiple Database VLAN 2 Forwarding Database) Problem: This switch detects continual moves of MAC address “A”...

  • Page 447: Using The Event Log To Identify Problem Sources

    W (warning) indicates that a service has behaved unexpectedly. M (major) indicates that a severe switch error has occurred. (debug) reserved for HP internal diagnostic information. Date is the date in mm/dd/yy format that the entry was placed in the log.

  • Page 448

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources Table C-1. Event Log System Modules Module Event Description Module Event Description addrMgr Address table timep Time protocol udpf UDP broadcast forwarder chassis switch hardware bootp bootp addressing vlan VLAN operations Cisco Discovery Protocol, v.1 Xmodem Xmodem file transfer...

  • Page 449: Menu: Entering And Navigating In The Event Log

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources Menu: Entering and Navigating in the Event Log From the Main Menu, select Event Log. Range of Events in the Log Range of Log Events Displayed Log Status Line Figure C-11. Example of an Event Log Display The log status line at the bottom of the display identifies where in the sequence of event messages the display is currently positioned.

  • Page 450: Cli: Listing Events

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources CLI: Listing Events Syntax: show logging [-a] [<search-text>] Uses the CLI to list: ■ Events recorded since the last boot of the switch All events recorded ■ ■ Event entries containing a specific keyword, either since the last boot or all events recorded show logging Lists recorded log messages since last reboot.

  • Page 451: Reducing Duplicate Event Log And Snmp Trap Messages

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources Reducing Duplicate Event Log and SNMP Trap Messages N o t e This feature is available with all software releases for the Series 3400cl and Series 6400cl switches and with software release E.08.xx and greater on the Series 5300xl switches.

  • Page 452

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources W 10/01/04 09:00:33 PIM:No IP address configured on VID 100 (1) The counter indicates that this is the first instance of this event since the switch last rebooted. Figure C-12. Example of the First Instance of an Event Message and Counter If PIM operation caused the same event to occur six more times during the initial log throttle period, there would be no further entries in the Event Log.

  • Page 453

    Troubleshooting Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources Example of Event Counter Operation. Suppose the switch detects the following after a reboot: ■ Three duplicate instances of the PIM “Send error” during the first log throttle period for this event Five more instances of the same Send error during the second log throttle ■...

  • Page 454: Debug And Syslog Messaging Operation

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation The switch’s Event Log records switch-level progress, status, and warning messages. The Debug/System-Logging (Syslog) feature provides a method for recording messages you can use to help in debugging network-level problems, such as routing misconfigurations and other network protocol details.

  • Page 455: Debug Command Operation

    Series 2600 switches and the Switch 6108 (software release H.07.30 or ■ greater) For the latest feature information on HP ProCurve switches, visit the HP ProCurve website and check the latest release notes for the switch products you use. Configure the switch to send Event Log messages to the current manage­...

  • Page 456: Debug Types

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Using the logging < dest-ip-addr > command to configure a Syslog server N o t e address creates an exception to the above general operation. Refer to “Syslog Operation” on page C-39. Debug Types This section describes the types of debug messages the switch can send to configured debug destinations.

  • Page 457

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Syntax: [no] debug < debug-type > (Continued) ip [ ospf < adj | event | flood | lsa-generation | packet | retransmission | spf > ] For the configured debug destination(s): ospf < adj | event | flood | lsa-generation | packet | retransmission | spf >...

  • Page 458: Debug Destinations

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Debug Destinations Debug enables you to disable and re-enable Syslog messaging to configured servers, and to designate a CLI session to receive messaging of any debug type. Syntax: [no] debug destination < logging | session > logging This command enables Syslog logging to the configured Syslog server(s).

  • Page 459: Syslog Operation

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Syslog Operation Syslog is a client-server logging tool that allows a client switch to send event notification messages to a networked device operating with Syslog server software. Messages sent to a Syslog server can be stored to a file for later debugging analysis.

  • Page 460: Viewing The Debug Configuration

    — cron/at subsystem sys10 - sys14 — Reserved for system use local10 - local17 — Reserved for system use For a listing of applicable HP ProCurve switches, refer to the Note on page C-35. Viewing the Debug Configuration Syntax: show debug This command displays the currently configured debug log­...

  • Page 461

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Using this command when there are no Syslog server IP addresses already configured enables both debug messaging to a Syslog server and the Event debug-type, which means that the switch begins send­ ing Event Log messages to the server, regardless of other debug types that may be configured.

  • Page 462

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Example: Suppose that there are no Syslog servers configured on the switch (the default). Configuring one Syslog server enables debug logging to that server and also enables Event Log messages to be sent to the server. Displays the default debug configuration.

  • Page 463

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Example. Suppose that you want to: ■ Configure Syslog logging of ACL and IP-OSPF packet messages on a Syslog server at 18.38.64.164 (with user as the default logging facility). Also display these messages in the CLI session of your terminal device’s ■...

  • Page 464: Operating Notes For Debug And Syslog

    Troubleshooting Debug and Syslog Messaging Operation Operating Notes for Debug and Syslog Rebooting the Switch or pressing the Reset button resets the ■ Debug Configuration. Debug Option Effect of a Reboot or Reset logging (destination) If any Syslog server IP addresses are in the startup-config file, they are saved across a reboot and the logging destination option remains enabled.

  • Page 465: Diagnostic Tools

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Diagnostic Tools Diagnostic Features Feature Default Menu Port Auto negotiation Ping Test — page C-48 page C-47 Link Test — page C-48 page C-47 Display Config File — page C-50 page C-50 Admin. and Troubleshooting — page C-52 —...

  • Page 466: Ping And Link Tests

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Ping and Link Tests The Ping test and the Link test are point-to-point tests between your switch and another IEEE 802.3-compliant device on your network. These tests can tell you whether the switch is communicating properly with another device. N o t e To respond to a Ping test or a Link test, the device you are trying to reach must be IEEE 802.3-compliant.

  • Page 467: Web: Executing Ping Or Link Tests

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Web: Executing Ping or Link Tests 1. Click here. 2. Click here. 3. Select Ping Test (the default) or Link Test 4. For a Ping test, enter the IP address of the target device. For a Link test, enter the MAC address of the target device.

  • Page 468: Cli: Ping Or Link Tests

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Number of Packets to Send is the number of times you want the switch to attempt to test a connection. Timeout in Seconds is the number of seconds to allow per attempt to test a connection before determining that the current attempt has failed. To halt a Link or Ping test before it concludes, click on the Stop button.

  • Page 469

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Link Tests. You can issue single or multiple link tests with varying repeti­ tions and timeout periods. The defaults are: ■ Repetitions: 1 (1 - 999) Timeout: 5 seconds (1 - 256 seconds) ■ Syntax: link < mac-address > [repetitions < 1 - 999 >] [timeout < 1 - 256 >] [vlan <...

  • Page 470: Displaying The Configuration File

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Displaying the Configuration File The complete switch configuration is contained in a file that you can browse from either the web browser interface or the CLI. It may be useful in some troubleshooting scenarios to view the switch configuration. CLI: Viewing the Configuration File Using the CLI, you can display either the running configuration or the startup configuration.

  • Page 471

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools IP routes ■ ■ Status and counters — VLAN information ■ GVRP support Load balancing (trunk and LACP) ■ Syntax: show tech Executing show tech outputs a data listing to your terminal emulator. However, using your terminal emulator’s text capture features, you can also save show data to a text file for viewing, printing, or sending to an associate.

  • Page 472: Cli Administrative And Troubleshooting Commands

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools 4. Execute show tech HPswitch# show tech a. Each time the resulting listing halts and displays -- MORE --, press the Space bar to resume the listing. b. When the CLI prompt appears, the show tech listing is complete. At this point, click on in HyperTerminal to stop Transfer...

  • Page 473: Traceroute Command

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools setup Displays the Switch Setup screen from the menu interface. repeat Repeatedly executes the previous command until a key is pressed. kill Terminates all other active sessions. Traceroute Command The traceroute command enables you to trace the route from the switch to a host address.

  • Page 474

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools [maxttl < 1-255 >] For the current instance of traceroute, changes the maximum number of hops allowed for each probe packet sent along the route. If the destination address is further from the switch than maxttl allows, then traceroute lists the IP addresses for all hops it detects up to the maxttl limit.

  • Page 475

    Troubleshooting Diagnostic Tools Traceroute does not reach destination IP address because of low maxttl setting. The asterisk indicates there was a timeout on the second probe to the third hop. Figure C-24. Example of Incomplete Traceroute Due to Low Maxttl Setting If A Network Condition Prevents Traceroute from Reaching the Destination.

  • Page 476: Restoring The Factory-default Configuration

    ■ Clear/Reset button combination N o t e HP recommends that you save your configuration to a TFTP server before resetting the switch to its factory-default configuration. You can also save your configuration via Xmodem, to a directly connected PC.

  • Page 477: Restoring A Flash Image

    Troubleshooting Restoring a Flash Image When the Self Test LED begins to flash, release the Clear button. The switch will then complete its self test and begin operating with the configuration restored to the factory default settings. Restoring a Flash Image The switch can lose its operating system if either the primary or secondary flash image location is empty or contains a corrupted OS file and an operator uses the erase flash command to erase a good OS image file from the opposite...

  • Page 478

    Troubleshooting Restoring a Flash Image 4. Since the OS file is large, you can increase the speed of the download by changing the switch console and terminal emulator baud rates to a high speed. For example: Change the switch baud rate to 115,200 Bps. =>...

  • Page 479

    Troubleshooting Restoring a Flash Image Figure C-26. Example of Xmodem Download in Progress 8. When the download completes, the switch reboots from primary flash using the OS image you downloaded in the preceding steps, plus the most recent startup-config file. C-59...

  • Page 480

    Troubleshooting Restoring a Flash Image — This page is intentionally unused. —­ C-60...

  • Page 481

    MAC Address Management Contents Overview ........... . . D-1 Determining MAC Addresses .

  • Page 482: Determining Mac Addresses

    MAC Address Management Determining MAC Addresses Determining MAC Addresses MAC Address Viewing Methods Feature Default Menu view switch’s base (default vlan) MAC address — and the addressing for any added VLANs view port MAC addresses (hexadecimal format) n/a — — ■...

  • Page 483: Menu: Viewing The Switch's Mac Addresses

    MAC Address Management Determining MAC Addresses Menu: Viewing the Switch’s MAC Addresses The Management Address Information screen lists the MAC addresses for: ■ Base switch (default VLAN; VID = 1) Any additional VLANs configured on the switch. ■ Also, the Base MAC address appears on a label on the back of the switch. N o t e The Base MAC address is used by the first (default) VLAN in the switch.

  • Page 484: Cli: Viewing The Port And Vlan Mac Addresses

    MAC Address Management Determining MAC Addresses CLI: Viewing the Port and VLAN MAC Addresses The MAC address assigned to each switch port is used internally by such features as Flow Control and the spanning-tree protocol. Using the walkmib command to determine the MAC address assignments for individual ports can sometimes be useful when diagnosing switch operation.

  • Page 485

    MAC Address Management Determining MAC Addresses (The above command is not case-sensitive.) For example, with a 4-port module in slot A of a 5304xl switch, a 24-port module in slot B, and four nondefault VLANs configured: ifPhysAddress.1 - 4: Ports A1 - A4 in Slot A (Addresses 5 - 24 in slot A are unused, and addresses 25 and 26 are reserved.) ifPhysAddress.27 - 50:...

  • Page 486

    MAC Address Management Determining MAC Addresses ifPhysAddress.1 - 24: Ports 1 - 24 (A 3400cl-48G switch includes addresses 1 - 48 for the fixed ports.) ifPhysAddress.25 - 26: Ports 25 - 26 (Addresses 25 - 26 appear only if a 10-gigabit expansion module is installed in the switch.

  • Page 487: Viewing The Mac Addresses Of Connected Devices

    MAC Address Management Viewing the MAC Addresses of Connected Devices Viewing the MAC Addresses of Connected Devices Syntax: show mac-address [ | mac-addr | Lists the MAC addresses of the devices the switch has detected, along with the number of the specific port on which each MAC address was detected.

  • Page 488

    MAC Address Management Viewing the MAC Addresses of Connected Devices — This page is intentionally unused. — D-8...

  • Page 489

    • 8000M • Series 6400cl HP ProCurve switches provide a way to automatically adjust the system clock for Daylight Savings Time (DST) changes. To use this feature you define the month and date to begin and to end the change from standard time. In addition to the value “none”...

  • Page 490

    Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches Middle Europe and Portugal: • Begin DST at 2am the first Sunday on or after March 25th. • End DST at 2am the first Sunday on or after September 24th. Southern Hemisphere: •...

  • Page 491

    Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches Before configuring a “User defined” Daylight Time Rule, it is important to understand how the switch treats the entries. The switch knows which dates are Sundays, and uses an algorithm to determine on which date to change the system clock, given the configured “Beginning day”...

  • Page 492

    Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches — This page is intentionally unused. — E-4...

  • Page 493

    Index Symbols => prompt … C-57 bandwidth displaying utilization … 5-15 boot Numerics See also reboot. 10-gig ports, FEC trunk … 12-6 boot command … 6-3, 6-17 802.1x boot ROM console … A-3 LLDP blocked … 14-31 boot ROM mode … C-57 802.1X effect, LLDP …...

  • Page 494

    neighbor maximum … 14-68 Telnet access configuration … 7-3 neighbors table … 14-58, 14-60 transferring … A-18 resetting … 14-62 trap receivers … 14-20 on individual ports … 14-63 viewing … 6-5 overview of operation … 14-53 web browser access … 7-3 packet-forwarding …...

  • Page 495

    startup-config … 6-22 address problems … C-7 startup-config file … 6-23 effect of no reply … C-7 transition to multiple files … 6-24 manual gateway precedence … 8-13 Unable to copy … 6-30 DHCP/Bootp differences … 8-14 workingConfig … 6-22, 6-24, 6-26 DHCP/Bootp process …...

  • Page 496

    … 13-21 HP Procurve firmware version … B-5 support URL … 5-13 flash memory … 3-10, 6-2 HP web browser interface … 2-5 flow control constraints … 10-5, 10-11 global … 10-10, 10-11 IEEE 802.1AB/D9 … 14-26 global requirement … 10-5, 10-10 IEEE 802.1d …...

  • Page 497

    network number … B-6 passive … 12-16, 12-20 IPX broadcast traffic … 10-5, 10-14 removing port from active trunk … 12-17 restrictions … 12-22 standby link … 12-19 status, terms … 12-21 Java … 5-4, 5-5 STP … 12-23 jumbo packets trunk limit …...

  • Page 498

    IEEE 802.1AB/D9 … 14-26 system name … 14-43 IEEE P802.1AB/D9 … 14-30 terminology … 14-26 Inconsistent value … 14-39 time-to-live … 14-28, 14-38 information options … 14-29 TLV … 14-26 invalid frames … 14-50 transmission frequency … 14-28 IP address advertisement … 14-31 transmission interval, change …...

  • Page 499

    … B-22 MIB … 14-4 password … 5-8, 5-10 MIB listing … 14-4 creating … 5-8 MIB, HP proprietary … 14-4 delete … 3-7, 5-10 MIB, standard … 14-4 if you lose the password … 5-10 mirroring lost …...

  • Page 500

    power supplies … 11-2 priority class, defined … 11-3 See also LACP. priority policies … 11-20 bandwidth capacity … 12-2 priority, port … 11-6, 11-8 caution … 12-3, 12-9, 12-17 PSE, defined … 11-3 CLI access … 12-11 related publications … 11-4 default trunk type …...

  • Page 501

    See PoE. Procurve, HP, URL … 14-4 See MIB. prompt, => … C-57 RFC 1493 … 14-4 public SNMP community … 14-5 RFC 1515 … 14-4 RFC 2922 … 14-30 RFC2737 … 14-30 RFC2863 … 14-30 QoS resources … 13-4 RIP quick configuration …...

  • Page 502

    slow network … C-7 show management … 9-9 SNMP … 14-3 unicast mode … 9-3, 9-11 CLI commands … 14-13 unicast time polling … 9-24 communities … 14-4, 14-5, 14-13, 14-14 unicast, address priority … 9-24 Communities screen … 14-12 unicast, deleting addresses …...

  • Page 503

    See console. enabling and disabling … 9-20 switch setup menu … 3-8 manual config priority … 8-13 switch software poll interval … 9-22 download using TFTP … A-3 selecting … 9-3 download, failure indication … A-18 server address listing … 9-9, 9-19 download, switch-to-switch …...

  • Page 504

    … B-5 URL walkmib … 14-30, D-4, D-5 browser interface online help location … 5-13 warranty … 1-ii HP Procurve … 5-13, 14-4 web agent enabled … 5-2 management … 5-13 web agent, management server … 5-12, 5-13 advantages …...

  • Page 505

    … C-5 URL default … 5-13 URL, management server … 5-13 URL, support … 5-13 web site, HP … 14-4 world wide web site, HP See HP Procurve. write access … 14-13 write memory, effect on menu interface … 3-13 Xmodem OS download …...

  • Page 508

    Technical information in this document is subject to change without notice. ©Copyright 2000, 2005. Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior written permission is prohibited except as allowed under the copyright laws. January 2005 Manual Part Number 5990-6050...

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