HP Router 650

Advertising

   Also See for HP 650

   Summary of Contents for HP 650

  • Page 1: Installation Guide

    HP Router 650 Installation Guide...

  • Page 2

    © Copyright Hewlett-Packard Hewlett-Packard assumes no Consideraciones sobre Company 1994. responsibility for the use or seguridad Informazioni sulla All rights reserved. reliability of its software on Antes de instalar y hacer regolamentazione equipment that is not funcionar el producto, se de- Il prodotto descritto in This document contains pro- furnished by Hewlett-...

  • Page 3

    Preface This manual is a both a task-oriented installation guide and a reference describing the hardware aspects of router features, operation, and troubleshooting. The organization is as follows: Chapter 1: Installation Begins with the parts list and continues with the steps for installation, from preparing the network through mounting the router, connecting the network cables, and initializing and verifying the router.

  • Page 5

    Installation...

  • Page 6

    Installation Ensure that you have the following items. Ensure that you have the following items. Accessory kit. The kit (5063-4270) contains the following accessories: 2 Mounting brackets (5182-3314) 4 0.7-mm #M4 screws (0515-0780) ⁄ -in #12-24 screws (2940-0283) ⁄ -in #10-32 screws (2680-0302) 5 Interface card labels (5182-3315) 4 Self-adhesive rubber feet (0403-0427) Power cord.

  • Page 7

    Interface Cards. You can install up to four interface cards in the router chassis—for example, you can install: HP J2435A 4-Port Ethernet/802.3 Interface HP J2437A 4-Port Token Ring Interface HP J2434A 4-Port WAN Interface For a list of all interface cards that can be installed in the router, refer to the HP Network Connectivity Product Catalog.

  • Page 8

    Installation Prepare the network. Prepare the network. 1. Complete the network plan. Include network maps and the location of power sources, computers, data-link equipment, hubs or repeaters, bridges, other routers, and cabling (and cabling types and length). Verify the design limits for the cable lengths and the number of repeaters and nodes in your network.

  • Page 9: Mount The Router, Rack Or Cabinet Mounting

    Installation Mount the router. Mount the router. Before mounting the router, make sure the router’s power cord is correct for your country’s ac power receptacle. Do not attach the power cord yet. Rack or Cabinet Mounting W a r n i n g The rack or cabinet should be adequately secured to prevent it from becoming unstable and/or falling over.

  • Page 10

    Installation Mount the router. 3. Position one of the two mounting brackets over the holes as shown in figure 1-2. The edge of the bracket with the large hole in the center should face the router, and the other bracket edge should face front. Figure 1-2.

  • Page 11

    Installation Mount the router. ⁄ 6. On each side of the rack, insert one -in. screw at the top of a pair of ⁄ holes that are -in. apart. (See figure 1-3; note that in a standard 19-inch telco rack, the screw hole pattern is repetitive—there are ⁄...

  • Page 12: Table Mounting

    Installation Mount the router. W a r n i n g Due to the weight of the router, the assistance of another person will help when mounting the router in the next step. You can minimize the weight of the router by removing the power supply (plus any interface cards or a second power supply that may already be installed).

  • Page 13

    Installation Install interface card(s). Install interface card(s). You can install any of the optional interface cards into any of the four available chassis slots (2–5). (The routing engine must remain installed in slot 1.) N o t e s The following installation procedure describes how to install an inter- face card in an empty slot.

  • Page 14

    Installation Install interface card(s). Figure 1-5. Unlocking Card Bezel Figure 1-6. Disengaging Card Bezel 3. Grasping the left and right ends of the bezel, pull out until the tray is about half exposed. 4. Grasping the sides of the tray, remove the card blank from the router. Keep the card blank so that it can be reinstalled if the interface card needs to be removed.

  • Page 15

    Installation Install interface card(s). 6. Pull the locks on the bezel outward, then push evenly on both ends of the bezel until it engages fully and the locks swing inward to about 45°. (See figure 1-7.) Figure 1-7. Reinstalling Interface Card 7.

  • Page 16

    Installation Install interface card(s). 9. Remove the blank strip from the position corresponding to the slot where you installed the interface card, then insert the LED label strip provided with the card as far as it will go. 10. Bend the end of the label strip toward the back of the router, creating a 90°...

  • Page 17: Connect A Console

    Installation Connect a console. Connect a console. You must connect a console to the router in order to verify and configure it. Connecting a Local Console 1. Use the supplied console cable (or one of the other options described in appendix A, “Cables and Adapters”) to connect the router’s console port (located on the routing engine) to an ANSI or VT100 terminal, or to a PC emulating an ANSI or VT100 terminal.

  • Page 18

    Installation Connect a console. Connecting a Remote Console 1. Use the supplied console cable and modem adapter (or one of the other options described in appendix A, “Cables and Adapters”) to connect the router’s console port (located on the routing engine) to a full-duplex, asynchronous (character-mode) modem.

  • Page 19

    N o t e For most interface cards (excluding, for example, the HP J2437A 4-Port Token Ring Interface), if any port has no network attached, the port’s Net Fail LED is lit after the router starts. To avoid unnecessary event log messages, remember to disable that port when you configure the router.

  • Page 20

    Installation Connect network cables. Some cables (such as WAN cables) will not fit inside the cable manage- ment bars. You can use the tie-wraps to bundle the extra cables and hang them on the outside of the bar. 1-16...

  • Page 21

    (without switch- ing off the first power supply). For information about installing a second power supply, refer to the documentation accompanying the HP J2446A Redundant Power Supply. The router automatically adapts to the correct ac voltage range for your power source.

  • Page 22

    Installation Plug in and verify router hardware. When the self-test is complete: The Status LED should be green. The Pwr, Fan, and Temp LEDs should be off. In each row of LEDs for an interface slot where a module (the routing engine or an interface card) is installed, the Card LED (the first LED in each row) should be green and the Self-test LED (the second LED in each row) should be off.

  • Page 23

    Installation Plug in and verify router hardware. 5. Press [Return] and wait for either the Main menu, or the copyright screen (if a password has been set) with a prompt for you to type the password. N o t e If your console is set to 9600 baud, you should have to press [Return] only once.

  • Page 24

    Installation Configure and boot the router. Configure and boot the router. Configuring the router assigns values to the parameters that control its networking operation. The router creates a set of default values in the configuration the first time it is booted. This default state allows the router to function minimally as a remote bridge when connected to LANs and WANs.

  • Page 25

    Installation Configure and boot the router. • You can exit without booting; then you will boot using the procedure described at the end of this list on page 1-23. After exiting, you will return to the Main menu. Date and Time Configuration Editor Quick Configuration Selection Pointer...

  • Page 26

    Manager (or another source of a complete configuration file that fits the particular router model being installed) and transfer the file to the router. For details on HP OpenView Interconnect Manager, refer to the product’s documentation. The router’s User’s Guide includes instructions for transferring configuration files.

  • Page 27

    Installation Configure and boot the router. NCL Prompt Figure 1-15. Default NCL Prompt 2. Boot the router (with your new configuration) by typing boot at the NCL prompt and pressing [Return], as follows: DEFAULT_CONFIG: boot [Return] 3. If your router does not have a manager password, skip to the next step.

  • Page 28

    Installation Configure and boot the router. 5. After the router boots (which takes only a few seconds), you will see the speed sensing prompt: Waiting for speed sense. or a line of garbled characters. Press [Return] one or more times, as necessary, to re-synchronize the router with the console and to display the copyright screen.

  • Page 29

    Installation Set the correct time and date. (Optional) Set the correct time and date. Each time you power up your router, it starts with a default time and date that differs from the actual time and date. Whether you set the correct time and date or not depends on how you want the correct time and date to be maintained in your network.

  • Page 30

    Installation Set the correct time and date. NCL Prompt Figure 1-17. NCL Screen with Default Prompt 3. At the prompt, enter the Time command with the date and time: time mm/dd/yy hh:mm:ss [Return] where: mm = month hh = hour dd = day mm = minutes yy = year...

  • Page 31

    Installation Set manager and user passwords. (Optional) Set manager and user passwords. Passwords are optional. If no password is set, anyone can use the console to access the router for viewing, booting, changing the configu- ration, resetting statistics or variables, and using various commands. Two passwords, a user and manager password, can be set to control access to two levels of functions: User password: allows viewing the statistics, event log, MIB...

  • Page 32

    Installation Set manager and user passwords. 1. At the Main menu (see figure 1-14), press [2] to select “Network Con- trol Language Interpreter.” The NCL prompt—DEFAULT_CONFIG: or another system name you have configured—then appears at the bottom of the screen, as shown in figure 1-18. NCL Prompt Figure 1-18.

  • Page 33

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. Verify router initialization and configuration. Earlier in the installation procedure it is normal to verify proper router hardware operation. (See “Plug in and verify router hardware.” on page 1-18.) At this point in the procedure, after you have configured and booted the router, you should verify that the router has initialized properly for your intended application.

  • Page 34

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. Examine the event log. Among the events posted to the event log are those which indicate the success or failure of the configuration and initialization. Events are occurrences such as enabling circuits and services, changes in spanning tree states, and error conditions.

  • Page 35

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. 3. Verify that no warning, major, or fatal events have occurred. Examine the statistics screens. 1. Access the statistics screens by using NCL’s Stats command or by selecting Statistics Screen menu from the Main menu. A menu of statistics screens is presented.

  • Page 36

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. 3. Select and examine the individual statistics screen for each routing and bridging service configured on the router. Verify that the config- ured services are exchanging frames or packets as expected. The information listed should match the information on the network maps.

  • Page 37

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. AppleTalk Router Statistics This screen summarizes AppleTalk traffic volume for each circuit group. It shows the number of packets received, forwarded, and dropped. The AppleTalk routing service must be configured for this screen to be available. 1-33...

  • Page 38

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. Examine the bridging and routing tables. NCL commands beginning with “rget” are used to verify that the bridging and routing tables represent the expected network topology. Rget commands are based on SNMP; IP routing or IP host-only service must be enabled to use them.

  • Page 39

    Trace the paths to the level 2 router in the destination area to verify that hop counts and path costs are as expected. Note that DECnet routing services on HP routers are always level 1 and level 2 routing services, but this may not be true for DECnet routing services from other vendors.

  • Page 40

    Installation Verify router initialization and configuration. Test node accessibility. Use NCL’s Ping command to test that specific IP routers or end nodes can be reached. Ping can be used on a router with IP routing enabled to test particular end nodes and routers that run IP. Use the specific IP address of the target.

  • Page 41

    Description and Operation...

  • Page 42

    The router can accomodate up to four interface cards, such as the HP J2434A 4-Port WAN Interface. This interface card includes four WAN ports supporting RS-232/V.24/V.28, RS-422/RS-449/V.36, V.35, or X.21 interfaces.

  • Page 43

    More detailed is provided by LEDs for port traffic, net failure, processing utilization, and diagnosis of particular modules and options. Also, you can remotely manage an HP router through a workstation running HP OpenView Interconnect Manager in HP-UX, or through any other standard SNMP network management system.

  • Page 44

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons LEDs and Buttons Router Status LEDs Status Status Temp Figure 2-1. Router Status LEDs The Status LED is a quick indicator of the overall state of the router. When it is lit green, the router is operating normally; when it is lit orange, some failure has occurred, and you should check for other orange LEDs to determine the cause of the failure.

  • Page 45

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons If the Status LED remains orange at the end of the self-test or turns orange during operation of the router, refer to chapter 3, “Troubleshooting.” Unlit when the routing engine is not properly installed in module slot Pwr appears orange if two power supplies are installed and there is a failure in one of them.

  • Page 46: Module Status Leds

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Module Status LEDs Self-test Card Card Self-test R o u t i n g E n g i n e U t i l i z a t i o n Card Self-test Fail Fail Card Self-test...

  • Page 47: Port Status Leds

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Self-test appears green when the self-test is in progress, when there is a failure of the corresponding module after the self-test, or when the corre- sponding inteface card is not properly installed. The Self-test LED for the routing engine appears green when there is a failure of either the routing engine, any interface card, or some other part of the router.

  • Page 48

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Routing Engine Utilization LEDs Routing engine utilization LEDs Routing Self-test R o u t i n g E n g i n e U t i l i z a t i o n Engine Self-test Fail...

  • Page 49

    Clearing the password(s) removes the current password(s), if any, without interrupting the current state of the router. This protects you from being denied console, Telnet, TFTP, or HP Openview Intercon- nect Manager access if you have forgotten the password(s). Clearing the router removes the current password(s), erases all configuration changes to the default (factory) configuration, and boots the router.

  • Page 50

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Resetting the Router: The Reset Button Using a non-conducting, pointed implement such as a wooden pencil or a toothpick, press and release the recessed Reset button on the routing engine. (See figure 2-6 on page 2-9.) Resetting does the following: Lights all router , module, and port status LEDs while the Reset button is pressed.

  • Page 51

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Clearing the Passwords: The Clear Button Using a non-conducting, pointed implement such as a wooden pencil or a toothpick, press and release the recessed Clear button on the routing engine. (See figure 2-6 on page 2-9.) N o t e Access to the router will no longer be limited by either a manager or user password.

  • Page 52

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Clearing the Router: The Reset and Clear Buttons in Combination The combination of the Reset and Clear buttons restores all factory defaults, including configuration defaults. It also removes the manager and user passwords. You might want to use this procedure (as described below), for example, in situations such as the following: So many settings in the configuration need to be changed that it would be easier to start over with the factory defaults.

  • Page 53

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons N o t e Do not wait more than 5 seconds after step 2 below. Holding the Clear button too long prevents this procedure from working. 1. Press the Reset button, and while holding it down, immediately press and hold the Clear button.

  • Page 54

    Description and Operation LEDs and Buttons Obtaining Diagnostic Information: The Diag Button Using a non-conducting, pointed implement such as a wooden pencil or a toothpick, press and release the recessed Diag button on the routing engine. (See figure 2-6 on page 2-9.) Pressing the Diag button resets the router just as does pressing the Reset button, plus it also generates diagnostic messages that appear on the console, in the event log (which can be displayed from the Main...

  • Page 55: Initialization Sequence

    Description and Operation Initialization Sequence Initialization Sequence Whenever the router is powered on, or when its Reset or Diag button is pressed: 1. The router automatically goes through a self-test. (A full self-test occurs when the power is switched on; it lasts 15–35 seconds, depending on how many interface cards are installed.

  • Page 56

    Description and Operation Initialization Sequence 7. If a console is connected to the router, the session is restarted. The message “Waiting for speed sense” appears on the console. Since the correct speed for your terminal has not been sensed yet, that 9600-baud message may appear garbled.

  • Page 57

    Troubleshooting...

  • Page 58: Basic Troubleshooting Tips

    LEDs, refer to “LEDs and Buttons” in chapter 2 (page 2-4). If none of the troubleshooting procedures in this chapter solves the problem, press the Diag button on the routing engine. If the problem persists, call for service from your HP dealer or service provider.

  • Page 59

    Troubleshooting Interpreting LED Error Patterns Interpreting LED Error Patterns If a failure occurs when power to the router is cycled (switched off and on), refer to table 3-1 below for information about using LED patterns to diagnose the failure. If a failure occurs during router operation, refer to table 3-2 (page 3-6).

  • Page 60

    1-21). If that entry does not appear in the event log, call for service from your HP dealer or service provider. Interface Card Apparently Not Present 1. Verify that the interface card is seated properly in the Engine: router slot.

  • Page 61

    Troubleshooting Interpreting LED Error Patterns Status Pwr/ Card Self- Port Diagnostic Tips Fan/ test Fail Temp Port Failure 1. If this error persists, replace the cable and/or (if ThinLAN) Engine: its terminator. Card: NetFail Status Temp (one port only) 2. If this error persists and the port is an Ethernet/802.3 interface, replace the transceiver.

  • Page 62

    Troubleshooting Interpreting LED Error Patterns N o t e After trying each diagnostic tip in table 3-2 below, reboot the router as directed; if a failure then occurs, use table 3-1, “LED Error Patterns During Power-On Self-Test,” to interpret the LED error patterns. Table 3-2.

  • Page 63

    LED remains green, the card is faulty. • If the Card LED turns green and the Self-test LED turns off, call for service from your HP dealer or service provider. Note: if this error has occurred, the remaining ports on the card can be used.

  • Page 64

    Troubleshooting Interpreting LED Error Patterns Status Pwr/ Card Self- Port Diagnostic Tips Fan/ test Fail Temp Power Supply Failure Engine: 1. Open the router door, and check the LEDs on the switches of the power supplies. Card: Status (all ports) 2.

  • Page 65

    Troubleshooting Verifying LED Operation Verifying LED Operation If you suspect a non-operating LED—for example, if the LEDs indicate a failure as shown in table 3-1 or table 3-2, or they have some anomalous pattern (for example, off or red); but the router nevertheless appears to be operating correctly—you can verify the LEDs by resetting the router using the following procedure.

  • Page 66

    Troubleshooting Verifying LED Operation Fail 3-10...

  • Page 67

    Troubleshooting Identifying a Bad Component Identifying a Bad Component Testing the Router Only To perform a self-test of the router’s internal circuitry, switch the power on and off. (For details regarding what happens when the power is switched on, refer to “Initialization Sequence,” page 2-15.) To diagnose a failure that occurs during the power-on self-test, refer to table 3-1;...

  • Page 68

    1. Verify that the flash card is properly installed (refer to Flash doesn’t seem to be installed. “Replacing the PCMCIA Flash Card,” page 3-31). 2. If the flash card is installed properly, the routing engine is faulty; call for service from your HP dealer or service provider. 3-12...

  • Page 69

    Identifying a Bad Component Error Diagnostic Tips The routing engine may be faulty; call for service from your HP Flash seems to be shorted. dealer or service provider. The routing engine may be faulty; call for service from your HP Flash seems to be unprogrammed.

  • Page 70

    Troubleshooting Identifying a Bad Component Troubleshooting a Terminal or Modem Connection If the automatic speed sensing does not connect your console and give you the router’s copyright and Main menu screens, as described under “Connect a console” (page 1-14), then try the “Reset speed sensing,” Adjust baud rate,"...

  • Page 71

    [Return] again. If pressing [Return] four or five times does not display either the copyright or Main menu screen, then ensure that you are using the correct console cable. (Refer to “HP Cables and Adapters,” page A-2.) If the cable is correct, then repeat this procedure for each other baud rate available for your terminal until you find a rate that gives you a successful connection.

  • Page 72

    The router provides three other specific link tests, Ping, AppleTalk Ping, and Telnet, described below. Note that you can use HP network management software to test the link; see the help screens for the software.

  • Page 73

    Troubleshooting Identifying a Bad Component 2. Enter the following command: get cct.cct-name.mac_addr [Return] where: cct-name is the configured circuit name for the port. Examples of circuit names are ETHER1 and ETHER3. 3. Note the station address listed as a result. 4.

  • Page 74

    Troubleshooting Identifying a Bad Component Ping Ping is a network-layer test that sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo request message to another node that has an IP address and is able to respond to an ICMP echo request message. The router must have IP routing configured in order to use this test.

  • Page 75

    Troubleshooting Identifying a Bad Component AppleTalk Ping AppleTalk Ping is a network-layer test that sends an AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP) message to another AppleTalk node. The router must have AppleTalk routing configured in order to use this test. 1. From the Main menu, select the Network Control Language Interpreter (NCL).

  • Page 76

    [Y] for “yes”. The remote node is disconnected, the Telnet session ends, and your local node’s system name appears as the prompt on your display. If the remote system is not another HP router, then type the appropriate commands to interact with that system and to disconnect Telnet.

  • Page 77

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Replacing a Module You can replace any interface card or the cooling module without taking the system offline (that is, without switching the router off and taking all networks down). If you have installed a second power supply, you can also replace either power supply without taking the system offline.

  • Page 78

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Swap Figure 3-2. Swap Button and LED 4. Press down slightly on the insides of both locks on the card bezel (see figure 3-5), then swing them outward until the bezel disengages (see figure 3-4). Figure 3-3. Unlocking Card Bezel 3-22...

  • Page 79

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Figure 3-4. Disengaging Card Bezel 5. Grasping the left and right ends of the bezel, pull out until the tray is about half exposed. 6. Grasping the sides of the tray, remove the interface card from the router.

  • Page 80

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Figure 3-5. Installing Interface Card 9. Push the two locks evenly to close them, pressing downward slightly to secure them in place. 10. Check that the Card LED has turned green and the Self-test LED has turned off.

  • Page 81

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Figure 3-6. Opening Router Door 13. Remove the LED label strip from the position corresponding to the slot where you replaced the interface card, then insert the LED label strip provided with the new card as far as it will go. 14.

  • Page 82

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 16. To replace the label at the left of the slot that identifies the depart- ment or site served by the interface card, slide it out from the right. Position the new label with its shiny side facing the router, and slide it in from the right.

  • Page 83

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Replacing the Routing Engine or an Interface Card (System Offline) N o t e s The router’s configuration information is stored in the PCMCIA flash card mounted on the routing engine. If you need to replace the routing engine because of some problem other than one in the flash card and you don’t want to re-enter the configuration information, refer to “Replacing the PCMCIA Flash Card,”...

  • Page 84

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Figure 3-8. Opening Router Door 3. Switch the power supply off by pressing the bottom of its switch (marked with “ ”). If two power supplies are installed, switch both off. 4. Connect a grounding wrist strap to your wrist and to the back of the router.

  • Page 85

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 7. Grasping the sides of the tray, remove the module from the router. N o t e If you are replacing an interface card but you are not ready to install the new interface card now, reinstall the card blank using the next three steps described below for installing the new interface card.

  • Page 86

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 12. Remove the LED label strip in the router door from the position cor- responding to the slot where you installed the new interface card, then insert the LED label strip provided with that card as far as it will 13.

  • Page 87

    Replacing a Module Replacing the PCMCIA Flash Card A new PCMCIA flash card is not available from HP separately from the routing engine. If the flash card needs to be replaced, you must replace the routing engine; the replacement routing engine comes with a new flash card preinstalled on it.

  • Page 88

    4. Grasping the exposed end of the flash card, remove it from its housing. Figure 3-13. Removing Flash Card 5. Position the new flash card to the left of the housing, with the HP label facing up and the arrow on the label pointing toward the housing.

  • Page 89

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 7. Push the flash card further into the housing as far as it will go; its lockshaft will move to the left. When properly seated, the end of the flash card will be flush with the end of its lockshaft. 8.

  • Page 90: Replacing The Power Supply

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Replacing the Power Supply If a second power supply has been installed, you can replace either of the two power supplies without taking the system offline (that is, you can “hot swap” one of two installed power supplies). C a u t i o n Be careful not to open the router door more than 90°.

  • Page 91

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Power supply screw Power supply screws Console RS-232 Reset Clear Figure 3-15. Power Supply Screws 4. Pull the handle on the power supply, and remove it from its compartment. 5. Insert the new power supply into the compartment, and push it all the way back.

  • Page 92

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module Replacing the Cooling Module You can replace the cooling module without taking the system offline (that is, the cooling module can be “hot swapped”). C a u t i o n Be careful not to open the router door more than 90°. Opening the door further could damage it.

  • Page 93

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 4. Holding the door open at 90°, pull the white tab to disconnect the cable from its connector. Figure 3-17. Disconnecting Cable N o t e While removing the cooling module from its compartment in the next step, ensure that the cooling module housing does not catch on the three screws on the inside of the router door.

  • Page 94

    Troubleshooting Replacing a Module 8. Holding the door open at 90°, continue sliding the cooling module back until the mounting ears for the screws are flush against the holes in the router chassis. 9. Insert and tighten the screws you removed in step 2. 10.

  • Page 95

    Cables and Adapters...

  • Page 96

    24542M cable * This cable or adapter is supplied with the router. † This part is not supplied with the router and is not available from HP; but it is generally available from most suppliers of cable adapters. ‡ If this cable is used, the DTR signal must be on (high) in your terminal emulation program or in your terminal, and the parameters “Enable DTR on Initialization”...

  • Page 97

    Cables and Adapters Configuration of Console Signals You can specify in the configuration how the router handles the DTR (Data Terminal Ready) and DCD (Data Carrier Detect) signals. (DCD is sometimes referred to simply as CD, Carrier Detect.) The parameter “Enable DTR on Initialization” in the User Session menu of the configuration controls whether the console port always maintains DTR on (high).

  • Page 98

    Cables and Adapters HP Cable and Adapter Pin-Outs Console Cable (F1047-80002) PC or Terminal Signal Router (9-pin) Signal 25-Pin Terminal Adapter (5181-6640) PC or Terminal Signal Router (25-pin) Signal...

  • Page 99

    Cables and Adapters 25-Pin Modem Adapter (5181-6642) Modem Signal Router (25-pin) Signal Alternate Console-to-Terminal Cable (24542G, 24542H) PC or Terminal Signal Router (25-pin) Signal...

  • Page 100

    Cables and Adapters Alternate Console-to-Modem Cable (24542M) Modem Signal Router (25-pin) Signal...

  • Page 101

    Cables and Adapters Minimum Pin-Outs If you will be purchasing a non-HP console cable or making your own cable, rather than using the supplied console cable or an alternate HP console cable, the cable must have the following minimum pin-outs.

  • Page 102

    Cables and Adapters Connecting to PC or Terminal with 25-Pin Connector PC or Terminal Signal Router (25-pin) Signal DCD * † * The DCD signal may be left unconnected if the router is configured to ignore DCD. † Note that the router must be configured to raise DTR. (Refer to “Configuration of Console Signals,” page A-3.) Connecting to Modem with 25-Pin Connector Modem...

  • Page 103

    Modem Configuration...

  • Page 104

    N o t e The following modems were tested at 9600 baud and operate correctly with the configurations indicated. HP 50759A Support Link At the router end: For an 8-position switch, set switch 4 down, all others up. For a 4-position switch, set switch 2 up, all others down.

  • Page 105

    Modem Configuration Intel High-Speed External Faxmodem At the router end: Configure with a terminal or PC using the following sequence: at&f ats0=1 At the console end: Configure with a terminal or PC using the following sequence: at&f US Robotics Courier HST Dual Standard with At the router end: Set switches 3, 8, and 10 down (set to off), all others up (set to on).

  • Page 107

    Specifications...

  • Page 108

    Specifications Physical Dimensions 44.7 cm by 29.7 cm by 22.2 cm (17.6 in. by 11.9 in. by 8.7 in.) Weight * 21 kg (46.3 lbs) * With four interface cards and two power supplies installed. Power Consumption Maximum current at 100-127 Vac 4 amp Maximum current at 200-240 Vac 2.5 amp...

  • Page 109

    Specifications Electromagnetic Emissions U.S.A., Canada, FCC part 15 class A and Latin America Europe, Japan, CISPR-22 (1985) class A and other countries Europe EN 55022 (1988) class A Japan VCCI class 1 ESD Immunity Europe IEC 801-2 (1991): 4kV CD, 8kV AD Radiated Immunity Europe IEC 801-3 (1984): 3 V/m...

  • Page 110

    (with the appropriate cable) EIA RS-422/449 and CCITT V.36, CCITT X.21, CCITT V.35 ISO 2593 and MIL-C-28747 Data Communications The HP J2430A Router 650 is approved under Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect connection to public telecommunication systems within the United Kingdom.

  • Page 111: Safety Information

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties Safety Information Safety Symbols Documentation reference symbol. If the product is marked with this symbol, refer to the product documentation to get more information about the product. WARNING A WARNING in the manual denotes a hazard that can cause injury or death.

  • Page 112

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties Informations concernant la sécurité Symboles de sécurité Symbole de référence à la documentation. Si le produit est marqué de ce symbole, reportez- vous à la documentation du produit afin d’obtenir des informations plus détaillées. AVERTISSEMENT Dans la documentation, un AVERTISSEMENT indique un danger susceptible d’entraîner des dommages corporels ou la mort.

  • Page 113: Hinweise Zur Sicherheit

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties Hinweise zur Sicherheit Sicherheitssymbole Symbol für Dokumentationsverweis. Wenn das Produkt mit diesem Symbol markiert ist, schlagen Sie bitte in der Produktdokumentation nach, um mehr Informationen über das Produkt zu erhalten. VORSICHT Eine VORSICHT in der Dokumentation symbolisiert eine Gefahr, die Verletzungen oder sogar Todesfälle verursachen kann.

  • Page 114: Considerazioni Sulla Sicurezza

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties Considerazioni sulla sicurezza Simboli di sicurezza Simbolo di riferimento alla documentazione. Se il prodotto è contrassegnato da questo simbolo, fare riferimento alla documentazione sul prodotto per ulteriori informazioni su di esso. PERICOLO La dicitura PERICOLO denota un pericolo che può causare lesioni o morte.

  • Page 115: Consideraciones Sobre Seguridad

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties Consideraciones sobre seguridad Símbolos de seguridad Símbolo de referencia a la documentación. Si el producto va marcado con este símbolo, consultar la documentación del producto a fin de obtener mayor información sobre el producto. ADVERTENCIA Una ADVERTENCIA en la documentación señala un riesgo que podría resultar en lesiones o la muerte.

  • Page 116

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties...

  • Page 117

    Plug the equipment and receiver into different branch circuits. Consult your dealer or an experienced technician for additional suggestions. VCCI Class 1 (Japan Only) for the HP J2430A Router 650 European Community This equipment complies with ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 55022 Class A.

  • Page 118

    Regulatory Statements and Warranties N o t e This is a class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference, in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures. The following Declaration of Conformity complies with ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014. It Declaration of identifies the product, the manufacturer’s name and address, and the applicable Conformity...

  • Page 119

    HP receives notice of such defects during the warranty period, HP will, at its option, either repair or replace products that prove to be defective. Should HP be unable to repair or replace the product within a reason- able amount of time, customer’s alternative exclusive remedy shall be a refund of the purchase price upon return of the product.

  • Page 120

    Please contact your HP authorized LAN dealer or HP representative for the current list of tested products. HP relies in part upon information from the suppliers of non-HP prod- ucts and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the operation of these products or their compliance with worldwide regula- tory requirements.

  • Page 121

    (90) days from the date of purchase from HP or its Authorized Reseller. If HP receives notice of such defects within the warranty period, HP will at its option...

  • Page 123

    Index 4-Port Ethernet/802.3 Interface ... 1-3, 1-12 4-Port Token Ring Interface ... 1-3 cabinet mounting ... 1-6, 1-8 4-Port WAN Interface ... 1-3, 2-2 cable ... 1-2, 1-4, 1-15 – 1-16, A-1 – A-8 802.3 console ... 3-14 – 3-15, A-2, A-4 - A-6 See Ethernet/802.3 interface, IEEE 802.3 custom ...

  • Page 124

    See IP routing service interface card ... 3-21 – 3-26 downloading configuration ... 1-22 HP cables ... A-2 DTR signal ... A-3 HP OpenView Interconnect Manager ... 1-22 humidity specifications ... C-2 echo request message See Ping ICMP: Internet Control Message electromagnetic specifications ...

  • Page 125

    ... 1-17 installation procedure ... 1-1 – 1-36 Pwr ... 1-18, 2-5, 3-8 Interconnect Manager router status ... 2-4 – 2-5 See HP OpenView Interconnect Manager routing engine utilization ... 2-8, 3-12 interface Rx ... 2-7, 3-9 AUI ... C-4 Self-test ...

  • Page 126

    Fput command ... 1-27 2-9 – 2-12 Get command ... 3-17 Password command in NCL ... 1-27 – 1-28, Logi command ... 1-30 2-11 Password command ... 1-27 – 1-28, 2-11 PC used as a console device ... 1-4, Ping command ... 1-27, 1-36, 3-16, 1-13 –...

  • Page 127

    resetting ... 2-9 – 2-10 serial ports and links restart See WAN See reset severity of events ... 1-30 Rget commands in NCL ... 1-34 – 1-35 Simple Network Management Protocol Rgetatr command in NCL ... 1-35 See SNMP Rgetb command in NCL ... 1-34 SNMP: Simple Network Management Rgetd command in NCL ...

  • Page 128

    TFTP ... 2-11 Time command in NCL ... 1-26 – 1-27 Time protocol ... 1-25, 2-15 cable ... 1-4, C-4 token ring interface ... 1-3 interface ... 1-3, 2-2 topology ... 1-34, 3-2 link-terminating equipment ... 1-4 See also map of network port ...

  • Page 130

    ©Copyright 1994 Hewlett-Packard Company Printed in U.S.A. 7/94 Manual Part Number 5962-8317...

Comments to this Manuals

Symbols: 0
Latest comments: