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Cisco Gigabit Switch Router 12008 Installation And Configuration Manual

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Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch
Router Installation and

Configuration Guide

Corporate Headquarters
Cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-1706
USA
World Wide Web URL:
http://www.cisco.com
Tel:
408 526-4000
800 553-NETS (6387)
Fax:
408 526-4100
Customer Order Number: DOC-12008GSR-ICG=
Text Part Number: 78-4953-03

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  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Corporate Headquarters Cisco Systems, Inc. 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-1706 World Wide Web URL: http://www.cisco.com Tel: 408 526-4000 800 553-NETS (6387) Fax: 408 526-4100 Customer Order Number: DOC-12008GSR-ICG=...
  • Page 2 Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco Systems, Inc. could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product. The following third-party software may be included with your product and will be subject to the software license agreement: CiscoWorks software and documentation are based in part on HP OpenView under license from the Hewlett-Packard Company.
  • Page 3 CCSP, the Cisco Square Bridge logo, Cisco Unity, Follow Me Browsing, FormShare, and StackWise are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn, and iQuick Study are service marks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; and Aironet, ASIST, BPX, Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP,...
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    About This Guide Document Objectives Audience xiii Document Organization Document Conventions Conventions Used in Command Descriptions Conventions Used in Examples Conventions Used for Special Notices Obtaining Documentation World Wide Web Documentation CD-ROM Ordering Documentation Obtaining Technical Assistance Cisco Connection Online Technical Assistance Center Documentation Feedback Chapter 1...
  • Page 6 Chapter 2 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Upper Card Cage and Associated Components Gigabit Route Processor Performance Route Processor Switch Fabric of the Cisco 12008 Clock and Scheduler Card Cisco 12000 Series Line Cards Air Filter Assembly 1-69 Lower Card Cage and Associated Components Switch Fabric Cards...
  • Page 7 Multimode Power Budget Example (with Sufficient Power for Transmission) Multimode Power Budget Example of Dispersion Limit Single-Mode Transmission SONET Single-Mode Power Budget Example Using Statistics to Estimate the Power Budget Installation Tools Required Unpacking the Cisco 12008 Checking the Contents of the Shipping Container Using a Site Log Chapter 3 Installing a Cisco 12008...
  • Page 8 Chapter 4 viii Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Connecting an External Alarm Monitoring Facility Connecting System Ground Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Connecting Source Power to an AC-Input Power Supply Connecting Source Power to a DC-Input Power Supply Starting the Cisco 12008 3-50 Observing System Startup and Performing a Basic Configuration...
  • Page 9 Recovering a Lost Password Using Flash Memory Cards in the RP Installing and Removing a Flash Memory Card in a RP Formatting a Flash Memory Card Specifying a Cisco IOS Image for Booting the System Console Commands Associated with Flash Memory Use Enabling Booting from Flash Memory Copying Files to a Flash Memory Medium Copying a Cisco IOS Software Image onto a Flash Memory...
  • Page 10 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Running Diagnostics on the Cisco 12008 Diagnostic Test Overview Using the diag Command Diagnostic Testing Sequence Loading and Running Diagnostics Diagnostic Examples Without verbose Option With verbose Option Failed Diagnostic Maintaining the Cisco 12008 Cleaning the Air Filter...
  • Page 11 Installing the RP Checking the Installation of the RP Removing and Replacing Line Cards Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Removing an SFC Installing an SFC Removing a CSC Installing a CSC Checking the Installation of Switch Cards Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Removing a Cable-Management Tray Installing a Cable-Management Tray Removing a Cable-Management Bracket...
  • Page 12 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 13: About This Guide

    About This Guide This section describes the objectives, intended audience, and organization of this document. The conventions used to convey instructions and information are also included. Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package that ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM, a member of the Cisco Connection Family, is updated monthly.
  • Page 14: Document Organization

    Document Organization Document Organization This document is organized as follows: • Chapter 1, “Product Overview,” introduces the Cisco 12008 router and describes the system’s components. • Chapter 2, “Preparing for Installation,” outlines the safety considerations that you should observe and the tools required during installation of your Cisco 12008 router. Also, this chapter provides an overview of the installation process and presents the procedures you should perform before actually installing the router.
  • Page 15: Document Conventions

    Document Conventions The conventions used in this document are described in the following sections. Conventions Used in Command Descriptions The following conventions are used for command descriptions: • Examples containing system prompts denote interactive sessions. Such examples indicate that you should enter commands at the system prompt. The system prompt indicates the current level of the EXEC command interpreter.
  • Page 16: Conventions Used In Examples

    Document Conventions Conventions Used in Examples The following conventions are used in examples: • Terminal sessions and sample console screen displays are in • Information that you enter is in • Nonprinting characters, such as passwords, are in angle brackets (< >). •...
  • Page 17 Document Conventions Waarschuwing Dit waarschuwingssymbool betekent gevaar. U verkeert in een situatie die lichamelijk letsel kan veroorzaken. Voordat u aan enige apparatuur gaat werken, dient u zich bewust te zijn van de bij elektrische schakelingen betrokken risico's en dient u op de hoogte te zijn van standaard maatregelen om ongelukken te voorkomen.
  • Page 18: Obtaining Documentation

    Obtaining Documentation Advarsel Dette varselsymbolet betyr fare. Du befinner deg i en situasjon som kan føre til personskade. Før du utfører arbeid på utstyr, må du vare oppmerksom på de faremomentene som elektriske kretser innebærer, samt gjøre deg kjent med vanlig praksis når det gjelder å unngå...
  • Page 19: Documentation Cd-Rom

    Documentation CD-ROM Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly. Therefore, it is probably more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or as an annual subscription. Ordering Documentation Registered CCO users can order the Documentation CD-ROM and other Cisco Product documentation through our online Subscription Services at http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/...
  • Page 20: Technical Assistance Center

    Obtaining Technical Assistance resolve technical issues with online support services, download and test software packages, and order Cisco learning materials and merchandise. Valuable online skill assessment, training, and certification programs are also available. Customers and partners can self-register on CCO to obtain additional personalized information and services.
  • Page 21: Documentation Feedback

    To submit your comments by mail, for your convenience many documents contain a response card behind the front cover. Otherwise, you can mail your comments to the following address: Cisco Systems, Inc. Document Resource Connection 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-9883 We appreciate and value your comments.
  • Page 22 Obtaining Technical Assistance xxii Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 23: Chapter 1 Product Overview

    Product Overview This chapter presents an overview of the Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router. The following sections are included in this chapter: • Cisco’s Next Generation of Routers • Features of the Cisco 12008 Router • Overview of the Cisco 12008 •...
  • Page 24: Cisco's Next Generation Of Routers

    Cisco’s Next Generation of Routers Cisco’s Next Generation of Routers Cisco Systems’ new family of Internet switching and routing products, referred to collectively as the Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Routers, consists of the following models: • Cisco 12016 Gigabit Switch Router—A 16-slot, carrier-class platform that supports Internet protocol (IP) switching capacity of up to 160 Gbps.
  • Page 25: Features Of The Cisco 12008 Router

    The networking capabilities and features of the Cisco 12000 series of routers make them ideally suited to meet the needs of the following classes of users: • Internet service providers (ISPs) • Carriers providing Internet services and utilities • Competitive access providers (CAPs) •...
  • Page 26 Features of the Cisco 12008 Router Figure 1-1 The Cisco 12008 supports the following features: • Online insertion and removal (OIR) capability—This feature allows you to insert or remove the following router components: — Power supplies—One AC-input power supply or one DC-input power supply is a required router component.
  • Page 27 The power supplies of both types are hot-swappable, load-sharing units. In a system equipped with two AC-input power supplies or two DC-input power supplies, if one of the units fails or if the power source for one of the units fails, the surviving power supply continues to operate to sustain normal router operations.
  • Page 28: Overview Of The Cisco 12008

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Separately orderable documents called configuration notes or replacement instructions are available for each of the FRUs described previously. These documents provide installation, removal, replacement, and configuration instructions for the FRUs. • Environmental monitoring system—The maintenance bus (MBus) facility of the Cisco 12008 functions as an environmental monitoring system for the router, enabling the router to monitor itself and alert site personnel to adverse electrical events or environmental conditions.
  • Page 29 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-2 Major Components of the Cisco 12008 Router enclosure Cable-management tray CSCs Upper card cage Line cards (Quad OC-3 POS Shown) connection socket AC- or DC-input power supplies Air filter assembly (AC-input power supplies shown) (lower card cage behind air Power supply filter assembly contains card...
  • Page 30: Router Enclosure

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Router Enclosure The outer shell of the Cisco 12008 is a rigid, sheet metal structure with the following dimensions: • Width—17.4 inches (44.6 cm) • Depth—21.2 inches (54.4 cm) • Height— 24.8 inches (63.6 cm) This enclosure, which houses all of the router’s internal components, can be mounted in a telco rack or a four-post equipment rack, or the enclosure can be used as a freestanding unit.
  • Page 31 The cable management tray enables you to route the line card interface cables to or from the system through the left side of the tray, keeping the cables organized, out of the way, and free of kinks or sharp bends. You direct the cables down to the individual ports on each line card, gauging cable length appropriately to minimize slack in the cable before connecting it to a given port.
  • Page 32: Card Cage Fan Tray

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 • Vertical cable-management bracket (one per line card)—This bracket is attached to a line card by means of captive installation screws at the top and bottom of the bracket. Once an interface cable is connected to its intended line card port, you loop the cable through the cable keeper clip nearest the port of connection and seat the cable in the bottom of the bracket raceway.
  • Page 33: Power Supply Fan Tray

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 If an overtemperature condition or a fan failure is detected within the router, the master MBus module on the RP directs the MBus module on the clock and scheduler card (CSC) to increase the operating voltage being delivered to the fan tray, causing the card cage fans to run at “maximum”...
  • Page 34: Ac-Input And Dc-Input Power Supplies

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 AC-Input and DC-Input Power Supplies The Cisco 12008 router can be configured to operate with AC source power or DC source power. You can install one or two AC-input power supplies or one or two DC-input power supplies in the power supply bays located in the right side of the router enclosure (see Figure 1-2).
  • Page 35 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-4 AC-Input Power Supply INPUT OUTP UT FAIL Product Overview 1-13...
  • Page 36: Operating Modes Of The Power Supplies

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-5 Carrying handle LTER Operating Modes of the Power Supplies The AC-input and DC-input power supplies operate in either of two modes: • Standalone mode—In this configuration, only one power supply is installed in one of the two available power supply bays.
  • Page 37: Features Of The Power Supplies

    • Redundant (1+1) mode—In this configuration, two power supplies are installed in the power supply bays, sharing the load current to provide required DC operating voltages to the backplane. If one of the units fails, the surviving power supply takes over to maintain normal system operations.
  • Page 38: Characteristics Of The Power Supplies

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Characteristics of the Power Supplies The AC-input and the DC-input power supplies have the following characteristics: • Width of power supply body—3.5 inches (8.97 cm) • Width of power supply faceplate—4.0 inches (10.26 cm) • Height—10 inches (25.64 cm) •...
  • Page 39 Figure 1-6 Rotary power switch CAUTION THIS UNIT MAY HAVE MORE THAN ONE POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION. ALL CONNECTIONS NEED TO BE REMOVED TO DE-ENERGIZE THE Carrying handle UNIT. ACHTUNG DIESE EINHEIT HAT MEHR ALS EINEN NETZTEIL-ANSCHLUSS: ALLE VERBINDUNGEN MUSSEN ABGEZOGEN WERDEN, DAMIT DIE EINHEIT NICHT UNTER SPANNUNG STEHT.
  • Page 40 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Rotary Power Switch The rotary power switch on the power supply faceplate (see Figure 1-6) applies a source AC voltage to the power supply. This switch also actuates an onboard circuit breaker and a latching mechanism that prevents the power supply from being inserted into or removed from the power supply bay when the switch is in the ON (1) position.
  • Page 41: Dc-Input Power Supply Faceplate

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 DC-Input Power Supply Faceplate This section describes the functional elements built into the faceplate of the DC-input power supply (see Figure 1-7). Product Overview 1-19...
  • Page 42 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-7 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NEC OR THE AUTHORITY HAVING JURISDICTION Rotary power switch TERMINALS MAY BE ENERGIZED. TURN OFF POWER SOURCE CIRCUIT BREAKER AND REMOVE POWER SUPPLY BEFORE ACCESSING TERMINALS. Carrying handle ANSCHLUSSE KONNEN UNTER SPANNUNG STEHEN.
  • Page 43 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Rotary Power Switch The rotary power switch on the DC-input power supply performs the same functions as those described in the section entitled “Rotary Power Switch” on page 18 for the AC-input power supply. Circuit Breaker Alarm Terminal Block The onboard power supply circuit breaker actuated by the rotary power switch on the DC- input power supply incorporates an auxiliary switch that is mechanically linked to (but electrically isolated from) the power supply circuit breaker.
  • Page 44 Overview of the Cisco 12008 The three contacts on the alarm terminal block are labeled as follows: • COM (Common)—This contact is common to both the Normally Open (NO) and the Normally Closed (NC) contacts. • NO (Normally Open)—These contacts on the alarm terminal block are open as long as no overcurrent condition is detected in the power supply.
  • Page 45: Upper Card Cage And Associated Components

    The power specifications for the DC-input power supplies, as well as the specifications of the source DC power cables for use with the Cisco 12008 router, are presented in the section entitled “DC-Powered Systems” on page 16 in Chapter 2. DC-Input Power Supply LEDs The DC-input power supply faceplate incorporates two LEDs (see Figure 1-7) that provide the following status indications:...
  • Page 46 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Although you can install a line card in slot 0, the recommended convention is for the RP to occupy this slot. Figure 1-8 Upper card cage A minimally configured Cisco 12008 contains the following cards in the upper card cage: •...
  • Page 47: Gigabit Route Processor

    A Cisco 12008 that is configured for full redundancy contains the following cards in the upper card cage: • Two RPs • Two CSCs • As many as six Cisco 12000 series line cards of any type and any combination The following sections briefly describe the cards that you can use to populate the upper card cage.
  • Page 48 Overview of the Cisco 12008 • Asynchronous serial ports • Ethernet port If you have a PRP, see the Performance Route Processor section. The faceplate of the GRP is shown in Figure 1-9. Figure 1-9 It is recommended that you install the GRP in the left-most slot (slot 0) in the upper card cage.
  • Page 49 The GRP communicates with the line cards either through the switch fabric or through a maintenance bus (MBus). The switch fabric connection is the main data path for routing table distribution as well as for packets that are sent between the line cards and the GRP. The MBus connection allows the GRP to download a system bootstrap image, collect or load diagnostic information, and perform general, internal system maintenance operations.
  • Page 50: Grp Memory Components

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 The Cisco 12008 supports downloadable system software for most Cisco IOS software upgrades, enabling you to remotely download, store, and boot from a new Cisco IOS software image. GRP Memory Components Table 1-2 lists the memory components on the GRP. Figure 1-10 shows the location of the two DRAM SIMMs and the Flash SIMM on the GRP.
  • Page 51 Figure 1-10 Locations of GRP Memory Bank 2 DRAM DIMMs Bank 1 PCMCIA slots slot 0: bottom slot 1: top Overview of the Cisco 12008 Backplane connector Auxiliary port Console port Flash SIMM GIGABIT ROUTE PROCESSOR Alphanumeric LED displays Ethernet interface (RJ-45 or MII) Product Overview 1-29...
  • Page 52 Overview of the Cisco 12008 DRAM The extended data output (EDO) dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) on the GRP stores routing tables, protocols, and network accounting applications, and runs the Cisco IOS software. The standard (default) GRP DRAM configuration is 64 megabytes (MB) of EDO DRAM, which you can increase up to 256 MB through DRAM upgrades.
  • Page 53: System Status Leds

    NVRAM The system configuration, software configuration register settings, and environmental monitoring logs are contained in the 512-KB NVRAM, which is backed up with built-in lithium batteries that retain the contents for a minimum of five years. NVRAM is not user configurable or field-upgradeable.
  • Page 54: Soft Reset Switch

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 — Two RJ-45 or MII Ethernet port select LEDs: these LEDs, when on, identify which one of the two Ethernet connections you selected. When the RJ-45 port is selected, its LED is on and the MII LED is off. When the MII port is selected, its LED is on and the RJ-45 LED is off.
  • Page 55: Pcmcia Slots

    Caution To prevent system problems or loss of data, use the soft reset switch only at the advice of Cisco service personnel. PCMCIA Slots The GRP has two PCMCIA slots available. Either slot can support a Flash memory card or an input/output (I/O) device as long as the device requires only +5 VDC.
  • Page 56: Performance Route Processor

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Note The RJ-45 and MII receptacles on the GRP faceplate represent two physical connection options for one Ethernet interface; therefore, you can use either the MDI RJ-45 connection or the MII connection, but not both simultaneously. Performance Route Processor Each Cisco 12012 GSR has one main system (or route) processor.
  • Page 57 Figure 1-11 shows the front panel view of the PRP. Figure 1-11 Performance Route Processor (Front Panel View, Horizontal Orientation Shown) ETH 0 The PRP is available as Product Number PRP-1=, which includes one PRP with 512 MB of synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) and one 64-MB advanced technology attachment (ATA) Flash disk.
  • Page 58 Overview of the Cisco 12008 • Up to 2 GB of SDRAM on two PC133-compliant, dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs). 512 MB of SDRAM is the default shipping configuration. SDRAM is field replaceable. • Two MB of SRAM for secondary CPU cache memory functions. SRAM is not user configurable or field replaceable.
  • Page 59 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-12 PRP (Horizontal Orientation) ETH 0 ETH 1 CONSOLE PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1) Product Overview 1-37...
  • Page 60 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Backplane connector Flash SIMM (Socket number P3) SDRAM DIMMs Bank 1 - Socket number U15 Bank 2 - Socket number U18 Ejector lever Flash disk slots (covered) PRP Memory Components Table 1-4 lists the memory components on the PRP. Table 1-4 Type Size...
  • Page 61 (ECC) SDRAM. DIMM upgrades of 512 MB and 1 GB are available. You cannot mix memory sizes. If two DIMMS are installed, they must be the same memory size. Cisco Systems strongly recommends that you use only Cisco-approved memory. Caution To prevent memory problems, SDRAM DIMMs must be +3.3VDC, PC133-compliant...
  • Page 62 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Flash memory also functions as a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to allow other servers to boot remotely from stored images or to copy them into their own Flash memory. The onboard Flash memory (called bootflash) contains the Cisco IOS boot image, and the Flash disk contains the Cisco IOS software image.
  • Page 63 The alphanumeric display LEDs are organized as two rows of four characters each and are located at one end of the card. These LEDs provide system status and error messages that are displayed during and after the boot process. The boot process and the content displayed are controlled by the PRPs MBus module software.
  • Page 64: Flash Disk Slots

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Access to the soft reset switch is through a small opening in the PRP faceplate. To press the switch, you must insert a paper clip or similar small pointed object into the opening. Flash Disk Slots The PRP includes two Flash disk (PCMCIA) slots.
  • Page 65: Switch Fabric Of The Cisco 12008

    Note The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable. Switch Fabric of the Cisco 12008 The heart of the Cisco 12008 is the switch fabric circuitry, which provides synchronized gigabit speed interconnections between the line cards and the RP. The switch fabric circuitry for the router is incorporated into two cards: •...
  • Page 66: Clock And Scheduler Card

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Table 1-6 Switch Fabric Bandwidth OC-12 nonredundant OC-12 redundant OC-48 nonredundant OC-48 redundant 1. A CSC is a required router component. A minimally configured router (one with a single CSC and no SFCs) supports an OC-12 data rate, but provides no redundancy of CSC functions.
  • Page 67 As a multi-function board, the CSC provides the following system services: • Provides one plane of switch fabric for the router (see the section below entitled “Switch Fabric in the Cisco 12008”). • Serves as a switch fabric controller card for the router (see the section below entitled “Switch Fabric Controller Functions of the CSC”).
  • Page 68 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Table 1-7 Switch Card Type One CSC Second CSC Three SFCs 1. Router equipped with one CSC and three SFCs. 2. Router equipped with two CSCs and three SFCs. Switch Fabric Controller Functions of the CSC In addition to providing one plane of switch fabric for the router, the CSC provides numerous other functions and services essential to router operations.
  • Page 69 Figure 1-13 Block Diagram of the CSC Clock and scheduler card (CSC) Master clock/ frame synch generator Central switch allocator Single plane switch fabric Mbus module Alarm functions Board power power The major functions of each element of the CSC are summarized briefly in the following paragraphs.
  • Page 70 Overview of the Cisco 12008 In a redundant CSC configuration, the phase of the master clock generator on one card is synchronized with that of the other card. If either clock drifts, the master clock generators on both cards remain tightly aligned. Should one of the CSCs fail, the phase lock between the two master clock sources is aborted within nanoseconds, enabling the surviving CSC clock to remain stable and take over master clock duties.
  • Page 71 This single switch plane of the CSC can be used alone in a minimum router configuration, or it can be used in combination with another CSC and the three optional SFCs for full switching redundancy. In the latter case, the per line-card slot bandwidth of the router is increased from an OC-12 rate to an OC-48 rate, and the second CSC provides redundancy.
  • Page 72 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-14 1-50 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide CSC Alarm Monitoring Facilities DB-25 alarm contact connector Alarm cutoff/lamp test button System alarm LEDs Status LEDs for the CSC Status LEDs for each fan tray Status LEDs for SFCs...
  • Page 73 — DB-25 alarm contact connector—A female DB-25 D-sub connector incorporated into the CSC faceplate enables you to attach an external alarm monitoring facility to the router, thus supporting a telco style of handling alarm conditions in the router. The alarm signals sent to this DB-25 connector are identical in function to those sent to the system LEDs on the CSC faceplate (see the following section entitled “System Alarm LEDS”).
  • Page 74 Overview of the Cisco 12008 In a system equipped with two CSCs, pressing the ACO/LT button on one CSC is equivalent to pressing this button on either CSC or both CSCs. — System alarm LEDs—Three system LEDs, labeled critical, major, and minor, are incorporated into the CSC faceplate (see Figure 1-14) to signal the existence of alarm conditions detected in the router by the system’s environmental monitoring circuitry.
  • Page 75 If the FAIL LED goes on, it indicates that one of the three SFCs in the lower card cage has failed. To determine which of the SFCs has failed, you must remove the air filter assembly and examine the status of the LEDs on each SFC. Two side-by-side LEDS behind a vertical tab near the center of the SFC (see Figure 1-15) indicate the operational status of the card.
  • Page 76: Cisco 12000 Series Line Cards

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 • Fan tray power—The Cisco 12008 router contains two fan trays (see Figure 1-2). Control of fan power is initiated at system startup, with the fans running at a slow rate for normal operations. Such operation minimizes fan noise, wear, and power consumption.
  • Page 77 Overview of the Cisco 12008 These cards provide the interfaces to the router’s external physical media. They exchange packet data with each other by way of the router’s switch fabric. Any unoccupied slot in the upper card cage must have a blank filler panel Caution installed for EMI compliance and to ensure proper air flow through the router enclosure.
  • Page 78 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-16 Packet Input receive Reassembly interfaces (Rx) Forwarding processor Packet Output transmit interfaces (Tx) 1-56 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Block Diagram of the Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS Line Card Buffer Burst memory buffer...
  • Page 79 Figure 1-17 Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS Line Card Multimode Single Mode Ejector lever Port 0 Status LEDs Port 1 Port 2 Port 3 Alphanumeric LED display Ejector lever Front view Overview of the Cisco 12008 160-pin backplane signal connector Rear view Product Overview 1-57...
  • Page 80 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Each Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS line card incorporates the following major components: • Transceivers—The single-mode intermediate reach transceiver provides a full-duplex, 155-Mbps, 1300-nm, laser-based SONET/SDH-compliant interface. The multimode transceiver provides a full-duplex, 155-Mbps, 1300-nm, LED-based SONET/SDH compliant interface.
  • Page 81 Once the forwarding decision has been made, the silicon queuing engine is notified by the forwarding processor, and the silicon queuing engine places the packet in the proper queue. This partitioning between the Layer 2 switching accelerator and the forwarding processor blends the high throughput of hardware-accelerated forwarding with the flexibility of software-based routing.
  • Page 82 Overview of the Cisco 12008 • Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) memory table—Each line card maintains CEF tables. These tables, derived from routing tables maintained by the GRP, are used by the line card processor in making forwarding decisions. Large networks may require more DRAM to support large CEF tables. For information on adding memory to a line card, see the document entitled Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Router Memory Replacement Instructions.
  • Page 83 Figure 1-18 Packet Input receive interface (Rx) Forwarding processor Packet Output transmit interface (Tx) Block Diagram of the OC-12c/STM-4c POS Line Card Buffer Burst memory buffer Silicon queuing engine L3 switching accelerator Silicon queuing engine Burst Buffer buffer memory Overview of the Cisco 12008 MBus MBus module...
  • Page 84 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-19 Single-mode 1-62 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide OC-12c/STM-4c POS Line Card Multimode Ejector lever Port 0 Status LEDs Alphanumeric LED display Ejector lever Front view Rear view 160-pin backplane signal connector...
  • Page 85 Each OC-12c/STM-4c POS line card incorporates the following primary components: Each Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS line card incorporates the following major components: • Transceivers—The single-mode intermediate reach transceiver provides a full-duplex, 155-Mbps, 1300-nm, laser-based SONET/SDH-compliant interface. The multimode transceiver provides a full-duplex, 155-Mbps, 1300-nm, LED-based SONET/SDH compliant interface.
  • Page 86 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Once the forwarding processor makes a forwarding decision, it notifies the silicon queuing engine, and the silicon queuing engine places the packet in the proper queue. This partitioning between the Layer 2 switching accelerator and the forwarding processor blends the high throughput of hardware-accelerated forwarding with the flexibility of software-based routing.
  • Page 87 • Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) memory table—Each line card maintains CEF tables. These tables, derived from routing tables maintained by the GRP, are used by the line card processor to make forwarding decisions. Large networks may require more DRAM to support large CEF tables. For information on adding memory to a line card, see the document entitled Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Router Memory Replacement Instructions.
  • Page 88 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-21 Single-mode 1-66 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Front View of OC-12c/STM-4c ATM Line Card Multimode Ejector lever Port 0 Status LEDs Alphanumeric LED display Ejector lever Front view Rear view 160-pin backplane signal...
  • Page 89 Each OC-12c/STM-4c ATM line card incorporates the following primary components: • Reassembly and segmentation—The transceivers support packet reassembly (converting ATM cells to packets) and segmentation (converting packets to ATM cells). The transceivers can handle up to 4000 simultaneous reassemblies (based on an average packet size of 280 bytes).
  • Page 90 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Once the forwarding decision has been made, the silicon queuing engine is notified by the forwarding processor, and the silicon queuing engine places the packet in the proper queue. This partitioning between the Layer 2 switching accelerator and the forwarding processor blends the high throughput of hardware-accelerated forwarding with the flexibility of software-based routing.
  • Page 91: Air Filter Assembly

    Large networks may require more DRAM to support large CEF tables. For information on adding memory to a line card, see the document entitled Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Router Memory Replacement Instructions. Air Filter Assembly The Cisco 12008 is equipped with a removable air filter that is mounted directly to the router enclosure in front of the lower card cage (see Figure 1-22).
  • Page 92: Switch Fabric Cards

    Overview of the Cisco 12008 Switch Fabric Cards The SFCs increase the switching capacity of the Cisco 12008. By adding three SFCs to a router equipped with a single CSC, you increase the bandwidth of each line card slot in the router from an OC-12 rate to an OC-48 rate.
  • Page 93 Overview of the Cisco 12008 Figure 1-22 Components in the Lower Card Cage ESD socket Card cage fan tray Lower card cage Switch fabric cards (SFCs) SFC0 SFC1 SFC2 Air filter assembly Product Overview 1-71...
  • Page 94: Power Distribution System In The Cisco 12008

    Power Distribution System in the Cisco 12008 The switching fabric of the SFC is identical to that of the CSC. However, the SFCs do not perform any of the system services native to the CSC (see the section entitled “Clock and Scheduler Card”...
  • Page 95 Figure 1-23 Power Distribution System in the Cisco 12008 Ð48 VDC +5.2 VDC Ð48 VDC +5.2 VDC Backplane Ð48 VDC +5.2 VDC Ð48 VDC +5.2 VDC +5.2 VDC Ð48 VDC Minimum power supply configuration: One AC-input power supply or one DC-input power supply Maximum power supply configuration: Two AC-input power supplies or two DC-input power supplies Power Distribution System in the Cisco 12008 +5 VDC...
  • Page 96: Cisco 12008 Environmental Monitoring Facility

    Cisco 12008 Environmental Monitoring Facility Cisco 12008 Environmental Monitoring Facility An environmental monitoring facility, called the maintenance bus (MBus), supports a variety of functions essential to router operations. These functions include the following: • System discovery (enabling the router to identify installed components) •...
  • Page 97: System Specifications

    The MBus modules on other installed components then power up on command from the master MBus agent on the GRP. • Device discovery—The GRP determines the system configuration by means of the MBus facility. A message is sent from the master GRP MBus agent, requesting that all installed components identify themselves.
  • Page 98 System Specifications Table 1-8 Description Chassis height Chassis width Chassis depth Weight, maximum configuration Weight, minimum configuration Weight, shipping pallet Weight, total system, on pallet Weight, base chassis with backplane Weight, card cage fan tray Weight, power supply fan tray Weight, AC-input power supply Weight, DC-input power supply Weight, line card...
  • Page 99 Table 1-9 Electrical Specifications of the AC-Input Power Supply Power Supply Electrical Type Characteristic Input power Input voltage Input current Line frequency Output power Table 1-10 Electrical Specifications of the DC-Input Power Supply Power Supply Electrical Type Characteristic Input power Input voltage Input current Output power...
  • Page 100: Agency Approvals

    Agency Approvals Table 1-11 Description Temperature Humidity Altitude Heat dissipation Acoustic Noise Shock 1. g = gravity. 2. oct/min = octave per minute. Agency Approvals In addition to meeting GR-63-CORE and GR-1089-CORE specifications, the Cisco 12008 meets the requirements of the agencies listed in Table 1-12. 1-78 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Environmental Specifications of the Cisco 12008...
  • Page 101 Table 1-12 Agency Approvals Category Agency Approval Safety UL 1950 CSA 22.2 No. 950 EN60950 AUSTEL TS001 AS/NZS 3260 FCC Class A CSA Class A EN55022 Class A VCCI Class 2 AS/NRZ 3548 Class A Immunity EN61000-4-2/IEC-1000-4-2 EN61000-4-3/IEC-1000-4-3 EN61000-4-4/IEC-1000-4-4 EN61000-4-5/IEC-1000-4-5 EN61000-4-6/IEC-1000-4-6 EN61000-4-11/IEC-1000-4-11 Agency Approvals...
  • Page 102 Agency Approvals 1-80 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 103: Chapter 2 Preparing For Installation

    Preparing for Installation This chapter provides specific information about preparing your site for installation of the Cisco 12008 router. Included are safety guidelines, specific preparatory information, and tools and parts required to ensure successful installation of your router. The shipping package for Cisco 12000 series routers is engineered to reduce the potential of product damage associated with routine material handling experienced during shipment.
  • Page 104: Safety Recommendations

    Safety Recommendations • Checking the Contents of the Shipping Container • Using a Site Log Before attempting to install your router, consider the power and cabling requirements that must be satisfied, the equipment that you will need to install the router, and the environmental conditions that your site must meet.
  • Page 105: Lifting Guidelines

    • Review the safety warnings contained in the document entitled Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Routers (Document Number 78-4347-02). This document accompanied the shipment of your Cisco 12008 router; familiarize yourself with its contents before attempting to install, configure, or maintain the router.
  • Page 106: Safety With Electricity

    Safety Recommendations • Enlist the assistance of a second person when lifting the router; do not attempt to lift the router by yourself. • Secure your footing when lifting the router; balance the lifted weight between your feet. • Lift the assembly slowly; avoid making sudden movements; avoid twisting your body as you lift.
  • Page 107: Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

    • Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to personnel or makes the equipment unsafe. • Never install equipment that appears to be damaged. • Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards, such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.
  • Page 108: Laser Safety

    Safety Recommendations • Always place a card component side up on an antistatic surface, in an antistatic card rack, or in a static-shielding bag. If you are returning a card to the factory, immediately place it in a static-shielding bag. •...
  • Page 109: Site Requirements Guidelines

    Site Requirements Guidelines Before installing the Cisco 12008 router, review the guidelines presented in the following sections. Rack-Mounting Guidelines Before installing the Cisco 12008 in a telco-style or 19-inch equipment rack, consider the following rack-mounting guidelines: • Install the router in an enclosed rack only if the rack has adequate ventilation or an exhaust fan;...
  • Page 110 Site Requirements Guidelines • If you mount the router in a telco-style rack, ensure that the rack is bolted to the floor. Ensure that the weight of the router does not make the rack unstable. Some telco-style racks are also secured to ceiling brackets, if necessary, due to the weight of equipment in the rack.
  • Page 111 Figure 2-1 Outer Dimensions of Cisco 12008 Enclosure (Top View) 19 inches of clearance required for component removal 19.10 Front inches inches Site Requirements Guidelines Vertical mounting rail (rack mounting surface) Side 21.2 inches Side Preparing for Installation 2-9 17.4 Rear inches...
  • Page 112: Air Flow Guidelines

    Site Requirements Guidelines Air Flow Guidelines The Cisco 12008 air circulation system includes two fan trays: • Card cage fan tray—This router component is located behind the air filter assembly (see Figure 2-2). The card cage fan tray draws ambient air through a removable and serviceable air filter assembly in the front of the router, passes it over the switch fabric cards in the lower card cage, directs it upward through the circuit boards in the upper card cage, and exhausts it through vents at the top rear of the router enclosure (see Figure 2-4).
  • Page 113 Site Requirements Guidelines Figure 2-2 Card Cage Fan Tray Captive installation screw Captive installation screw Insertion/extraction tab Air filter assembly Preparing for Installation 2-11...
  • Page 114 Site Requirements Guidelines Figure 2-3 Power Supply Fan Tray Captive installation screw 2-12 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 115: Temperature And Humidity Guidelines

    Figure 2-4 Air filter assembly Ambient air Temperature and Humidity Guidelines For the operating and nonoperating environmental specifications for the Cisco 12008, refer to Table 1-11 in Chapter 1. The router operates within the ranges specified in this table; however, a temperature that approaches a minimum or maximum level indicates a potential problem.
  • Page 116: Power Guidelines

    Site Requirements Guidelines Power Guidelines The Cisco 12008 router can be configured with either AC-input or DC-input power supplies. Combining an AC-input power supply with a DC-input power supply in the same Note router is not allowed. A minimally configured router has one AC-input power supply or one DC-input power supply.
  • Page 117 • Provide a dedicated power source for each AC-input power supply installed in the router. • Install an uninterruptible power source for your site, if possible. • Install proper site grounding facilities to guard against damage from lightning or power surges.
  • Page 118: Dc-Powered Systems

    Site Requirements Guidelines Table 2-1 Label United States Australian European Italian United Kingdom All source AC power cords are 14 feet (4.27 m) in length. Note DC-Powered Systems In a router to be equipped with DC-input power supplies, observe the following guidelines: •...
  • Page 119 Each set of power terminals on the DC-input power supply faceplate consists of two 6-mm, metric-threaded, nickel-plated brass studs centered 0.625 inch apart. The earth ground studs extend 0.52 inch (13.2 mm) above the power supply faceplate; the set of positive (+) and negative (–) studs extend 0.9 inch (22.9 mm) above the faceplate.
  • Page 120: System Ground Connection Guidelines

    Two grounding wires (4 AWG recommended)—The length of the grounding wires depends on the location of your router within the site and its proximity to proper grounding facilities. The grounding wire is not available from Cisco Systems; it is readily available from any commercial cable vendor.
  • Page 121: Site Wiring Guidelines

    Figure 2-7 Site Wiring Guidelines This section presents guidelines for setting up site wiring and cabling for your router. When planning the location for your router, you should take into account the following: • Electromagnetic interference (EMI) • Distance limitations for fiber-optic transmission •...
  • Page 122: Emi Considerations

    Site Wiring Guidelines EMI Considerations When wires are run for any significant distance in an electromagnetic field, interference can occur between the electromagnetic field and the signals on the wires. Be aware of the following points: • Bad site wiring practices can result in the emanation of radio frequency interference (RFI) within the site.
  • Page 123: Synchronous Optical Network Connection Guidelines

    Synchronous Optical Network Connection Guidelines The Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) specification for fiber-optic transmission defines two types of fiber: • Single mode • Multimode Data transmission in either mode occurs by means of bundles of light rays that enter the fiber at a particular angle.
  • Page 124: Power Budget

    Site Wiring Guidelines Power Budget To design an efficient optical data link, you must evaluate the power budget. The power budget represents the amount of light that must be available to overcome attenuation in the optical link and to exceed the minimum power required by the receiver to operate within specifications.
  • Page 125: Approximating The Line Card Power Margin

    Approximating the Line Card Power Margin The LED used for a multimode transmission light source creates multiple propagation paths of light, with each path having a different path length and time requirement to cross the optical fiber. This causes signal dispersion (smear). Higher order loss (HOL) results from light from the LED entering the fiber and being radiated into the fiber cladding.
  • Page 126: Multimode Power Budget Example (With Sufficient Power For Transmission)

    Site Wiring Guidelines Subtracting the data link loss from the power budget should produce a result greater than zero. If a result is less than zero, you may have insufficient power for receiver operation. For SONET line cards, the signal must meet the signal requirements listed in Table 2-6. Table 2-6 Characteristic Minimum transmitter...
  • Page 127: Multimode Power Budget Example Of Dispersion Limit

    Multimode Power Budget Example of Dispersion Limit Below is a multimode power budget example based on the same parameters as in the previous example, but with a multimode link distance of 4 km: PB = 13 dB – 4 km (1.0 dB/km) – 4 (0.5 dB) – 3 (0.5 dB) – 0.5 dB (HOL) – 1 dB (CRM) PB = 13 dB –...
  • Page 128: Using Statistics To Estimate The Power Budget

    Installation Tools Required Estimate the power budget as follows: PB = 11.5 dB – 11 km (0.5 dB/km) – 10 (0.5 dB) PB = 11.5 dB – 5.5 dB – 5 dB PB = 1 dB The resulting power budget (PB) value of 1 dB indicates that this link would have sufficient power for transmission and would not exceed the maximum receiver input power.
  • Page 129: Unpacking The Cisco 12008

    • 9/16-inch wrench (open-end or socket)—for removing the lag bolts from the router shipping pallet • Wire cutters • Pliers Unpacking the Cisco 12008 To unpack your Cisco 12008, use the instructions in the document entitled Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router System Packing and Unpacking Instructions, which was shipped with the router.
  • Page 130: Using A Site Log

    Using a Site Log If you do not receive everything you ordered, contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance. Using a Site Log It is good practice to use a site log to record all actions taken relevant to router operation and maintenance.
  • Page 131 Using a Site Log Figure 2-8 Sample Site Log Date Description of Action Performed or Symptom Observed Initials Preparing for Installation 2-29...
  • Page 132 Using a Site Log 2-30 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 133: Chapter 3 Installing A Cisco 12008

    Installing a Cisco 12008 This chapter presents the procedures for installing and starting the Cisco 12008. It contains the following sections: • Installation Considerations • Installing the Mounting Brackets • Removing Components from the Router • Rack-Mounting the Cisco 12008 •...
  • Page 134: Installation Considerations

    Installation Considerations Installation Considerations The Cisco 12008 offers the following mounting options: • A 2-post, telco-style rack • A 4-post, full-height equipment rack • Shelf-top mounting • Freestanding system The installation procedures presented in this chapter pertain only to the first two of these mounting options.
  • Page 135: Installing The Mounting Brackets

    You must allow at least 24 inches (61 cm) of clearance in front of the router enclosure for installing or replacing line cards, fan trays, and power supplies, and for attaching network interface cables or equipment. You cannot use an AC-input power supply and a DC-input power supply in the Caution same router.
  • Page 136 Installing the Mounting Brackets You can install a single Cisco 12008 at any height in the rack, or you can “stack” as many as three routers in the rack to make maximum use of available rack space. Each installed router requires 25 inches of rack space (63.5 cm). The height of each router is 24.85 inches (63.1 cm), leaving a minimum of tolerance between each rack-mounted router.
  • Page 137 Installing the Mounting Brackets Figure 3-1 Installing the Mounting Brackets (Telco-Style Rack Shown) 1/16" sheet metal 3 3/8" 1 1/4" 2 1/2" 3/4" Left mounting rail Right mounting rail Installing a Cisco 12008 3-5...
  • Page 138: Removing Components From The Router

    Removing Components from the Router Removing Components from the Router For the procedures in this section, it is assumed that you have unpacked the router, as instructed in the document Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router System Packing and Unpacking Instructions posted on the outside of the shipping container. It is assumed further that you have positioned the router near the intended installation site and that you have accomplished all other preparatory installation tasks, as described in Chapter 2, “Preparing for Installation.”...
  • Page 139 Caution As you remove the cards from the upper card cage, place them on antistatic mats for ESD protection until they are reinstalled in the router. Note Each line card has a vertical cable-management bracket affixed to it that enables you to neatly “dress”...
  • Page 140 Removing Components from the Router Go back to Step 3 and repeat the procedure as many times as necessary to completely depopulate the upper card cage. Stack the removed cards on the antistatic mat in their order of removal, thus leaving them properly ordered for later reinstallation. Figure 3-2 1 Loosen captive...
  • Page 141: Removing A Power Supply From The Router

    Removing a Power Supply from the Router The router is shipped with all the circuit boards and the AC-input or the DC-input power supply(ies) already installed, as ordered, but without any cables connected. To remove a power supply from the router, perform the following steps: Set the rotary power switch on each power supply, as follows: Step 1 •...
  • Page 142 Removing Components from the Router Go back to Step 1 and repeat the procedure to remove the second power supply, if one is present. Figure 3-3 Note If you ordered your system with a single AC-input or DC-input power supply, the system arrives with a power supply blank installed in the vacant power supply bay.
  • Page 143: Rack-Mounting The Cisco 12008

    If you intend to use your router with a single power supply of either type, the power supply blank must remain in place at all times for EMI compliance and to ensure that cooling air flows properly through the router. Rack-Mounting the Cisco 12008 This section presents the procedures for mounting the Cisco 12008 in a rack.
  • Page 144 Rack-Mounting the Cisco 12008 Figure 3-4 Note people must support the weight of the router while holding it in position for installation; a third person must then secure the router in the rack using the screws provided in the accessories box. 3-12 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Lifting Handles for the Cisco 12008...
  • Page 145 Figure 3-5 Installing the Router in the Rack Remove the two lifting handles from the side panels of the router before Step 5 attempting to slide the router into the rack. Slide the router into the rack until the rack-mounting flanges on each side of the Step 6 router rest against the rack-mounting posts.
  • Page 146: Reinstalling Components In The Router

    Reinstalling Components in the Router In standard EIA and telco-style racks, the holes in each mounting post should align with the holes in each rack-mounting flange on the router, as follows: • • Thus, to properly secure the router to the mounting posts in a telco-style rack, you should use a total of 8 screws—four per mounting flange.
  • Page 147: Reinstalling The Power Supplies In The Router

    Step 4 Grasp the front edge of the metal card carrier with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support the card’s weight and guide it into the card cage slot. Note cage help you to align the cards properly for insertion. Make sure you properly align the card carrier with these alignment grooves to facilitate card insertion.
  • Page 148 Reinstalling Components in the Router To reinstall a power supply that was removed prior to rack mounting the router, perform the following steps: Step 1 Verify that the rotary power switch on the power supply to be reinstalled is set, as follows: •...
  • Page 149: Connecting The Line Card Cables

    This action engages the blind mating connector at the rear of the power supply with its companion backplane connector. To prevent damage to the backplane, do not use excessive speed or force when Caution sliding the power supply into the bay. Using a flat-blade screwdriver, turn the captive installation screw on the power Step 6 supply faceplate clockwise until it is tight, thus securing the power supply in the...
  • Page 150 Connecting the Line Card Cables To install the network interface cables in the cable-management system and connect the cables to the line cards, perform the following steps: Step 1 Attach an antistatic ESD wrist strap to your wrist; ensure that it makes good contact with your skin.
  • Page 151 Connecting the Line Card Cables Figure 3-6 Attaching Network Interface Cable to Line Card (Cisco 12012 Shown) Chassis cable-management tray Interface cable Line card cable-management bracket Cable clip Cable clips Installing a Cisco 12008 3-19...
  • Page 152: Connecting Route Processor Cables

    Connecting Route Processor Cables When you have completed installing the network interface cables on the left-most line card, proceed to the next card in turn in the upper card cage. Repeat this procedure until you have installed all of the network interface cables on all of the line cards present in the upper card cage.
  • Page 153 (9600 baud). Set up the terminal as follows: 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2). You need an EIA/TIA-232 DCE console cable to connect the terminal to the console port. Cisco Systems does not provide console and auxiliary port cables; cables are available from commercial sources.
  • Page 154: Grp Console Port Signals

    You must provide the EIA/TIA-232 cables to connect the terminal to the GRP console port or other devices to the auxiliary port. Cisco Systems does not provide console and auxiliary port cables; cables are available from other vendors. For compliance with GR- 1089 (intra-building surge), you must use shielded cables on the GRP console and auxiliary ports.
  • Page 155: Grp Auxiliary Port Signals

    GRP Auxiliary Port Signals The auxiliary port on the GRP is a DB-25 plug DTE port for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or other router) to the Cisco 12008. The port is located above the console port on the GRP faceplate. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.
  • Page 156 Connecting Route Processor Cables Note At the auto-sensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port provides maximum usable bandwidth that is less than 100 Mbps; a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 20 Mbps should be expected from either the RJ-45 or MII connections. Transmission speed is determined by the network to which the Ethernet interface is connected and is not user-configurable.
  • Page 157 Depending on the type of media you use between the MII receptacle and your switch or hub, the network side of your 100-Mbps transceiver should be appropriately equipped with ST-type connectors (for optical fiber), BNC connectors, and so forth. Figure 3-9 shows the pin orientation of the female MII receptacle on the Ethernet port. Figure 3-9 Ethernet MII Receptacle Jackscrew...
  • Page 158 Connecting Route Processor Cables Table 3-3 22–39 1, 20, 21, 40 1. Any pins not indicated are not used. 2. Tx_CLK and Rx_CLK are provided by the external transceiver. Table 3-4 Signal TX– Termination Network Termination Network RX– Termination Network Termination Network Figure 3-10 shows the pin orientation of the female RJ-45 receptacle on the Ethernet port.
  • Page 159: Prp Console And Auxiliary Port Connection Guidelines

    Connecting Route Processor Cables Figure 3-10 Ethernet RJ-45 Receptacle 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 RJ-45 connector The ports labeled “Ethernet,” “10BASE-T,” “Token Ring,” “Console,” and Warning “AUX” are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.
  • Page 160 Connecting Route Processor Cables Figure 3-11 Modem Console terminal RJ-45 Ethernet cables The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices Note connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. (Asynchronous is the most common type of serial device; for example, most modems are asynchronous devices.) 3-28 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 161: Prp Console Port Signals

    PRP Console Port Signals The console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle. Table 3-5 lists the signals used on this port. Table 3-5 Console Port Pin 1. These pins are not connected. PRP Auxiliary Port Signals The auxiliary port on the PRP is a DTE, RJ-45 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router.
  • Page 162: Prp Ethernet Connection Equipment

    Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable. The RJ-45 receptacles on the PRP provide two physical connection options for Ethernet interfaces. RJ-45 cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from outside commercial cable vendors. To connect cables to the PRPs Ethernet interfaces (ports labeled ETH0 and ETH1), attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to a RJ-45 receptacle on the PRP.
  • Page 163: Prp Ethernet Connections

    Figure 3-13 shows a PRP RJ-45 receptacle and cable connectors. The RJ-45 connection does not require an external transceiver. The RJ-45 connection requires Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables, which are not available from Cisco Systems, but are available from commercial cable vendors. Table 3-7 lists the pinout for the RJ-45 receptacle.
  • Page 164 Connecting Route Processor Cables Figure 3-13 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 RJ-45 receptacle Warning The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.
  • Page 165 Depending on your RJ-45 cabling requirements, use the cable pinouts shown in Figure 3- 14 or Figure 3-15. Figure 3-14 Straight-Through Cable Pinout (Connecting MDI Ethernet Port to MDI-X Wiring) MDI wiring MDI-X wiring 1 TxD+ 1 RxD+ 2 TxD– 2 RxD–...
  • Page 166: Connecting An External Alarm Monitoring Facility

    Connecting an External Alarm Monitoring Facility Table 3-8 Parameter Cable specification Cable length (max) Segment length (max) Network length (max) 1. EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant. Not supplied by Cisco. 2. AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard. 3.
  • Page 167 The alarm signals sent to this DB-25 connector correspond to those sent to the system alarm LEDs on the CSC faceplate (see Figure 3-16). Thus, a critical, major, or minor alarm condition detected in the router can trigger a simultaneous fault indication in some or all of the following ways: •...
  • Page 168 Connecting an External Alarm Monitoring Facility Figure 3-16 3-36 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide DB-25 Connector and System Alarm LEDs on the CSC DB-25 alarm contact connector Alarm cutoff/lamp test button System alarm LEDs Status LEDs for the CSC Status LEDs for each fan tray Status LEDs for SFCs...
  • Page 169 Figure 3-17 shows an expanded view of the DB-25 connector on the CSC faceplate. Figure 3-17 Expanded View of the DB-25 Connector Pin 25 Alarm Pin 13 input Minor visual contacts Major Critical visual visual contacts contacts Minor Major audible audible contacts contacts...
  • Page 170: Connecting System Ground

    Connecting System Ground Table 3-10 Pin Group Critical audible alarm Major audible alarm Minor audible alarm Critical visible alarm Major visible alarm Minor visible alarm Alarm input Only safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the DB-25 Note connector.
  • Page 171 These grounding lugs are not available from Cisco Systems; they are common items that can be obtained from any electrical equipment vendor, such as Panduit. • Four Phillips head, M6 (metric) machine screws with locking washers and nuts—This mounting hardware is not available from Cisco Systems; it can be obtained readily from any commercial electrical equipment vendor.
  • Page 172 Connecting System Ground Figure 3-18 3-40 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Connecting System Ground on the Cisco 12008 Screws Grounding lug Wire Side panel of router Grounding holes (2) appear on each side panel of router System grounding receptacles...
  • Page 173: Connecting Source Power To The Power Supplies

    Step 6 Place the grounding lug against the grounding receptacle on the side panel of the router. Step 7 Insert two screws through the holes in the grounding lug and the grounding receptacle. Ensure that the grounding lug will not interfere with other router hardware or rack equipment.
  • Page 174: Connecting Source Power To An Ac-Input Power Supply

    Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Note You should not install two power supplies of either type unless you intend to use both units. In other words, you should not install two power supplies and power the router with only one of the units. Powering the router with a single power supply while using the other bay to “store”...
  • Page 175 To connect source power to an AC-input power supply, perform the following steps: Step 1 Verify that the rotary power switch on the power supply is in the Standby (OFF) position. A power supply bay not occupied by a power supply must have a power Note supply blank installed for EMI compliance and to ensure proper airflow through the router.
  • Page 176 Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Step 5 Connect the other end of the AC power cord to the source AC outlet for your site (see Figure 3-19). Step 6 Go back to Step 1 and repeat the procedure to connect source AC power to the second (redundant) AC-input power supply, if one is present.
  • Page 177 Figure 3-19 INPUT OUTP UT FAIL Connect power cord Turn on the source AC circuit breaker that services the AC-input power Step 7 supply(ies). Before applying power to your Cisco 12008, go to the section entitled “Starting the Cisco 12008.” Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Connecting a Source AC Power Cord to an AC-Input Power Supply Attach bail latch...
  • Page 178: Connecting Source Power To A Dc-Input Power Supply

    Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Connecting Source Power to a DC-Input Power Supply In the following procedure, you are assumed to have a DC-input power supply already installed in your router; you need to connect it to a DC power source. If a DC-input power supply is not already installed, perform the procedures in the earlier section entitled “Reinstalling the Power Supplies in the Router”...
  • Page 179 Also, before attempting to connect source power to a DC-input power supply, review the content of the section in Chapter 2 entitled “DC-Powered Systems,” which deals with the following topics: • Specifications for source DC input power (see Table 1-10 in Chapter 1) •...
  • Page 180 Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Note DC-input power supply depends on the scheme used for the site DC power source. Typically, green or green/yellow is used for earth ground, red is used for positive (+), and black is used for negative (–). Make certain that you properly map the color coding scheme used at the site for the DC power source to the proper terminals on the DC-input power supply faceplate.
  • Page 181 Figure 3-20 Plant Controls B a t t e r y LTER Connecting Source Power to the Power Supplies Connecting Source DC Power Cables to a DC-Input Power Supply p l a n t CAUTION INPUT OUTPU T FAIL 48 VDC Central office primary...
  • Page 182: Starting The Cisco 12008

    Starting the Cisco 12008 Step 7 If you intend to attach an external alarm monitoring facility to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the power supply, do so at this time. For an illustration of how the leads from the alarm monitoring facility are connected to the alarm terminal block, refer to Figure 7-9 in the section entitled “Adding a DC-Input Power Supply”...
  • Page 183 To start up your Cisco 12008, perform the following steps: Step 1 Verify that the following conditions are satisfied: • Each line card is fully seated and its captive installation screws are tightened. • The RP is fully seated and its captive installation screws are tightened. •...
  • Page 184 Starting the Cisco 12008 • Step 3 Listen for the fans in the card cage fan tray and the power supply fan tray to power up. You should hear the fans come up to normal rotational speed in about 2 seconds. In a noisy environment, you can check fan operation by placing your hand in front of the air filter assembly and the power supply fan tray to determine if air is being drawn into the interior of the router.
  • Page 185: Chapter 4 Observing System Startup And Performing A Basic Configuration

    Observing System Startup and Performing a Basic Configuration This chapter describes the initial system startup process and provides procedures for performing a basic configuration for your Cisco 12008. This chapter contains the following sections: • Sources of Cisco IOS Software •...
  • Page 186: Sources Of Cisco Ios Software

    Sources of Cisco IOS Software This chapter will help you to • Configure your router so that it can access the network • Enable other hosts in the network to remotely access your system by means of a Telnet connection Detailed configuration procedures for all of the line cards and network interfaces that you can install in your Cisco 12008 are beyond the scope of this document.
  • Page 187: Checking Conditions Prior To System Startup

    Checking Conditions Prior to System Startup Before attempting to start up your system, verify that the following conditions exist: • All line cards in the upper card cage are fully inserted into their slots; all captive installation screws on the line cards are tightened. •...
  • Page 188: Starting The System And Observing Initial Conditions

    Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions This section describes the initial system startup processes and procedures. To start up your Cisco 12008, perform the following steps: Apply power to each installed power supply by turning its rotary power switch Step 1 fully clockwise to the ON (|) position.
  • Page 189 Figure 4-1 RP Alphanumeric LEDs (Partial Faceplate View) Upper alphanumeric LED display (four digits) Lower alphanumeric LED display (four digits) Table 4-1 Typical Contents of the RP Alphanumeric LEDs LED Display Meaning MROM The MBus microcode begins to execute; nnnn is the nnnn microcode version number.
  • Page 190 Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions Step 4 During the line card boot process, which occurs immediately following that of the RP, observe the alphanumeric LEDs on each line card. The alphanumeric LEDs on a line card are also located at the bottom of the line card faceplate (see Figure 4-2).
  • Page 191 Table 4-2 Typical Contents of the Line Card Alphanumeric LEDs Line Card LED Display Meaning MROM The MBus microcode begins to execute; nnnn is the nnnn microcode version number. For example, microcode version 1.17 would display as 0117. might not be visible, since it occurs briefly. LMEM Low memory on the line card is being tested.
  • Page 192 Starting the System and Observing Initial Conditions Note If a Flash memory card containing a valid Cisco IOS software image is inserted in PCMCIA slot 0 and the software configuration register is set to 0x0102 (the factory default setting), the system automatically boots using this image. The system then enters the setup facility, prompting you to perform a basic system configuration by means of an interactive script (see Step 9).
  • Page 193 Step 6 To locate a desired Cisco IOS software image for manually booting the router from the ROM monitor prompt ( onboard Flash memory SIMM (NVRAM) on the RP by issuing the directory command: rommon 1> dir bootflash: File size 3277967 bytes (0x32048f) rommon 2>...
  • Page 194 Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-MZ), Released Version 11.2(8)GS Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Sat 10-May-97 06:02a Observe the system startup banner. When you first start up an unconfigured system, it automatically enters the setup facility.
  • Page 195: Configuring The Cisco 12008

    The system asks you if you want to continue with the configuration dialog. If you answer yes, the system proceeds with the interactive script for the setup facility. If you answer no, the system exits from the setup facility. In this case, you must issue configuration commands at the console terminal to configure the system and network interface parameters.
  • Page 196 Configuring the Cisco 12008 You can perform a basic configuration for your Cisco 12008 using either of the following methods: • Method 1—Using the setup facility or the setup command. At initial startup of a completely unconfigured router, the system automatically defaults to the setup facility, which enables you to begin manually configuring your router.
  • Page 197: Using The Setup Facility Or The Setup Command

    Using the Setup Facility or the Setup Command You must consider the following types of parameters during the initial manual configuration of your router: • Global (system-wide) parameters • Network interface (line card) parameters As noted earlier, you can establish the above parameters using the setup facility (as presented to you automatically at initial system startup), or you can issue the setup command at any time at the privileged EXEC prompt ( facility.
  • Page 198: Configuring Global Parameters

    After about 30 seconds, the following display appears on the console, indicating that you have successfully booted the system: System Bootstrap, Version 11.2(8)GS [biff 571], RELEASED SOFTWARE Copyright (c) 1994-1997 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Restricted Rights Legend Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is...
  • Page 199 2 four-port OC3 POS controllers (8 POS). 5 OC12 POS controllers (5 POS). 1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) 13 Packet over Sonet network interface(s) 507K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory. 20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K). 8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
  • Page 200 Configuring the Cisco 12008 Pressing Return in either case accepts the default response [yes]. The following sample display results from a yes response to the current interface summary query that is entered while you are using the setup facility. The display shows that no interfaces have been configured: Interface IP-Address...
  • Page 201 A typical minimum configuration procedure using IP follows and continues through Step 8: Configuring global parameters: Enter host name [Router]: Router Enter the enable secret password when prompted to do so: Step 5 The enable secret is a one-way cryptographic secret used instead of the enable password when it exists.
  • Page 202 Configuring the Cisco 12008 In either case, you cannot use a number as the first character. Spaces, however, are valid password characters. For example, “two words” is a valid password. Leading spaces are ignored, but trailing spaces are recognized. Enter the virtual terminal password when prompted to do so: Step 7 Enter virtual terminal password: bambam For future use, make a note of this password.
  • Page 203: Sample Display Of Global Parameters

    Note SNMP provides a means to access and set configuration and run-time parameters and to monitor and control network elements for routers and communication servers. For more information about SNMP, refer to the appropriate software configuration publications listed in the section entitled “If You Need More Configuration Information.”...
  • Page 204: Configuring Network Interfaces

    Configuring the Cisco 12008 The display indicates the order in which the parameters and their defaults appear on your console terminal. Configuring global parameters: Enter host name: Router Enter enable secret: barney Enter enable password: wilma Enter virtual terminal password: bambam Configure IP?: yes Configure IGRP routing?: yes Your IGRP autonomous system number [1]: 199...
  • Page 205 Note The sample configuration dialog in this section continues the script displayed when you used the setup facility or the setup command in establishing the system’s global parameters (see the section entitled “Configuring Global Parameters”). The output shown in this section is only an example; your configuration dialog might be different, depending on how you configure your router.
  • Page 206 Configuring the Cisco 12008 Also, consider Step 3 below, which shows this same Quad OC-3c POS line card interface being configured for IP unnumbered; perform whichever step is appropriate to your configuration requirements. Configuring interface POS4/0: Note default. Note For more complete POS interface configuration information, refer to the documents entitled Quad OC-3c/STM-1c Packet-Over-SONET Line Card Installation and Configuration (document number 78-4333-02) and OC-12c/ STM-4c Packet-Over-SONET Line Card Installation and Configuration...
  • Page 207 Repeat Step 2 or Step 3, as required, to individually configure each port on every Quad OC-3c POS line card installed in your system. If you have an ATM line card installed in your router, proceed with Step 4; otherwise, skip to Step 5. Configure the ATM line card interface(s).
  • Page 208 Configuring the Cisco 12008 Step 5 When you have completed entering the configuration information for all of the installed line cards, the following configuration query is displayed: Use this configuration? [yes/no]: At this point, you should visually verify all of the configuration parameters displayed on your console terminal.
  • Page 209: Checking The Software Version Number And The Installed Interfaces

    Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-MZ), Released Version 11.2(8)GS [biff- bfr_112] Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 25-Aug-97 20:13 by biff Image text-base: 0x60010900, data-base: 0x604FE000 ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 11.2(8)GS [biff-bfr_112], RELEASED SOFTWARE BOOTFLASH: GS Software (GSR-BOOT-M), Released Version 11.2(8)GS [biff-...
  • Page 210: Using The Global Configuration Mode

    Configuring the Cisco 12008 20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K). 8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K). Configuration register is 0x0102 Using the Global Configuration Mode If you prefer not to use the interactive script of the setup facility, you can manually configure your router using the global configuration mode.
  • Page 211: Verifying The Running Configuration Settings

    At the global configuration mode prompt, enter the interface type slot/port command to enter the interface configuration mode: Router(config)# interface type slot/port Router(config-if)# This command accepts either POS or ATM as the type argument. In either the global configuration mode or the interface configuration mode, you can change the router’s configuration parameters.
  • Page 212: Example Of Running Configuration Settings For Quad Oc-3 Pos Interface

    Configuring the Cisco 12008 Example of Running Configuration Settings for Quad OC-3 POS Interface The show running-config command typically displays output in the following form for a Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS interface installed in slot 7: Ohm#sh run Building configuration... Current configuration: version 11.2 no service pad no service udp-small-servers...
  • Page 213: Example Of Running Configuration Settings For Oc-12 Pos Interface

    Example of Running Configuration Settings for OC-12 POS Interface The show running-config command typically displays output in the following form for an OC-12 POS interface installed in slot 6: Turing#sh run Building configuration... Current configuration: version 11.2 no service pad no service udp-small-servers no service tcp-small-servers hostname Turing...
  • Page 214: Saving The Running Configuration Settings To Nvram

    Configuring the Cisco 12008 no service tcp-small-servers hostname Turing -------------! enable password lab no ip domain-lookup ip host ray 172.27.136.253 ip host crusty 171.69.209.28 interface POS6/0 ip address 12.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 crc 32 Saving the Running Configuration Settings to NVRAM To save the running configuration settings to NVRAM, enter the following command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt ( Router# copy running-config startup-config As an alternative, you can also use the following command to save the running...
  • Page 215: Reviewing The Running Configuration Settings

    Reviewing the Running Configuration Settings To display the running configuration settings stored in NVRAM, issue the show startup- config command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. This command displays output in the following form: Router# show startup-config Using 1133 out of 520184 bytes version 11.2 no service udp-small-servers no service tcp-small-servers...
  • Page 216 Configuring the Cisco 12008 no cdp enable interface ATM4/0 ip address 15.0.0.15 255.0.0.0 secondary ip address 1.1.1.2 255.0.0.0 atm pvc 1 0 64 aal5snap atm pvc 2 0 72 aal5mux ip 155000 155000 1 atm pvc 3 1 90 aal5snap 312000 312000 1 atm pvc 4 0 108 aal5snap atm pvc 10 0 144 aal5mux ip 155000 155000 1 atm pvc 11 1 91 aal5snap 310000 310000 1...
  • Page 217: Performing Other Configuration Tasks

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks This section presents procedures for performing the following additional configuration tasks: • Configuring the Software Configuration Register • Recovering a Lost Password • Using Flash Memory Cards in the RP Configuring the Software Configuration Register The software configuration register is a 16-bit register in NVRAM that you use to define specific system parameters.You can set or change the contents of this register to accomplish the following tasks: •...
  • Page 218 Performing Other Configuration Tasks • Force an automatic boot using a boot image. When you first power on the router, a boot image called the RP ROM monitor is executed, resulting in the display of the ROM monitor prompt ( prompt, you have access to a limited set of commands that enable you to set values in the software configuration register and to perform a number of other tasks.
  • Page 219 Table 4-3 Definition of Bits in the Software Configuration Register (Continued) Bit Number Hexadecimal Value 11 and 12 0x0800 to 0x1000 0x2000 0x4000 0x8000 1. OEM stands for original equipment manufacturer. Table 4-4 specifies the content of the boot field, which defines a source for booting the default Cisco IOS software image required to run the router.
  • Page 220: Boot Field Settings And The Use Of The Boot Command

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks Boot Field Settings and the Use of the Boot Command The four low-order bits of the software configuration register (bits 3, 2, 1, and 0) form a boot field that defines the source of a Cisco IOS software image for booting the router. You can set or change the contents of the boot field by issuing the config-register command at the global configuration mode prompt [ The factory default setting for the software configuration register (and RP spares) is...
  • Page 221 • When the boot field is set to 1, the system automatically boots using the first image found in the onboard Flash SIMM on the RP. If you set the boot field to any bit pattern other than 0 or 1, the router uses the software configuration register settings to compute a filename from which to boot a default system image stored on a network TFTP server.
  • Page 222: Changing The Software Configuration Register Settings

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks Note If a bootable Cisco IOS software image exists in a Flash memory card inserted in PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1, the software configuration register boot field setting is overridden and the system boots from the Cisco IOS software image in the Flash memory card, rather than from a network TFTP image (that is, from a computed filename in the range from cisco2-grp through cisco17-grp).
  • Page 223: Meaning Of Bits In The Software Configuration Register

    The new contents of the software configuration register are saved to NVRAM. However, these new settings do not take effect until you reload the system or reboot the router. To display the software configuration register setting that is currently in effect as Step 5 a result of Step 3 (and which will be used at the next reboot of the router), issue the show version command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt:...
  • Page 224 Performing Other Configuration Tasks If you set the boot field value to 0x2 through 0xF and a valid boot system command is stored in the configuration file, the system boots the Cisco IOS software image as directed by that value. If no boot system command is present in the configuration file, the system computes a default boot filename for booting from a network TFTP server.
  • Page 225 Table 4-5 Default Boot Filenames Computed from Boot Field Bits Action/File Name Bit 3 Bit 2 Bit 1 Bit 0 Bootstrap mode Default software cisco2-grp or cisco2-prp cisco3-grp or cisco3-prp cisco4-grp or cisco4-prp cisco5-grp or cisco5-prp cisco6-grp or cisco6-prp cisco7-grp or cisco7-prp cisco10-grp or cisco10-prp cisco11-grp or cisco11-prp cisco12-grp or cisco12-prp...
  • Page 226 Performing Other Configuration Tasks Bit 10 of the software configuration register controls the host portion of the IP broadcast address. Setting bit 10 causes the processor to use all zeros in the host portion of the IP broadcast address; clearing bit 10 (the factory default) causes the processor to use all ones. Bit 10 interacts with bit 14, which controls the network and subnet portions of the IP broadcast address.
  • Page 227: Recovering A Lost Password

    bit 13 causes the system to continue attempting to load a boot file from the network TFTP server indefinitely. By default, bit 13 in the software configuration register is set to 0 at the factory prior to router shipment. Table 4-3 summarizes the functions of all of the bits in the software configuration register. Recovering a Lost Password This section tells you how to recover a lost password.
  • Page 228 Performing Other Configuration Tasks Step 3 Enter the show version command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt to display the current software configuration register setting: Router#show version Make a note of this current configuration setting, as displayed in the last line of the show version command output.
  • Page 229 Configuration Summary enabled are: console baud: 9600 boot: image specified by the boot system command or default to: cisco2-grp do you wish to change the configuration? y/n [n] You must reset or power cycle for the new config to take effect Initialize the router by entering the initialize command at the ROM monitor Step 7 prompt:...
  • Page 230: Using Flash Memory Cards In The Rp

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks Step 11 Enter the show start-up config command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt to display the enable password in the configuration file: Router# Issue the configure terminal command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt to Step 12 enter the global configuration mode: Router# configure terminal...
  • Page 231: Installing And Removing A Flash Memory Card In A Rp

    • Copying Files to a Flash Memory Medium • Copying a Cisco IOS Software Image onto a Flash Memory Card • Copying Cisco IOS Software Images between Flash Memory Cards • Copying System Configuration Files between RP Memory and a Flash Memory Card •...
  • Page 232 Performing Other Configuration Tasks Figure 4-3 Installing and Removing a Flash Memory Card 4-48 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 233: Formatting A Flash Memory Card

    Formatting a Flash Memory Card The Flash memory card that shipped with your router contains the default Cisco IOS image for booting your router. In some cases, you might need to insert a new Flash memory card and copy images or backup configuration files to the card.
  • Page 234: Specifying A Cisco Ios Image For Booting The System

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks The new Flash memory card is now ready for use. Specifying a Cisco IOS Image for Booting the System Use the procedure in this section to identify a particular Cisco IOS software image (named new.image) that is to be made bootable from a Flash memory card. The software configuration register must be set to “0x2102”...
  • Page 235: Console Commands Associated With Flash Memory Use

    Console Commands Associated with Flash Memory Use This section outlines the console commands for using the onboard Flash memory SIMM on the RP and the PCMCIA Flash memory cards. To determine the type of Flash memory medium currently in effect for access, issue the pwd command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Router# pwd slot0...
  • Page 236 Performing Other Configuration Tasks An example of deleting the file fun1 from the current Flash memory directory follows: Router# delete fun1 Router# dir -#- -length- -----date/time------ name 4601977 Files that are deleted from the current Flash memory directory are marked as such, but they still occupy space in the Flash memory directory.
  • Page 237: Enabling Booting From Flash Memory

    Note During the squeeze operation, the system maintains a log identifying which of the squeeze functions has been accomplished so that the system can return to the proper place and continue the operation in the event of a power failure. The character “Z”...
  • Page 238: Copying Files To A Flash Memory Medium

    Performing Other Configuration Tasks Copying Files to a Flash Memory Medium It is a good idea to copy a new Cisco IOS software image to a Flash memory medium (1) when a new image becomes available or (2) when you want to back up the image. The information in this section enables you to copy any type of file to the Flash memory SIMM on the RP or to a PCMCIA Flash memory card inserted in either slot 0 or slot 1.
  • Page 239: Copying A Cisco Ios Software Image Onto A Flash Memory Card

    Typical output generated by a copy tftp:filename command follows: Router# copy tftp:myfile1 slot0:myfile1 20575008 bytes available on device slot0, proceed? [confirm] Address or name of remote host [1.1.1.1]? Loading new.image from 1.1.1.1 (via Ethernet0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Page 240 Performing Other Configuration Tasks The following assumptions apply for the Flash memory card copying procedures in this section: • You have a formatted Flash memory card inserted in a PCMCIA slot in the RP. • You know the name of the file you want to copy to the Flash memory card. •...
  • Page 241: Copying Cisco Ios Software Images Between Flash Memory Cards

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [OK - 7799951/15599616 bytes] CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCC Router# In this example, the exclamation points (!!!) appear as the source file is being downloaded (copied) to the destination device. The “C” characters indicate that a CRC is being calculated during the downloading process. The CRC verifies that the file has been correctly copied to the destination device (the Flash memory card inserted in PCMCIA slot 0).
  • Page 242 Performing Other Configuration Tasks Note In this procedure, it is assumed that the new Cisco IOS software image will fit on the old Flash memory card inserted in slot 0, together with the old image. If sufficient space is not available for both images on the old Flash memory card, use the delete command to delete files from the old Flash memory card;...
  • Page 243: Copying System Configuration Files Between Rp Memory And A Flash Memory Card

    Router# copy slot1:image.new slot0:image.new You can also enter this command in the following form to achieve the same result: Router# copy slot1:image.new slot0: In the latter case, the name of the file is carried along with the copied image. Issue the following commands to designate the file named image.new (in the Step 5 Flash memory card in slot 0) as the new default system image for boot purposes: Router# config t...
  • Page 244 Performing Other Configuration Tasks Copying a Configuration File from NVRAM to a Flash Memory Card To copy a configuration file from NVRAM to a Flash memory card, perform the following steps: Issue the show boot command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt to display Step 1 the current setting for the environmental variable CONFIG_FILE: Router# show boot...
  • Page 245 CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCC Router# In this example, the exclamation points (!!!) appear as the file is being Note copied. The “C” characters signify the calculation of the CRC. The CRC verifies that the file has been copied correctly. To further verify that the configuration file was copied correctly to the Flash Step 3 memory card inserted in slot 0, issue the directory command: Router# dir slot0:...
  • Page 246 Performing Other Configuration Tasks To initiate the copy operation, issue the following command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Router# copy running-config slot0:myfile2 20575008 bytes available on device slot0, proceed? [confirm] Address or name of remote host [1.1.1.1]? Loading new.image from 1.1.1.1 (via Ethernet0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Page 247: Recovering From Locked Blocks In Flash Memory Cards

    Copying a Configuration File from a Flash Memory Card to NVRAM To copy a configuration file from a Flash memory card inserted in PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1 to NVRAM, perform the following steps: Issue the command for copying a configuration file from a Flash memory card Step 1 to NVRAM.
  • Page 248: What To Do Next

    What to Do Next? When a block of Flash memory is locked, it cannot be written to or erased. Any attempt to do so will consistently fail at the blocked location. What to Do Next? After you have installed the Cisco 12008, checked all external connections, turned on system power, allowed the system to boot up, and minimally configured the system, you might need to perform additional configuration tasks.
  • Page 249 • For systems with Cisco IOS Release 11.2(8)GS or later, refer to the following modular configuration and command reference publications, as appropriate, for your system configuration: — Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide — Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference — Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide —...
  • Page 250 If You Need More Configuration Information • For additional information about the GRP, refer to the configuration note Gigabit Route Processor Installation and Configuration (document number 78-4339-02) that shipped with your GRP. • For additional PRP information, refer to the configuration note Performance Route Processor (PRP) Installation and Configuration (Document Number 78-13302-xx) that accompanied your PRP.
  • Page 251: Chapter 5 Troubleshooting The Installation

    Troubleshooting the Installation Your Cisco 12008 was subjected to extensive testing and burn-in before being shipped from the factory. However, if you encounter problems starting up the router, the information in this chapter will help you to isolate the probable cause. This chapter contains the following sections: •...
  • Page 252: Troubleshooting Overview

    Troubleshooting Overview If you cannot solve a problem, contact a customer service representative for assistance. When you call, have the following information at hand: • Date you received the router and the chassis serial number • Line card configuration (the line cards installed in your system) •...
  • Page 253 Table 5-1 Status of Alphanumeric Displays and LEDs at System Startup Card LED Function LED alphanumeric displays Line card LED alphanumeric displays CSC(s) System alarm LEDs CSC Status LEDs FAN FAIL Status LEDs SFC Status LEDs AC-input Power status LEDs power supply DC-input Power status LEDs...
  • Page 254: Problem Solving Using A Subsystem Approach

    Troubleshooting Overview Problem Solving Using a Subsystem Approach The key to solving system problems is to try to isolate the difficulty to a specific subsystem. The first step in solving startup problems, for example, is to compare what the system is doing to what it should be doing.
  • Page 255 Troubleshooting Overview Each fan tray incorporates individual fans that draw +24 VDC from a DC-DC converter on the CSC that operates under control of its onboard MBus module. Both fan trays should begin to operate about two seconds after application of system power. The fan trays incorporate a variable-speed feature, enabling the fans to run at a slower speed (when the internal chassis temperature remains within the normal operating range) or to run at a higher speed (when the internal temperature of the router exceeds...
  • Page 256: Identifying Startup Problems

    Troubleshooting Overview • Processor subsystem—The processor subsystem includes the RP and all installed line cards. Each line card has an onboard processor, to which the RP downloads a copy of the Cisco IOS operating image. A line card or RP that is not firmly seated in the backplane might cause the system to hang and crash.
  • Page 257: Power Supply Status Leds

    • The MBus module on the RP monitors the progress of the CSC power-up sequence. When the CSC is powered up, the MBus module on the RP turns on its DC-DC converter to power its own electronics. • The master MBus module on the RP then sends instructions to each line card and each SFC to power up;...
  • Page 258 Troubleshooting Overview If this LED does not go on, or if it goes off while system power is still applied, there could be a problem with either the source power itself or the DC output voltages being delivered to the backplane (+5 VDC and –48 VDC). There could also just be a problem with the MBus controller inside the power supply.
  • Page 259 — If the AC INPUT OK LED (on the AC-input power supply) or the INPUT OK LED (on the DC-input power supply) goes on, and the system starts up as expected but then displays the following message and shuts down after 2 minutes, there may be a problem with one of the fan trays.
  • Page 260: Troubleshooting The Power Subsystem

    Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem The power subsystem in the Cisco 12008 consists of the following: • AC-input or DC-input power supply(ies) • MBus modules on the individual cards • DC-DC converters on the individual cards • Power distribution system in the Cisco 12008 (see Figure 1-23) Each power supply provides +5.2 VDC and –48 VDC output voltages to the backplane.
  • Page 261 — If the answer is no, but the fan trays are operating and the alphanumeric displays on the RP and line cards are functional, the likely suspect is a faulty power supply LED. The MBus modules driving the alphanumeric displays are powered by +5.2 VDC from the power supply.
  • Page 262: Troubleshooting The Processor Subsystem

    Troubleshooting the Processor Subsystem • In systems powered by source DC, check the cable connections to the terminal studs on the DC-input power supply faceplate to ensure that the correct polarity (+ and –) has been observed in making the connections. •...
  • Page 263: Troubleshooting The Rp

    The MBus module processor begins to operate as soon as power is applied to the system. The MBus processor determines what type of card it is mounted on and whether it should turn on the card’s DC-DC converter. The master MBus module on the RP turns on card power after a brief delay;...
  • Page 264 Troubleshooting the Processor Subsystem Some messages appear briefly (millisecond duration), and others last several seconds. If one of the messages appears frozen, the boot process could be hung. Note the message being displayed on a piece of paper. Turn off the system power supply power switches, then turn them back on to reset the system and start the boot process anew.
  • Page 265: Troubleshooting The Line Cards

    • Is a critical, major, or minor alarm LED on the CSC(s) on? — If any one of the three system alarm LEDs is on, a fault has been detected in the system. Check the console for messages indicating the source of the problem. —...
  • Page 266 Troubleshooting the Processor Subsystem process continues on the line card. Table 5-3 lists the messages that appear in the line card alphanumeric display. Some messages are displayed for only a few milliseconds, and others are displayed for several seconds. Table 5-3 Top Display LROM EXPT...
  • Page 267: Csc Alarm Functions

    CSC Alarm Functions The CSC incorporates the following system and component alarm functions: • Primary system alarm functions—The system’s primary alarm LEDs are incorporated into the CSC faceplate (see Figure 3-16). From top to bottom, these LEDs correspond to three levels of severity for system alarm conditions: critical, major, and minor. •...
  • Page 268 Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem • Power supply fan tray—This fan tray is mounted in the lower right corner of the router enclosure. Each fan tray operates from +24 VDC that is distributed to it through the backplane from a DC-DC converter on the CSC. A recessed, blind-mating connector in the back of each fan tray provides connectivity to the backplane.
  • Page 269 Tighten the fan tray captive installation screws. Reinstall the air filter assembly. If the left fan tray LED remains on after reseating the card cage fan tray, the unit is faulty and should be replaced. If the right fan tray LED on the CSC faceplate is on (amber), reseat the power supply fan tray in the backplane, as follows: Loosen the captive installation screw on the fan tray faceplate.
  • Page 270: Additional Troubleshooting Reference Information

    Additional Troubleshooting Reference Information +3.3 VDC and +5 VDC from the DC-DC converter, the +5.2 VDC for the MBus module, and the operating voltage for the fan trays. Each command also displays the temperature measurements made by two sensors on each card (one for inlet air temperature and one for the card’s hot-spot temperature), as well as a temperature measurement made by a sensor in the power supply(ies).
  • Page 271: Chapter 6 Running Diagnostics On The Cisco 12008

    Running Diagnostics on the Cisco 12008 Field diagnostics are available for the Cisco 12008 to help you isolate faulty hardware to the level of a field-replaceable unit (FRU) without disrupting the operation of the system. After you identify the faulty unit, you can replace it with a spare unit. Field diagnostics are not designed to identify specific components within the router.
  • Page 272: Using The Diag Command

    Using the diag Command Note When using Cisco IOS Release 12.0(21)S or 12.0(21)ST, or a later release of 12.0S or 12.0ST, the default download method changes from the mbus to the switch fabric. It takes about 1-minute to obtain test results from the switch fabric compared to 15-minutes to obtain test results from the mbus.
  • Page 273: Diagnostic Testing Sequence

    where: slot halt previous mbus verbose wait (Continue on error) 1. Using this option results in a 15-minute delay before test results are returned. This command option is available when using Cisco IOS Release 12.0(21)S or 12.0(21)ST, or a later release of 12.0S or 12.0ST. 2.
  • Page 274: Loading And Running Diagnostics

    Loading and Running Diagnostics Downloads a diagnostic image from the RPs running IOS software to the line card before testing. The Cisco IOS software image is removed from the line card DRAM and is replaced with the diagnostic software image for the duration of the tests. Sends and receives messages across the MBus to and from the card being tested.
  • Page 275: Diagnostic Examples

    Step 2 Enter the password assigned to the system. The prompt changes to the privileged EXEC prompt: Router# Determine the slot number of the card on which you want to run diagnostics. Step 3 Although you can run diagnostics concurrently on up to three line cards, the Note recommended number is only one at a time.
  • Page 276: Without Verbose Option

    Loading and Running Diagnostics Without verbose Option To see how the verbose option changes the messages from the diagnostics to the console, refer to the following examples. In the first example, diagnostics are run on a line card installed in slot 2 in the card cage. The diagnostics are run without the verbose option set (minimum messaging).
  • Page 277: With Verbose Option

    SLOT 2:%SYS-5-RESTART: System restarted -- Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-MZ), Released Version 12.0(n)GS Copyright (c) 1986-2000 by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Fri 17-Sep-00 17:58 by ... Router# The messages in the lines shown above indicate that the diagnostics software is automatically terminated and the line card is reloaded and restarted.
  • Page 278 SLOT 2:%SYS-5-RESTART: System restarted -- Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-MZ), Released Version 12.0(n)GS Copyright (c) 1986-2000 by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Fri 17-Sep-00 17:58 by ... Router# When you set the verbose option, most of the information returned by the diagnostic tests is status messages that indicate when tests start and when they are completed.
  • Page 279: Failed Diagnostic

    Failed Diagnostic If a diagnostic test fails on a line card, testing halts with that test. The line card will not reload or come back online automatically. The following example shows a diagnostic message stream to the console for a line card located in slot 7. In the example, the card fails one of the diagnostic tests, stopping the diagnostic cycle on that test.
  • Page 280 Loading and Running Diagnostics Note The DRAM is the only field-replaceable component on a line card; therefore, if a diagnostic test fails, you must replace the line card, which is the field-replaceable unit (FRU). 6-10 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 281: Chapter 7 Maintaining The Cisco 12008

    Maintaining the Cisco 12008 After your Cisco 12008 has been operational for a period of time, you might need to perform specific maintenance tasks, replace certain field replaceable units (FRUs), upgrade memory components, or perform other tasks to ensure that the router continues to operate properly and reliably.
  • Page 282: Cleaning The Air Filter

    Cleaning the Air Filter Cleaning the Air Filter The Cisco 12008 has a removable air filter assembly that forms part of the outer enclosure of the lower card cage (see Figure 7-1). This card cage accommodates a fan tray containing six fans that provide cooling air for all of the router’s internal electronic circuitry, including all of the cards installed in the upper card cage slots and the optional set of three SFCs that you can install in the lower card cage slots.
  • Page 283 Step 2 Inspect the condition of the air filter and decide if it should be removed and cleaned. Step 3 To remove the filter, slide it off the two panel fasteners (see Figure 7-1). Exercise care to prevent damage to the honeycomb screen in the EMI frame. Caution Damage to the honeycomb screen might reduce its EMI suppression characteristics and restrict the flow of cooling air through the router.
  • Page 284 Cleaning the Air Filter Figure 7-1 Removing and Replacing the Air Filter Assembly EMI frame Panel fasteners (2) Spring clips(4) Replaceable air filter Plastic bezel Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 285: Installing And Removing A Blank Filler Panel

    Installing and Removing a Blank Filler Panel The Cisco 12008 must be fully enclosed to ensure that cooling air is circulated properly throughout the interior of the router. Fully enclosing the router prevents overheating of electronic components in the upper and lower card cages and suppresses EMI radiation. To cover any vacant slot in the upper card cage of the Cisco 12008, you must install a blank filler panel (see Figure 7-2).
  • Page 286 Installing and Removing a Blank Filler Panel Figure 7-2 Tighten captive installation screws (top and bottom) Blank filler card Grasp card carrier and insert into vacant slot Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Installing a Blank Filler Panel in the Upper Card Cage...
  • Page 287: Adding, Removing, Or Replacing An Ac-Input Power Supply

    Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply The Cisco 12008 can operate with either one or two AC-input power supplies. Although the router supports an online insertion and removal (OIR) capability for field replaceable units (FRUs), you must observe the following rules regarding the AC-input power supplies: •...
  • Page 288 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply Note It is recommended that you connect each AC-input power supply to an independent source of power with a 20A service. It is also recommended that you use an uninterruptable power source (UPS) for your site to protect against a site power failure. To add a second (redundant) AC-input power supply to the router, perform the following steps: Locate the source AC circuit breaker that will service the AC-input power...
  • Page 289 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply Figure 7-3 Faceplate of the AC-Input Power Supply Rotary power switch THIS UNIT MAY HAVE MORE THAN ONE POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION. ALL CONNECTIONS NEED TO BE REMOVED TO DE-ENERGIZE THE Carrying handle UNIT.
  • Page 290 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply Caution To prevent damage to the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply, do not use excessive speed or force when inserting the power supply into the bay. Note All necessary electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply.
  • Page 291: Removing An Ac-Input Power Supply

    Figure 7-4 Connect power cord Removing an AC-Input Power Supply For the following procedure, it is assumed that you will remove an AC-input power supply from a Cisco 12008 that is equipped with a single such unit. In this case, you must power down the router before removing the power supply.
  • Page 292 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply It is also assumed that the power supply to be removed is installed in the lower power supply bay, which, by convention, is the normal configuration for a single power supply. Lastly, in such a single power supply configuration, it is assumed that the upper power supply bay has been previously covered by a blank filler panel to ensure EMI compliance and the proper flow of cooling air through the router.
  • Page 293: Replacing An Existing Ac-Input Power Supply

    Step 8 Place your free hand beneath the power supply to support its weight and withdraw the unit completely from the bay. Step 9 Set the power supply aside, pending further disposition. If you intend to return the removed power supply to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit properly for return shipment using the original packing materials, if available.
  • Page 294 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply Step 5 Release the bail latch that secures the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate. Step 6 Remove the power cord from the AC receptacle. Grasp the power supply carrying handle with one hand and pull the unit halfway Step 7 out of the bay to disengage the blind-mating connector at the back of the power...
  • Page 295: Verifying The Installation Of An Ac-Input Power Supply

    Note the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connectors. Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screw on Step 14 the power supply faceplate. Connect the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply Step 15 faceplate.
  • Page 296 Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply • • • • Step 2 Set the rotary power switch on the newly-installed power supply to the ON position. Observe the behavior of the green AC INPUT OK LED on the power supply Step 3 faceplate for the following conditions: •...
  • Page 297: Adding, Removing, Or Replacing A Dc-Input Power Supply

    • • • • If the new AC-input power supply fails to operate properly after several attempts to power it up as described above, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance. Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply The Cisco 12008 can operate with either one or two DC-input power supplies. Although the router supports an online insertion and removal (OIR) capability for field replaceable units (FRUs), you must observe the following rules regarding the DC-input power supplies: •...
  • Page 298: Adding A Dc-Input Power Supply

    Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply To add, remove, or replace a DC-input power supply, you need the following tools: • A 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver (to loosen/tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate). • A 10 mm, hollow-shaft nutdriver (to secure the source DC power cables to the terminals on the power supply with the lock washers and nuts).
  • Page 299 DC power cables and terminal lugs from a commercial supplier in order to connect source DC power to the new DC-input power supply. These parts are not available from Cisco Systems. Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-19...
  • Page 300 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Figure 7-5 End View 0.267 2 holes 7-20 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Dimensions of the Lugs Used with the Source DC Power Cables All measurements in inches 2.25 Terminal crimp heat-shrink...
  • Page 301 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Figure 7-6 Faceplate of the DC-Input Power Supply IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NEC OR THE AUTHORITY HAVING JURISDICTION Rotary power switch TERMINALS MAY BE ENERGIZED. TURN OFF POWER SOURCE CIRCUIT BREAKER AND REMOVE POWER SUPPLY BEFORE ACCESSING...
  • Page 302 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply To add a second (redundant) DC-input power supply to the router, perform the following steps: Step 1 Locate the source DC circuit breaker that will service the DC-input power supply; ensure that this circuit breaker is set to the OFF position. For added safety, tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position.
  • Page 303 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Note The carrying handle on the DC-input power supply is designed to be grasped with your left hand, rather than your right hand. Using your left hand eliminates the potential for catching your fingers in the limited space between the plastic safety shield (see Figure 7-7) and the carrying handle.
  • Page 304 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Figure 7-7 Carrying handle Unscrew the loosely mounted lock washers and nuts from all six terminals on Step 9 the power supply faceplate; set this hardware aside temporarily. 7-24 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Grasp the safety shield and move it to the right and obliquely upward, positioning the shield so that it can be freed from the three standoffs on the power supply faceplate.
  • Page 305 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Step 10 As an added safety precaution, it is recommended that you add a length of shrink tubing to the crimp area on each power cable lug (see Figure 7-5) before connecting the leads to the power supply. The shrink tubing acts as an insulator to prevent the crimp area on the source DC power cable lugs from coming in contact with the faceplate of the DC-input power supply.
  • Page 306 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Note monitoring facility to the power supply to detect when the power supply circuit breaker trips during an electrical event, such as an overvoltage condition in the power supply. The functions and uses of the circuit breaker alarm terminal block are described in detail in the subsection entitled “Circuit Breaker Alarm Terminal Block”...
  • Page 307 Figure 7-8 Plant Controls B a t t e r y LTER Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Connecting Source DC Power Cables to the DC-Input Power Supply p l a n t CAUTION INPUT OUTPU T FAIL 48 VDC Central office...
  • Page 308 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Figure 7-9 Alarm terminal block Normal state of circuit breaker Reinstall the plastic safety shield (see Figure 7-7) on the power supply faceplate Step 15 by taking the following actions: Remove the tape from the main circuit breaker supplying source power to the Step 16 new power supply (see Step 1).
  • Page 309: Removing A Dc-Input Power Supply

    Step 17 Set the circuit breaker to the ON position. Step 18 Set the rotary power switch on the new DC-input power supply to the ON (|) position. To verify that the new DC-input power supply is operating properly, proceed to the section below entitled “Verifying the Installation of a DC-Input Power Supply.”...
  • Page 310 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply To remove the plastic safety shield (see Figure 7-7), take the following actions: Warning To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit that is presently servicing the power supply, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (–) and positive (+) source DC leads on the power supply.
  • Page 311 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Step 8 Using a 10 mm nutdriver (or a 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket) loosen the nuts securing the negative (–) power cable to the bottom terminals on the power supply faceplate; remove the nuts and locking washers from the terminals and set this hardware aside temporarily.
  • Page 312: Replacing A Dc-Input Power Supply

    Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply In the following procedure, it is assumed that you will be replacing an existing power supply in a router containing redundant DC-input power supplies. In this configuration, the router’s online insertion and removal (OIR) capability enables you to replace a given power supply without removing power from the router.
  • Page 313 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Warning To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit presently servicing the power supply that you intend to remove, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (–) and positive (+) source DC leads. Set the voltmeter to a range that makes it capable of measuring up to 75 VDC.
  • Page 314 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Step 11 If an external alarm monitoring facility is attached to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the power supply faceplate (see Figure 7-9), make a note of how the leads are connected. Doing so enables you to properly identify each lead for later reconnection.
  • Page 315 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Step 20 Gently slide the new power supply into the vacant bay, carefully seating it so that the power supply faceplate is flush against the sheet metal of the power supply bay. This action ensures that the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply is firmly seated into the backplane connector.
  • Page 316 Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply Step 24 Before connecting each cable to the appropriate terminals on the power supply faceplate, remove the tape (that you applied in Step 10 above) from the lug. Strictly observe the following order in reconnecting the leads to the power supply terminals: Secure each cable to the terminals using the previously removed lock washers Step 25...
  • Page 317: Verifying The Installation Of A Dc-Input Power Supply

    Verifying the Installation of a DC-Input Power Supply To verify the operation of a newly-installed DC-input power supply, first apply power to the unit and observe the status of the LEDs on the power supply faceplate. To verify the operation of a newly-installed DC-input power supply, perform the following steps: First, verify that the following conditions are satisfied: Step 1...
  • Page 318: Removing And Replacing The Fan Trays

    Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays • • Observe the behavior of the red OUTPUT FAIL LED on the power supply Step 4 faceplate after applying power to the unit. This LED should flash on momentarily, then go off and remain so. •...
  • Page 319: Removing The Fan Tray From The Lower Card Cage

    The Cisco 12008 supports online insertion and removal of field-replaceable units (FRUs); thus, you can remove and replace a fan tray while the rest of the system remains powered up and fully operational. Note If you replace a defective fan tray while the router is running, you must do so quickly to minimize the risk of overheating router components.
  • Page 320 Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Caution The card cage fan tray weighs approximately 12 lb (5.45 kg). For safety, use both hands when handling this assembly. If you plan to return the removed fan tray to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit in the original shipping container, if available, and prepare the package for return shipment.
  • Page 321 Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Figure 7-10 Removing the Card Cage Fan Tray from the Router ESD socket Captive installation screw Captive installation screw Insertion/extraction tab Air filter assembly Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-41...
  • Page 322: Installing A Fan Tray In The Lower Card Cage

    Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Installing a Fan Tray in the Lower Card Cage For the following procedure, it is assumed that you have removed a defective fan tray from the lower card cage and that you intend to replace it with a new one. To install a new fan tray in the lower card cage, perform the following steps.
  • Page 323 Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Figure 7-11 Inserting the Card Cage Fan Tray into the Router Captive installation screw Captive installation screw Insertion/extraction tab Air filter assembly Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-43...
  • Page 324: Removing The Power Supply Fan Tray

    Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Removing the Power Supply Fan Tray To remove the power supply fan tray from the router, perform the following steps. Loosen the captive installation screw on the honeycomb faceplate of the power Step 1 supply fan tray (see Figure 7-12).
  • Page 325 Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Figure 7-12 Removing the Power Supply Fan Tray from the Router Captive installation screw Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-45...
  • Page 326: Installing The Power Supply Fan Tray

    Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Installing the Power Supply Fan Tray For the following procedure, it is assumed that you have already removed a defective power supply fan tray and that you intend to replace it with a new one. To install the new power supply fan tray, perform the following steps.
  • Page 327 Figure 7-13 Inserting the Power Supply Fan Tray into the Router Captive installation screw Step 4 Using gentle pressure, fully insert the assembly into the bay until the sheet metal carrier of the fan tray rests against the stop for the captive installation screw. Step 5 Tighten the captive installation screw on the fan tray faceplate (see Figure 7-13).
  • Page 328: Checking The Installation Of A Fan Tray

    Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Checking the Installation of a Fan Tray To verify that a replacement fan tray is operating properly, perform the following steps: Check the following components to make sure that they are secure: Step 1 •...
  • Page 329 Table 7-1 Status LEDs for the Fan Trays Status LEDs State Left LED On (amber) Right LED On (amber) Both LEDs If a fan in one of the fan trays fails, the following occurs: • Fan speed on both fan trays increases to the maximum rate, even in the absence of an over-temperature condition in the router.
  • Page 330 Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays Figure 7-14 LED for card cage fan tray 7-50 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Fan Tray Status LEDs on the CSC LED for power supply fan tray...
  • Page 331: Removing And Replacing The Rp

    Removing and Replacing the RP The following sections present the procedures for removing and replacing the RP. The RP can be installed in any of the upper card cage slots 0 through 3 and 4 through 7. By convention, however, it is normally installed in slot 0 (the left-most slot in the upper card cage).
  • Page 332: Removing The Rp

    Removing and Replacing the RP Caution Before replacing the RP with another, back up the running configuration file to a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) file server or an installed Flash memory card. Doing so enables you to retrieve the file later for reuse. If you do not back up the configuration file, it will be lost and you will have to manually reenter the configuration information for the router.
  • Page 333 Step 5 Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the RP faceplate (see Figure 7-15a). Step 6 Place your thumbs on each of the ejector levers and simultaneously pivot them away from the RP faceplate (see Figure 7-15b). This action disengages the RP from the backplane.
  • Page 334: Installing The Rp

    Removing and Replacing the RP Figure 7-15 Loosen captive screws Pivot ejector levers away from card to unseat card Grasp card carrier to slide card out of slot Installing the RP As noted in the preceding section, Figure 7-15 illustrates an RP being removed from a Cisco 12012.
  • Page 335 To install the RP in the Cisco 12008, perform the following steps: Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.
  • Page 336: Checking The Installation Of The Rp

    Removing and Replacing Line Cards Checking the Installation of the RP To verify that the new (or reinstalled) RP is functioning properly, perform the following steps: Verify the following conditions: Step 1 • • • Ensure that a console terminal is connected to the console port on the RP and Step 2 that the console is turned on, or that you are able to accomplish a remote login to the router from another host in the network by means of a telnet session.
  • Page 337: Removing An Sfc

    When you install a new CSC or SFC, the router’s OIR capability enables the new card to be recognized, initialized, and become operational in a transparent manner. For the procedures in this section, it is assumed that you will be removing and replacing a switch card from a fully redundant and operational router.
  • Page 338 Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Figure 7-16 Removing an SFC ESD socket Air filter assembly 7-58 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 339: Installing An Sfc

    Step 2 Grasp the front of the card carrier’s metal faceplate, unseat the card from the backplane, and slide the SFC out of the slot, supporting the weight of the card by placing your other hand underneath the card carrier. Store the SFC in an antistatic bag or in an antistatic rack.
  • Page 340 Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Figure 7-17 Installing an SFC ESD socket Air filter assembly 7-60 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide...
  • Page 341: Removing A Csc

    Removing a CSC To remove a CSC from the router, perform the following steps. Before accessing any of the router’s internal components, put on an antistatic wrist Note strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.
  • Page 342 Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Figure 7-18 1 Loosen captive screws Pivot ejector levers upward Grasp card carrier and remove from slot 7-62 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Removing a CSC...
  • Page 343: Installing A Csc

    Installing a CSC To install a CSC in the router, perform the following steps. Before accessing any of the router’s internal components, put on an antistatic wrist Note strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.
  • Page 344: Checking The Installation Of Switch Cards

    Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Figure 7-19 3 Tighten captive screws Pivot ejector levers toward card faceplate Grasp card carrier and insert into vacant slot Checking the Installation of Switch Cards This section tells you how to verify the operability of a newly installed switch card. Refer to Figure 7-20 while performing the following procedures.
  • Page 345 Removing and Replacing Switch Cards Figure 7-20 Status LEDs on a CSC DB-25 alarm contact connector Alarm cutoff/lamp test button System alarm LEDs Status LEDs for the CSC Status LEDs for each fan tray Status LEDs for SFCs Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-65...
  • Page 346 Removing and Replacing Switch Cards To verify that a new switch card is operating properly, perform the following steps: Step 1 Observe the LEDs on the faceplate of the CSC(s), as follows: • Table 7-2 Status LEDs Top LED (FAIL) Bottom LED (ENABLED) •...
  • Page 347 Step 2 The secondary indication of SFC status is provided by two LEDs on each SFC (see Figure 7-21). Figure 7-21 Status LEDs on an SFC Left LED (OK) Status LEDs Observe each pair of LEDs on each SFC for the following indications: •...
  • Page 348: Removing And Replacing The Cable Management System

    Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System In Step 2 above, since the SFCs are not visible during normal operation, you must remove the air filter assembly from the router to observe the status LEDs on each SFC (see Figure 7-21). These LEDs are arranged side-by-side behind a raised tab near the middle of the card (as you view the SFC from the front of the router).
  • Page 349 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Figure 7-22 Cable-Management Tray on a Cisco 12008 End cap Top trim piece Installation screws ESD socket Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-69...
  • Page 350 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System To remove the cable-management tray while the system is operating, perform the following steps. Note Before accessing any of the router’s internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD grounding socket on the lower left edge of the upper card cage (see Figure 7-24).
  • Page 351 Step 2 Once the interface cables are removed from the cable-management tray, position the interface cables out of the way in preparation for removal of the cable- management tray. Remove the four installation screws securing the cable-management tray to the Step 3 recessed router enclosure (see Figure 7-24).
  • Page 352: Installing A Cable-Management Tray

    Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Step 4 Remove the top trim piece from the chassis by pulling it away from the chassis fasteners (see Figure 7-24, part 1). Step 5 Remove the end cap (left-most, large finger piece) from the chassis by pulling it away from the chassis fasteners (see Figure 7-24, part 2).
  • Page 353 Figure 7-25 Installation screws ESD socket Install the end cap onto the chassis by pushing it onto the chassis fasteners (see Step 5 Figure 7-25, part 2). Secure the cable-management tray in the recess with the remaining two Step 6 installation screws that you set aside in the previous procedure entitled “Removing a Cable-Management Tray.”...
  • Page 354: Removing A Cable-Management Bracket

    Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Step 8 Carefully arrange the attached interface cables in the bottom of the cable- management tray so that they emerge from the tray directly over the intended line card (see Figure 7-29). This completes the installation procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management tray. Removing a Cable-Management Bracket This section tells you how to remove a cable-management bracket from the Cisco 12008.
  • Page 355 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Figure 7-26 Removing Interface Cables from a Line Card Go back to Step 2 and proceed through the cable removal procedure in a bottom Step 5 to top direction until you have removed all of the interface cables from the line card ports.
  • Page 356 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Step 7 Remove the cable-management bracket from the line card. This completes the removal procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management bracket. Figure 7-27 Horizontal cable-management tray Captive screw Vertical cable- management bracket Captive screw ESD socket Line card 7-76...
  • Page 357: Installing A Cable-Management Bracket

    Installing a Cable-Management Bracket For the procedure in this section, it is assumed that you have installed a new line card in the router, in which case you must also install a cable-management bracket on the card. A small hook on the top of the cable-management bracket allows you to hook the bracket onto small cutouts on the cable-management tray during a line card replacement procedure.
  • Page 358 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Figure 7-28 Horizontal cable-management tray Captive screw Vertical cable- management bracket Captive screw Line card 7-78 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Attaching a Cable-Management Bracket to a Line Card...
  • Page 359 Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System Figure 7-29 Installing Interface Cables onto a Line Card Horizontal cable- management tray Interface cable Cable clip Cable clips Vertical cable-management bracket Maintaining the Cisco 12008 7-79...
  • Page 360: Upgrading Memory On A Line Card

    Upgrading Memory on a Line Card Upgrading Memory on a Line Card This section presents the procedures for upgrading memory on a Cisco 12000 series line card. The Cisco 12000 series line cards used with the Cisco 12008 incorporate the following types of onboard memory: •...
  • Page 361 Figure 7-30 Memory Locations on Cisco Series 12000 Line Cards (Quad OC-3c/ STM-1C POS Card Shown) Rx DIMM 1 Rx DIMM 2 Before attempting to upgrade line card memory, consult Table 7-4 or Table 7-5 to determine the particular DIMM module(s) that you will need to achieve the desired memory configuration.
  • Page 362 Upgrading Memory on a Line Card Table 7-5 lists the available configurations and associated product numbers of SDRAM DIMMs for upgrading the transmit and receive buffer memory on a line card. Table 7-4 DRAM DIMM Sockets P4 DIMM0 P4 DIMM1 P4 DIMM0 P4 DIMM0 P4 DIMM0 and...
  • Page 363: Removing A Line Card From The Router

    Removing a Line Card from the Router This section presents the procedures for removing a line card from the router. The router supports online insertion and removal (OIR) of line cards; thus, you can remove and replace any line card while the system remains powered up and operational. When removing or installing a line card, be sure to use the ejector levers to properly Note unseat and reseat the card in the backplane connector.
  • Page 364 Upgrading Memory on a Line Card Figure 7-31 Interface cable Captive screw Captive screw Line card cable-management bracket 7-84 Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide Removing Vertical Cable-Management Bracket from Line Card (Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS Line Card Shown in Cisco 12012) Hook Cutout for hook Chassis cable-management tray...
  • Page 365 Step 6 Grasp the line card faceplate with one hand and pull the line card straight out of the slot, keeping your other hand under the line card to support its weight. Avoid touching the line card printed circuit board, its components, or its edge connector pins (see Figure 7-32c).
  • Page 366: Removing A Dimm From A Line Card

    Upgrading Memory on a Line Card Removing a DIMM from a Line Card Line card memory consists of DRAM DIMMs for the line card’s processor, as well as SDRAM DIMMs for the line card’s transmit and receive buffers. The locations of the DIMM sockets for these two types of line card memory are shown in Figure 7-30.
  • Page 367: Installing A New Dimm On A Line Card

    Step 5 As one end of the DIMM is released, grasp the top corners of the DIMM with the thumb and forefinger of each hand and pull the DIMM completely out of its socket. Note or the keyed insertion fingers along the bottom of the DIMM (see Figure 7-32). Immediately place the module in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD Step 6 damage.
  • Page 368: Reinstalling A Line Card In The Router

    Upgrading Memory on a Line Card Step 5 Gently insert the DIMM into the socket until the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. If necessary, rock the DIMM back and forth gently to ensure that it is fully seated. When inserting DIMMs into a socket, apply firm, but not excessive, pressure.
  • Page 369: Checking The Installation Of Line Card Memory

    Step 6 Replace the vertical cable-management bracket, as follows: Restore the network interface cables to their original ports on the line card Step 7 faceplate. Proceed to the next section to check the installation of the line card memory. Checking the Installation of Line Card Memory After installing the new line card memory, replace the card and turn on system power.
  • Page 370: Upgrading Memory On The Rp

    Upgrading Memory on the RP If the system fails to restart properly after several attempts and you are unable to resolve the problem, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance. Before calling, however, make note of any console error messages, unusual LED states, or other system indications or behaviors that might help to resolve the problem.
  • Page 371: Appendix A Unpacking And Repacking The Cisco 12008

    Unpacking and Repacking the Cisco 12008 This appendix presents information about the shipping container for the Cisco 12008. The shipping container, which includes a shipping pallet and an accessories box, has the following specifications: • Width—25.3 inches (64.3 cm) • Length—37.7 inches (95.8 cm) •...
  • Page 372: Cisco 12008 Packaging Materials

    Cisco 12008 Packaging Materials Cisco 12008 Packaging Materials The packaging materials for the Cisco 12008 consist of the following items: • Cardboard box • Cardboard sleeve • Foam top cap • Accessories box • Anchors (4)—two on each side panel of the router •...
  • Page 373 Cisco 12008 Packaging Materials Figure A-1 Components of the Cisco 12008 Packaging System Cardboard box Cardboard sleeve Foam top cap Anchor Accessories box Pallet Unpacking and Repacking the Cisco 12008 A-3...
  • Page 374: Unpacking/Packing Tools

    Unpacking/Packing Tools Unpacking/Packing Tools For visual guidance in unpacking or repacking the Cisco 12008, refer to Figure A-1. To prevent damage, never attempt to lift or tilt the Cisco 12008 using the handles Caution on the power supplies. These handles are not designed to support the weight of the router You need the items in Table A-1 to unpack or pack the Cisco 12008.
  • Page 375 Numerics 100BASE-T maximum cable lengths 3-34 specifications 3-34 transmission recommendations 3-34 AC power cords 2-14 AC power requirement 3-43 AC-input power supply electrical codes power cord types available 2-14 agency approvals 1-78 air filter checking condition of 5-20 description 1-69 maintaining 1-69 removal procedure...
  • Page 376 to Ethernet port 3-24 to 3-27, 3-30 to 3-34 distance limitations 2-20 safety guidelines ungrounded and uninsulated card handling safety caution description caution, description cd command 4-51 CD-ROM, ordering documentation chassis, lifting safely checking configuration, system 4-27 connections codes, electrical commands 4-8, 4-39 boot...
  • Page 377 pinout 3-22, 3-29 settings 3-21, 3-27 cooling subsystem components 5-17 environmental shutdown 5-19 troubleshooting 5-17 copy command 4-55 copy command (Flash memory) copy running-config startup-config command customer service, accessing 4-64 DC power requirement 2-3, 3-46 DC-input power supply cable lead color coding 3-48, 7-22 electrical codes removing from bay...
  • Page 378 formatting a Flash memory card multimode power budget, line card squeeze command 4-52, 4-53 EXEC command interpreter 4-11 extended data output See EDO DRAM, GRP Fast Ethernet, specifications 3-34 filenames, for booting over the network Flash boot ROM, PRP (table) 1-38 Flash memory card...
  • Page 379 unpacking the system 2-27 interface command 4-27 configuration 4-20 to 4-24 Ethernet (MDI) 3-30 Ethernet (MII and MDI) 3-23 parameters, configuring 4-20 interference, radio frequency 2-20 interrupting system with Break key jewelry, avoiding for safety laser safety LEDs alphanumeric displays at startup 4-5 to 4-7 description...
  • Page 380 attribute summary (table) 1-38 description 1-39 saving settings 4-30 observing system startup password, enabling 4-11 PCMCIA description, slot 1-33, 1-39 formatting a new Flash memory card See also Flash memory Performance Route Processor See PRP Personal Computer Memory Card International Association See PCMCIA pinouts...
  • Page 381 RP, troubleshooting 5-12 alphanumeric LED displays 1-41 Cisco IOS software images 1-36 Flash disk slots 1-42 Flash memory, description 1-39 LEDs, types 1-40 NVRAM 1-39 onboard Flash memory, description PCMCIA slots 1-42 SDRAM configurations 1-39 description 1-36 soft reset switch, function 1-41 SRAM 1-39...
  • Page 382 weight 1-76 squeeze command 4-52, 4-53 SRAM description 1-28 1-30 PRP (table) 1-38 startup, system 4-4 to 4-11 static random-access memory See SRAM switch fabric bandwidth 1-43 card configurations and bandwidth description 1-43 lower card cage slots 1-43 switches PRP soft reset (NMI) switch 1-41 soft reset 1-32...

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Gsr8/10-40-upg= - 12008 router -anylan, serial