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Yamaha MO6 Owner's Manual

Yamaha music production synthesizer owner's manual mo6, mo8.
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Table of Contents
OWNER'S MANUAL
MUSIC PRODUCTION SYNTHESIZER
EN

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Table of Contents

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  • Page 1 OWNER’S MANUAL MUSIC PRODUCTION SYNTHESIZER...
  • Page 2: Special Message Section

    Yamaha directly. NAME PLATE LOCATION: The name plate is located on the rear (MO8) or bottom (MO6) of the product. The model number, serial number, power requirements, etc., are located on this plate. You should record...
  • Page 3 Compliance with FCC regulations does * This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA CORPORATION OF AMERICA. COMPLIANCE INFORMATION STATEMENT (DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY PROCEDURE) Responsible Party : Yamaha Corporation of America Address : 6600 Orangethorpe Ave., Buena Park, Calif.
  • Page 4 • Only use the voltage specified as correct for the instrument. The required voltage is printed on the name plate of the instrument. • Use the specified adaptor (PA-5D or an equivalent recommended by Yamaha) only. Using the wrong adaptor can result in damage to the instrument or overheating.
  • Page 5 Yamaha cannot be held responsible for damage caused by improper use or modifications to the instrument, or data that is lost or destroyed. Always turn the power off when the instrument is not in use.
  • Page 6: Introduction

    Introduction Introduction Congratulations and thank you for your purchase of the Yamaha MO Music Production Synthesizer! You now own a fantastic-sounding, highly versatile keyboard—one that combines comprehensive synthesizer sound- crafting controls and powerful performance/recording features in a total music production instrument.
  • Page 7: Main Features

    The instrument features two USB connectors—USB TO HOST for connecting to computer, and USB TO DEVICE for connecting to storage devices, such as a hard disk drive or flash disk. Compatibility with Yamaha’s powerful Voice Editor and Multi Part Editor software—featuring comprehensive, intuitive editing of all parameters from your computer.
  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    If this instrument does not function as expected or you have some problem with the sound or operation, refer to this section before calling your Yamaha dealer or service center. Most common problems and their solutions are covered here in a very simple and easy-to-understand way.
  • Page 9: Application Index

    Application Index Listening to the MO • Listening to the Demo Song/Pattern ... Page 73 • Listening to Song Chain playback... Page 95 • Listening to Pattern Chain playback ... Page 84 • Listening to Arpeggio playback... Page 48 Playing the keyboard •...
  • Page 10 Application Index Sounding only the specified Part or Voice • Turning each element on or off in the Voice Edit mode...Page 55 • Determining whether each Element is used or not in the Voice Edit mode [VOICE] [EDIT] Element selection •...
  • Page 11 Storing/Saving the created data • Storing an edited Voice to internal memory (Flash ROM) and saving all the Voices in internal memory to a USB storage device ... Page 60 • Storing an edited Performance to internal memory (Flash ROM) and saving all the Performances in internal memory to a USB storage device ...
  • Page 12 Application Index Connecting to a computer/external MIDI instrument • Determining which connector (MIDI, USB TO HOST) is used for MIDI input/output [UTILITY] [F5] MIDI [SF4] OTHER • Using the sounds of the MO for Song playback from a MIDI sequencer...Page 110 •...
  • Page 13 Table of Contents Introduction ...6 Accessories...6 Main Features...7 How to use this manual ...8 Application Index ... 9 The Controls & Connectors Front Panel ...14 Rear Panel...18 Setting up and Playing Power supply...20 Playing the keyboard ...22 Modes ...24 Basic instructions ...25 Resetting the User Memory to the Initial Factory Settings ...26 Basic Operation...
  • Page 14: The Controls & Connectors

    Front Panel The Controls & Connectors Front Panel C0 D0 E0 F0 G0 A0 B0 C1 When [UTILITY] [F1] GENERAL illustrations. Refer to this illustration when setting a note name of a parameter like Note Limit. PHONES OUTPUT DIGITAL OUT L MONO DAW REMOTE PAGE SELECT PAN SEND...
  • Page 15 º VOICE SONG DEC NO INC YES REMOTE INFORMATION EXIT ENTER EDIT EXECUTE COMPARE & ™ ¡ £ DC IN ¶ ¢ CATEGORY SEARCH DRUM KITS PRE 1 PRE 2 PRE 3 PRE 4 USER 1 USER 2 – SECTION FAVORITES A.
  • Page 16 Front Panel 1 Keyboard The MO6 features a 61-key keyboard, while the MO8 has 88 keys. All are equipped with an initial touch feature. With initial touch, the instrument senses how strongly or softly you play the keys, and uses that playing strength to affect the sound in various ways, depending on the selected voice.
  • Page 17: Data Dial

    & [INFORMATION] button For calling up a special “help” feature that shows information about the currently selected mode. You can go back to the previous display by pressing this button again or pressing any other button. Depending on the selected display, this button may be used to call up a window for inputting characters, for inputting numbers, for selecting note lengths, or for selecting keys or note names (page 35).
  • Page 18: Rear Panel

    Connect the AC adaptor to this terminal. WARNING Do not attempt to use an AC adaptor other than the Yamaha PA-5D or an equivalent recommended by Yamaha. The use of an incompatible adaptor may cause irreparable damage to the MO, and may even pose a...
  • Page 19 FOOT FOOT DIGITAL OUT OUTPUT SWITCH CONTROLLER L MONO 6 FOOT SWITCH jack For connection of optional FC4 or FC5 Footswitch. 7 FOOT CONTROLLER jack For connection of an optional foot controller (FC7, etc.). The FOOT CONTROLLER jack lets you continuously control one of various different assignable functions—such as volume, tone, pitch, or other aspects of the sound.
  • Page 20: Setting Up And Playing

    Power supply Setting up and Playing Power supply Power supply connections Before you connect the power adapter, make sure that the MO [STANDBY/ON] switch is set to STANDBY (Off). Connect the plug of the power adapter PA-5D to the DC IN terminal on the rear panel of the MO. Plug in the AC cable to an appropriate AC outlet.
  • Page 21: Turning The Power On

    Turning the power on Make sure the volume settings of the MO and external devices are turned down to the minimum. Turn the power on by pressing the [STANDBY/ON] switch on the MO rear panel, then turn the power on the amplifiers.
  • Page 22: Playing The Keyboard

    Playing the keyboard Playing the keyboard Playing the sounds Try playing some of the realistic and dynamic MO sounds from the keyboard now. When you turn the power on following the directions in “Power supply connections” (page 20), the display below appears.
  • Page 23 Selecting and playing the sounds The MO provides three different types of programs for playing the sounds: Voices, Performances, Songs, and Patterns. The basic difference among these programs is in their use—for playing the keyboard, or for creating music with multiple parts. For playing the keyboard Voice This program contains a...
  • Page 24: Modes

    Modes Modes There are several operation modes in the MO, and they can be selected by using the 12 mode buttons. 1 Playing the keyboard using a Voice Voice mode [VOICE] button The MO has a wealth of high-quality, dynamic sounds—also referred to as “Voices.”...
  • Page 25: Basic Instructions

    Basic instructions Voices—the basic building blocks of the MO Voices—created in the Voice mode—are the basic sonic building blocks for the other modes of the MO. The Performance, Song, and Pattern programs are made up of different Voices, used together for specific performance or song recording.
  • Page 26: Resetting The User Memory To The Initial Factory Settings

    Resetting the User Memory to the Initial Factory Settings Resetting the User Memory to the Initial Factory Settings The original factory setting of this synthesizer’s User Memory can be restored as follows. WARNING When the factory settings are restored, all the Voice, Performance, Song, Pattern, and system setting in the Utility mode you created will be erased.
  • Page 27: Basic Operation

    Basic Operation In this section, we’ll take a look at the fundamental operating conventions of the MO. Here, you’ll learn the basics—how to select modes, call up the various functions, change settings, and edit parameter values. Before reading further, familiarize yourself with the basic terms used with the MO in the chart below.
  • Page 28: Mode Table

    Modes Mode table The functions of each mode and how to enter each mode are as follows: Mode Voice mode Voice Play mode Voice Edit mode Voice Job mode Voice Store mode Performance mode Performance Play mode Performance Edit mode Performance Job mode Performance Store mode Song mode...
  • Page 29: Keyboard Octave Setting

    Keyboard octave setting (MO6) Sometimes when playing a voice, you may wish to play in a lower or higher pitch range. For example, you may want to shift the pitch down lower to get extra bass notes, or shift up to get higher notes for leads and solos. The Octave Up/Down controls let you do this quickly and easily.
  • Page 30: About Data Storage To Usb Storage Devices

    About data storage to USB storage devices About data storage to USB storage devices As you make music with this instrument, you’ll create a wide variety of data—such as custom Voice data (including Voices, Performances, etc.), and MIDI sequence data (Songs, Patterns, Arpeggios). Naturally, you’ll want to store this data for safekeeping and future use, and for this reason the instrument is equipped with a USB TO DEVICE connector—letting you save your data to a convenient USB storage device.
  • Page 31: Using Usb Storage Devices

    USB storage devices. Yamaha cannot guarantee operation of USB storage devices that you purchase. Before purchasing USB storage devices, please consult your Yamaha dealer, or an authorized Yamaha distributor (see list at end of the Owner’s Manual) for advice, or see the following website: http://www.yamahasynth.com/...
  • Page 32 About data storage to USB storage devices Backing up your data to a computer Backing up MO data to a computer Once you’ve saved data to a USB storage device, you can copy the data to the hard disk of your computer, then archive and organize the files as desired.
  • Page 33: Functions And Sub-functions

    Functions and Sub-Functions Each mode described above contains various displays, with various functions and parameters. To navigate your way through these displays and select a desired function, use the [F1] – [F6] buttons and the [SF1] – [SF5] buttons. When you select a mode, the available displays or menus appear directly above the buttons at the bottom of the display (as shown below).
  • Page 34 Selecting a Program Using the Group buttons and Number buttons As shown below, you can select a program number by pressing any of the Group [A] – [H] buttons and pressing any of the Number [1] – [16] buttons. The convenient Category Search function (page 42) lets you easily locate and select the Voices you want by type. The Voice program numbers and the corresponding Group/Numbers are listed below.
  • Page 35: Moving The Cursor And Setting Parameters

    Moving the Cursor and Setting Parameters Moving the cursor Use these four buttons to navigate the display, moving the cursor around the various selectable items and parameters in the screen. When selected, the relevant item is highlighted (the cursor appears as a dark block with inverse characters).
  • Page 36: In The Voice Mode

    About the editing functions About the editing functions There are three types of method for creating data—Editing parameters (Voice, Performance, etc.) and Recording MIDI data (Song, Pattern, etc.). In this section, we’ll explain the basic operations for editing the Voice, Performance, Song Mixing, Pattern Mixing, Mixing Voice settings.
  • Page 37: Confirmation Message

    Edit Recall Function If you are editing a program and select a different program without storing your edited one, all the edits you’ve made will be erased. However, the edited program is maintained in a backup memory location called the Recall buffer (page 150). To restore the lost data with your latest edits intact, use the Edit Recall function in the Job mode.
  • Page 38: Naming

    Naming Naming You can freely name your created data such as Voices and files saved to the USB storage device. The chart below lists the types of data that can be named along with the operations for calling up the respective naming displays. Data types that can be named Voice Performance...
  • Page 39 Using the character list If you find it difficult to select the desired characters with the above method, you may want to use the following method— selecting the characters from a list. Perform the operations below while holding the [INFORMATION] button. Move the cursor to the desired location.
  • Page 40: Quick Guide

    Voice Play mode Quick Guide Voice Play mode The Voice Play mode is where you select and play the instrument sounds (voices) of this synthesizer. Selecting a Normal Voice Internally, there are two Voice Types: Normal Voices and Drum Voices. Normal Voices are mainly pitched musical instrument type sounds that can be played over the range of the keyboard.
  • Page 41 Select a Normal Voice Bank. Select one of the Banks from Preset 1 – 4, User 1 – 2, and PRE 1 PRE 2 PRE 3 PRE 4 USER 1 Group About the User Banks The User Banks contain various factory default Voices.
  • Page 42: Using The Category Search Function

    Voice Play mode Using the Category Search function You’ll probably have a lot of fun and inspiration going through the Voices one-by-one, listening to each in order—but it will take you a long time to get through all of them, since the MO has so many. This is where the Category Search function comes in handy.
  • Page 43 Favorite Category The MO also lets you collect and store your favorite Voices to create your personal “Favorite” Category. By putting your most often-used Voices in the Favorite Category, you can select your favorite Voices quickly and easily. Select the Voice using the Category Search function.
  • Page 44: Selecting A Performance

    Performance Play mode Performance Play mode Each Performance can contain up to four different Parts. This lets you play, for example, Flute, Violin, and Timpani Voices in a layer across the keyboard, or split the keyboard according to the bass and melody parts, then play the two different instruments and sound like a duo—even though you’re playing by yourself.
  • Page 45 Select a Performance Bank. Select one of the Banks from User 1 and 2. PRE 1 PRE 2 PRE 3 PRE 4 USER 1 USER 2 A. PIANO KEYBOARD ORGAN GUITAR BASS STRINGS PLUCKED Select a Performance Group. Performances are divided into Groups [A] – [H]. Select a Group to display a list of the Performances.
  • Page 46: Creating A Performance

    Performance Play mode Creating a Performance by combining Voices Performances can be made up of a maximum of four Parts, each of which can be assigned a different Voice. In this section, we’ll create a Performance by combining two Voices. Preparing to create a Performance (Initializing the Performance) Select the desired Performance in the...
  • Page 47 Voice Bank Voice Number SCENE Assigns a Voice to Deletes the Voice assignment of the selected Part. the selected Part. Play the keyboard. The Part 1 (piano Voice) and Part 2 (flute Voice) can be played in unison. Part 1: Piano Part 2: Flute Next, we’ll divide the keyboard into two sections—one for each Voice.
  • Page 48: Using The Arpeggio Feature

    Using the Arpeggio feature Using the Arpeggio feature The versatile Arpeggio feature allows you to automatically play various rhythms and phrases by simply pressing a key or playing a chord. The MO contains a remarkably wide variety of Arpeggios—a total of 1,787—from conventional, popular phrases to the latest cutting-edge rhythm patterns.
  • Page 49 Register your favorite Arpeggio types to the [SF1] – [SF5] buttons You can change the default settings and assign any Arpeggio types you like to the [SF1] – [SF5] buttons. Select the desired Voice, Performance, Song, or Pattern, and then press the [ARPEGGIO] button to turn Arpeggio on.
  • Page 50: Pitch Bend Wheel

    Using the Controllers on the MO Using the Controllers on the MO This section shows you how to change the sounds by using the controllers on the MO. When using the external controllers, see page 69. Pitch Bend Wheel Use the Pitch Bend wheel to bend notes up (roll the wheel away from you) or down (roll the wheel toward you) while playing the keyboard.
  • Page 51 Knob Changing the sounds You can change the brightness and tone characteristics of the current Voice, Performance, Song or Pattern in realtime by turning the knobs while you play. Rotating it to the right (clockwise) increases the program number, while rotating it to the left (counter-clockwise) decreases it.
  • Page 52: Changing The Volume

    Using the Controllers on the MO Control slider Changing the volume You can adjust the volume of the Voice/Performance you play on the keyboard, or the volume of the specified part (track) of the Song/Pattern by using the Control sliders. In the Master mode, various functions as well as the volume can be assigned to the Control sliders when the Zone Switch is set to on (page 215).
  • Page 53: Editing A Program

    Editing a Program Editing a Voice Each Voice can consist of up to four Elements. An Element is made up of a basic waveform—the basic sound of a musical instrument—plus the various synthesizer processing parameters used to enhance, alter or define the sound, such as pitch, filter, and amplitude controls.
  • Page 54 Editing a Voice Call up the Common Edit display or Element Edit display. If you wish to edit the sounds that make up a Voice and the basic parameters that determine the sound—such as Oscillator, Pitch, Filter, Amplitude, and EG (Envelope Generator)—call up the Element Edit display. If you wish to edit more global parameters related to the overall Voice and how it’s processed—such as Arpeggio, Controller, and Effects—call up the Common Edit display.
  • Page 55 The Compare Function You can compare the sound of the original (unedited) Voice with the edited Voice. For details, see page 36. To solo an Element for editing This feature is useful for isolating the sound of single Element, for ease in editing. In the Normal Voice Edit mode, simultaneously hold down the [MUTE] button and press one of the Number buttons [9] to [12] to solo the...
  • Page 56 Editing a Voice Editing a Voice by using the Knobs The four knobs at the top left of the instrument are not only for tweaking the sound while you perform—you can also use them to edit a Voice, either in the Voice Play mode or the Voice Edit mode. When the [PAN/SEND] indicator is turned on: Determines the stereo pan position of the Voice.
  • Page 57: Drum Voice Edit

    Drum Voice Edit Press the [VOICE] button to enter the Voice mode, then select a Drum Voice to be edited. Press the [EDIT] button to enter the Voice Edit mode. Call up the Common Edit display or Key Edit display. If you want to edit the sounds that make up a Drum Voice and the basic parameters that determine the sound, such as Oscillator, Pitch, Filter, Amplitude, and EG (Envelope Generator), call up the Key Edit display.
  • Page 58 Editing a Voice Assigning drum/percussion instruments to individual keys [VOICE] Drum Voice selection In the Drum Voice Edit mode, you can create your own original drum kits by assigning specific instrument sounds to individual keys—in any desired order—and edit detailed parameters for each key’s sound. Call up the Key Edit display in the Voice Edit mode.
  • Page 59 Setting the drum key for independent open and closed hi-hat sounds [VOICE] Drum Voice selection In a real drum kit, some drum sounds cannot physically be played simultaneously, such as open and closed hi-hats. You can prevent drum instruments from playing back simultaneously by assigning them to the same Alternate Group. The preset Drum Voices have many such Alternate Group assignments to ensure the most authentic, natural sound.
  • Page 60 Editing a Voice Storing/Saving the created Voice Two steps are necessary in order to store (save) your Voice—storing the edited Voice to internal memory and saving the stored voices to a USB storage device. Store Voice Edit Keep in mind that edited Voice data is stored to internal User memory (Flash ROM) and is stored even when turning the power off.
  • Page 61 To execute the Store operation, press the [INC/YES] button. After the Voice has been stored, a “Completed” message appears and operation returns to the Voice Play display. DEC NO INC YES EXIT ENTER EXECUTE CAUTION Never attempt to turn off the power while an “Executing...” or “Please keep power on”...
  • Page 62 Editing a Voice Loading Voice data from a USB storage device [FILE] [F3] LOAD In the previous section, we saved Voice data as an “All Voice” file to a USB storage device. Here, we’ll recall that Voice data and load it to the instrument with the Load operation.
  • Page 63: Editing A Performance

    Editing a Performance The Performance Edit mode ([PERFORM] different Parts (Voices)—by editing the various parameters. After assigning different Voices to separate ranges of the keyboard, edit the detailed parameters in the Performance Edit mode. Press the [PERFORM] button to enter the Performance mode, then select a Performance to be edited (page 44).
  • Page 64 Editing a Performance Select the menu you wish to edit by pressing the [F1] – [F6] buttons and [SF1] – [SF5] buttons, then edit the parameters in each display. The following briefly describes the main Performance parameters. Parameters for the Voice assigned to each Part Part selection [F1] VOICE The Voice assigned to each part and its note range can be...
  • Page 65: Editing A Performance By Using The Knobs

    Editing a Performance by using the Knobs The four knobs at the top left of the instrument are not only for tweaking the sound while you perform—you can also use them to edit a Performance, either in the Performance Play mode or the Performance Edit mode. When the [PAN/SEND] indicator is turned on: Determines the stereo pan position of the Performance.
  • Page 66 Editing a Performance Storing/Saving the created Performance Two steps are necessary in order to store (save) your Performance—storing the edited Performance to internal memory and saving the stored Performances to a USB storage device. Performance Edit Storing edited Performances individually When you turn off the power to the instrument, User Performances saved in the Performance Store mode are not erased.
  • Page 67 Saving the edited Performances to a USB storage device [FILE] [F2] SAVE The basic operations are the same as in the Voice mode (page 61). However, keep in mind that you must set the Type parameter to “All.” When Type is set to “All,” executing the Save operation saves all the created data, including the Performances as well as the Voices assigned to them, as a single file (extension: M7A).
  • Page 68 Editing a Performance Select the file ( ) to be loaded. Move the cursor to the file (extension: M7A) saved in the operation explained in the previous instructions. If the desired file was saved in specific folder, enter the folder and select the file. For information on how to select a folder, see page 213. If you have set the Type parameter to “All”...
  • Page 69: Using The Controllers-advanced Course

    Footswitch An optional Yamaha FC4 or FC5 Foot Switch connected to the rear panel FOOT SWITCH jack can be assigned to a range of parameters. It is suited for switch-type (on/off) controls, such as sustain, Portamento Switch, increment/decrement of a Voice or Performance Number, starting/stopping the Sequencer, and holding the Arpeggio on or off.
  • Page 70 Controllers supported by the MO Controlling a Voice with Controller Set [VOICE] Voice selection [EDIT] Each of the Preset Voices of MO is programmed with appropriate Modulation Wheel and Knob assignments, for adjusting the sound and effects in ways that best match the selected Voice. For example, you can use the Modulation Wheel to apply a chorus effect to a piano Voice, or use one of the Knobs to control the decay time parameter of a bass guitar Voice.
  • Page 71 Controlling the overall system with ASSIGN A and B [UTILITY] [F4] CTL ASN [SF2] ASSIGN (page 208) The ASSIGN A and B (Knob 1 and 2) settings let you control the functions that affect all Voices, Performances, Song, and Pattern. You can store the ASSIGN A and B settings as the system settings by pressing the [STORE] button.
  • Page 72 Controllers supported by the MO Changing Control Change numbers The functions assigned to the controllers by the Controller Set and ASSIGN A/B functions are applied only to the internal tone generator block. For connected external MIDI instruments, use of the controllers generates MIDI Control Change messages, as assigned in the chart below.
  • Page 73: Creating A Song On The Mo

    Creating a Song on the MO In this section, we’ll explain how to create a Song by using the built-in sequencer of the MO (Song mode and Pattern mode). There are two ways (or modes) that you can use the music production features of the MO to create your own music: Song mode and Pattern mode.
  • Page 74 Playing the Demo Songs/Patterns Set the LoadType to “All.” Any of following three types can be set. However, for this example, select “All.” All ... Loads both the Demo Song and Pattern data. Song ... Loads only the Demo Song data. Pattern ...
  • Page 75 Press the [PATTERN] button to enter the Pattern mode. MODE VOICE PERFORM MASTER SONG PATTERN MIXING REMOTE FILE UTILITY DEMO EDIT STORE COMPARE SCENE STORE SET LOCATE Press the [F] (Play) button to start Pattern playback. There is another way to start Pattern playback—by pressing the notes on the keyboard.
  • Page 76: Creating A Pattern

    Creating a Pattern Creating a Pattern When you create a Song, one of the most essential aspects is the rhythm. It is almost always the first thing you start with, and provides a foundation for the rest of the music. The Pattern mode gives you the tools to create rhythm patterns for the accompaniment of the Song.
  • Page 77 Repeat steps 3 and 4 above to assign the Voice to each track (Part). Store the Mixing settings. Press the [STORE] button (the display below appears). Press the [ENTER] button to store the Mixing settings with the Pattern. CAUTION The created Song and Pattern data resides temporarily in DRAM (page 150).
  • Page 78 Creating a Pattern Creating Mixing Voices exclusively for Songs/Patterns If you assign User Voices to your Song or Pattern and then edit them (in the Voice Edit mode), the Voices may sound different than expected. This convenient feature lets you create dedicated Mixing Voices for your Songs and Patterns—ensuring that the Voices will play exactly as they were edited for the Song/Pattern.
  • Page 79 Set the meter (time signature), tempo, and length. Tempo Meter (time signature) Press the [F4] PATCH button to call up the Patch display. Select Track 1, then select one of the settings Dr 1 to Dr 4 in the category. Next, select a Phrase Number.
  • Page 80 Creating a Pattern Type, Loop, and Quantize Type The “replace” setting lets you overwrite an already recorded track with new data. The first recording is lost, and the new one takes its place. The “overdub” setting lets you record (layer) additional data to a track that already contains data.
  • Page 81: Copying A Pattern

    MIDI data recorded in the Pattern mode is stored as a User Phrase. You can store up to 256 User Phrases to a single Pattern. Next, let’s use the Pattern Copy function and record our User Phrases to Section B. Copying Patterns and Creating a Pattern with User Phrases In the following steps, you’ll assign the same phrases as the drum and bass guitar parts of Section A to the drum and bass parts of Section B, and create a guitar part playing the guitar and bass in unison.
  • Page 82 Creating a Pattern Copying a User Phrase from another Pattern to the current Pattern The User Phrases that can be assigned with the Patch function are limited to the ones contained in the currently selected Pattern. To copy Phrases from other Patterns for use in the current one, follow the instructions below. In the [F4] PATCH display, press the [SF5] COPY button to call up the Copy Phrase display.
  • Page 83: Using The Groove Function

    Creating a Pattern with Step recording Next, we’ll add a strings part by using the Step recording method. Select the track to which the strings part is to be assigned. Press the [TRACK SELECT] button so that its lamp lights, and select the track for the strings part by pressing the Number [5] button.
  • Page 84 Creating a Pattern Select a track, then adjust the Groove settings. Select a track. ELEMENT PERF. PART ZONE Set each parameter. Move the cursor... DEC/NO INC / YES EXIT ENTER EXECUTE Play the Pattern SEQ TRANSPORT to check the result of the Groove settings.
  • Page 85 Creating a Pattern Chain by changing a Section while playing a Pattern Switching of sections, track muting, scene/mute changes, and tempo changes can all be recorded in real time as a Pattern Chain. In the Pattern Play mode, select a Pattern for which data has already been created.
  • Page 86 Creating a Pattern Editing a Pattern Chain The Pattern Chain Edit mode makes it possible to edit the order of the Sections in a chain, as well as insert tempo and scene/mute event data. In the Pattern Play mode, select a Pattern for which data has already been created.
  • Page 87: Creating A Song

    Creating a Song The following chart illustrates the basic procedure for creating a Song, using the various methods and functions described in this tutorial. Now, that you’ve assembled the backing tracks for your Song by converting the Phrases or Pattern Chain to Song data, you can now record melody parts on them.
  • Page 88 Creating a Song Recording with the keyboard to a Song track Arpeggio, Realtime Recording/Step Recording, Groove function In the Song mode, you can use the Arpeggio, Realtime Recording/Step Recording, and Groove function in the same ways as you did in the Pattern mode. The procedure is basically the same as that of the Pattern mode.
  • Page 89 Song Recording using a Performance If you have a favorite Performance or one that would fit the Song to be recorded, you can copy certain settings of up to four Parts of the Performance to the Song Mixing settings currently being edited. Enter the Song Mixing Job mode ([SONG] [MIXING] [JOB]).
  • Page 90 Creating a Song Recalling a Song Scene and Arpeggio type during recording ARP1 – ARP5 menus appear also in the [F3] ARP display in the Song Record mode as well as the [F1] PLAY display in the Song Play mode. These indicate that you can change the Song Scene and Arpeggio type simultaneously during Song recording from the [F3] ARP display.
  • Page 91 Edit the MIDI events of the Song. Editing/Deleting Existing Events To edit data in the Event List, use the up/down cursor buttons to highlight the specific event you want to edit, and use the left/right cursor buttons to highlight the data type or parameter to be edited.
  • Page 92 Creating a Song Press the [JOB] button to enter the Song Job mode. As shown below, the Jobs are divided into six main groups, each of which is selected using the [F1] – [F6] buttons. Indicates the Job List. Because all the Jobs cannot be displayed simultaneously, you will need to use the cursor buttons to scroll the display in order to find the desired Job.
  • Page 93 Using the Undo/Redo functions If you’re not satisfied with the results of a just-executed Job, or you want to hear the difference of the sound before and after using a Job, you can use the convenient Undo and Redo functions. After changing the data with a particular Job, repeat steps 1 –...
  • Page 94 Creating a Song Call up the Common Edit display or Part Edit display. Use Part Edit to edit the parameters for each Part. Use Common Edit to edit the parameters for all of the Parts. While in the Song Mixing Edit mode, you can switch between the Common Edit display and the Element Edit display as shown below.
  • Page 95 Song Chain This function allows Songs to be “chained” together for automatic sequential playback. In this section, try using the Song Chain features with the Demo Songs. Press the [F6] CHAIN button to call up the Song Chain display. From this display you can program and play your own custom Song sequences.
  • Page 96 Creating a Song Editing a Mixing by using the Knobs (in the Song mode/Pattern mode) The four knobs at the top left of the instrument can be used to tweak the Song/Pattern Mixing settings as they play (in the Song Play/Pattern Play mode). What’s mode, you can use them to edit the Mixing settings, in the Song Mixing Edit/ Pattern Mixing Edit modes.
  • Page 97: Creating An Arpeggio

    Editing a Mixing by using Control sliders (in the Song mode/Pattern mode) [SONG] Song selection [MIXING] In the Song/Pattern mode, the four Control sliders let you independently adjust the levels of the Parts (Voices), letting you control the overall balance of the Parts. Inadvertent use of the sliders may result in no sound.
  • Page 98 Creating a Song Record the MIDI sequence data to a Song or Pattern track, referring to the previous instructions in this chapter as needed. The examples listed below are used as reference. Creating a rhythm pattern (using a Drum Voice) Track 1 Record a basic rhythm pattern using various drum instruments.
  • Page 99 Storing the edited Song Mixing/ Pattern Mixing settings to internal memory [MIXING] [STORE] Storing the Mixing settings as a part of a Song Press the [STORE] button to enter the Song Mixing Store mode/Pattern Mixing Store mode, then select “Store to Current Song”...
  • Page 100 Creating a Song Saving a Song or a Pattern Section as a Standard MIDI File After connecting the USB storage device to the instrument, follow the instructions below. Press the [FILE] button to enter the File mode. Then press the [F1] CONFIG button and [SF1] CURRENT button.
  • Page 101 Select a file type to be loaded. You can load the file (extension: M7A) saved as “All” by selecting one of the following file types. All data in a file that is saved to the USB storage device as an “All” type can be loaded and restored to this instrument. Voice A specified Voice in a file can be individually selected and loaded to this instrument.
  • Page 102 Creating a Song Setting a specific file to load automatically when the power is turned on The MO is very easy to use and you can create Voices, Performances, Patterns and Songs very quickly on it. However, there may be times that creating and editing of data may be spread out over several sessions. In such a case, you may find it convenient to have the instrument automatically load the appropriate files for you when you turn it on, so you can easily resume your editing session.
  • Page 103: Connecting To External Audio Equipment

    Connecting the MO to external devices Connections Connecting to External Audio Equipment Since the MO has no built-in speakers, you’ll need an external audio system or a set of stereo headphones to properly monitor it. Alternatively, you could use a pair of headphones. There are several methods of connecting to external audio equipment, as described in the following illustrations.
  • Page 104: Connecting External Midi Instruments

    Connections Connecting External MIDI Instruments Using a standard MIDI cable (optional), you can connect an external MIDI device, and control it from the MO. Likewise, you can use an external MIDI device (such as a keyboard or sequencer) to control the sounds on the MO. This section introduces several different applications of MIDI.
  • Page 105: Volume

    Splitting the sound between the MO and an external tone generator by MIDI channel (Part 1) Using the connection example shown above, you can play both instruments and have them separately sound different parts—for example, having your keyboard performance sound the external instrument while the Song/Pattern plays the sounds of the MO. Check the following points.
  • Page 106: Mixing]

    MTC (MIDI Time Code) allows simultaneous synchronization of multiple audio devices via standard MIDI cables. It includes data corresponding to hours, minutes, seconds, and frames. The MO does not transmit MTC. An instrument such as the Yamaha AW2400 is necessary as an MTC master.
  • Page 107: Connecting To A Computer

    Controlling an MTR by using MMC transmitted from the MO You can control the start/stop and fast forward/rewind of the MMC-compatible MTR from the SEQ TRANSPORT buttons on the front panel of the MO, outputting MMC messages via MIDI. SEQ TRANSPORT LOCATE MMC (MIDI Machine Control) allows remote control of multitrack recorders, MIDI sequencers, etc.
  • Page 108 Connections Thru Port Setting MIDI ports can be used to divide playback among multiple synthesizers, as well as expand the MIDI channel capacity beyond sixteen. In the example below, a separate synthesizer connected to the MO is played by MIDI data via port 5, as set in the ThruPort parameter with the following operation.
  • Page 109 Local On/Off—when Connected to a Computer When connecting this synthesizer to a computer, the keyboard performance data is generally sent to the computer, and then returned from the computer to play the tone generator block. If the Local Control in the Utility mode is set to “on,” a “double” sound may result, since the tone generator is receiving performance data from both the keyboard directly and the computer.
  • Page 110: Using As A Multi-timbral Tone Generator For Your Daw/sequencer

    Song/Pattern can be set in the [F1] VOICE display in the Song/Pattern Mixing Edit mode. MIDI ports 1 – 8 of USB are shown as “YAMAHA USB IN/OUT 0-1” – “YAMAHA USB IN/OUT 0-8” in Windows, and as “YAMAHA MO Port 1”...
  • Page 111 Record your song data to the sequencer song file. For details, refer to the owner’s manual of your sequencer. Play back the sequencer song file using the sounds of the MO. When a Note On message is received, the corresponding Part is played.
  • Page 112: Using The Mo With Computer Software

    Voices and Mixing settings (Multis) with remarkable efficiency, speed and convenience. The latest versions of MO6/MO8 Voice Editor and Multi Part Editor can be downloaded at our website: http://www.yamahasynth.com/download/ For details on how to operate the Editor, refer to the PDF manual included with the Editor.
  • Page 113 “off” because the Multi Part Editor is not used. The “general” setting is for remote control of the Yamaha software. This lets you control the Multi Part Editor in Mode A, and control Yamaha sequencer software in Mode B.
  • Page 114 Surfaces] to call up the Control Surface window. Click the “[+] button, select “Mackie Control,” then set the Input Port to “YAMAHA USB IN 0-4” and the Output Port to “YAMAHA USB OUT 0-4” (for example, when setting the Port to “4” in step 4 of “Setting up for Remote Control”).
  • Page 115 Using the Remote Control functions To enter the Remote Control mode, press the [DAW REMOTE] button (the lamp flashes). The REMOTE display appears, and the panel controls are enabled for Remote operation of the computer software (their normal functions are disabled). Press this button again to exit from the Remote Control mode.
  • Page 116 “General” Bank, Group [A] – [H], Number [1] – [16] buttons These buttons are assigned to perform the same functions as the buttons directly over the faders on the Yamaha 01X, Mackie Control and Logic Control. When the Mode is set to “General”...
  • Page 117: Remote Control Assignments

    Checking the Remote Control assignments If you’re unsure as to which software function has been assigned to a particular panel control on the MO, this convenient feature lets you quickly check it from the display. In the Remote Control mode, press the [INFORMATION] button to call up the information display, indicating the function of the last pressed button.
  • Page 118 Using the MO with computer software Button/Controller names on 01X [AUX/BUS] Opens the AUX/BUS window or brings it to the front of the computer screen (when the Audio Mixer is active). [OTHER] Starts the Audio Mixer or brings it to the front of the computer screen.
  • Page 119 Button/Controller names Functions on Logic Control [RWD] Press to continuously rewind. Press repeatedly to rewind more quickly. When the Marker is turned on, this operation moves the song position to the previous Marker. When Nudge is turned on, this operation moves the current object. [FF] Press to continuously fast-forward.
  • Page 120 Using the MO with computer software Button/Controller names on Mackie Control SEND mode [DYN] (SELECTED CHANNEL only) Knobs 1 – 8 For editing parameters. PLUG-IN mode [PLUG-IN] (SELECTED CHANNEL only) Knob 1 Changes the Slot Number (on page 1 only). Knob 2 Turns the Effects on or off (on page 1 only).
  • Page 121 When controlling Digital Performer 4.52: Functions of Mackie Control assigned to [F1] – [F6] and [SF1] – [SF5] buttons ASSIGNMENT SENDS PLUG-INS PAN/SEND BANK-L FADER BANKS TONE FLIP EDIT LEVEL METERS CHANNEL-L CHANNEL-R BANK-L Track Groups/Windows SEQ EDITOR TR OVERVIEW MIXING BOARD ARP FX GROUOP UNGROUP...
  • Page 122: Creating Your Original Program Set (master Mode)

    Creating Your Original Program Set (Master mode) Creating Your Original Program Set The Master mode is the highest mode in the MO hierarchy, letting you instantly switch between programs you’ve created in the Voice, Performance, Song and Pattern modes. Use the Master mode in one of the following ways: Storing your favorite programs This lets you register settings that you often use in the Voice, Performance, Song or Pattern mode, and instantly recall the mode and custom settings together in a single button press, without having to first select a mode.
  • Page 123 Storing your favorite programs Select a Master to be created. Press the [F2] MEMORY button to call up the Mode setting display. Select the desired mode and program number to register the Master. If you want to divide the keyboard into multiple Zones in the Master, set the Zone Switch to “on.”...
  • Page 124 Creating Your Original Program Set (Master mode) After setting the Mode and Program number which you wish to memorize to the Master, set the Zone Switch to “on.” Determines the mode that is called up when the Master number is selected. Press the [EDIT] button to enter the Master Edit mode.
  • Page 125 Using Zones effectively with an external tone generator The two examples below show how to use the Zones with both the internal tone generator and a connected external tone generator. These instructions correspond to the steps on the previous page. Though all four Zones are used in the example below, you can use any number of Zones (two, three, or four).
  • Page 126 Creating Your Original Program Set (Master mode) Assigning Control Change numbers to the Knobs/Sliders for each Zone Here in the KN/CS display of the Master Edit mode, you can set how the Control Knobs and Sliders will affect each Zone. This lets you specify a separate MIDI Control Change number for each Knob and Slider.
  • Page 127: F1] Init

    Setting up the Master Zones to Split or Layer This operation lets you easily determine whether the Zones of the selected Master are to be used in a Split or a Layer. The note range settings for each Zone can be determined by setting the NoteLimitH and NoteLimitL parameters from the NOTE display ([MASTER] [EDIT] Zones 1 and 2 are used in the explanations here.
  • Page 128: Basic Structure

    Internal Structure (System Overview) Basic Structure This section gives you an easy-to-understand overview of the MO—its wide range of sophisticated features, its MIDI control and performance functions, and its convenient file management system for original data you’ve created with the instrument. Internal Structure (System Overview) This synthesizer is made up of several blocks, as shown here.
  • Page 129: Tone Generator Block

    AWM2 (Advanced Wave Memory 2) is a synthesis system based on sampled waves (sound material), and is used in many Yamaha synthesizers. For extra realism, each AWM2 Voice uses multiple samples of a real instrument’s waveform. Furthermore, a wide variety of parameters—envelope generator, filter, modulation, and others—can be applied.
  • Page 130 Internal Structure (System Overview) The illustration below shows the structure and interrelationship of the Voices, Performances, and Mixings. One Voice VOICE Up to four elements (Normal Voice) Up to 73 keys (Drum Voice) This synthesizer has two types of Voices—Voices created in the Voice mode and Mixing Voices (dedicated for the Song/Pattern) created in the Mixing Voice mode.
  • Page 131: Normal Voice

    The following illustrations may help in understanding the memory structure of the Voices, Performances, and Mixings. VOICE Voices Preset Voice PRE 1 Normal Voices: 512 Drum Voices: 64 A. PIANO PRE 2 KEYBOARD GM Voice Normal Voices: 128 Drum Voice: 1 BRASS User Voice USER 1...
  • Page 132 Internal Structure (System Overview) Normal Voice and Drum Voice Internally, there are two Voice Types: Normal Voices and Drum Voices. Normal Voices are mainly pitched musical instrument-type sounds that can be played over the range of the keyboard. Drum Voices are mainly percussion/drum sounds that are assigned to individual notes on the keyboard.
  • Page 133 Filter [VOICE] Voice selection [EDIT] Element selection/ Drum Key selection [F3] FILTER This unit modifies the tone of the sound output from Pitch by cutting the output of a specific frequency portion of the sound. Cutoff Frequency and Resonance Here’s how filters work. In the example below (a low pass filter), a portion of the signal lower than a given frequency is allowed to pass, and signals above that frequency are cut.
  • Page 134 Internal Structure (System Overview) Amplitude [VOICE] Voice selection [EDIT] Drum Key selection [F4] AMP This unit controls the output level (amplitude) of the sound output from the Filter block. The signals are then sent at this level to the Effect block. Also, by setting the AEG (Amplitude Envelope Generator), you can control how the volume changes over time.
  • Page 135 Part structure of the Tone Generator block The MO plays the sounds in its tone generator block in response to MIDI messages received from external controllers or sequencer. The MIDI messages are assigned to sixteen independent channels, and the instrument is capable of simultaneously playing sixteen separate Parts, via the sixteen MIDI channels.
  • Page 136: Sequencer Block

    Internal Structure (System Overview) Sequencer Block This block lets you create Songs and Patterns by recording and editing your performances as MIDI data (from the controller block), then playing it back with the tone generator block. The sequencer block can be operated in the Song mode, in the Pattern mode, and with the Arpeggio feature.
  • Page 137 Song Mixing Even if you record your keyboard performance to a Song track, the setup data (non-note events such as voice, pan, volume) which for proper playback should be recorded at the top of the Song will not be recorded to it. For this reason, the setup data handled as Song Mixing settings should be stored in the Song Mixing Store mode.
  • Page 138 Internal Structure (System Overview) Pattern Mixing Even if you record your keyboard performance to a Pattern track, the setup data (non-note events such as voice, pan, volume) which for proper playback should be recorded at the top of the Pattern will not be recorded to it. For this reason, the setup data handled as Pattern Mixing settings should be stored in the Pattern Mixing Store mode.
  • Page 139 Loop Recording (Pattern) [PATTERN] [REC] (Record) [F1] SETUP Pattern repeats the rhythm pattern of several measures (1 to 256 measures) in a “loop,” and its recording is also done using loops. This method is used when recording a Pattern Phrase using the Overdub method (above).
  • Page 140: Effect Block

    Internal Structure (System Overview) Effect Block This block applies effects to the output of the tone generator block, processing and enhancing the sound using sophisticated DSP (digital signal processing) technology. Effect structure The effect processing of this synthesizer features the System Effects, Insertion Effects, Master Effect, Part EQ (Equalizer), and Master EQ (Equalizer).
  • Page 141 Equalizer (EQ) Usually an equalizer is used to correct the sound output from amps or speakers to match the special character of the room, or to change the tonal character of the sound. The sound is divided into several frequency bands, and adjustments are made to the sound by raising or lowering the level of each band.
  • Page 142: In The Voice Mode

    Internal Structure (System Overview) Effect connection in each mode In the Voice mode The Effect parameters in the Voice mode are set for each Voice and the settings are stored as a User Voice. Note that the Master Effect and Master EQ parameters are set for all the Voices in the Utility mode. Once the Master Effect and EQ settings have been made, they can be stored as System settings by pressing the [STORE] button.
  • Page 143 In the Performance mode The Effect parameters in the Performance mode are set for each Performance. [PERFORM] Performance selection [EDIT] [COMMON] [F6] EFFECT [SF1] CONNECT The Insertion connection type depends on the setting of the Voice assigned to the selected Part. Tone Generator Part 1 block...
  • Page 144 Internal Structure (System Overview) In the Song/Pattern mode The Effect parameters in the Song/Pattern mode are set for each Song/Pattern. [SONG]/[PATTERN] Song/Pattern selection [EDIT] [COMMON] [F6] EFFECT [SF1] CONNECT Tone Generator block Part 1 Part EQ *2 Owner’s Manual System effects (Reverb effect and Chorus effect) Chorus Ctg, Chorus Typ (Chorus Effect Category, Chorus Effect Type) Reverb Typ (Reverb Effect Type) Determines the effect type for Chorus.
  • Page 145 Arpeggio This function lets you automatically trigger musical and rhythmic phrases using the current Voice by simply pressing a note or notes on the keyboard. The Arpeggio sequence also changes in response to the actual notes or chords you play, giving you a wide variety of inspiring musical phrases and ideas—both in composing and performing.
  • Page 146: Octave

    Internal Structure (System Overview) Arpeggio playback types The MO features a total of 1787 Arpeggio types divided into 18 categories, each with its own playback type designed for use with particular types of Voices, as described below. Arpeggios for Normal Voices Arpeggio types (belonging to the categories except for the DrPC and Cntr) created for use of Normal Voices have the following two playback types.
  • Page 147 Arpeggio related parameters The Arpeggio related parameters can be set from the following displays, depending on the selected mode. Voice mode Arpeggio type parameters called up when selecting a Voice Assigning Arpeggio types to the [SF1] – [SF5] buttons for each Voice MIDI output parameters for Arpeggio playback for all the Voices MIDI output parameters for Arpeggio playback are set for each Voice in the Voice mode.
  • Page 148: Internal Memory And File Management

    Internal Memory and File Management Internal Memory and File Management As you use the MO, you’ll create many different kinds of data, including Voices, Performances, Songs, and Patterns. This section describes how to maintain the various types of data and use the memory devices/media for storing them. Maintaining data You can maintain the data you’ve created via the following three methods.
  • Page 149: Memory Structure

    Memory Structure This diagram details the relationship among the functions of the MO and the internal memory and USB storage device. Internal Memory Recall Buffer Compare Buffer (DRAM) Excluding Master and Utility settings Edit Buffer (DRAM) • Voice Edit • Mixing Voice Edit •...
  • Page 150: Internal Memory

    Internal Memory and File Management Internal Memory Below are explanations of the basic terms used in the Memory Structure illustration on the previous page. Flash ROM ROM (Read Only Memory) is memory designed specifically for reading out of data, and as such data cannot be written to it. Unlike conventional ROM, Flash ROM can be overwritten –...
  • Page 151: Reference

    Reference Voice mode Voice Play mode The Voice Play mode lets you perform a variety of general editing operations on the selected Voice. For more detailed and comprehensive editing operations, use the Voice Edit mode. Edited parameters with the exception of some parameters are stored to internal Flash ROM as a User Voice.
  • Page 152 Voice Play mode [F5] EG (Envelope Generator) This display contains the basic EG settings, both volume and filter, for the Voice, as well as the filter’s cutoff frequency and resonance settings. The settings made here are applied as offsets to the AEG and FEG settings in the Voice Edit mode. The full names of the available parameters are shown in the chart below, as they appear in the display.
  • Page 153: Voice Edit Mode

    Voice Edit mode There are two kinds of Voices: Normal Voices and Drum Voices. The following section shows how to edit the different types of Voices and explains the parameters available. Note that the parameters available for editing differ depending on the Voice types (Normal Voice, Drum Voice).
  • Page 154 Voice Edit mode Normal Voice Edit [SF5] OTHER KnobAssign PB Upper (Pitch Bend range Upper), PB Lower (Pitch Bend range Lower) AssignA, AssignB, Assign1, Assign2 [F2] OUTPUT Volume RevSend ChoSend For details on the Effect connections in the Voice mode, see page 142. [F3] ARP (Arpeggio) [SF1] TYPE Bank,...
  • Page 155 [SF2] LIMIT NoteLimit Determines the lowest and highest notes in the Arpeggio’s note range. Notes played in this range trigger the Arpeggio. Settings: C -2 – G8 VelocityLimit Determines the lowest and highest velocity in the Arpeggio’s velocity range. This lets you control when the Arpeggio sounds by your playing strength.
  • Page 156 Voice Edit mode Normal Voice Edit [F5] LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) From these displays, you can make a variety of LFO related settings. As its name suggests, the LFO creates waveforms of a low frequency. These waveforms can be used to vary the pitch, filter or amplitude to create effects such as vibrato, wah and tremolo. [SF1] WAVE Wave Speed...
  • Page 157 Determines the amount of time for the LFO effect to fade out (after the Delay time has elapsed). A higher value FadeOut results in a slower fade-out. Settings: 0 – 127 [SF3] PHASE Phase Determines the value for the particular step selected in the Step parameter below. Settings: 0, 90, 120, 180, 240, 270 Offset EL1 –...
  • Page 158: Element Edit

    Voice Edit mode Normal Voice Edit [F6] EFFECT For details on the Effect connections in the Voice mode, see page 142. For details on the Effect Types, refer to the Effect Type list in the separate Data List booklet. [SF1] CONNECT [SF2] INS A (Insertion A) [SF3] INS B (Insertion A) [SF4] REVERB...
  • Page 159: Tune

    [F2] PITCH [SF1] TUNE From this display you can set various pitch-related parameters for the selected Element. Coarse Determines the pitch of each Element in semitones. Settings: -48 – 0 – +48 Fine Determines the fine tuning for the pitch of each Element. Settings: -64 –...
  • Page 160: Owner's Manual

    Voice Edit mode Normal Voice Edit EGTimeSens (EG Time Sensitivity) FCenterKey Pitch Sensitivity and Center Key When Pitch Sensitivity is set to 100 Amount of pitch change Lower Center key range [F3] FILTER [SF1] TYPE Type Gain Cutoff Resonance/Width Distance HPFCutoff HPFKeyFlw (Key Follow) [SF2] VEL SENS...
  • Page 161 Determines the velocity sensitivity of the FEG Level. EGDepth, Curve For positive settings, the more strongly you play the keyboard, the more Filter changes the sound. Negative settings do the opposite; the more softly you play, the more the sound changes. The Curve parameter lets you select from five different preset velocity curves (graphically indicated in the display), that determine how velocity affects the Filter EG.
  • Page 162 Voice Edit mode Normal Voice Edit [F4] AMP (Amplitude) [SF1] LVL/PAN (Level/Pan) Level AlternatePan RandomPan ScalingPan [SF2] VEL SENS (Velocity Sensitivity Depth) EG Time, Segment Level, Curve [SF3] AEG (Amplitude Envelope Generator) [SF4] KEY FLW (Key Follow) LevelSens (Level Sensitivity) FCenterKey EGTimeSens (EG Time Sensitivity)
  • Page 163 FCenterKey Determines the central note or pitch for the Key Follow effect on Amplitude EG. Depending on the EG Time Sensitivity parameter above, the further away from the Center Key the keys are played, the more the time of the Amplitude EG deviates from the norm.
  • Page 164 Voice Edit mode Element Edit [F6] EQ (Equalizer) Type When set to EQ L/H Low Freq Settings: 50.1Hz – 2.00kHz Gain High Freq Setttings: 503.8Hz – 10.1kHz – Low Gain Settings: -32 – 0 – +32 Owner’s Manual Determines the Equalizer Type. This synthesizer features a wide selection of various equalizer types, which can be used not only to enhance the original sound, but even completely change the character of the sound.
  • Page 165 Drum Voice Edit When a Drum Voice is selected, Voice Edit parameters are divided into Common Edit (parameters common to all keys, up to 73), and Key Edit (parameters of individual keys). Common Edit [VOICE] These parameters are for making global (or common) edits to all keys of the selected Drum Voice. [F1] GENERAL [SF1] NAME Same as in Normal Voice Common Edit.
  • Page 166 Voice Edit mode Drum Voice Edit [SF2] OUTPUT InsEFOut (Insertion Effect Output) RevSend (Reverb Send) ChoSend (Chorus Send) [SF5] OTHER AssignMode RcvNoteOff (Receive Note Off) AlternateGroup [F2] PITCH [SF1] TUNE Coarse Fine [SF2] VEL SENS (Velocity Sensitivity) Pitch [F3] FILTER [SF1] CUTOFF LPFCutoff LPFReso...
  • Page 167 [F4] AMP (Amplitude) [SF1] LVL/PAN (Level/Pan) This display not only lets you make basic Level and Pan settings for the sound of each individual Drum key, it also gives you some detailed and unusual parameters for affecting Pan position. Level Determines the output for the selected Drum key (Wave).
  • Page 168: Voice Job Mode

    Voice Job mode Voice Job mode The Voice Job mode features several basic operations, such as Initialize and Copy. After setting parameters as required from the selected display, press the [ENTER] button to execute the Job. [F1] INIT (Initialize) This function lets you reset (initialize) all Voice parameters to their default settings. It also allows you to selectively initialize certain parameters, such as Common settings, settings for each Element/Drum key, and so on—very useful when creating a completely new Voice from scratch.
  • Page 169: Supplementary Information

    Supplementary information Micro Tuning List [VOICE] [EDIT] [COMMON] [F1] GENERAL M.TuningNo. Type Equal Temp (Equal temperament) PureMaj (Pure major) PureMin (Pure minor) Werckmeist (Werckmeister) Kirnberger Vallot&Yng (Vallotti & Young) 1/4 Shift (1/4 shifted) 1/4 tone 1/8 tone Indian Arabic 1 Arabic 2 Arabic 3 Setting example of Filter Scaling...
  • Page 170 Supplementary Information Filter Type List [VOICE] [EDIT] Element selection LPF24D (24dB/oct Digital Low Pass Filter) A dynamic 24dB/oct low-pass filter with a characteristic digital sound. Compared to the LPF24A type (below), this filter can produce a more pronounced resonance effect. Resonance These frequencies are “passed”...
  • Page 171: Performance Mode

    Performance mode Performance Play mode The Performance Play mode lets you perform a variety of general editing operations on the selected Performance. For more detailed and comprehensive editing operations, use the Performance Edit mode. Edited parameters with the exception of some parameters are stored to internal Flash ROM as a User Performance.
  • Page 172: Performance Edit Mode

    Performance Edit mode Common Edit Performance Edit mode Voice Edit parameters are divided into Common Edit (parameters common to all four Parts), and Part Edit (parameters of individual Parts). Common Edit These parameters are for making global (or common) edits to all four Parts of the selected Performance. [F1] GENERAL [SF1] NAME [SF3] MEQ OFS...
  • Page 173 [F3] ARP (Arpeggio) From this display you can set the Arpeggio related parameters. [SF1] TYPE Same as in Normal Voice Common Edit. See page 154. [SF2] LIMIT [SF3] PLAY FX (Play Effect) [SF4] OUT CH (Output Channel) From this display you can set a separate MIDI output channel for the Arpeggio playback data, letting you have the Arpeggio sound from an external tone generator or synthesizer.
  • Page 174 Performance Edit mode Part Edit Part Edit These parameters are for editing the individual Parts that make up a Performance. [F1] VOICE [SF1] VOICE PartSw (Part Switch) Bank Number [SF2] MODE Mono/Poly ArpSwitch (Arpeggio Switch) [SF3] LIMIT NoteLimitH (Note Limit High) NoteLimitL (Note Limit Low) VelLimitH (Velocity Limit High) VelLimitL (Velocity Limit Low)
  • Page 175 Determines the amount by which played velocities are adjusted for the actual resulting velocity effect. This lets VelSensOfst (Velocity Sensitivity Offset) you raise or lower all velocities by the same amount—allowing you to automatically compensate for playing too strongly or too softly. Settings: 0 –...
  • Page 176 Performance Edit mode Part Edit [F4] TONE You can set parameters related to the pitch and tone for each Part. Keep in mind that the settings made here are applied as offsets to the Voice Edit settings. [SF1] TUNE NoteShift Detune [SF2] FILTER Cutoff...
  • Page 177: Performance Job Mode

    Performance Job mode The Performance Job mode features several basic operations, such as Initialize and Copy. After setting parameters as required from the selected display, press the [ENTER] button to execute the Job. [F1] INIT (Initialize) This function lets you reset (initialize) all Performance parameters to their default settings. It also allows you to selectively initialize certain parameters, such as Common settings, settings for each Part, and so on—very useful when creating a completely new Performance from scratch.
  • Page 178: Song Mode

    Song Play mode Song mode Creating Songs—basic procedure Songs consist of the following three types of data: • MIDI sequence data (created in the Song Record mode, Song Edit mode, and Song Job mode) • Setup data (created in the Song Play mode) •...
  • Page 179: Song Record Mode

    Determines the MIDI transmission port for the corresponding track. Playback data of tracks set to off is output PORT via MIDI without any Port message. The internal tone generator parts of this synthesizer can be played back only over Port 1. Settings: off, 1 –...
  • Page 180 Song Record mode Song Record Standby mode (Tempo) Meas (Measure) [F2] VOICE In this display you can set the voice related parameters for the recording track. The settings here affect the Part for which the receive channel (set in the Mixing mode) matches the transmit (output) channel of the recording track.
  • Page 181 During Song Recording [SONG] Realtime Recording Refer to page 88 in the Quick Guide section. Step Recording Examples of Step Recording are described on page 193. [F1] SETUP Pointer indicating the current note position. Beat Graph This is the display in which notes are “placed” during step recording. When the meter is 4/4, the display is divided into four beats (one measure).
  • Page 182: Song Edit Mode

    Song Edit mode Song Edit mode This mode gives you comprehensive, detailed controls for editing the MIDI events of individual Song tracks. MIDI events are messages (such as note on/off, note number, program change number, etc.) that make up the data of a recorded Song. [F1] CHANGE Shows the Event List of the selected Song track.
  • Page 183: Song Job Mode

    This event changes parameter values for each tone generator Part. This event is used to set Part settings such (Registered Parameter Number) as Pitch Bend Sensitivity or Tuning. FMSB-LSB See page 225. Settings: 000 – 127 FDATA (Data Entry MSB-LSB) See page 225.
  • Page 184 Song Job mode SwingRate GateTime 02: Modify Velocity TR (Track) 001 : 1 : 000 – 999 : 4 : 479 SetAll Rate Offset 03: Modify Gate Time TR (Track) 001 : 1 : 000 – 999 : 4 : 479 SetAll Rate Offset...
  • Page 185 05: Transpose Transpose lets you change the key or pitch of the notes in the specified range. TR (Track) Determines the track (01-16, all) and range of measures/beats/clocks over which the Job is applied. 001 : 1 : 000 – 999 : 4 : 479 Note Determines the range of note pitches over which the Job is applied.
  • Page 186 Song Job mode [F3] EVENT (Event Job) Before executing the Event Job, make sure that you specify the track and range (measure : beat : clock) to which the Job is applied. Please note that the track to be specified varies depending on the Job.
  • Page 187 Determines the number of times the data creation is to be repeated. NumberOfTimes For example, if data is created in the range M001:1:000 – M003:1:000 and this parameter is set to 03, the same data will be created at M003:1:000 – M005:1:000 and M005:1:000 – M007:1:000. This Job lets you insert continuous volume or filter cutoff variations to create tremolo or wah effects.
  • Page 188 Song Job mode 02: Delete Measure Delete Range [F5] TRACK (Track Job) 01: Copy Track Data Type to be copied 02: Exchange Track Data Type to be exchanged 03: Mix Track Target tracks for the Mix operation 04: Clear Track Data type to be cleared 05: Normalize Play Effect TR (Track)
  • Page 189 [F6] SONG (Song Job) 01: Copy Song 02: Split Song To Pattern 03: Clear Song This Job deletes all data from the selected Song or all Songs, including the Mixing Voices. 04: Song Name This Job lets you assign a name to the selected Song. See “Basic Operation” on page 38. Song Mixing mode In this mode, you can set up mixing data for your songs, and set various parameters for the tone generator parts—including the desired Voice, as well as its level, pan, EQ, effect and other settings.
  • Page 190 Song Mixing Edit mode Common Edit [F6] TEMPLATE [SF1] MIX [SF2] PERFORMANCE Song Mixing Edit mode This mode provides more detailed Mixing parameters than in the Song Mixing mode. Keep in mind that Song Mixing parameters are not actually part of the Song sequence data in each track, but rather are settings for the tone generator, as it is played back by the Song data.
  • Page 191 [F4] CTL ASN (Controller Assign) From this display, you can assign Control Change numbers to the hardware controllers of the instrument (such as the Knobs), for each Song. The parameters are the same as in Performance Common Edit. See page 173. [F6] EFFECT For information on the effect connections in the Song mode, see page 144.
  • Page 192: Song Mixing Job Mode

    Song Mixing Job mode [F5] RCV SW (Receive Switch) From this display you can set how each individual Part responds to various MIDI data, such as Control Change and Program Change messages. When the relevant parameter is set to “on,” the corresponding Part responds to the appropriate MIDI data. Note that two different display types listed below are provided and you can switch between them by pressing the [SF5] button.
  • Page 193 Supplementary information Song Track Loop—setting example [SONG] [F3] TRACK [SF3] TR LOOP (Track Loop) In the example below, a 40-measure song has been recorded and Track 1 is set to play back normally over the 40 measures. Track 2 has been set to loop, and will repeat until the [J] (Stop) button is pressed.
  • Page 194 Supplementary infomation • Example 2 (Using the Tie function) Set the parameters as illustrated below. Since the first note is a half note, set the StepTime to the half- note icon (a value of 960), and set the GateTime to 80%, since you don't want the notes to play in legato.
  • Page 195 • Example 3 (Using the Rest function) Set the parameters as illustrated below. Set the StepTime to a quarter note (480) and the Gate Time to 80%. Enter the first note, F. Press and release F. Enter the next 8th rest as shown below. 1 Change this to an eighth note (240), since we’ll be entering an eighth-note rest.
  • Page 196: Pattern Mode

    Pattern Play mode Pattern mode Creating Patterns—basic procedure Patterns consist of the following three types of data: • MIDI sequence data (created in the Pattern Record mode, Pattern Edit mode, and Pattern Job mode) • Setup data (created in the Pattern Play mode) •...
  • Page 197 [F5] REMIX This function gives you a variety of semi-random presets for dividing the MIDI sequence data and altering the note lengths, letting you create completely new variations of a Pattern. Set the parameters below, then press the [ENTER] button to execute the Remix operation. You can press the Play button at this point to hear the results of the Remix.
  • Page 198: Realtime Recording

    Pattern Record mode Pattern Record Standby mode Pattern Record mode Pattern Record Standby mode [F1] SETUP Type (Recording Type) Loop Quantize Event (Tempo) Meas (Measure) [F2] VOICE From this display you can set Voice-related parameters for the selected track. The settings made here affect the tone generator parts whose MIDI receive channels match the MIDI transmit channel of the song track.
  • Page 199: Pattern Job Mode

    Pattern Job mode The Pattern Job mode contains a comprehensive set of editing tools and functions you can use to change the sound of the Pattern. It also includes a variety of convenient operations, such as copying or erasing data. After setting parameters as required from the selected display, press the [ENTER] button to execute the Job.
  • Page 200 Pattern Job mode 03: Mix Phrase 04: Append Phrase 05: Split Phrase 06: Get Phrase From Song 07: Put Phrase To Song 08: Clear Phrase 09: Phrase Name [F5] TRACK (Track Job) 01: Copy Track 02: Exchange Track Owner’s Manual This Job mixes all data from two selected user phrases (“A”...
  • Page 201 03: Clear Track Section and track from which data is to be cleared 04: Normalize Play Effect This Job rewrites the data in the selected track so that it incorporates the current Grid Groove settings. After specifying a track (TR 01 – 16) to which this Job is applied, press the [ENTER] button to execute this Job. 05: Divide Drum Track Separates the note events in a drum performance assigned to a specified track, and places the notes corresponding to different drum instruments in separate tracks (tracks 1 through 8).
  • Page 202 Pattern Mixing mode 04: Clear Pattern 05: Pattern Name Pattern Mixing mode In this mode, you can set up mixing data for your patterns, and set various parameters for the tone generator parts—including the desired Voice, as well as its level, pan, EQ, effect and other settings. Pattern Mixing parameters are not actually part of the Pattern sequence data in each track, but rather are settings for the tone generator, as it is played back by the Pattern data.
  • Page 203: Mixing Voice Mode

    Mixing Voice mode Creating Mixing Voices — basic procedure The Mixing Voice mode provides most of the same Normal Voice editing parameters as the Voice mode, with the main exception that these Voices are dedicated for use with the Songs and Patterns, and are stored specifically as Mixing Voices. The Mixing Voice Job mode lets you use the supplementary functions like Copy and Delete.
  • Page 204 Mixing Voice Job mode Mixing Voice Job mode The Mixing Voice Job mode features two basic operations, Copy and Delete. After setting parameters as required from the selected display, press the [ENTER] button to execute the Job. [F2] RECALL If you are editing a Mixing Voice and select a different Mixing Voice, Mixing program, Song or Pattern without storing your edited one, all the edits you’ve made will be erased.
  • Page 205: Utility Mode

    Octave Determines the amount in octaves by which the range of the keyboard is shifted up or down. This setting can be changed also by pressing any of the [OCTAVE] buttons on the MO6. Settings: -3 – 0 – +3 Transpose Determines the amount in semitones by which the range of the keyboard is shifted up or down.
  • Page 206 Utility mode [SF4] OTHER AutoLoad PowerOnMode CtrlReset (Controller Reset) [F2] OUTPUT L&RGain [F3] VOICE These special voice-related settings are available only when entering the Utility mode from the Voice mode, letting you set parameters related to all the Voices. [SF1] MEQ (Master EQ) [SF2] MEF (Master Effect) [SF3] ARP CH (Arpeggio Channel)
  • Page 207 Sets the number of count-in measures provided before recording actually starts after pressing the [F] (Play) RecCount button in the Record standby mode. Settings: off (Recording starts as soon as the [F] button is pressed), 1 meas – 8 meas Since the click sound is created with the internal tone generator, using click playback affects the overall polyphony of this synthesizer.
  • Page 208 Utility mode [SF4] QUICK SET [F4] CTL ASN (Controller Assign) [SF1] ARP (Arpeggio) Switch Hold [SF2] ASSIGN ASA (Assign A) Dest (Destination) ASB (Assign B) Dest (Destination) Owner’s Manual If you use the MO for a variety of sequencer based applications and switch between those applications, the Quick Setup comes in handy.
  • Page 209 [SF3] FT SW (Footswitch) FSAssign (Footswitch Assign) From this display you can determine the Control Change number generated by using the Footswitch connected to the FOOT SWITCH jack. Keep in mind that if the same MIDI Control Change messages set here are received from an external device, the internal tone generator also responds to those messages as if the Footswitch of the instrument was used.
  • Page 210: Utility Job Mode

    This synthesizer does not transmit MTC. A device such as the Yamaha AW2400 is necessary in order to use this synthesizer as an MTC master. MMC (MIDI Machine Control) allows remote control of multitrack recorders, MIDI sequencers, etc. A MMC-compatible multitrack recorder, for example, will automatically respond to start, stop, fast forward, and fast reverse operations performed on the controlling sequencer, thus keeping playback of the sequencer and multitrack recorder aligned.
  • Page 211: File Mode

    File mode The File mode provides tools for transferring data between the instrument and USB storage device. For details about USB storage devices, see page 31. For details about the relationship between the data created on this synthesizer and the files for saving, see page 149. File mode For information on how to select a file/folder and how to create a new folder, see page 213.
  • Page 212 File mode [F4] RENAME Select the desired file type. Select the file/folder to be renamed. Rename the selected file/folder here. [SF1] EXEC [SF2] SETNAME [F6] NEW [F5] DELETE Select the desired file type. Select the file or folder to be deleted. Owner’s Manual From this display you can rename files or folders in the selected USB storage device, using up to eight alphabetic and numeric characters.
  • Page 213 Supplementary information File ( )/Folder ( ) selection The instructions and illustrations below show you how to select files and folders on the USB storage devices within the File mode. Move the cursor to the desired file or folder by using the [INC/YES] and [DEC/NO] buttons or the data dial.
  • Page 214 Voice Editor .W7E The Voice data edited via the MO6/MO8 Voice Editor on your computer can be loaded to the instrument. * Assigned to the file which can be loaded. • The “All Voice,” “UserARP,” “All Song,” “All Pattern,” and “Voice Editor” files using the MOTIF ES can be loaded to the MO. These file extensions are same as the MO.
  • Page 215: Master Mode

    Master mode Master Play mode The Master Play mode lets you perform a variety of general editing operations on the selected Master. For more detailed and comprehensive editing operations, use the Master Edit mode. Edited parameters with the exception of some parameters are stored to internal Flash ROM as a User Master.
  • Page 216: Master Edit Mode

    Master Edit mode Common Edit Master Edit mode The Master Edit is divided into Common Edit, for setting parameters common to all four Zones, and Zone Edit, for setting parameters of individual Zones. When Zone Switch is set to on in the [F2] MEMORY display in the Master Play mode, only the Common Edit is available. Common Edit These parameters are for making global (or common) edits to all four Zones of the selected Master.
  • Page 217 [F3] TX SW (Transmit Switch) From this display you can set how the playing of each individual Zone affects transmission of various MIDI messages, such as Control Change and Program Change messages. When the relevant parameter is set to “on,” playing the selected Zone will transmit the corresponding MIDI messages. Note that two different display types are provided (see below).
  • Page 218 Master Job mode Zone Edit Master Job mode The Master Job mode contains two convenient operations (called “Jobs”)—one letting you initialize (reset) the Master data, and the other letting you transmit your edited Master data to an external MIDI device or computer. After setting parameters as required from the selected display, press the [ENTER] button to execute the Job.
  • Page 219: Appendix

    Appendix Information Displays The convenient Information displays let you see at-a-glance some of the more important settings relevant to each mode. Select the desired mode, then press the [INFORMATION] button to call up the Information display for that mode. To exit from the display, press the button again (or any other panel button).
  • Page 220 Information Displays Pattern mode Pattern Play mode Indicates the amount of currently unused (available) memory (DRAM) for Pattern Phrase recording. Pattern Mixing mode Same as in the Song Mixing mode. Mixing Voice Edit mode Same as in the Song Mixing Voice Edit mode. Utility mode MIDI IN/OUT Indicates which physical output terminal(s) will be used for...
  • Page 221: Display Messages

    Display Messages LCD Indication Are you sure ? [YES]/[NO] Confirms whether you want to execute a specified operation or not. Press [INC/YES] or [DEC/NO] as required. Arp memory full The internal memory for Arpeggio data is full, preventing storing the recorded sequence data as an Arpeggio. Arpeggio type stored The current Arpeggio type has been stored to one of the [SF1] - [SF5] buttons.
  • Page 222 Display Messages LCD Indication Please stop sequencer. Power on mode stored Read only file. Receiving MIDI bulk Recording stopped Scene & Arpeggio type stored Seq memory full. System memory crashed. This performance uses user voices. Too many favorites Too many fixed notes Transmitting MIDI bulk Unknown file format.
  • Page 223: About Midi

    About MIDI MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a standard which allows electronic musical instruments to communicate with each other, by sending and receiving compatible Note, Control Change, Program Change and various other types of MIDI data, or messages. This synthesizer can control other MIDI devices by transmitting note related data and various types of controller data. It can also be controlled by incoming MIDI messages which automatically determine the tone generator mode, select MIDI channels, voices and effects, change parameter values, and of course play the voices specified for the various Parts.
  • Page 224: Channel Messages

    About MIDI CHANNEL MESSAGES Channel messages contain data related to the performance on the keyboard for the specific channel. Note On/Note Off (Key On/Key Off) Messages which are generated when the keyboard is played. Reception note range = C-2 (0) – G8 (127), C3 = 60 Velocity range = 1 –...
  • Page 225 Decay Time (Control #075) Messages which adjust the AEG decay time set for each Part. The value set here is an offset value which will be added to or subtracted from the voice data. Effect1 Depth (Reverb Send Level) (Control #091) Messages which adjust the send level for the Reverb effect.
  • Page 226: System Messages

    About MIDI Pitch Bend Pitch Bend messages are continuous controller messages that allow the pitch of designated notes to be raised or lowered by a specified amount over a specified duration. Channel Aftertouch Messages which let you control the sounds by the pressure you apply to the keys after the initial striking of the keys, over the entire channel.
  • Page 227: Troubleshooting

    (page 26). (Make sure to back up any important data to an external device first.) If the problem persists, consult your Yamaha dealer. No sound comes from the speakers.
  • Page 228 Troubleshooting • When the Song/Pattern produces no sound, is the Velocity Offset parameter in the Groove display set appropriately? [SONG]/[PATTERN] [F2] GROOVE Playback continues without stopping. • When the [ARPEGGIO ON/OFF] button is turned on, press it so that its lamp is turned off. •...
  • Page 229 • When the Performance/Song/Pattern produces a wrong pitch, is the Note Shift or Detune parameter of each Part set to a value other than “0”? [PERFORM] [EDIT] Part selection [F4] TONE [SONG]/[PATTERN] [MIXING] [EDIT] Part selection • When the Performance/Song/Pattern produces a wrong pitch, is the Note Offset parameter in the Groove display set to a value other than “0”? [SONG]/[PATTERN] [F2] GROOVE...
  • Page 230 Troubleshooting Song/Pattern (Phrase) cannot be recorded. • Is there enough free memory for recording? The total memory capacity determines the number of Songs/Patterns (phrases) that can be recorded. For example, if the memory contains Songs/Patterns (phrases) that use up a large amount of memory, the memory may become full even though the available Pattern or Song numbers are not all used.
  • Page 231: Specifications

    Accessories * Specifications and descriptions in this owner's manual are for information purposes only. Yamaha Corp. reserves the right to change or modify products or specifications at any time without prior notice. Since specifications, equipment or options may not be the same in every locale, please check with your Yamaha dealer.
  • Page 232: Index

    Index Index Numerics [1] – [16] buttons ...17, 34 1/4 Shift (1/4 shifted) ...169 1/4 tone ...169 1/8 tone ...169 [A] – [H] buttons ...17, 34 Accessories ...6 Active Sensing (FEH) ...226 ADD ...171 AEG (Amplitude Envelope Generator) ...134, 162, 176, 191 Aftertouch ...72 All Notes Off ...225 All Sounds Off ...225...
  • Page 233 Element ...53 Element Edit ...53 Element EQ ...141 Element Switch ...70 ElementSw (Element Switch) ...155, 158 ElemSw (Element Switch) ...157 [ENTER] button ...17 EQ (Equalizer) ...164, 167, 175, 191 [EQ] button ...51 Equal Temp (Equal temperament) ...169 Equalizer (EQ) ...141 Erase Event ...186 Event ...179, 198 EVENT (Event Job) ...186, 199...
  • Page 234 Index Mixing Voice Store mode ...204 MMC ...107 MODE ...24 Mode ...153, 174, 215 Mode A ...113 Mode B ...113 Mode structure ...27 Mode table ...28 Modify Control Data ...187 Modify Gate Time ...184 Modify Velocity ...184 Modulation ...224 Modulation wheel ...50 Mono ...225 Mono/Poly ...151, 153, 174, 191 MTC ...106...
  • Page 235: Transmitch

    Shelving type ...141 Shift Clock ...186 Single Timbre Tone Generator ...134 Slave ...105 Slope ...157 SMF (Standard MIDI File) ...100 [SOLO] button ...45, 55, 75 SONG ...197 Song ...23, 73, 136 SONG (Song Job) ...189 [SONG] button ...24 Song Chain ...95, 137 Song Edit mode ...90, 182 Song Job mode ...90, 183 Song Location ...92...
  • Page 236 Memo Owner’s Manual...
  • Page 237 Memo Owner’s Manual...
  • Page 238 Memo Owner’s Manual...
  • Page 239 For details of products, please contact your nearest Yamaha representative or the authorized distributor listed below. Pour plus de détails sur les produits, veuillez-vous adresser à Yamaha ou au distributeur le plus proche de vous figurant dans la liste suivante.
  • Page 240 Yamaha Web Site (English only) http://www.yamahasynth.com/ Yamaha Manual Library http://www.yamaha.co.jp/manual/ U.R.G., Pro Audio & Digital Musical Instrument Division, Yamaha Corporation © 2005 Yamaha Corporation WF68510 510MWCP58.2-01A0 This document is printed on chlorine free (ECF) paper with soy ink. Printed in Japan...

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