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HP StorageWorks MSA 2/8 - SAN Switch User Manual

Hp storageworks fabric os procedures v3.1.x/4.1.x user guide (aa-rs23c-te, june 2003).
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user guide
hp StorageWorks
fabric OS procedures version
3.1.x/4.1.x
Product Version: V3.1.x/V4.1.x
Third Edition (June 2003)
Part Number: AA–RS23C–TE
This guide describes the procedures for configuring switches, working with the management
server, working with diagnostics, and displaying switch status information.

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   Summary of Contents for HP StorageWorks MSA 2/8 - SAN Switch

  • Page 1 user guide hp StorageWorks fabric OS procedures version 3.1.x/4.1.x Product Version: V3.1.x/V4.1.x Third Edition (June 2003) Part Number: AA–RS23C–TE This guide describes the procedures for configuring switches, working with the management server, working with diagnostics, and displaying switch status information.
  • Page 2 © Copyright 1999-2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Hewlett-Packard Company makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    contents Contents Initial Configuration ..........13 Connecting and Configuring the Switch.
  • Page 4 Contents Connect Devices to the Switch ..........35 Verifying Device Connectivity .
  • Page 5 Contents Additional Help Topics ..........72 Hexadecimal Port Diagrams .
  • Page 6 Contents Setting the Boot PROM Password Only (SAN Switch 2/32) ....102 Setting the Boot PROM Password Only (Core Switch 2/64) ....104 About Forgotten Passwords.
  • Page 7 Contents Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing ......139 Overview..............140 Determining If You Need to Enable the Core PID .
  • Page 8 Contents Setting the Error Save Level of a Switch ........168 Displaying the Current Error Save Level Setting of a Switch .
  • Page 9 Contents Check for Zoning Discrepancies ......... . 202 Fabric Segmentation.
  • Page 10 Contents Test a Switches Internal Components ........222 Test Components To and From the HBA .
  • Page 11 Contents 16-Port Count Addressing ..........144 10 Larger Port Count Addressing .
  • Page 12 Contents Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 13: Initial Configuration

    Initial Configuration This chapter provides information on initial configuration tasks for a switch. Connecting and Configuring the Switch, page 14 Switch Login, page 21 Changing the Admin Password in v4.1 Firmware, page 23 Manage Licensed Features, page 25 Configure Fabric Parameters, page 28 Configure Software Features, page 30...
  • Page 14: Connecting And Configuring The Switch

    Initial Configuration Connecting and Configuring the Switch Perform the following tasks when initially connecting the switch: Physically Connecting to the Switch Beginning communication with the new switch requires a serial connection. Refer to the specific hardware manual for your switch for instructions on physically connecting to the switch.
  • Page 15: Configuring The Control Processor Ip Addresses For The San Switch 2/32

    Initial Configuration 7. At the Gateway Address prompt, enter the IP address of the gateway system if applicable. Press the Enter key to continue. The configuration is then committed to the switch firmware. 8. You are then prompted whether to make the IP address changes active now or at the next reboot.
  • Page 16: Configuring Ip Addresses For The Core Switch 2/64

    Initial Configuration 8. Enter the ippaddrset command to verify the data you entered, and exit. 9. Repeat the steps to configure all SAN Switch 2/32 switches. Example: switch:admin> ipaddrset Ethernet IP Address [10.77.77.77]: 10.64.119.7 Ethernet Subnetmask [10.77.77.76]: 255.255.240.0 Fibre Channel IP Address [0.0.0.0]: Fibre Channel Subnetmask [0.0.0.0]: Gateway IP Address [10.64.112.1]: IP address being changed...
  • Page 17 Initial Configuration — Ethernet Subnetmask — Hostname — Gateway IP Address 2. Log in to the switch as the admin user. 3. Enter the ipaddrset command at the command line. An interactive session is opened. 4. Choose the CP that you want to configure. Enter the value that corresponds to that logical region: —...
  • Page 18: Configuring A Logical Switch Ip Address For The Core Switch 2/64

    Initial Configuration Example: switch:admin> ipaddrset Switch number [0 for switch0, 1 for switch1, 2 for CP0, 3 for CP1]: 2 Ethernet IP Address [192.168.186.61]: Ethernet Subnetmask [255.255.255.0]: Hostname [192.168.68.193]: Gateway IP [255.255.255.0]: Committing configuration...Done. switch:admin> Configuring a Logical Switch IP Address for the Core Switch 2/64 1.
  • Page 19: Initial Setup Example

    Initial Configuration Example: switch:admin> ipaddrset Switch number [0 for switch0, 1 for switch1, 2 for CP0, 3 for CP1]: 0 Ethernet IP Address [192.168.186.61]: Ethernet Subnetmask [255.255.255.0]: Fibre Channel IP Address [192.168.68.193]: Fibre Channel Subnetmask [255.255.255.0]: Committing configuration...Done. switch:admin> Initial Setup Example The following example shows an initial setup of a Core Switch 2/64.
  • Page 20 Initial Configuration switch:admin> ipaddrset Switch number [0 for switch0, 1 for switch1, 2 for CP0, 3 for CP1]: 0 Ethernet IP Address [10.32.162.106]: Ethernet Subnetmask [255.255.255.0]: Hostname [192.168.68.193]: Gateway IP [255.255.255.0]: Committing configuration...Done. switch:admin> ipaddrset Switch number [0 for switch0, 1 for switch1, 2 for CP0, 3 for CP1]: 1 Ethernet IP Address [10.32.162.107]: Ethernet Subnetmask [255.255.255.0]: Hostname [192.168.68.193]:...
  • Page 21: Switch Login

    Initial Configuration Switch Login The following sections describe logging into a switch and changing the admin password. Logging Into the Switch To perform the initial login into a switch: 1. Verify that the switch is connected to your IP network through the RJ-45 ethernet port to enable connection through telnet.
  • Page 22: Changing The Admin Password In V3.1 Firmware

    Initial Configuration Changing the Admin Password in v3.1 Firmware For security reasons, the first time you log into the Fabric OS you are requested to change the system password. The following procedure applies specifically to v3.1. To change the admin password: 1.
  • Page 23: Changing The Admin Password In V4.1 Firmware

    Initial Configuration Changing the Admin Password in v4.1 Firmware The following procedures is specific to v4.1 firmware. For security reasons, the first time you log in to the Fabric OS you are requested to change the admin system passwords. There are four user levels: root, factory, admin, and user.
  • Page 24: Customize The Switch Name

    Initial Configuration Customize the Switch Name You can customize the switch names for the logical switches. If you chose to change the default switch name, use a switch name that is unique and meaningful. Note: Changing the switch name causes a domain address format RSCN to be issued. Switch Names Can be up to 15 characters in length Must begin with an alpha character...
  • Page 25: Manage Licensed Features

    Initial Configuration Manage Licensed Features Licensed features such as Extended Fabric, QuickLoop, and Fabric Watch are already loaded onto the switch firmware, but must be enabled with a license key. Once you have purchased these features, you are provided with a key to unlock the features in the firmware.
  • Page 26: Activating A License

    Initial Configuration Activating a License 1. Log into the Command Line Interface as the Admin user. 2. To activate a license, you must have a valid license key. Use the license key provided in the licensed Paper Pack. Activate the license using the licenseadd command, as follows: Example: switch:admin>...
  • Page 27 Initial Configuration Example: switch:admin> licenseshow SbQdRdzedzTcReS1: Web license bR9SeSydbckSATf1: Trunking license yQbze9eyzRc0f4: Fabric license bR9SeSydbcgSATfx: Performance Monitor license R9deQQeczeSAefRw: Extended Fabric license bR9SeSydbcsSATf9: Security license bcceR9QQyQcddfSG: Zoning license bR9SeSydbceSATfv: Fabric Watch license switch:admin> If a license is not listed, it is not activated. To activate a license on a switch using telnet and the command line interface, see “Activating a License”...
  • Page 28: Configure Fabric Parameters

    Initial Configuration Configure Fabric Parameters Fabric Parameters include all the items listed in the configure command. Fabric Parameters (displayed using the configshow command) must be identical for each switch across a fabric. To save time when configuring the fabric parameters: 1.
  • Page 29: (optional) Enabling Core Pid Addressing

    Initial Configuration Configuration Requirement The Core PID must be enabled on all 2.6.0c + and 3.0.2g + switches. See (Optional) Enabling Core PID Addressing. (Optional) Enabling Core PID Addressing To enable Core PID addressing on 2.6.0c or 3.0.2g switches for the purpose of mixing in to a 4.x.x fabric: 1.
  • Page 30: Configure Software Features

    Initial Configuration Configure Software Features Configure the software features (such as Fabric Watch, Zoning, and Secure Fabric OS) for each switch. Refer to the User Guide for each software feature for configuration information. To save time, configure the software features on one switch, then save the configuration file, and download it to each of the remaining switches.
  • Page 31: Verify Switch Function

    Initial Configuration Verify Switch Function To verify that your switch is operating correctly, display information about the switch and port status. To display information about the switch and port status: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. Enter the switchshow command at the command line. This command displays a switch summary and a port summary.
  • Page 32 Initial Configuration 3. Check that the switch and ports are online. 4. (Optional) Verify that the device is connected to the switch by entering the nsshow [-r] command. Use the -r option to replace the TTL attribute output with SCR (state change registration) information in the display.
  • Page 33: Connect Isls To Switch

    Initial Configuration Connect ISLs to Switch Refer to the switch installation guide supplied with your specific switch (the installation guide is also available on the v3.1.x or v4.1.x Software CD) for ISL connection and cable management information. Verifying the Fabric Connectivity To verify that you have fabric-wide switch connectivity, display a summary of information about the fabric.
  • Page 34 Initial Configuration Example: switch:admin> fabricshow Switch ID Worldwide Name Enet IP Addr FC IP Addr Name ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1: fffc01 10:00:00:60:69:80:04:5a 192.168.186.61 192.168.68.193 "switch61" 3: fffc03 10:00:00:60:69:10:9c:29 192.168.186.175 0.0.0.0 "switch175" 4: fffc04 10:00:00:60:69:12:14:b7 192.168.174.70 0.0.0.0 "switch70" 5: fffc05 10:00:00:60:69:45:68:04 192.168.144.121 0.0.0.0 "switch121"...
  • Page 35: Connect Devices To The Switch

    Initial Configuration Connect Devices to the Switch Power off all devices (to minimize Port Logins (PLOGIs)) and connect them to the switch, according to your topology. For devices that cannot be powered off, connect the devices, but use the portdisable command to disable the port on the switch.
  • Page 36 Initial Configuration switch:admin> nsallshow 12 Nx_Ports in the Fabric { 011200 0118e2 0118e4 0118e8 0118ef 021200 0214e2 0214e4 0214e8 0214ef switch:admin> nsAllShow 8 8 FCP Ports { 0118e2 0118e4 0118e8 0118ef 0214e2 0214e4 0214e8 0214ef switch:admin> nsAllShow 5 2 FC-IP Ports in the Fabric { 011200 021200} Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 37: Backing Up Switch Configuration Information

    Initial Configuration Backing up Switch Configuration Information The following sections describe how to back up switch configuration information. Making a Hard Copy of Switch Information It is recommended that you make a hard copy backup of all key configuration data, including license key information for every switch, and store it in a safe and secure place for emergency reference.
  • Page 38: Description Of Configupload Options

    Initial Configuration The second section Contains general switch configuration variables, such as diagnostic settings, fabric configuration settings, and SNMP settings. This section corresponds to the output of the configshow command (after the first few lines), although there are more lines uploaded than shown by the command.
  • Page 39: Basic Switch Management

    Basic Switch Management This chapter provides information on basic configuration tasks for a switch. The following procedures are described in this chapter: Switch Enable/Disable Procedures, page 40 Domain IDs, page 47 Firmware Versions, page 49 Switch Date and Time, page 51 Fabric Configuration Settings, page 53 Switch...
  • Page 40: Switch Enable/disable Procedures

    Basic Switch Management Switch Enable/Disable Procedures The following sections describe how to disable and enable a switch. Disabling a Switch To disable a switch: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. Enter the switchdisable command at the command line. All Fibre Channel ports on the switch are taken offline.
  • Page 41: Disabling A Port

    Basic Switch Management Disabling a Port To disable a port: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line, enter the portdisable command using the following syntax: portdisable [slotnumber]/portnumber (Optional) Specify the slotnumber and portnumber that you want to disable.
  • Page 42 Basic Switch Management portId: 021500 portWwn: 20:05:00:60:69:c0:06:71 portWwn of device(s) connected: 20:05:00:60:69:c0:06:71 Distance: normal Speed: 2Gbps Interrupts: Link_failure: 0 Frjt: Unknown: Loss_of_sync: 7 Fbsy: Lli: Loss_of_sig: Proc_rqrd: Protocol_err: 0 Timed_out: Invalid_word: 0 Rx_flushed: Invalid_crc: Tx_unavail: Delim_err: Free_buffer: Address_err: Overrun: Lr_in: Suspended: Lr_out: Parity_err:...
  • Page 43: Enabling A Port

    Basic Switch Management portWwn of device(s) connected: None Distance: normal portSpeed: N2Gbps Interrupts: 1086 Link_failure: 0 Frjt: 0 Unknown: 0 Loss_of_sync: 0 Fbsy: 0 Lli: 0 Loss_of_sig: 0 Proc_rqrd: 1086 Protocol_err: 0 Timed_out: 0 Invalid_word: 0 Rx_flushed: 0 Invalid_crc: 0 Tx_unavail: 0 Delim_err: 0 Free_buffer: 0 Address_err: 0 Overrun: 0 Lr_in: 0...
  • Page 44 Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> portenable 4 The following example is the portenable command output from a SAN Switch 2/32. Example: SAN Switch 2/32 switch:admin> portenable 4 switch:admin> portshow 4 portName: portFlags: 0x300082d7 portLbMod: 0x10 PRESENT ACTIVE E_PORT G_PORT U_PORT SEG MENTED CBL_LB LOGIN portType: portState: 1...
  • Page 45 Basic Switch Management portData: 0x11efc2d0 portId: 021500 portWwn: 20:05:00:60:69:c0:06:71 portWwn of device(s) connected: 20:05:00:60:69:c0:06:71 Distance: normal Speed: 2Gbps Interrupts: Link_failure: 0 Frjt: Unknown: Loss_of_sync: 7 Fbsy: Lli: Loss_of_sig: Proc_rqrd: Protocol_err: 0 Timed_out: Invalid_word: 0 Rx_flushed: Invalid_crc: Tx_unavail: Delim_err: Free_buffer: Address_err: Overrun: Lr_in: Suspended:...
  • Page 46 Basic Switch Management The following example is the portenable command output from a Core Switch 2/64. Example: Core Switch 2/64 switch:admin> portenable 4 switch:admin> portshow 4 portName: portFlags: 0x300082d7 portLbMod: 0x10 PRESENT ACTIVE E_PORT G_PORT U_PORT SEG MENTED CBL_LB LOGIN portType: portState: 1 Online...
  • Page 47: Domain Ids

    Basic Switch Management Domain IDs Domain IDs are assigned dynamically when a switch is enabled. However, the Domain ID can be set manually in order to control the number or to resolve a Domain ID conflict when merging fabrics. Display a Current List of Domain IDs 1.
  • Page 48: Setting A Domain Id

    Basic Switch Management If multicast alias groups exist, the following fields are shown: Group ID The alias group number and D_ID. Token The alias group token (assigned by the N_Port). Setting a Domain ID 1. Log into the switch. 2. Enter the switchdisable command to disable the switch. 3.
  • Page 49: Firmware Versions

    Basic Switch Management Firmware Versions Different StorageWorks Fibre Channel switches run different versions of Fabric OS firmware. The following table describes the switch series and the corresponding firmware: Table 3: Switch Series and Applicable Firmware Switch Type Correct Firmware StorageWorks 1 Gb SAN Fabric OS 2x switches SAN Switch 2/8 EL and...
  • Page 50 Basic Switch Management Fabric OS Displays the version of switch Fabric OS Made on Displays the build date of firmware running in switch Flash Displays the build date of firmware stored in flash proms BootProm Displays the version of the firmware stored in the boot PROM Usually the Made on and Flash dates are the same, since the switch starts running flash firmware at power-on.
  • Page 51: Switch Date And Time

    Basic Switch Management Switch Date and Time All switches maintain current date and time in non-volatile memory. Date and time are used for logging events. Switch operation does not depend on the date and time; a switch with an incorrect date and time value still functions properly. Note: This command is disabled when the security feature is enabled.
  • Page 52: Synchronize Local Time With An External Source

    Basic Switch Management Synchronize Local Time with an External Source Use this procedure to synchronize the local time of the Principal or Primary FCS switch to an external NTP server. 1. Log in as admin. 2. Enter the tsclockserver [ipaddr] command where ipaddr is the IP address of the NTP server.
  • Page 53: Fabric Configuration Settings

    Basic Switch Management Fabric Configuration Settings It is important to have consistent system configuration settings since inconsistent parameters among switches in the same fabric can cause fabric segmentation. To troubleshoot a fabric segmentation issue, refer to “Restoring the System Configuration Settings”...
  • Page 54: Backing Up The System Configuration Settings

    Basic Switch Management boot.server.name:host boot.user:user diag.loopID:125 diag.mode.burnin:0 diag.mode.burnin.1.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.10.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.2.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.3.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.4.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.7.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.8.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.9.name:switchess.sh diag.mode.burnin.level:0 diag.mode.esd:0 diag.mode.lab:28 switch:admin> Note: System configuration parameters vary depending on switch model and configuration. Backing Up the System Configuration Settings Keep a backup file of the system configuration settings in the event that the configurations are lost or unintentional changes are made.
  • Page 55: Restoring The System Configuration Settings

    Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> configupload Server Name or IP Address [host]: 192.168.15.42 User Name [user]: johndoe File Name [config.txt]: config-switch.txt Password:xxxxx configuration complete switch:admin> Restoring the System Configuration Settings System Configurations can be saved through the Fabric OS, or through Fabric Manager.
  • Page 56 Basic Switch Management switch, this file's configuration settings will override any current switch settings. Downloading a configuration file, which was uploaded from a different type of switch, may cause this switch to fail. Do you want to continue [y/n]: y download complete..
  • Page 57: Switch Names

    Basic Switch Management Switch Names Switches can be identified by IP address, Domain ID, WWN, or customized switch name. Changing a Switch Name To change the name of a switch: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. Enter the switchname command at the command line, using the following syntax: switchname “newname”...
  • Page 58: Switch Status Policies

    Basic Switch Management Switch Status Policies For detailed information about setting policy parameters, refer to the HP StorageWorks Fabric Watch Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide. The policy parameter determines the number of failed or non-operational units for each contributor that will trigger a status change in the switch. Each parameter can be adjusted so that a specific threshold must be reached before that parameter changes the overall status of a switch to MARGINAL or DOWN.
  • Page 59: Configuring The Policy Threshold Values

    Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> switchstatuspolicyshow The current overall switch status policy parameters: Down Marginal ---------------------------------- FaultyPorts MissingSFPs PowerSupplies Temperatures Fans PortStatus ISLStatus switch:admin> Configuring the Policy Threshold Values To set the switch status policy threshold values: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2.
  • Page 60 Basic Switch Management — Enter the number of temperature warnings required to change the switch status to DOWN and click Enter. — Enter the number of temperature warnings required to change the switch status to MARGINAL and click Enter. — Enter the number of fan speed warnings required to change the switch status to DOWN and click Enter.
  • Page 61 Basic Switch Management ** Simply hit the Return key. The minimum number of FaultyPorts contributing to DOWN status: (0..64) [2] FaultyPorts contributing to MARGINAL status: (0..64) [1] MissingSFPs contributing to DOWN status: (0..64) [0] MissingSFPs contributing to MARGINAL status: (0..64) [0] Bad PowerSupplies contributing to DOWN status: (0..4) [2] Bad PowerSupplies contributing to...
  • Page 62 Basic Switch Management 3. Verify the threshold settings you have configured for each parameter. Enter the switchstatuspolicyshow command to view your current switch status policy configuration. Note: By setting the DOWN and MARGINAL value for a parameter to 0,0, that parameter is no longer used in setting the overall status for the switch.
  • Page 63: Tracking Switch Changes

    Basic Switch Management Tracking Switch Changes The Track Change feature allows you to keep a record of specific changes that may not be considered switch events, but may be useful. The output from the track changes feature is dumped to the error log for the switch. Use the errdump command or errshow command to view the error log.
  • Page 64: Displaying Whether Track Changes Are Enabled

    Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> errdump Error 07 -------- 0x17ef (fabos): Mar 24 11:10:27 Switch: 1, Info TRACK-CONFIG_CHANGE, 4, Config file change from task:TRACKIPC Error 06 -------- 0x4e7 (fabos): Mar 24 11:10:24 Switch: 1, Info TRACK-TRACK_ON, 4, Track-changes on Displaying Whether Track Changes are Enabled To display the status of the Track Changes feature: 1.
  • Page 65: Routing

    Basic Switch Management Routing In Order Delivery In a stable fabric, frames are always delivered in order, even when the traffic between switches is shared among multiple paths. However, when topology changes occur in the fabric (for instance, a link goes down), traffic is rerouted around the failure.
  • Page 66: Restoring In-order Delivery Of Frames

    Basic Switch Management Restoring In-order Delivery of Frames To restore the default In-order delivery setting (which allows frames to be delivered out-of-order during topology changes for faster delivery): 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. Enter the iodreset command at the command line. Example: switch:admin>...
  • Page 67: Viewing Routing Path Information

    Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> dlsshow DLS is not set switch:admin> dlsset Committing configuration...done. switch:admin> dlsshow DLS is set switch:admin> dlsreset Committing configuration...done. Viewing Routing Path Information 1. Log in as admin. 2. Enter the topologyShow command to display the fabric topology, as it appears to the local switch.
  • Page 68 Basic Switch Management Example: switch:admin> topologyshow 2 domains in the fabric; Local Domain ID: 1 Domain: 6 Metric: 500 Name: switch Path Count: 4 Hops: 1 Out Port: 60 In Ports: None Total Bandwidth: 2 Gbps Bandwidth Demand: 0 % Flags: D Hops: 1 Out Port: 61...
  • Page 69 Basic Switch Management The following entries appear: Local Domain - Domain number of local switch. In Ports - Port from which a frame is received. Domain - Destination domain of incoming frame. Out Port - The Port that incoming frame will be forwarded to, in order to reach the destination domain.
  • Page 70 Basic Switch Management The example below displays the routing information for port 11 on slot 1 Example: switch:admin> urouteshow 1/11 Local Domain ID: 3 In Port Domain Out Port Metric Hops Flags Next (Dom, Port) -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11 2 16 1500 2 D 4,16 4 16 500 1 D 4,16 Example: The example below displays the routing information of port 11 to domain 4 only:...
  • Page 71: Help Commands

    Basic Switch Management Help Commands Each Fabric OS command provides Help information that displays what the command does, explains the possible operands, displays the command level, and sometimes provides additional information. Displaying Help Information for a Command To display help information about a command: 1.
  • Page 72: Additional Help Topics

    Basic Switch Management Additional Help Topics The help command lists most of the files. There are also commands that provide additional help files for specific topics. The following is not a complete list. For example: diagHelp—Print diagnostic help information. fwHelp—Print Fabric Watch help information. licenseHelp—Print license help information.
  • Page 73: Hexadecimal Port Diagrams

    Basic Switch Management Hexadecimal Port Diagrams Many of the commands, such as bcastshow, portLogShow, and portLogDump return port diagrams in hexadecimal format. Reading Hexadecimal Port Diagrams The following example shows the bcastshow command and a member port list, member ISL port list, and static ISL port list in hexidecimal format. Example: switch:admin>...
  • Page 74 Basic Switch Management Table 4: Hexidecimal to binary conversions (Continued) Hex value = Binary value Hex value = Binary value 5 = 0101 D = 1101 6 = 0110 E = 1110 7 = 0111 F = 1111 Once the Hexadecimal is converted into a binary bit map, each bit represents a port, where a value of 1 means yes and a value of 0 means no.
  • Page 75: Firmware Download

    Firmware Download This chapter provides information on upgrading firmware on the StorageWorks 2 Gb SAN switches using Web Tools and FOS CLI. This chapter provides the following information: About Firmware Downloads, page 76 Understanding the Dual-CP Firmware Upgrade Process, page 76 Non-Disruptive Firmware Activation, page 77 The Firmware Upgrade...
  • Page 76: About Firmware Downloads

    Firmware Download About Firmware Downloads The following sections help one understand the firmware upgrade process. Understanding the Dual-CP Firmware Upgrade Process The 4.1 version of firmware offers a non-disruptive firmware download process for the SAN Switch 2/32 and the Core Switch 2/64 dual-CP switch. The following process describes the default behavior of the firmwaredownload command on a Core Switch 2/64 dual CP when no options are used.
  • Page 77: Non-disruptive Firmware Activation

    Firmware Download Non-Disruptive Firmware Activation The v4.1 Fabric OS provides the ability to activate firmware non-disruptively. The Core Switch 2/64 platform provides non-disruptive behavior as long as both CP blades are installed, and that they are fully synchronized. Use the haShow command to confirm synchronization.
  • Page 78: The Firmware Upgrade Process

    Firmware Download The Firmware Upgrade Process The firmware upgrade processes are shown for the various switch models. Upgrading the Firmware on the SAN Switch 2/32 Note: The procedure below only applies to upgrading firmware version v4.0.0d or later. The SAN Switch 2/32 maintains a primary and secondary partition for firmware. The firmwaredownload command downloads only to the secondary partition.
  • Page 79 Firmware Download 4. Enter Y for yes to continue with the reboot, when prompted. Enter the firmwaredownload command to be prompted for parameters. Example: Displays a “prompted” firmware download. switch:admin> firmwaredownload Server Name or IP Address: 192.168.166.30 User Name: johndoe File Name: /pub/dist/system.plist Password: xxxxxx Full Install (Otherwise upgrade only) [Y]:...
  • Page 80: Upgrading The Firmware On The Core Switch 2/64

    Firmware Download Upgrading the Firmware on the Core Switch 2/64 Note: The procedure below only applies to upgrading firmware from versions v4.0.0d or later. When upgrading a that is running v4.0.0c or less, use the Core Switch 2/64 “Downloading Firmware to a Single CP on a Core Switch 2/64”...
  • Page 81 Firmware Download This message will vary, depending on the operating system you are currently running. Note, in this example the Active CP is CP1, and the Standby CP is CP0. 5. Enter the ipaddrshow command to determine the IP address of the Active Example switch:admin>...
  • Page 82 Firmware Download Example: Displays a "prompted" firmwaredownload switch:admin> firmwaredownload This command will upgrade both CPs in the switch. If you what to upgrade a single CP only, please use -s option. You can run firmwareDownloadStatus from a telnet session to get the status of this command. This command will cause the active CP to reset.
  • Page 83: Customizing The Firmware Download Process

    Firmware Download 9. Enter the firmwaredownloadstatus command in a new session to monitor the firmwaredownload status. After the firmware is downloaded, a firmware commit is started on both CPs and both partitions. 10. Enter the firmwareShow command in a new telnet session to display the new firmware versions.
  • Page 84: Downloading Firmware To A Single Cp On A Core Switch 2/64

    Firmware Download By default, firmwaredownload will do a full install of the whole firmware regardless of whether a package is already current or not. In Incremental Install Upgrade Mode, the names of packages are compared to what is already installed on the switch;...
  • Page 85 Firmware Download Example switch:admin> hashow Local CP (Slot 5, CP0): Active Remote CP (Slot 6, CP1): Standby, Healthy HA enabled, Heartbeat Up, HA State in sync This message varies, depending on the version of firmware that is currently installed. 3. Telnet in to the Active CP. Example Telnet 192.168.174.91 4.
  • Page 86 Firmware Download 5. Enter the User name and the Host IP (ftp server). 6. Answer the prompts as they appear. The following are the recommended responses. — Answer Y (yes) to Full Install. Answering no to this prompt can cause problems with the CP.
  • Page 87: Upgrading The Firmware Using Web Tools

    Firmware Download Upgrading the Firmware Using Web Tools For more information about Web Tools, refer to the HP StorageWorks Web Tools Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide. Use the following procedure to load new firmware: 1. Launch the web browser. 2. Enter the name or IP address of the licensed switch in the browser’s Location/Address field, and click Enter.
  • Page 88: Upgrading The Firmware Using The Cli

    Firmware Download Upgrading the Firmware Using the CLI Note: The following procedure does not apply to the SAN Switch 2/32 switch. For firmware information regarding the SAN Switch 2/32 switch, refer to “Upgrading the Firmware on the SAN Switch 2/32” on page 78 Use this procedure to download and commit a new firmware version to both partitions of flash memory.
  • Page 89: Frequently Asked Questions

    Firmware Download Frequently Asked Questions Password Migration When Upgrading and Downgrading Firmware Q: When the user upgrades to a newer firmware release for the first time, which passwords will be used? A: When you upgrade from v4.0.x to v4.1 for the first time, the v4.0 passwords will be preserved.
  • Page 90 Firmware Download Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 91: Basic Security In Fos

    Basic Security in FOS This chapter provides information provides the following general fabric security information: Ensuring a Secure Operating System, page 93 Secure Shell (SSH), page 93 Disabling the Telnet Interface, page 95 Listeners, page 95 About Passwords, page 97 Managing Passwords, page 99 Setting Recovery...
  • Page 92: Overview

    Basic Security in FOS Overview The following standard security information is specific to v4.1 firmware. Standard security in FOS depends on account and password management. The information in this chapter discusses security that is available without Secure Fabric OS. For information regarding Secure Fabric OS, refer to the HP StorageWorks Secure Fabric OS Version 1.0 User Guide.
  • Page 93: New Features

    Basic Security in FOS New Features Ensuring a Secure Operating System Fabric OS v4.1 uses Linux as the operating system in the switch. Therefore, securing the switch includes securing the underlying operating system as well. Fabric OS uses the Berkeley r-commands facility to transfer data between control processors in the Core Switch 2/64 platform.
  • Page 94 Basic Security in FOS prevent, or even detect, these attempts to sniff passwords. Secure Shell (SSH), is an alternative to Telnet, and uses strong encryption to prevent password sniffing and enhance the privacy of the management link. SSH encrypts all messages, including the client sending the password at login time.
  • Page 95: Disabling The Telnet Interface

    Basic Security in FOS Disabling the Telnet Interface From a security standpoint, with the addition of SSH, the telnet interface is no longer necessary to manage the switch. Some customers may wish to disable telnet to prevent a user from passing cleartext passwords over the network when logging in to the switch.
  • Page 96 Basic Security in FOS Table 5: Removed Listeners for the Core Switch 2/64 and SAN Switch 2/32 Listener Name Core Switch 2/64 SAN Switch 2/32 discard Do not start Do not start Do not start Do not start rexec Block with packet filter Do not start Block with packet filter Do not start...
  • Page 97: Passwords

    Basic Security in FOS Passwords About Passwords There are four accounts for each switch instance. For a Core Switch 2/64, there are four accounts for switch instance 0, and four accounts for switch instance 1. The account names are the same for the both switch instances. For the SAN Switch 2/32, there are four accounts.
  • Page 98: Default Fabric And Switch Accessibility

    Basic Security in FOS Table 7: Core Switch 2/64 Password Accounts Single Core Switch 2/64 root one password factory one password Logical Switch 0 One Set of Passwords user one password admin one password One Set of Passwords root one password factory one password Logical Switch 1...
  • Page 99: Zoning

    Basic Security in FOS All switches in the fabric can be accessed through serial port All switches in the fabric that have front panels (some of the 2000 series) can be accessed through front panel Zoning: Node WWNs can be used for WWN-based zoning Managing Passwords Modifying a Password There are four levels of account access.
  • Page 100: Setting Recovery Passwords

    Basic Security in FOS 4. Repeat for all switches in the fabric. Note: You cannot change account login names in Standard or Secure Mode. Setting Recovery Passwords About Boot Prom Passwords Fabric OS v4.1 provides the option of setting the Boot PROM and Recovery passwords.
  • Page 101: Setting Both The Boot Prom And Recovery Passwords (core Switch 2/64)

    Basic Security in FOS 1) Start system. 2) Recovery password. 3) Enter command shell. 4. Enter “2” at the prompt to set the Recovery password. The following message displays: “Recovery password is NOT set. Please set it now.” 5. Enter the Recovery password. The Recovery password must be between 8 and 40 alphanumeric characters.
  • Page 102: Setting The Boot Prom Password Only (san Switch 2/32)

    Basic Security in FOS 3) Enter command shell. 5. Enter “2” at the prompt to set the Recovery password. The following message displays: “Recovery password is NOT set. Please set it now.” 6. Enter the Recovery password. The Recovery password must be between 8 and 40 alphanumeric characters. A random password that is 15 characters or longer is recommended for higher security.
  • Page 103 Basic Security in FOS Note: Setting the Boot PROM password requires accessing the boot prompt, which stops traffic flow through the switch until the switch is rebooted. 1. Create a serial connection to the switch. If Secure Mode is enabled, connect to the Primary FCS switch.
  • Page 104: Setting The Boot Prom Password Only (core Switch 2/64)

    Basic Security in FOS 5. Enter passwd command at the prompt. Note: This command is specific to the Boot PROM password when entered from the boot interface. 6. Enter the Boot PROM password at the prompt, then re-enter when prompted. The password must be 8 alphanumeric characters (any additional characters are not recorded).
  • Page 105 Basic Security in FOS 4. Reboot the standby CP card by pressing the yellow ejector buttons at top and bottom of the CP card, then pressing both ejector handles back towards the switch to lock the card back into the slot. This causes the card to reset. 5.
  • Page 106: About Forgotten Passwords

    Basic Security in FOS About Forgotten Passwords Passwords can be recovered as follows: If the User, Admin, or Factory passwords are lost, but the Root password is known, follow the steps described in “Recovering a User, Admin, or Factory Password” on page 106. If the Root or Boot PROM password is lost, contact Technical Support.
  • Page 107 Basic Security in FOS A: The end-user is prompted to use the old password when the account is being changed or has the same or higher privilege than the login account. For example, if the login account is admin, the old admin password is required to change the admin password.
  • Page 108 Basic Security in FOS Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 109: Working With The Core Switch 2/64

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 This chapter provides information on working with the Core Switch 2/64. For detailed information about the Core Switch 2/64 refer to the Core Switch 2/64 installation guide (the installation guide is also available on the v3.1.x or v4.1.x Software CD).
  • Page 110: Ports On The Core Switch 2/64

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Ports on the Core Switch 2/64 In previous versions of the Fabric OS (v2.x and v3.x), the primary method for identifying a port within the fabric was the "domain,port" combination. The following example shows the zoneadd command where a port is identified using the domain, and port number.
  • Page 111: About The Slot/port Method

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Figure 1: Graphic Illustration of Core Switch 2/64 About the Slot/Port Method A new method of selecting ports is required in the Core Switch 2/64. To select a specific port you must identify both the slot number and port number you are working with.
  • Page 112: About The Port Area Number Method

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Note: No spaces are allowed between the slot number, the slash (/), and the port number. The Core Switch 2/64 has a total of 10 slots counted 1 to 10. Refer to Figure Slots number 5 and 6 are control processor cards Slots 1 through 4 and 7 through 10 are switch cards.
  • Page 113 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Example switch:admin> switchshow switchName: switch switchType: 10.1 switchState: Online switchRole: Subordinate switchDomain: switchId: fffc61 switchWwn: 10:00:00:60:69:80:04:5a switchBeacon: blade1 Beacon: blade3 Beacon: Area Slot Port Gbic Speed State ===================================== No_Light No_Light No_Module Online E-Port 10:00:00:60:69:80:04:5b "ulys62" (Trunk master) No_Light Online...
  • Page 114 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 No_Module No_Light No_Module Online F-Port 21:00:00:e0:8b:03:70:b1 Online E-Port 10:00:00:60:69:90:02:5e "sqad120" ( Trunk master) No_Light No_Module Online Loopback->Slot 3 Port No_Light No_Light Online E-Port 10:00:00:60:69:00:54:ea "san79" (Tr unk master) No_Light No_Light Online E-Port (Trunk port, master is Slot 3 Port Online E-Port...
  • Page 115: Basic Blade Management

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Basic Blade Management For the purposes of this section, Basic Blade Management refers to: Disabling a Blade on page 115 Enabling a Blade on page 116 Powering On a Blade on page 116 Powering Off a Blade on page 116 Displaying the Status of All Slots in the Chassis on page 118...
  • Page 116: Enabling A Blade

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Enabling a Blade To enable a blade unit. 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. Enter the sloton command with the following syntax the command line: sloton slotnumber where slotnumber is the slot number of the blade you want to enable. Example switch:admin>...
  • Page 117 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 The blade must be disabled so that processing stops. Refer to “Disabling a Blade” on page 115. 3. Enter the slotpoweroff command with the following syntax at the command line: slotpoweroff slotnumber where slotnumber is the slot number of the blade you want to power off. Example switch:admin>...
  • Page 118: Core Switch 2/64 Chassis

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Core Switch 2/64 Chassis Chassis-wide commands display or control both logical switches. Displaying the Status of All Slots in the Chassis To display the status of slots in the chassis: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2.
  • Page 119: Displaying Information On Switch Frus

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 DISABLED The blade is powered on but disabled. FAULTY The blade is faulty because an error was detected. UNKNOWN The blade is inserted but it’s state cannot be determined. switch:admin> slotshow Slot Blade Type Status --------------------------------- SW BLADE...
  • Page 120 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 — Object ID and object number. Valid values include the following: CHASSIS, FAN, POWER SUPPLY, SW BLADE (switch), CP BLADE (control processor), WWN, or UNKNOWN. The object number refers to the slot number for blades, and unit number for everything else. —...
  • Page 121 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Example switch:admin> chassisshow SW BLADE Slot: 1 Header Version: Power Consume Factor: -180 Brocade Part Num: 65-0000555-04 Brocade Serial Num: FQ000000000 Manufacture: Day: Month: Year: 2001 Update: Day: 18 Month: Year: 2002 Time Alive: 228 days Time Awake: 0 days...
  • Page 122 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Power Consume Factor: Brocade Part Num: 65-0000555-04 Brocade Serial Num: FQ000000000 Manufacture: Day: 26 Month: Year: 2002 Update: Day: 18 Month: Year: 2002 Time Alive: 131 days Time Awake: 0 days SW BLADE Slot: 8 Header Version: Power Consume Factor: -180...
  • Page 123: Blade Beacon Mode

    Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Blade Beacon Mode When beaconing mode is enabled, the port LEDs will flash amber in a running pattern from port 0 through port 15 and back again. The pattern continues until the user turns it off. This can be used to signal the user to a particular blade. Setting the Blade Beacon Mode To set the blade beacon mode on: 1.
  • Page 124 Working With the Core Switch 2/64 Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 125: The San Management Application

    The SAN Management Application This chapter provides the following information: The Management Server on page 126 Configuring Access to the Management Server on page 128 Displaying the Management Server Database on page 133 Clearing the Management Server Database on page 134 Activating the Platform Management Service on page 135 Deactivating the Platform Management Service...
  • Page 126: The Management Server

    The SAN Management Application The Management Server This chapter provides information on working with the Management Server (MS) platform database. The Fabric Operating System (Fabric OS) includes a Distributed Management Server. The Management Server allows a Storage Area Network (SAN) management application to retrieve information and administer the fabric and interconnected elements, such as switches, servers, and storage devices.
  • Page 127 The SAN Management Application fabric for management purposes; it contains interconnect information about switches and devices connected to the fabric. Under normal optional circumstances, a device (typically an FCP initiator) queries the Name Server for storage devices within its member zones. Because this limited view is not always sufficient, the MS provides the application with a list of the entire Namer Server database.
  • Page 128: Configuring Access To The Management Server

    The SAN Management Application Configuring Access to the Management Server An Access Control List (ACL) of WWN addresses determines which systems have access to the Management Server database. If the list is empty (default), the Management Server is accessible to all systems connected in-band to the Fabric. For a more secured access, an administrator may specify WWNs in the ACL.
  • Page 129 The SAN Management Application 2. At the command line enter the msconfigure command. The command becomes interactive. 3. At the select prompt enter 2 to add a member based on its Port/Node WWN. 4. At the prompt enter the WWN of the member you would like to add to the ACL.
  • Page 130: Deleting A Wwn From The Access Control List

    The SAN Management Application MS Access List consists of (13): { 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:aa 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:bb 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:ff 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:11 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:22 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:33 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:24 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:23 21:00:00:e0:8b:04:70:3b 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:33 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:55 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:66 00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00 Done Display the access list Add member based on its Port/Node WWN Delete member based on its Port/Node WWN select : (0..3) [1] 0 done ...
  • Page 131 The SAN Management Application 3. At the select prompt enter 3 to delete a member based on its Port/Node WWN. 4. At the prompt enter the WWN of the member you would like to delete from the ACL. Press the Return key, and the main menu is displayed. 5.
  • Page 132 The SAN Management Application MS Access List consists of (13): { 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:aa 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:bb 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:ff 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:11 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:22 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:33 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:24 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:23 21:00:00:e0:8b:04:70:3b 10:00:00:60:69:04:11:33 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:55 20:00:00:20:37:65:ce:66 00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00 Done Display the access list Add member based on its Port/Node WWN Delete member based on its Port/Node WWN select : (0..3) [1] 0 done ...
  • Page 133: Displaying The Management Server Database

    The SAN Management Application Displaying the Management Server Database To view the contents of the Management Server Platform Database: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the msplatshow command. The contents of the Management Server Database are displayed.
  • Page 134: Clearing The Management Server Database

    The SAN Management Application Clearing the Management Server Database To clear the MS Platform database: 1. Login to the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the msplcleardb command. 3. Enter Y to confirm the deletion. The Platform database is cleared. Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 135: Activating The Platform Management Service

    The SAN Management Application Activating the Platform Management Service To activate the Platform Management Service for a fabric, perform the following steps. 1. Login to the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the msplmgmtactivate command. Example: switch:admin>...
  • Page 136: Deactivating The Platform Management Service

    The SAN Management Application Deactivating the Platform Management Service To deactivate the Platform Management Service for a fabric: 1. Login to the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the msplmgmtdeactivate command. 3. Enter Y to confirm the deactivation. Example: switch:admin>...
  • Page 137: Controlling The Topology Discovery

    The SAN Management Application Controlling the Topology Discovery The Topology Discovery is an individual feature within the Management Server, and can be displayed, enabled, and disabled separately. Display the Status of MS Topology Discovery Service To display the current status of the Management Server Topology Discovery feature: 1.
  • Page 138: Disable The Ms Topology Discovery Feature

    The SAN Management Application Disable the MS Topology Discovery Feature Disabling the MS Topology Discovery management may erase all NID entries. To disable the MS Topology Discover management feature: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the mstddisable command. A warning displays that all NID entries may be cleared.
  • Page 139: Updating Switches To The Core Pid Addressing

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing For detailed information regarding migrating to larger SANs, refer to the Core Switch 2/64installation guide (the installation guide is also available on the v3.1.x or v4.1.x Software CD). This chapter provides information about updating the Core Switch Port Identifier (PID) Format, including best practices for updating an existing production SAN to the new PID format.
  • Page 140: Overview

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Overview Core PID addressing is an option of the configure command for 2.6.0c + and 3.0.2.g+ firmware, but not 4.x firmware. In a purely 4.x fabric, it is not necessary to enable Core PID addressing since this is set by default. However, even if you are configuring a Core Switch 2/64 or SAN Switch 2/32 switch, it is important to note this requirement if you have a fabric that mixes 4.x switches with other switches.
  • Page 141: Switch Update Requirements

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Figure 2: Switch Update Requirements Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 142: Determining If You Need To Enable The Core Pid

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Determining If You Need to Enable the Core PID Use the following scenarios to determine if any Core PID-related action is required for your particular fabric. Example Scenarios Table 8: Sample Fabric Scenarios Scenario Desired Change Required Action...
  • Page 143: About Core Pid Addressing

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Table 8: Sample Fabric Scenarios (Continued) Scenario Desired Change Required Action You have a fabric that Add an additional 2.x switch to No action is required. The switch is in consists of 2.x switches the fabric.
  • Page 144: About Fibre Channel Addressing

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing About Fibre Channel Addressing There are two addressing mechanisms used in Fibre Channel: Port Identifier (PID) - The PID is analogous to specifying the physical switch and port to which a device is attached in a network; it is not analogous to an IP address.
  • Page 145: Recommendations

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Recommendations Redundant fabrics and multi-pathing software are recommended for uptime-sensitive environments. If redundant fabrics are not used, there are numerous possible failure cases and even routine maintenance scenarios that can result in application downtime. This is true for any currently available Fibre Channel technology.
  • Page 146: About Pid Mapping

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Note: It is recommended not to use drivers that bind by PID. There are several routine maintenance procedures which may result in a device receiving a new PID. Refer to About PID Mapping for more information.
  • Page 147 Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Detailed Update Procedures for HP/UX and AIX provides examples of step-by-step instructions for certain PID-bound devices. These procedures are applicable to any of a broad class of routine maintenance tasks; indeed, they would apply to these devices in many scenarios with any Fibre Channel switch in any addressing mode.
  • Page 148: Evaluate The Fabric

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Evaluate the Fabric The fabric must be evaluated to: Find any devices which bind to PIDs Determine how each device driver will respond to the PID format change Determine how any multi-pathing software will respond to a fabric service interruption If current details about the SAN are already available, it may be possible to skip the Data Collection step.
  • Page 149: Make List Of Manually Configurable Pid Drivers

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Make List of Manually Configurable PID Drivers Some device drivers do not automatically bind by PID, but allow the operator to manually create a PID binding. For example, persistent binding of PIDs to logical drives may be done in many HBA drivers.
  • Page 150: Performing Empirical Testing

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing It is also important to understand how multi-pathing software reacts when one of the two fabrics is taken offline. If the time-outs are set correctly, the switchover between fabrics should be transparent to the users. Note: It is recommended that you use the multi-pathing software to manually fail a path before starting maintenance on that fabric.
  • Page 151: Planning The Update Procedure

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Planning the Update Procedure Whether it is best to perform an offline or online update depends on the uptime requirements of the site. An offline update requires less advance planning than an online update. However, it requires that all devices attached to the fabric be offline.
  • Page 152: Outline For Offline Update Procedure

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing 5. Change the PID format on each switch in the fabric (see “Procedures for Updating the Core PID Format”, on page 154). 6. Once the fabric has re-converged, use the cfgenable command to update zoning (see “Procedures for Updating the Core PID Format”, on page 154).
  • Page 153: Hybrid Update

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing 9. For any devices manually bound by PID, bring the device back online, but do not start applications. Update their bindings and reboot again if necessary. This may involve changing them to the new PIDs, or may (preferably) involve changing to WWN binding.
  • Page 154: Procedures For Updating The Core Pid Format

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Procedures for Updating the Core PID Format The following sections present basic procedures for update the Core PID format and detailed procedures for HP/UX and AIX. Basic Update Procedures This process should be executed as part of the overall online or offline update process.
  • Page 155: Detailed Update Procedures For Hp/ux And Aix

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Example: switch:admin> switchdisable switch:admin> configure Configure... Fabric parameters (yes, y, no, n): [no] yes Domain: (1..239) [1] R_A_TOV: (4000..120000) [10000] E_D_TOV: (1000..5000) [2000] Data field size: (256..2112) [2112] Sequence Level Switching: (0..1) [0] Disable Device Probing: (0..1) [0] Suppress Class F Traffic: (0..1) [0] SYNC IO mode: (0..1) [0]...
  • Page 156 Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing 2. If you are not using multi-pathing software, stop all I/O going to all volumes connected through the switch/fabric to be updated. 3. If you are not using multi-pathing software, unmount the volumes from their mount points using umount.
  • Page 157 Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing 14. Import the volume groups using vgimport. The proper usage would be vgimport –m <mapfile> <path_to_volume_group> <physical_volume_path>. For example: vgimport –m /tmp/jbod_map /dev/jbod /dev/dsk/c64t8d0 /dev/dsk/c64t9d0 15. Activate the volume groups using vgchange. The proper usage would be vgchange –a y <path_to_volume_group>.
  • Page 158: Aix Procedure

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing 19. Validate that the entry has been removed by using the command ioscan –funC disk. Notice in the following example that the NO_HW entry is no longer listed. Example het46 (HP-50001)> ioscan -funC disk Class H/W Path Driver S/W State...
  • Page 159 Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing rmdev -Rdl fcs0 7. Log into each switch in the fabric. 8. Issue the switchdisable command. 9. Issue the configure command and change the Core Switch PID Format to 10. Issue the configenable [effective_zone_configuration] command.
  • Page 160: Frequently Asked Questions

    Updating Switches to the Core PID Addressing Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is a PID? A: A PID is a Port Identifier. PIDs are used by the routing and zoning services in Fibre Channel fabrics to identify ports in the network. They are not used to uniquely identify a device;...
  • Page 161: Diagnostics And Status

    Diagnostics and Status For detailed diagnostics information, refer to the HP StorageWorks Diagnostic and System Error Message Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide. This chapter provides information on diagnostics and displaying switch, port, and hardware status information. Diagnostics Overview, page 162 Persistent Error Log, page 165 Syslog Daemon, page 165...
  • Page 162: Diagnostics Overview

    Diagnostics and Status Diagnostics Overview The purpose of the diagnostic subsystem is to evaluate the integrity of the system hardware. Diagnostics are invoked two ways: Manually (through the Fabric OS command line), or During the power-on self test (POST) The error messages generated during these test activities are sent to the console, error logs, and possibly to non-volatile storage.
  • Page 163 Diagnostics and Status There are two basic modes in which diagnostics can be manually run; they are normal interactive mode and burnin mode. Burnin mode has additional control commands for its operation. Diagnostics are also executed in the power-on self test (POST) operation, but do not require user command input.
  • Page 164: Interactive Diagnostic Commands

    Diagnostics and Status statsclear diagshow diagstatus diagreset diagcommandshow diaghelp forceerror forceporterror Interactive Diagnostic Commands When diagnostics are executed manually (from the Fabric OS command line), many commands require the switch/blade to be in an offline state. This ensures that the activity of the diagnostic does not interfere or disturb normal fabric traffic. If the switch/blade is not in an offline state (switchdisable or bladedisable), the diagnostic command will not run and display an error message.
  • Page 165: Persistent Error Log

    Diagnostics and Status Persistent Error Log The Persistent Error Log feature prevents messages of lesser severity from over-writing messages of greater severity. For example, Warning messages cannot over write Error, Critical, or Panic messages. Features of the persistent error log include: The error log sub-system supports persistent logging.
  • Page 166: Displaying The Error Log Without Page Breaks

    Diagnostics and Status Options are provided to the errdump command to display three options: all the errors (previous persistent log and the current run-time log), only errors from the current run-time cycle, or the errors from the persistent error log. Options are provided to clear the persistent error log.
  • Page 167: Displaying The Error Log With Page Breaks

    Diagnostics and Status Error 01 -------- 0x271 (fabos): Nov 24 15:04:06 Switch: 1, Info EM-BOOT, 4, Restart reason: Failover switch:admin> Displaying the Error Log With Page Breaks To display the error log: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2.
  • Page 168: Setting The Error Save Level Of A Switch

    Diagnostics and Status If no operand is specified, this command changes the way the error log appears in subsequent sessions. By default, the errShow command displays error messages from both the active session and persistent logs from previous sessions. However, using the errclear command with no operands makes the following change: in future sessions, you would have to use the errShow -p command specifically to view persistent error messages.
  • Page 169: Resizing The Persistent Error Log

    Diagnostics and Status Example switch:admin> errsavelvlshow Current message save level is = 3 switch:admin> The following example shows how to display current error log save level on the Standby CP for switch 0.The value -s is added to save the Standby CP. Example switch:admin>...
  • Page 170: Showing The Current Persistent (non-volatile) Error Log Configuration Of A Switch

    Diagnostics and Status Showing the Current Persistent (Non-Volatile) Error Log Configuration of a Switch To show the current maximum size of the persistent error log: 1. Log in to the switch as the admin user. 2. At the command line enter the errnvlogsizeshow command. The following example shows how to display persistent error log configuration Example switch:admin>...
  • Page 171: Syslog Daemon

    Diagnostics and Status Syslog Daemon The Fabric OS can be configured to use a UNIX style syslog daemon (syslogd) process to read system events and forward system messages to users and/or write the events to log files on a remote UNIX host system. See “Configuring syslogd”...
  • Page 172: Message Classification

    Diagnostics and Status Switch 2/64 uses the kernel logging facility. The word “kernel” is the name of the syslogd facility used by the Core Switch 2/64 or SAN Switch 2/32 to send error log messages to the remote host. The rest of the message is similar to the error log message output from the errshow command line interface on the switch.
  • Page 173: Syslogd Cli Commands

    Diagnostics and Status Syslogd CLI Commands Below is a list of commands that are related to the syslogd configuration. Please refer to the help pages of these commands for more details. Command Summary syslogdipadd Add the IP address of the remote syslogd host to the switch.
  • Page 174: Enabling Syslogd On The Core Switch 2/64 Or San Switch 2/32

    Diagnostics and Status Example kern.warning /var/adm/SilkWorm The following entry in /etc/syslog.conf causes all messages (Debug, Info, Warning, Error, Critical, and Panic) from the switch to be stored in the file /var/adm/SilkWorm. Example kern.debug /var/adm/SilkWorm The kern prefix identifies that the Core Switch 2/64 and SAN Switch 2/32 use “kernel”...
  • Page 175: Disabling Syslogd On The Core Switch 2/64 Or San Switch 2/32

    Diagnostics and Status Disabling syslogd on the Core Switch 2/64 or SAN Switch 2/32 To disable sending of error log messages to a previously enabled remote syslogd host do the following: 1. Log in to the switch as Admin user. 2.
  • Page 176: Switch Diagnostics

    Diagnostics and Status Switch Diagnostics The switch status can be either Healthy/OK, Marginal/Warning, or Down. The overall status of a switch is determined by the status of several individual components within the switch. For more information on how the overall switch status is determined, refer to the switchstatuspolicyset command in the HP StorageWorks Fabric OS Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide.
  • Page 177 Diagnostics and Status 12.1 = SAN Switch 2/32 16.2 = SAN Switch 2/8 EL — switchstate - Displays the switch state: Online, Offline, Testing, or Faulty. — switchrole - Displays the switch role: Principal, Subordinate, or Disabled. — switchdomain - Displays the switch Domain ID. —...
  • Page 178 Diagnostics and Status port 0: id N1 Online E-Port 10:00:00:60:69:11:fc:08 "fmgr129" (downstream port 1: id N2 Online E-Port 10:00:00:60:69:90:03:1f "fmgr137" (upstream) port 2: -- N2 No_Module port 3: -- N2 No_Module port 4: -- N2 No_Module port 5: -- N2 No_Module port 6: id N2 No_Light port...
  • Page 179 Diagnostics and Status No_Light Disabled No_Module Disabled In_Sync Disabled No_Light Disabled In_Sync Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Module Disabled No_Light Disabled In_Sync Disabled No_Module Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Module Disabled No_Sync Disabled In_Sync Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Module Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Light Disabled No_Light Disabled...
  • Page 180: Displaying The Uptime Of The Switch

    Diagnostics and Status The output will appear different on a SAN Switch 2/32 switch. For more information refer to the switchshow command in the HP StorageWorks Fabric OS Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide. Displaying the Uptime Of the Switch To display the uptime for a switch: 1.
  • Page 181: Port Diagnostics

    Diagnostics and Status Port Diagnostics There are two types of statistics you can view for a port: software statistics hardware statistics Displaying Software Statistics for a Port Software statistics for a port include information such as port state, number of interrupts, number of link failures, number of loss of synchronization warnings, and number of loss of signal warnings.
  • Page 182 Diagnostics and Status Example: switch:admin> portshow 3/7 portCFlags: 0x1 ENABLED portFlags: 0x20041 PRESENT U_PORT LED portType: portState: 2 Offline portPhys: No_Light portScn: portId: 612700 portWwn: 20:27:00:60:69:80:04:5a portWwn of device(s) connected: None Distance: normal Speed: N2Gbps Interrupts: Link_failure: 0 Frjt: Unknown: Loss_of_sync: 0 Fbsy: Lli:...
  • Page 183: Displaying Hardware Statistics For A Port

    Diagnostics and Status Note: For more information on the portshow command, refer to the StorageWorks Fabric OS Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide Displaying Hardware Statistics for a Port Hardware statistics for a port include information such as the number of frames received, the number of frames sent, the number of encoding errors received, and the number of class 2 and 3 frames received.
  • Page 184 Diagnostics and Status Example: switch:admin> portstatsshow 3/7 stat_wtx 4-byte words transmitted stat_wrx 4-byte words received stat_ftx Frames transmitted stat_frx Frames received stat_c2_frx Class 2 frames received stat_c3_frx Class 3 frames received stat_lc_rx Link control frames received stat_mc_rx Multicast frames received stat_mc_to Multicast timeouts stat_mc_tx...
  • Page 185: Displaying A Summary Of Port Errors

    Diagnostics and Status Displaying a Summary of Port Errors This porterrshow command displays a summary of port errors for all the ports in a single switch. To display a summary of port errors for a switch: 1. Log into the switch as the admin user. 2.
  • Page 186 Diagnostics and Status Table 11: Error Summary Description (Continued) Error Type Description bad eof Frames with bad end-of-frame delimiters. enc out Encoding error outside of frames. disc c3 Class 3 frames discarded. link fail Link failures (LF1 or LF2 states). loss sync Loss of synchronization.
  • Page 187: Hardware Diagnostics

    Diagnostics and Status Hardware Diagnostics For detailed hardware information, refer to the switch installation guide supplied with your specific switch (the installation guide is also available on the v3.1.x or v4.1.x Software CD. Monitoring the Fan Status To display the fan status of a switch: 1.
  • Page 188: Monitoring The Power Supply Status

    Diagnostics and Status Note: The number of fans and valid range for RPMs varies depending on the type of switch. For more information, refer to the particular hardware reference manual for your switch. Monitoring the Power Supply Status To display the power supply status of a switch: 1.
  • Page 189: Monitoring The Temperature Status

    Diagnostics and Status Note: The number of power supply units varies depending on the type of switch. For more information, refer to the particular hardware reference manual for your switch. Monitoring the Temperature Status To display the temperature status of a switch: 1.
  • Page 190 Diagnostics and Status crossPortTest portLoopbackTest sramRetentionTest turboRamTest statsTest spinSilk Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 191: Linux Root Capabilities

    Diagnostics and Status Linux Root Capabilities You can enable Linux root capabilities for diagnostic purposes. Enabling Linux root capabilities requires the Linux Root Enabling firmware, available from the switch provider. You cannot use the Linux Root Enabling firmware to perform any other switch functions.
  • Page 192 Diagnostics and Status Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 193: Troubleshooting

    Troubleshooting This chapter provides information on troubleshooting and the most common procedures used to diagnose and repair issues. This chapter provides the following information. About Troubleshooting, page 194 Gathering Information for Technical Support, page 198 The following specific scenarios are described to provide examples of Troubleshooting techniques: Host Can Not See Target (Storage or Tape Devices), page 199...
  • Page 194: About Troubleshooting

    Troubleshooting About Troubleshooting Troubleshooting should begin at the center of the SAN — the fabric. Because switches are located between the hosts and storage devices, and have visibility into both sides of the storage network; starting with them can help narrow the search path.
  • Page 195: Fibre Channel Process

    Troubleshooting Fibre Channel Process Figure 3: Fibre Channel Process Flow Chart Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 196: Most Common Problem Areas

    Troubleshooting Most Common Problem Areas Table 12: Most Common Problem Areas Area Investigate Fabric Missing devices Marginal links (unstable connections) Incorrect zoning configurations Incorrect switch configurations Storage Devices Physical issues between switch and devices Incorrect storage software configurations Hosts Incorrect host bus adapter installation Incorrect device driver installation Incorrect device driver configuration Storage Management...
  • Page 197 Troubleshooting Table 13: Troubleshooting Tools (Continued) Problem Area Troubleshooting Tool Hosts Host adaptor LEDs Host operating system diagnostic tools Device driver diagnostic tools Storage Management Application-specific tools and resources Applications Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...
  • Page 198: Gathering Information For Technical Support

    Troubleshooting Gathering Information for Technical Support To aid in troubleshooting, gather as much of this information as possible prior to contacting the SAN technical support vendor. 1. Gather Switch Information: a. Serial number (located on the chassis). b. Worldwide name (obtain using licenseidshow or wwn commands) c.
  • Page 199: Specific Scenarios

    Troubleshooting Specific Scenarios The following sections provide specific help with some of the most common SAN problems. Host Can Not See Target (Storage or Tape Devices) When a host cannot “see” its disks, the best way to troubleshoot the problem is to start in the middle half of the data path, figure out if the problem is “above”...
  • Page 200: Check The Simple Name Server (sns)

    Troubleshooting Check the Simple Name Server (SNS) Check for the Device in the SNS 1. Enter the nsShow command on the switch to which the device is attached. Example: The Local Name Server has 9 entries { Type Pid PortName NodeName TTL(sec) 021a00;...
  • Page 201: Fabric Os Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide

    Troubleshooting Fabric Port Name: 20:0e:00:60:69:10:9b:5b 051ee8; 3;21:00:00:20:37:d9:6f:eb;20:00:00:20:37:d9:6f:eb; na FC4s: FCP [SEAGATE ST318304FC 0005] Fabric Port Name: 20:0e:00:60:69:10:9b:5b 051eef; 3;21:00:00:20:37:d9:77:45;20:00:00:20:37:d9:77:45; na FC4s: FCP [SEAGATE ST318304FC 0005] Fabric Port Name: 20:0e:00:60:69:10:9b:5b 051f00; 2,3;50:06:04:82:bc:01:9a:0c;50:06:04:82:bc:01:9a:0c; na FC4s: FCP [EMC SYMMETRIX 5267] Fabric Port Name: 20:0f:00:60:69:10:9b:5b 2.
  • Page 202: Check For Zoning Discrepancies

    Troubleshooting Check for Zoning Discrepancies To determine if zoning might be causing a communication problem between devices: 1. Enter the cfgShow command to determine if zoning is enabled. If zoning is enabled, it is possible that the problem is being caused by a zoning conflict, that is, two devices in different zones cannot see each other.
  • Page 203: Fabric Segmentation

    Troubleshooting Fabric Segmentation Possible Causes Fabric Segmentation is generally caused by: Incompatible fabric parameters. See “Restore a Segmented Fabric” on page 204 The Core PID is not set. The Core PID is part of fabric parameters. See “Procedures for Updating the Core PID Format”...
  • Page 204: Domain Id Conflicts

    Troubleshooting Long Distance Fabric BB Credit Core PID Domain ID Conflicts A Domain ID conflict can occur if a switch that is in the online state is added to a fabric and the joining switch Domain ID conflicts with the Domain ID of a switch in the fabric.
  • Page 205: Restore Fabric Parameters Through Configupload

    Troubleshooting Restore Fabric Parameters Through ConfigUpload The following procedure describes how to restore a segmented fabric by uploading the entire “correct” configuration, then downloading that configuration to the segmented switch. This reconciles any discrepancy in the fabric parameters and allows the segmented switch to rejoin the main fabric. To edit and correct a configuration by hand, see “Reconcile Fabric Parameters Individually”...
  • Page 206: Zoning Setup Issues

    Troubleshooting 5. Chose the fabric on which to change the duplicate Domain ID; log into the conflicting switch in that fabric. 6. Enter the switchdisable command. 7. Enter the switchenable command. This will enable the joining switch to obtain a new Domain ID as part of the process of coming online.
  • Page 207: Fabric Merge Conflicts Related To Zoning

    Troubleshooting Refer to the HP StorageWorks Zoning Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide for information about setting up zoning and preventing segmentation due to zoning. Fabric Merge Conflicts Related to Zoning The following sections cover fabric merge conflicts related to zoning. Prevention To prevent fabric segmentations, refer to the HP StorageWorks Zoning Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide for setup information.
  • Page 208: Detailed Zone Merge Correction Procedure

    Troubleshooting 2. Enter the cfgDisable command. 3. Enter the cfgClear command. Caution: Be careful when using the cfgclear command because you can inadvertently delete the Zone configuration in the fabric. Make sure you are deleting the “incorrect” configuration. 4. Enter the switchdisable command. 5.
  • Page 209: Reorder The Zone Member List

    Troubleshooting 9. Compare the two fabric zone configurations line by line and look for incompatible configuration. See “Fabric Merge Conflicts Related to Zoning” on page 207 for definitions. 10. Log into one of the Fabrics. 11. Run zone configure edit commands to edit the fabric zone configuration for the segmented switch.
  • Page 210: I2c Bus Errors

    Troubleshooting supplier. When MQ errors are encountered, execute the supportShow command to capture debug information about the switch. Then forward the supportShow data to the switch supplier for further investigation. I2C bus Errors The following sections cover troubleshooting i2C bus errors. Possible Causes i2C bus errors indicate defective hardware, and the specific item is listed in the error message.
  • Page 211: Check The Temperature, Fan, And Power Supply

    Troubleshooting Check the power supply status. Refer to the HP StorageWorks Fabric OS Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide or refer to the switch installation guide supplied with your specific switch (the installation guide is also available on the v3.1.x or v4.1.x Software CD) for details regarding the power supply status.
  • Page 212: Device Login Issues

    Troubleshooting Device Login Issues In narrowing down problems with device logins, use the following commands: 1. Log into the switch. 2. Enter the switchShow command. Check for correct logins. Example: switch:admin> switchshow switchName: switch switchType: 16.2 switchState: Online switchMode: Native switchRole: Subordinate switchDomain:...
  • Page 213 Troubleshooting 3. Enter the portconfigShow command to see how the port is configured. Example: switch:admin> portcfgshow Ports -------------------+--+--+--+--+----+--+--+-- Speed 2G 2G 2G 2G 2G 2G 2G 2G Trunk Port ..ON ON ON ON ON ON Long Distance ..
  • Page 214 Troubleshooting 4. Enter the portErrShow command. Check for errors that may cause login problems. — A high number of errors relative to the frames transmitted and frame received may indicate a marginal link. See “Marginal Links” on page 234. — A steadily increasing number of errors may indicate a problem. Track errors by sampling the port errors every five or ten seconds.
  • Page 215 Troubleshooting 5. Enter the portFlagsShow command to see how a port has logged in and where a login failed, if a failure occurred. Example: 13: Online In_Sync PRESENT ACTIVE E_PORT G_PORT U_PORT SEGMENTED CBL_LB L OGIN LED 14: Online In_Sync PRESENT ACTIVE E_PORT G_PORT U_PORT SEGMENTED CBL_LB L OGIN LED 15: Online...
  • Page 216: Watchdog (best Practices)

    Troubleshooting Watchdog (Best Practices) Watchdog is a subset of the Kernel Error Reporting Software. It is a feature that reports unexpected and fatal errors when a switch dies. The Watchdog feature ensures that the switch will not send corrupted data when the software is not properly performing its function.
  • Page 217: Kernel Software Watchdog Related Errors

    Troubleshooting Kernel Software Watchdog Related Errors This section describes the kernel software Watch Dog-related errors. kSWD-APP_NOT_REFRESH_ERR Message Critical kSWD-APP_NOT_REFRESH_ERR, 1, (kSWD)Application with pid <PID number> not refreshing watchdog. Explanation A critical kernel software error occurred in the Watch Dog subsystem. A kernel application is not able to refresh.
  • Page 218: Identifying Media-related Issues

    Troubleshooting Identifying Media-Related Issues Use the following section to narrow down media-related issues in the fabric. Component Tests Overview Hardware diagnostics available on switches can be classified into two different types of tests: Structural tests - do basic tests of the switch circuit. When structural tests fail, replace the main board.
  • Page 219: Check Switch Components

    Troubleshooting Check Switch Components The following sections describe how to troubleshoot the switch components. Cursory Debugging of Media Components The following procedure describes basic steps that can help to narrow down faulty media. 1. Log into the switch as admin. 2.
  • Page 220: Test Cascaded Switch Isl Links

    Troubleshooting — To check all switches attached components (on an FC loop), see “Check All Switch Components Between Main Board, SFP, and Fiber Cable” page 223. — To check all of a port’s attached components (on an FC loop), see “Check Port’s External Transmit and Receive Path”...
  • Page 221: Test A Port's External Transmit And Receive Path

    Troubleshooting switch:admin> setdbg "DIAG", 2 switch:admin> spinfab 3,0,3 spinFab running... port 1 Rx 1 million frames. port 0 Rx 1 million frames. port 2 Rx 1 million frames. port 3 Rx 1 million frames. port 1 Rx 2 million frames. port 0 Rx 2 million frames.
  • Page 222: Test A Switches Internal Components

    Troubleshooting [-spd_mode mode] Select the speed mode for the test. [-ports itemlist] Specify a list of user ports to test. Example: switch:admin> crossporttest Running Cross Port Test ..passed. Test a Switches Internal Components To use the crossporttest command to test a switch’s internal components: 1.
  • Page 223: Check All Switch Components Between Main Board, Sfp, And Fiber Cable

    Troubleshooting [pattern_width] Specify the width of the pattern which the user specified—it could be 1, 2, or 4 (which are byte, word, or quad). [pattern_size] Specify the number of words in test packet payload (default is 512). The following example executed fPortTest 100 times on port 8 with payload pattern 0xaa55, pattern width 2 (meaning word width), and default payload size 512 bytes.
  • Page 224 Troubleshooting 8. Determine if any of the following statistic error counters are non-zero: ENC_in, CRC_err, TruncFrm, FrmTooLong, BadEOF, Enc_out, BadOrdSet, DiscC3. 9. Determine if the transmit, receive, or class 3 receiver counters are stuck at a value. 10. Determine if the number of frames transmitted is not equal to the number of frames received.
  • Page 225: Check Port's External Transmit And Receive Path

    Troubleshooting ERR_STAT_C3DISC ERR_STAT_CRC ERR_STAT_ENCIN ERR_STAT_ENCOUT ERR_STAT_TRUNC FDET_PERR FINISH_MSG_ERR FTPRT_STATUS_ERR MBUF_STATE_ERR MBUF_STATUS_ERR NO_SEGMENT PORT_ABSENT PORT_ENABLE PORT_M2M PORT_STOPPED PORT_WRONG RXQ_FAM_PERR RXQ_RAM_PERR STATS STATS_C3FRX STATS_FTX TIMEOUT XMIT Check Port’s External Transmit and Receive Path The following procedure exercises the path of a loop from the port N transmitter, along the parallel loopback path, and back to the same N port transmitter.
  • Page 226 Troubleshooting 2. Disable the switch by entering switchdisable at the command line. 3. Enter portloopbacktest [passcount] to set all ports for parallel loopback. Refer to the HP StorageWorks Fabric OS Version 3.1.x/4.1.x Reference Guide for detailed information about the optional operand. 4.
  • Page 227: Check All Switch Components Of The Port Transmit And Receive Path

    Troubleshooting Check all Switch Components of the Port Transmit and Receive Path The following procedure exercises all the switch components from the main board --> SFP --> fibre cable --> back to SFP --> back to main board. 1. Make sure all cables used for connected port and SFPs are of the same technology (i.e., a short wavelength SFP switch port should be connected to another short wavelength device SPF through a short wavelength cable).
  • Page 228: Additional Component Tests

    Troubleshooting 14. Repeat steps 6 - 12 for all ports until: — the number of frames requested is reached. — all ports are marked bad. 15. (Optional) Disable SFP mode. If you entered setsfpmode, the mode remains in volatile memory until it is disabled. Enter setsfpmode 0. Additional Component Tests The following list displays additional tests that can be used to determine those switch components that are not functioning properly.
  • Page 229: Link Failure

    Troubleshooting Link Failure A link failure occurs when a server or storage is connected to a switch, but the link between the server/storage and the switch does not come up. This prevents the server/storage from communicating through the switch. Possible Causes for Link Failure If the switchshow command and/or the LED lights indicate that the link has not come up properly, follow the steps for one or more of the areas indicated below.
  • Page 230: Port's Physical State

    Troubleshooting Port’s Physical State 1. Enter the switchshow command. 2. Check the port and state columns in the switchshow output. 3. Use the following list to determine the next step: Table 20: Port States and Suggested Actions Port State Action Online The port physical state is OK.
  • Page 231: Link Initialization Failure (loop)

    Troubleshooting 1 Gig example: 14:38:51.976 SPEE <Port#> 00000001,00000000,00000001 2 Gig example: 14:39:39.227 SPEE <Port#> 00000002,00000000,00000001 — The sn field indicates a speed negotiation. — The NC field indicates Negotiation Complete. — The 01 or 02 fields indicate the speed that has been negotiated. If these fields do not appear, move on to step 3.
  • Page 232: Point-to-point Initialization Failure

    Troubleshooting Point-to-Point Initialization Failure 1. Confirm that the port is active If a Fabric device or another switch is connected to the switch, the switch port must be active. a. Enter the portLogShow or portLogDump commands. b. Verify that the State Change Notification (SCN) code is 1. An SCN of 1 indicates that the port is active.
  • Page 233 Troubleshooting Table 21: SwitchShow Output and Suggested Action (Continued) Output Suggested Action E_port If the opposite side is not another switch, the link has come up in a wrong mode. Check the output from the portLogShow/PortLogDump commands and identify the link initialization stage where the initialization procedure went wrong.
  • Page 234: Marginal Links

    Troubleshooting Marginal Links A marginal link involves the connection between the switch and the edge device. Isolating the exact cause of a marginal link involves analyzing and testing many of the components that make up the link: switch port, switch SFP, cable, the edge device, and the edge device SFP.
  • Page 235: Isolating The Areas

    Troubleshooting 99m 146m 99m 149m 99m 152m 99m 147m switch:admin> 2. Establish if there are a relatively high number of errors (such as CRC errors or ENC_OUT errors), or if there are a steadily increasing number of errors to confirm a marginal link. If high errors exist, see step Isolating the Areas...
  • Page 236: Ruling Out Cabling Issues

    Troubleshooting 6. Check the results of the loopback test and proceed as follows: — If the loopback test failed, the port is bad. Replace the port card. — If the loopback test did not fail, the SFP was bad. Ruling Out Cabling Issues 7.
  • Page 237: Glossary

    glossary Glossary This glossary defines terms used in this guide or related to this product and is not a comprehensive glossary of computer terms. Glossary 16-port card The Fibre Channel port card provided with the StorageWorks Core switch. Contains 16 Fibre Channel ports and the corresponding LEDs indicating port status and speed.
  • Page 238 Glossary Alias An alternate name for an element or group of elements in the fabric. Aliases can be used to simplify the entry of port numbers and WWNs when creating zones. Alias Address Identifier An address identifier recognized by a port in addition to its standard identifier. An alias address identifier may be shared by multiple ports.
  • Page 239 Glossary Asynchronous Transfer Mode. A transport used for transmitting data over LANs or WANs that transmit fixed-length units of data. Provides any-to-any connectivity, and allows nodes to transmit simultaneously. Auto-negotiate Speed Process that allows two devices at either end of a link segment to negotiate common features, speed (e.g., 1 or 2 Gbps) and functions.
  • Page 240 Glossary Beginning Running Disparity The disparity at the transmitter or receiver when the special character associated with an ordered set is encoded or decoded. See also disparity. Bit Error Rate. The rate at which bits are expected to be received in error. Expressed as the ratio of error bits to total bits transmitted.
  • Page 241 Glossary Boot Monitor Code used to initialize the CP (control processor) environment after powering on. Identifies the amount of memory available and how to access it, and retrieves information about system buses. Broadcast The transmission of data from a single source to all devices in the fabric, regardless of zoning. See also multicast, unicast.
  • Page 242 Glossary Class F Connectionless service for control traffic between switches, with notification of delivery or non-delivery of data between the E_Ports. Class of Service A specified set of delivery characteristics and attributes for frame delivery. Command line interface. Interface that depends entirely on the use of commands, such as through telnet or SNMP, and does not involve a Graphic User Interface (GUI).
  • Page 243 Glossary Configuration How a system is set up. May refer to hardware or software. Hardware: The number, type, and arrangement of components that make up a system or network. Software: The set of parameters that guide switch operation. May include general system parameters, IP address information, Domain ID, and other information.
  • Page 244 Glossary CT_HDR Common Transport Header. A header that conforms to the Fibre Channel Common Transport (FC_CT) protocol. CT_IU Common Transport Information Unit. An information unit that conforms to the Fibre Channel Common Transport (FC_CT) protocol. Current Fill Word The fill word currently selected by the LPSM. See also fill word, LPSM.
  • Page 245 Glossary Device Connection Controls Enables organizations to bind an individual device port to a set of one or more switch ports. Device ports are specified by a WWN and typically represent HBAs (servers). See also access control lists. Device A disk, a RAID, or an HBA. Disparity The relationship of ones and zeros in an encoded character.
  • Page 246 Glossary E_Port Expansion Port. A type of switch port that can be connected to an E_Port on another switch to create an ISL. See also ISL. EE_Credit End-to-end Credit. The number of receive buffers allocated by a recipient port to an originating port.
  • Page 247 Glossary Exchange The highest level Fibre Channel mechanism used for communication between N_Ports. Composed of one or more related sequences, and can work in either one or both directions. Extended Fabric An HP product that runs on Fabric OS and allows creation of a Fibre Channel fabric interconnected over distances of up to 100 kilometers.
  • Page 248 Glossary Fabric Configuration Server One or more designated HP switches that store and manage the configuration parameters for all other switches in the fabric. These switches are designated by WWN, and the list of designated switches is known fabric-wide. Fabric Manager An HP product that works in conjunction with Web Tools to provide a graphical user interface for managing switch groups (such as the SAN Switch Integrated/32) as a single unit, instead of as separate switches.
  • Page 249 Glossary FC-FLA The Fibre Channel Fabric Loop Attach standard defined by ANSI. FCIA Fibre Channel Industry Association. An international organization of Fibre Channel industry professionals. Among other things, provides oversight of ANSI and industry developed standards. Fibre Channel Protocol. Mapping of protocols onto the Fibre Channel standard protocols. For example, SCSI FCP maps SCSI-3 onto Fibre Channel.
  • Page 250 Glossary Firmware Download Loading firmware down from a server into a switch. Firmware The basic operating system provided with the hardware. FL_Port Fabric Loop Port. A port that is able to transmit under fabric protocol and also has arbitrated loop capabilities.
  • Page 251 Glossary FS_REQ Fibre Channel Services Request. A request for a Fibre Channel services function, or notification of a fabric condition or event. FS_RJT Fibre Channel Services Reject. An indication that a request for Fibre Channel services could not be processed. Fibre Channel Service.
  • Page 252 Glossary GBIC Gigabit interface converter. A removable serial transceiver module that allows gigabaud physical-level transport for Fibre Channel and gigabit Ethernet. Typically refers only to the SC-form factor transceivers. See also SFP. Gbps Gigabits per second (1,062,500,000 bits/second). GBps Gigabytes per second (1,062,500,000 bytes/second). Half-duplex A mode of communication that allows a port to either transmit or receive frames at any time, but not simultaneously (with the exception of link control frames, which can be transmitted at any...
  • Page 253 Glossary Host A computer that accesses storage devices over the fabric. May also be referred to as a server. See also workstation. Hot Pluggable A FRU capability that indicates it may be extracted or installed while customer data is otherwise flowing in the chassis.
  • Page 254 Glossary Isolated E_Port An E_Port that is online but not operational due to overlapping Domain IDs or nonidentical parameters (such as E_D_TOVs). See also E_Port. Interswitch Link. a Fibre Channel link from the E_Port of one switch to the E_Port of another. See also E_Port, cascade, ISL trunking.
  • Page 255 Glossary L_Port Loop Port. A node port (NL_Port) or fabric port (FL_Port) that has arbitrated loop capabilities. An L_Port can be in one of two modes: Fabric mode: Connected to a port that is not loop capable, and using fabric protocol. Loop mode: In an arbitrated loop and using loop protocol.
  • Page 256 Glossary Loop Failure Loss of signal within a loop for any period of time, or loss of synchronization for longer than the time-out value. See also error. Loop Initialization The logical procedure used by an L_Port to discover its environment. Can be used to assign AL_PA addresses, detect loop failure, or reset a node.
  • Page 257 Glossary Modem Serial Port The upper serial port on the CP Card of the StorageWorks Core switch. Can be used to connect the CP Card to a modem with a standard 9-pin modem cable. Consists of a DB-9 connector wired as a RS-232 device, and can be connected by serial cable to a DCE device.
  • Page 258 Glossary NL_Port Node Loop Port. A node port that has arbitrated loop capabilities. Used to connect an equipment port to the fabric in a loop configuration through an FL_Port. See also N_Port, Nx_Port. Node Name The unique identifier for a node, communicated during login and port discovery. Node A Fibre Channel device that contains an N_Port or NL_Port.
  • Page 259 Glossary Ordered Set A transmission word that uses 8B/10B mapping and begins with the K28.5 character. Ordered sets occur outside of frames, and include the following items: Frame delimiters: Mark frame boundaries and describe frame contents. Primitive signals: Indicate events. Primitive sequences: Indicate or initiate port states.
  • Page 260 Glossary Point-to-point A Fibre Channel topology that employs direct links between each pair of communicating entities. See also topology. Port Cage The metal casing extending out of the optical port on the switch, and in which the SFP can be inserted.
  • Page 261 Glossary Public Device A device that supports arbitrated loop protocol, can interpret 8-bit addresses, and can log into the fabric. Public Loop An arbitrated loop that includes a participating FL_Port, and may contain both public and private NL_Ports. Public NL_Port An NL_Port that logs into the fabric, can function within either a public or a private loop, and can communicate with either private or public NL_Ports.
  • Page 262 Glossary RAID Redundant Array of Independent Disks. A collection of disk drives that appear as a single volume to the server and are fault tolerant through mirroring or parity checking. See also JBOD. Remote Fabric A fabric that spans across WANs by using protocol translation (a process also known as tunneling) such as Fibre Channel over ATM or Fibre Channel over IP.
  • Page 263 Glossary RSCN Registered State Change Notification. A switch function that allows notification of fabric changes to be sent from the switch to specified nodes. RX_ID Responder Exchange Identifier. A 2-byte field in the frame header used by the responder of the Exchange to identify frames as being part of a particular exchange.
  • Page 264 Glossary Small form factor pluggable. A transceiver used on 2 Gbps switches that replaces the GBIC. Refers to the LC-form factor transceiver. See also GBIC. SID/DID Source identifier/Destination identifier. S_ID is a 3-byte field in the frame header that is used to indicate the address identifier of the N_Port from which the frame was sent.
  • Page 265 1.0625-Gbps link speeds. May also refer to the type of GBIC or SFP. See also LWL. Tachyon A chip developed by Hewlett-Packard, and used in various devices. This chip has FC-0 through FC-2 on one chip. Target A storage device on a Fibre Channel network.
  • Page 266 Glossary Transceiver Device that converts one form of signaling to another for transmission and reception; in fiber optics, it refers to optical and electrical. Transfer State The state in which a port can establish circuits with multiple ports without reentering the arbitration cycle for each circuit.
  • Page 267 Glossary Upper-level Protocol. The protocol that runs on top of Fibre Channel. Typical upper-level protocols are SCSI, IP, HIPPI, and IPI. Unicast The transmission of data from a single source to a single destination. See also broadcast, multicast. user account A login intended for use by the customer to monitor, but not control, switch operation.
  • Page 268 Glossary Zone A set of devices and hosts attached to the same fabric and configured as being in the same zone. Devices and hosts within the same zone have access permission to others in the zone, but are not visible to any outside the zone. See also Zoning.
  • Page 269: Index

    index displaying the error log of a switch displaying the firmware version activating the management server displaying the management server database adding a WWN to the access control list displaying the status of a port displaying the switch status backing up the system configuration settings displaying the system configuration settings 51, blade beacon mode displaying the uptime of the switch...
  • Page 270 Index running diagnostic tests on the switch hardware upgrading the firmware level in v4.0 80, setting the switch date and time viewing the policy threshold values slot and port syntax switch beacon mode switch WWN Fabric OS Procedures Version 3.1.x/4.1.x User Guide...

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Storageworks msa 2/8 - san switch

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