HPE 3100 v2 Switch Series
Layer 2—LAN Switching
Part number: 5998-5991s
Software version: Release 5213 and Release 5213P02
Document version: 6W101-20160506

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  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    HPE 3100 v2 Switch Series Layer 2—LAN Switching Configuration Guide Part number: 5998-5991s Software version: Release 5213 and Release 5213P02 Document version: 6W101-20160506...

  • Page 2

    © Copyright 2016 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for Hewlett Packard Enterprise products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. Hewlett Packard Enterprise shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents Configuring Ethernet interfaces ······································································ 1   Ethernet interface naming conventions ·············································································································· 1   Configuring a combo interface ··························································································································· 1   Configuration prerequisites ························································································································ 1   Changing the active port of a combo interface ··························································································· 1   Configuring basic settings of an Ethernet interface ··························································································· 1  ...

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Configuring the MAC learning limit on ports ···································································································· 23   Enabling MAC address migration log notifying ································································································ 23   Displaying and maintaining MAC address tables ····························································································· 24   MAC address table configuration example ······································································································ 24   Network requirements ······························································································································ 24  ...

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Implementation of MSTP on devices ······································································································· 60   Protocols and standards ·································································································································· 60   Spanning tree configuration task list ················································································································ 61   Configuration restrictions and guidelines ································································································· 61   STP configuration task list ························································································································ 61   RSTP configuration task list ····················································································································· 62  ...

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Disabling the device to reactivate edge ports shut down by BPDU guard ······················································· 88   Enabling SNMP notifications for PVST topology changes ··············································································· 89   Displaying and maintaining the spanning tree ································································································· 89   Spanning tree configuration examples ············································································································· 90  ...

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Configuring a port to operate in automatic voice VLAN assignment mode ···················································· 129   Configuration restrictions and guidelines ······························································································· 129   Configuration procedure ························································································································· 129   Configuring a port to operate in manual voice VLAN assignment mode ······················································· 130   Configuration restrictions and guidelines ·······························································································...

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    Configuration prerequisites ···················································································································· 166   Configuring an uplink policy ··················································································································· 166   Configuring the customer-side port ········································································································ 167   Configuring the network-side port ·········································································································· 167   Configuring one-to-one VLAN mapping with port QoS policies ····································································· 168   Configuration prerequisites ···················································································································· 168  ...

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Configuration procedure ························································································································· 200   Document conventions and icons ······························································· 209   Conventions ··················································································································································· 209   Network topology icons ·································································································································· 210   Support and other resources ······································································ 211   Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support ···························································································· 211   Accessing updates ········································································································································· 211  ...

  • Page 10: Configuring Ethernet Interfaces

    Configuring Ethernet interfaces Ethernet interface naming conventions The Ethernet interfaces on the HPE 3100 v2 EI are named in the format of interface-type A/B/C, where the following definitions apply: • A—Specifies the ID of a switch. The value can only be 1. •...

  • Page 11: Shutting Down An Ethernet Interface

    • Full-duplex mode (full)—Interfaces that operate in this mode can send and receive packets simultaneously. • Half-duplex mode (half)—Interfaces that operate in this mode cannot send and receive packets simultaneously. • Auto-negotiation mode (auto)—Interfaces that operate in this mode negotiate a duplex mode with their peers.

  • Page 12: Setting Speed Options For Auto Negotiation On An Ethernet Interface

    To shut down an Ethernet interface or a group of Ethernet interfaces: Step Command Remarks Enter system system-view view. • Enter Ethernet interface view: Use any command. interface interface-type Enter Ethernet To shut down an Ethernet interface, interface-number interface view or enter Ethernet interface.

  • Page 13: Configuration Procedure

    • The speed and speed auto commands supersede each other, and whichever is configured last takes effect. Configuration procedure To set speed options for auto negotiation on an Ethernet interface: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view interface interface-type Enter Ethernet interface view. interface-number Set speed options for auto speed auto { 10 | 100 | 1000 } *...

  • Page 14: Configuring Link State Change Suppression On An Ethernet Interface

    To enable flow control on an Ethernet interface: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Enter Ethernet interface interface interface-type view. interface-number • Enable TxRx flow control: Use either command. flow-control Enable flow control. • Enable Rx flow control: By default, Rx flow control is disabled flow-control receive on an Ethernet interface.

  • Page 15: Configuring Link-up Event Suppression

    Configuring link-up event suppression To configure link-up event suppression on an Ethernet interface: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Enter Ethernet interface interface interface-type view. interface-number Set a link-up event Link-up event suppression is disabled by link-delay delay-time mode suppression interval.

  • Page 16: Configuring Jumbo Frame Support

    Step Command Remarks Optional. Enable loopback testing. loopback { external | internal } Disabled by default. Configuring jumbo frame support An Ethernet interface might receive some frames larger than the standard Ethernet frame size (called "jumbo frames") during high-throughput data exchanges such as file transfers. Usually, an Ethernet interface discards jumbo frames.

  • Page 17: Configuring Storm Suppression

    Configuring storm suppression In interface or port group view, you can set the maximum size of broadcast, multicast, or unknown unicast traffic allowed to pass through an interface or each interface in a port group. When the broadcast, multicast, or unknown unicast traffic on the interface exceeds this threshold, the system discards packets until the traffic drops below this threshold.

  • Page 18: Enabling Loopback Detection On An Ethernet Interface

    To display the interface statistics collected in the last polling interval, use the display interface command. To clear interface statistics, use the reset counters interface command. Enabling loopback detection on an Ethernet interface If a switch receives a packet that it sent, a loop has occurred to the switch. Loops might cause broadcast storms, which degrade network performance.

  • Page 19: Configuration Restrictions And Guidelines

    Table 1 Actions to take upon detection of a loop condition Actions Port type No protective action is configured A protective action is configured • • Place the receiving interface in controlled Perform the configured protective mode. The interface does not receive or action.

  • Page 20: Setting The Mdi Mode Of An Ethernet Interface

    Step Command Remarks • Enter Ethernet interface Use either command. view: To configure loopback detection on one Enter Ethernet interface interface-type interface, enter Ethernet interface view. interface view or port interface-number To configure loopback detection on a group group view. •...

  • Page 21: Testing The Cable Connection Of An Ethernet Interface

    To enable the interface to communicate with its peer, make sure that its transmit pins are connected to the remote receive pins. If the interface can detect the connection cable type, set the interface in auto MDI mode. If not, set its MDI mode by using the following guidelines: •...

  • Page 22

    When a particular type of traffic exceeds its upper threshold, the interface does either of the following, depending on your configuration: • Blocks this type of traffic, while forwarding other types of traffic. Even though the interface does not forward the blocked traffic, it still counts the traffic. When the blocked traffic drops below the lower threshold, the port begins to forward the traffic.

  • Page 23: Displaying And Maintaining An Ethernet Interface

    Step Command Remarks Optional. By default, the interface outputs Enable the interface to log log messages when monitored storm control threshold storm-constrain enable log traffic exceeds the upper events. threshold or drops below the lower threshold from the upper threshold. Displaying and maintaining an Ethernet interface Task Command...

  • Page 24: Configuring Loopback And Null Interfaces

    Configuring loopback and null interfaces Configuring a loopback interface Introduction to the loopback interface A loopback interface is a software-only virtual interface. It delivers the following benefits: • The physical layer state and link-layer protocols of a loopback interface are always up unless the loopback interface is manually shut down.

  • Page 25: Configuring A Null Interface

    NOTE: You can configure settings such as IP addresses and IP routes on loopback interfaces. For more information, see Layer 3—IP Services Configuration Guide and Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide. Configuring a null interface Introduction to the null interface A null interface is a completely software-based logical interface, and is always up. However, you cannot use it to forward data packets or configure an IP address or link-layer protocol on it.

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    Task Command Remarks display interface [ null ] [ brief [ down | description ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } Display information about regular-expression ] Available in any view the null interface. display interface null 0 [ brief [ description ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] Clear the statistics on a reset counters interface [ loopback [ 0 ] ]...

  • Page 27: Bulk Configuring Interfaces

    Bulk configuring interfaces You can enter interface range view to bulk configure multiple interfaces with the same feature instead of configuring them one by one. For example, you can perform the shutdown command in interface range view to shut down a range of interfaces. Failure of applying a command on one member interface does not affect the application of the command on the other member interfaces.

  • Page 28: Configuring The Mac Address Table

    Configuring the MAC address table This feature covers only the unicast MAC address table. For information about configuring static multicast MAC address table entries for IGMP snooping and MLD snooping, see IP Multicast Configuration Guide. The MAC address table can contain only Layer 2 Ethernet ports and Layer 2 aggregate interfaces. The MAC address table configuration tasks are all optional can be performed in any order.

  • Page 29: Types Of Mac Address Table Entries

    To improve port security, you can bind specific user devices to the port by manually adding MAC address entries to the MAC address table of the switch. Types of MAC address table entries A MAC address table can contain the following types of entries: •...

  • Page 30: Configuring A Static Or Dynamic Mac Address Table Entry In Interface View

    Step Command Remarks By default, no MAC address entry is configured. Add or modify a mac-address { dynamic | static } dynamic or static MAC mac-address interface interface-type Make sure that you have address entry. interface-number vlan vlan-id created the VLAN and assigned the interface to the VLAN.

  • Page 31: Disabling Mac Address Learning On A Vlan (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Step Command Remarks Enter system system-view view. Use either command. • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface Settings in Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view interface view: Enter interface take effect on the interface only. Settings interface interface-type view or port group in port group view take effect on all...

  • Page 32: Configuring The Mac Learning Limit On Ports

    Step Command Remarks Configure the aging Optional mac-address timer timer for dynamic { aging seconds | 300 seconds by default. MAC address no-aging } entries. The no-aging keyword disables the aging timer. You can reduce flooding on a stable network by disabling the aging timer to prevent dynamic entries from unnecessarily aging out.

  • Page 33: Displaying And Maintaining Mac Address Tables

    To enable MAC address migration log notifying: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Enable MAC address By default, MAC address migration log mac-flapping notification migration log notifying. notifying is disabled. enable The MAC address migration logs of the last one minute are displayed once every one minute. Displaying and maintaining MAC address tables Task Command...

  • Page 34

    Figure 5 Network diagram Configuration procedure # Add a static MAC address entry. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] mac-address static 000f-e235-dc71 interface ethernet 1/0/1 vlan 1 # Add a blackhole MAC address entry. [Sysname] mac-address blackhole 000f-e235-abcd vlan 1 # Set the aging timer for dynamic MAC address entries to 500 seconds. [Sysname] mac-address timer aging 500 # Display the MAC address entry for port Ethernet 1/0/1.

  • Page 35: Configuring Mac Information

    Configuring MAC Information Overview Introduction to MAC Information To monitor a network, you must monitor users who are joining and leaving the network. Because a MAC address uniquely identifies a network user, you can monitor users who are joining and leaving a network by monitoring their MAC addresses.

  • Page 36: Configuring Mac Information Mode

    Step Command Remarks Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface interface-type interface view. interface-number Enable MAC Information on mac-address information Disabled by default. the interface. enable { added | deleted } Configuring MAC Information mode Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Optional Configure MAC Information mac-address information mode...

  • Page 37: Mac Information Configuration Example

    MAC Information configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure 6, enable MAC Information on Ethernet 1/0/1 on Device to send MAC address changes in Syslog messages to Host B through Ethernet 1/0/3. Host B analyzes and displays the Syslog messages. Figure 6 Network diagram Configuration procedure Configure Device to send Syslog messages to Host B (see Network Management and...

  • Page 38: Configuring Ethernet Link Aggregation

    Configuring Ethernet link aggregation Overview Ethernet link aggregation, or simply link aggregation, combines multiple physical Ethernet ports into one logical link, called an "aggregate link." Link aggregation delivers the following benefits: • Increases bandwidth beyond the limits of any single link. In an aggregate link, traffic is distributed across the member ports.

  • Page 39

    Configuration classes Every configuration setting on a port might affect its aggregation state. Port configurations fall into the following classes: • Port attribute configurations—Includes port rate, duplex mode, and link status (up/down). These are the most basic port configurations. • Class-two configurations—A member port can be placed in Selected state only if it has the same class-two configurations as the aggregate interface.

  • Page 40

    Category Description Extended Implemented by extending the LACPDU with new Type/Length/Value (TLV) fields. LACP functions LACP priorities LACP priorities have the following types: system LACP priority and port aggregation priority. Table 4 LACP priorities Type Description Remarks Used by two peer devices (or systems) to determine which one is superior in link aggregation.

  • Page 41: Aggregating Links In Static Mode

    Aggregating links in static mode LACP is disabled on the member ports in a static aggregation group. You must manually maintain the aggregation state of the member ports. Choosing a reference port The system chooses a reference port from the member ports that are: •...

  • Page 42: Aggregating Links In Dynamic Mode

    Figure 8 Setting the aggregation state of a member port in a static aggregation group Set the aggregation state of a member port Is there any hardware restriction? Is the port up? Port attribute/class 2 configurations same as the reference port? Port number as low as to set More candidate ports than max.

  • Page 43: Load-sharing Criteria For Link Aggregation Groups

    Figure 9 Setting the state of a member port in a dynamic aggregation group Meanwhile, the system with the higher system ID, which has identified the aggregation state changes on the remote system, sets the aggregation state of local member ports as the same as their peer ports.

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    You can choose one of the following criteria or any combination for load sharing: • Source/Destination MAC addresses • Source/Destination IP addresses Configuration restrictions and guidelines Follow these guidelines when you configure a link aggregation group: • To ensure stable aggregation state and service continuity, do not change port attributes or class-two configurations on any member port.

  • Page 45: Configuring A Static Aggregation Group

    Feature Reference IP source guard IP source guard in Security Configuration Guide 802.1X 802.1X in Security Configuration Guide Ports specified as source Portal in Security Configuration Guide interfaces in portal-free rules • If a port is used as a reflector port for port mirroring, do not assign it to an aggregation group. For more information about reflector ports, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

  • Page 46: Configuring A Dynamic Aggregation Group

    Configuring a dynamic aggregation group To guarantee a successful dynamic aggregation, be sure that the peer ports of the ports aggregated at one end are also aggregated. The two ends can automatically negotiate the aggregation state of each member port. Configuring a Layer 2 dynamic aggregation group Step Command...

  • Page 47: Configuring An Aggregate Interface

    Configuring an aggregate interface Most of the configurations that can be performed on Layer 2 Ethernet interfaces can also be performed on Layer 2 interfaces. Configuring the description of an aggregate interface You can configure the description of an aggregate interface for administration purposes such as describing the purpose of the interface.

  • Page 48: Shutting Down An Aggregate Interface

    • All member ports change to the Unselected state and the link of the aggregate interface goes down, when the number of member ports eligible for being selected is smaller than the minimum threshold. • When the minimum threshold is reached, the eligible member ports change to the Selected state, and the link of the aggregate interface goes up.

  • Page 49: Configuring Load Sharing For Link Aggregation Groups

    Step Command Enter Layer 2 aggregate interface interface bridge-aggregation interface-number view. Restore the default settings for the default aggregate interface. Configuring load sharing for link aggregation groups Configuring load-sharing criteria for link aggregation groups You can determine how traffic is load-shared in a link aggregation group by configuring load sharing criteria.

  • Page 50: Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Examples

    Task Command Remarks display interface [ bridge-aggregation ] [ brief [ down | description ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] Display information about an aggregate interface or multiple Available in any view display interface bridge-aggregation aggregate interfaces.

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    Figure 10 Network diagram Configuration procedure Configure Device A: # Create VLAN 10, and assign port Ethernet 1/0/4 to VLAN 10. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] vlan 10 [DeviceA-vlan10] port ethernet 1/0/4 [DeviceA-vlan10] quit # Create VLAN 20, and assign port Ethernet 1/0/5 to VLAN 20. [DeviceA] vlan 20 [DeviceA-vlan20] port ethernet 1/0/5 [DeviceA-vlan20] quit...

  • Page 52: Layer 2 Dynamic Aggregation Configuration Example

    [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit # Configure Device A to use the source and destination MAC addresses of packets as the global link-aggregation load-sharing criteria. [DeviceA] link-aggregation load-sharing mode source-mac destination-mac Configure Device B in the same way Device A is configured. Verifying the configuration # Display summary information about all aggregation groups on Device A.

  • Page 53

    Figure 11 Network diagram Configuration procedure Configure Device A: # Create VLAN 10, and assign the port Ethernet 1/0/4 to VLAN 10. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] vlan 10 [DeviceA-vlan10] port ethernet 1/0/4 [DeviceA-vlan10] quit # Create VLAN 20, and assign the port Ethernet 1/0/5 to VLAN 20. [DeviceA] vlan 20 [DeviceA-vlan20] port ethernet 1/0/5 [DeviceA-vlan20] quit...

  • Page 54

    [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit # Configure the device to use the source and destination MAC addresses of packets as the global link-aggregation load-sharing criteria. [DeviceA] link-aggregation load-sharing mode source-mac destination-mac Configure Device B in the same way Device A is configured. Verifying the configuration # Display summary information about all aggregation groups on Device A.

  • Page 55: Configuring Port Isolation

    Configuring port isolation Port isolation enables isolating Layer 2 traffic for data privacy and security without using VLANs. You can also use this feature to isolate the hosts in a VLAN from one another. To use the feature, assign ports to a port isolation group. Ports in an isolation group are called "isolated ports."...

  • Page 56

    Configure Device to provide Internet access for all the hosts and isolate them from one another. Figure 12 Networking diagram Configuration procedure # Add ports Ethernet 1/0/1, Ethernet 1/0/2, and Ethernet 1/0/3 to the isolation group. <Device> system-view [Device] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [Device-Ethernet1/0/1] port-isolate enable [Device-Ethernet1/0/1] quit [Device] interface ethernet 1/0/2...

  • Page 57: Configuring Spanning Tree Protocols

    Configuring spanning tree protocols As a Layer 2 management protocol, the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) eliminates Layer 2 loops by selectively blocking redundant links in a network, putting them in a standby state, which still also allows for link redundancy. The recent versions of STP include the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), Per VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST), and the Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP).

  • Page 58: Basic Concepts In Stp

    Basic concepts in STP Root bridge A tree network must have a root bridge. The entire network contains only one root bridge. The other bridges in the network are called "leaf nodes." The root bridge is not permanent, but can change with changes of the network topology.

  • Page 59: Calculation Process Of The Stp Algorithm

    Calculation process of the STP algorithm The spanning tree calculation process described in the following sections is a simplified process for example only. The STP algorithm uses the following calculation process: Initialize the state. Upon initialization of a device, each port generates a BPDU with the port as the designated port, the device as the root bridge, 0 as the root path cost, and the device ID as the designated bridge Select the root bridge.

  • Page 60

    The configuration BPDU with the lowest root bridge ID has the highest priority. If configuration BPDUs have the same root bridge ID, their root path costs are compared. For example, the root path cost in a configuration BPDU plus the path cost of a receiving port is S.

  • Page 61

    Table 11 Comparison process and result on each device Configuration BPDU Device Comparison process on ports after comparison • Port A1 receives the configuration BPDU of Port B1 {1, 0, 1, Port B1}, finds that its existing configuration BPDU {0, 0, 0, Port A1} is superior to the received configuration BPDU, and discards the received one.

  • Page 62

    Configuration BPDU Device Comparison process on ports after comparison • Port C1 receives the configuration BPDU of Port A2 {0, 0, 0, Port A2}, finds that the received configuration BPDU is • superior to its existing configuration BPDU {2, 0, 2, Port C1}, Port C1: {0, 0, 0, Port and updates its configuration BPDU.

  • Page 63

    Figure 15 The final calculated spanning tree Root bridge Root port Designated port Blocked port Normal link Blocked link The configuration BPDU forwarding mechanism of STP The configuration BPDUs of STP are forwarded following these guidelines: • Upon network initiation, every device regards itself as the root bridge, generates configuration BPDUs with itself as the root, and sends the configuration BPDUs at a regular hello interval.

  • Page 64: Rstp

    RSTP RSTP achieves rapid network convergence by allowing a newly elected root port or designated port to enter the forwarding state much faster than STP. A newly elected RSTP root port rapidly enters the forwarding state if the old root port on the device has stopped forwarding data and the upstream designated port has started forwarding data.

  • Page 65: Mstp Basic Concepts

    • MSTP prunes a loop network into a loop-free tree, which avoids proliferation and endless cycling of packets in a loop network. In addition, it supports load balancing of VLAN data by providing multiple redundant paths for data forwarding. MSTP basic concepts Figure 16 shows a switched network that comprises four MST regions, each MST region comprising four MSTP devices.

  • Page 66

    Figure 17 Network diagram and topology of MST region 3 To MST region 4 MST region 3 Device A Device B MSTI 1 MSTI 2 Regional root MSTI Device C Device D MSTI 0 VLAN 1 MSTI 1 Topology of MSTIs in MST region 3 VLAN 2&3 MSTI 2 Other VLANs...

  • Page 67

    An internal spanning tree (IST) is a spanning tree that runs in an MST region. It is also called MSTI 0, a special MSTI to which all VLANs are mapped by default. Figure 16, MSTI 0 is the IST in MST region 3. CIST The common and internal spanning tree (CIST) is a single spanning tree that connects all devices in a switched network.

  • Page 68

    • Designated port—Forwards data to the downstream network segment or device. • Alternate port—The backup port for a root port or master port. When the root port or master port is blocked, the alternate port takes over. • Backup port—The backup port of a designated port. When the designated port is invalid, the backup port becomes the new designated port.

  • Page 69: How Mstp Works

    How MSTP works MSTP divides an entire Layer 2 network into multiple MST regions, which are connected by a calculated CST. Inside an MST region, multiple spanning trees are calculated. Each spanning tree is an MSTI. Among these MSTIs, MSTI 0 is the IST. Like STP, MSTP uses configuration BPDUs to calculate spanning trees.

  • Page 70: Spanning Tree Configuration Task List

    Spanning tree configuration task list Before configuring a spanning tree, you must determine the spanning tree protocol to be used (STP, RSTP, PVST, or MSTP) and plan the device roles (the root bridge or leaf node). Configuration restrictions and guidelines •...

  • Page 71: Rstp Configuration Task List

    Task Remarks Configuring the timeout factor Optional Configuring the maximum port rate Optional Configuring path costs of ports Optional Configuring the port priority Optional Enabling outputting port state transition information Optional Enabling the spanning tree feature Required Configuring TC snooping Optional Configuring protection functions Optional...

  • Page 72: Pvst Configuration Task List

    Task Remarks Enabling the spanning tree feature Required Performing mCheck Optional Configuring TC snooping Optional Configuring protection functions Optional Disabling the device to reactivate edge ports shut down by BPDU guard Optional PVST configuration task list Task Remarks Required Setting the spanning tree mode Configure the device to operate in PVST mode.

  • Page 73: Mstp Configuration Task List

    Task Remarks Enabling SNMP notifications for PVST topology changes Optional MSTP configuration task list Task Remarks Optional By default, the device Setting the spanning tree mode operates in MSTP mode. Configuring an MST region Required Configuring the root bridge or a secondary root bridge Optional Configuring the device priority Optional...

  • Page 74: Setting The Spanning Tree Mode

    Task Remarks Configuring Digest Snooping Optional Configuring No Agreement Check Optional Configuring TC snooping Optional Configuring protection functions Optional Disabling the device to reactivate edge ports shut down by BPDU guard Optional Setting the spanning tree mode The spanning tree modes include: •...

  • Page 75

    Configuration restrictions and guidelines • The configuration of MST region–related parameters, especially the VLAN-to-instance mapping table, will result in a new spanning tree calculation. To reduce the possibility of topology instability, the MST region configuration takes effect only after you activate it by using the active region-configuration command, or enable a spanning tree protocol by using the stp enable command in the case that the spanning tree protocol is disabled.

  • Page 76

    A device has independent roles in different spanning trees. It can act as the root bridge in one spanning tree and as a secondary root bridge in another. However, one device cannot be the root bridge and a secondary root bridge in the same spanning tree. A spanning tree can have one root bridge only.

  • Page 77: Configuring The Device Priority

    Configuring the device priority CAUTION: • You cannot change the priority of a device after it is configured as the root bridge or as a secondary root bridge. • During root bridge selection, if all devices in a spanning tree have the same priority, the one with the lowest MAC address will be selected as the root bridge of the spanning tree.

  • Page 78: Configuring The Network Diameter Of A Switched Network

    Configuring the network diameter of a switched network Any two terminal devices in a switched network are connected through a specific path composed of a series of devices. The network diameter is the number of devices on the path composed of the most devices.

  • Page 79

    calculate the timers based on the network diameter. If the network diameter uses the default value, the timers also use their default values. Configure the timers on the root bridge only, and the timer settings on the root bridge apply to all devices on the entire switched network.

  • Page 80: Configuring The Maximum Port Rate

    After the network topology is stabilized, each non-root-bridge device forwards configuration BPDUs to the downstream devices at the interval of hello time to determine whether any link is faulty. If a device does not receive a BPDU from the upstream device within nine times the hello time, it assumes that the upstream device has failed and starts a new spanning tree calculation process.

  • Page 81

    Configuration restrictions and guidelines • If BPDU guard is disabled, a port set as an edge port will become a non-edge port again if it receives a BPDU from another port. To restore the edge port, re-enable it. • If a port directly connects to a user terminal, configure it as an edge port and enable BPDU guard for it.

  • Page 82

    Table 13 Mappings between the link speed and the path cost Path cost Link speed Port type Private IEEE 802.1d-1998 IEEE 802.1t standard 65535 200,000,000 200,000 Single port 2,000,000 2000 Aggregate interface containing 2 Selected 1,000,000 1800 ports Aggregate interface 10 Mbps containing 3 Selected 666,666...

  • Page 83: Configuring Path Costs Of Ports

    calculation formula of IEEE 802.1t is: Path cost = 200,000,000/link speed (in 100 kbps), where link speed is the sum of the link speed values of the Selected ports in the aggregation group. • When multiple ports operate at a rate higher than 10 Gbps and the standard for default path cost calculation is dot1d-1998 or legacy, the path cost of a single port or an aggregate interface takes the smallest value.

  • Page 84: Configuring The Port Priority

    # In PVST mode, specify the device to calculate the default path costs of its ports by using IEEE 802.1d-1998, and set the path cost of Ethernet 1/0/3 to 2000 on VLANs 20 through 30. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] stp mode pvst [Sysname] stp pathcost-standard dot1d-1998 [Sysname] interface ethernet 1/0/3 [Sysname-Ethernet1/0/3] stp vlan 20 to 30 cost 2000...

  • Page 85

    • If the physical link to which the port connects is not a point-to-point link but you set it to be one, the configuration might bring a temporary loop. Configuration procedure To configure the link type of a port or a group of ports: Step Command Remarks...

  • Page 86: Enabling Outputting Port State Transition Information

    Step Command Remarks • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: Enter interface view or Use one of the interface interface-type interface-number port group view. commands. • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Configure the mode that the port uses to stp compliance { auto | dot1s | legacy } auto by default.

  • Page 87: Enabling The Spanning Tree Feature (in Stp/rstp/mstp Mode)

    Enabling the spanning tree feature (in STP/RSTP/MSTP mode) In STP/RSTP/MSTP mode, make sure that the spanning tree feature is enabled globally and on the desired ports. To enable the spanning tree feature in STP/RSTP/MSTP mode: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Enable the spanning By default, the spanning tree...

  • Page 88: Performing Mcheck

    Performing mCheck If a port on a device that is running MSTP, RSTP, or PVST connects to an STP device, this port automatically transitions to the STP mode. However, it cannot automatically transition back to the original mode under the following circumstances: •...

  • Page 89

    To enable communication between an HPE device and a third-party device, enable the Digest Snooping feature on the port that connects the HPE device to the third-party device in the same MST region. Configuration restrictions and guidelines • Before you enable Digest Snooping, make sure that associated devices of different vendors are connected and run spanning tree protocols.

  • Page 90: Configuring No Agreement Check

    Enable Digest Snooping on the ports of Device A and Device B that connect to Device C, so that the three devices can communicate with one another. Figure 19 Digest Snooping configuration Configuration procedure # Enable Digest Snooping on Ethernet 1/0/1 of Device A and enable global Digest Snooping on Device A.

  • Page 91: Configuration Prerequisites

    Figure 20 Rapid state transition of an MSTP designated port Figure 21 Rapid state transition of an RSTP designated port If the upstream device is a third-party device, the rapid state transition implementation might be limited. For example, when the upstream device uses a rapid transition mechanism similar to that of RSTP, and the downstream device adopts MSTP and does not operate in RSTP mode, the root port on the downstream device receives no agreement packet from the upstream device and sends no agreement packets to the upstream device.

  • Page 92: No Agreement Check Configuration Example

    Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: Enter interface view or interface interface-type Use either command. port group view. interface-number • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Enable No Agreement Disabled by default.

  • Page 93

    Figure 23 TC snooping application scenario Device User network 1 User network 2 In the network, Device transparently transmits the received BPDUs and does not participate in spanning tree calculations. When a topology change occurs to user networks, Device may need a long time to learn the correct MAC address table entries and ARP entries, resulting in long network disruption.

  • Page 94

    • BPDU guard • Root guard • Loop guard • TC-BPDU guard • BPDU drop Configuration prerequisites The spanning tree feature has been correctly configured on the device. Enabling BPDU guard For access layer devices, the access ports can directly connect to the user terminals (such as PCs) or file servers.

  • Page 95: Enabling Root Guard

    Enabling BPDU guard on an interface or port group You can enable BPDU guard on specific edge ports when it is globally disabled. To enable BPDU guard on an interface or port group: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view •...

  • Page 96: Enabling Loop Guard

    NOTE: You cannot configure root guard and loop guard on a port at the same time. Enabling loop guard A device that keeps receiving BPDUs from the upstream device can maintain the state of the root port and blocked ports. However, link congestion or unidirectional link failures might cause these ports to fail to receive BPDUs from the upstream devices.

  • Page 97: Enabling Bpdu Drop

    Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Optional. Enable the TC-BPDU guard function. stp tc-protection enable Enabled by default. Configure the maximum number of Optional. forwarding address entry flushes that stp tc-protection the device can perform every 10 threshold number 6 by default.

  • Page 98: Enabling Snmp Notifications For Pvst Topology Changes

    Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Disable the device to By default, the device reactivates reactivate edge ports shut the shutdown edge ports after a stp port shutdown permanent down by BPDU guard. port status detection interval. Enabling SNMP notifications for PVST topology changes This feature is available on the HPE 3100 v2 EI switches.

  • Page 99: Spanning Tree Configuration Examples

    Task Command Remarks display stp region-configuration [ | Display the MST region configuration { begin | exclude | include } Available in any view information that has taken effect. regular-expression ] Display the root bridge information of all display stp root [ | { begin | exclude | Available in any view MSTIs.

  • Page 100

    Configure Device A: # Enter MST region view; configure the MST region name as example; map VLAN 10, VLAN 30, and VLAN 40 to MSTI 1, MSTI 3, and MSTI 4, respectively; configure the revision level of the MST region as 0. <DeviceA>...

  • Page 101

    [DeviceC-mst-region] active region-configuration [DeviceC-mst-region] quit # Specify the current device as the root bridge of MSTI 4. [DeviceC] stp instance 4 root primary # Enable the spanning tree feature globally. [DeviceC] stp enable Configure Device D: # Enter MST region view, configure the MST region name as example, map VLAN 10, VLAN 30, and VLAN 40 to MSTI 1, MSTI 3, and MSTI 4, respectively, and configure the revision level of the MST region as 0.

  • Page 102: Pvst Configuration Example

    [DeviceC] display stp brief MSTID Port Role STP State Protection Ethernet1/0/1 DESI FORWARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/2 ROOT FORWARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/3 DESI FORWARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/1 ROOT FORWARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/2 ALTE DISCARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/3 DESI FORWARDING NONE # Display brief spanning tree information on Device D. [DeviceD] display stp brief MSTID Port...

  • Page 103

    • VLAN 10, VLAN 20, and VLAN 30 are terminated on the distribution layer devices, and VLAN 40 is terminated on the access layer devices. The root bridge of VLAN 10 and VLAN 20 is Device A, that of VLAN 30 is Device B, and that of VLAN 40 is Device C. Figure 26 Network diagram Configuration procedure Configure VLANs and VLAN member ports: (Details not shown.)

  • Page 104

    [DeviceC] stp vlan 40 root primary # Enable the spanning tree feature globally and for VLANs 10, 20, and 40. [DeviceC] stp enable [DeviceC] stp vlan 10 20 40 enable Configure Device D: # Set the spanning tree mode to PVST. <DeviceD>...

  • Page 105

    Ethernet1/0/3 ALTE DISCARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/1 ROOT FORWARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/2 ALTE DISCARDING NONE Ethernet1/0/3 ROOT FORWARDING NONE Based on the output, you can draw the spanning tree mapped to each VLAN, as shown Figure Figure 27 Spanning trees mapped to different VLANs...

  • Page 106: Configuring Bpdu Tunneling (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Configuring BPDU tunneling (available only on the HPE 3100 v2 EI) Overview As a Layer 2 tunneling technology, BPDU tunneling enables Layer 2 protocol packets from geographically dispersed customer networks to be transparently transmitted over specific tunnels across a service provider network. Background Dedicated lines are used in a service provider network to build user-specific Layer 2 networks.

  • Page 107: Bpdu Tunneling Implementation

    • Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) • Per VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST) • Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) • Unidirectional Link Direction (UDLD) • VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) BPDU tunneling implementation The BPDU tunneling implementations for different protocols are all similar. This section uses the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) to describe how to implement BPDU tunneling.

  • Page 108: Enabling Bpdu Tunneling

    At the ingress of the service provider network, PE 1 changes the destination MAC address of the BPDU from 0x0180-C200-0000 to a special multicast MAC address, 0x010F-E200-0003 (the default multicast MAC address), for example. In the service provider network, the modified BPDU is forwarded as a data packet in the VLAN assigned to User A.

  • Page 109: Configuring Destination Multicast Mac Address For Bpdus

    Step Command Remarks • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view: interface interface-type Enter Ethernet interface view or interface-number Use either command. port group view. • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Enable BPDU tunneling for a bpdu-tunnel dot1q { cdp | hgmp | Disabled by default.

  • Page 110

    • All ports that connect service provider devices and customer devices are access ports and belong to VLAN 2. All ports that interconnect service provider devices are trunk ports and allow packets of any VLAN to pass through. • MSTP is enabled on User A’s network. After the configuration, CE 1 and CE 2 must implement consistent spanning tree calculation across the service provider network, and the destination multicast MAC address carried in BPDUs must be 0x0100-0CCD-CDD0.

  • Page 111: Bpdu Tunneling For Pvst Configuration Example

    BPDU tunneling for PVST configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure • CE 1 and CE 2 are edge devices on the geographically dispersed network of User A. PE 1 and PE 2 are edge devices on the service provider network. •...

  • Page 112

    # Disable STP on Ethernet 1/0/2, and then enable BPDU tunneling for STP and PVST on it. [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] bpdu-tunnel dot1q stp [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] bpdu-tunnel dot1q pvst...

  • Page 113: Configuring Vlans

    Configuring VLANs Overview Ethernet is a network technology based on the CSMA/CD mechanism. Because the medium is shared, collisions and excessive broadcasts are common on Ethernet networks. To address the issue, virtual LAN (VLAN) was introduced to break a LAN down into separate VLANs. VLANs are isolated from each other at Layer 2.

  • Page 114: Vlan Types

    In the header of a traditional Ethernet data frame, the field after the destination MAC address and the source MAC address is the Type field, which indicates the upper layer protocol type, as shown Figure Figure 33 Traditional Ethernet frame format IEEE 802.1Q inserts a four-byte VLAN tag after the DA&SA field, as shown in Figure Figure 34 Position and format of VLAN tag...

  • Page 115: Protocols And Standards

    • The HPE 3100 v2 EI switches support port-based VLAN, MAC-based VLAN, and protocol-based VLAN. • The HPE 3100 v2 SI switches support port-based VLAN and MAC-based VLAN. • On a port configured with port-based VLAN, MAC-based VLAN, and protocol-based VLAN, the switch determines which VLAN a packet that passes through the port should be assigned to by looking up the VLANs in the default order of MAC-based VLAN, protocol-based VLAN, and port-based VLAN.

  • Page 116

    They do not exist as physical entities on devices. For each VLAN, you can create one VLAN interface. You can assign the VLAN interface an IP address and specify the IP address as the gateway address for the devices in the VLAN, so that traffic can be routed to other IP subnets. Configuration procedure To configure basic settings of a VLAN interface: Step...

  • Page 117

    • An access port belongs to only one VLAN and sends traffic untagged. It is usually used to connect a terminal device unable to identify VLAN tagged-packets or when separating different VLAN members is unnecessary. • A trunk port can carry multiple VLANs to receive and send traffic for them. Except traffic from the port VLAN ID (PVID), traffic sent through a trunk port will be VLAN tagged.

  • Page 118: Assigning An Access Port To A Vlan

    Actions (in the inbound direction) Actions (in the outbound Port type direction) Untagged frame Tagged frame • Removes the tag and send the frame if the frame carries the PVID tag and the port belongs to the PVID. Trunk Checks whether the •...

  • Page 119: Assigning A Trunk Port To A Vlan

    Step Command Remarks Use any command. • The configuration made in Layer 2 Ethernet interface view applies only to the port. • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet • The configuration made in port interface view: group view applies to all ports in the interface interface-type port group.

  • Page 120: Assigning A Hybrid Port To A Vlan

    Step Command Remarks Use any command. • The configuration made in Layer 2 Ethernet interface view applies only to • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface the port. view: • The configuration made in port group interface interface-type view applies to all ports in the port group. interface-number •...

  • Page 121: Port-based Vlan Configuration Example

    Step Command Remarks Use any command. • The configuration made in Ethernet interface view applies only to the port. • • The configuration made in port group Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view applies to all ports in the port view: group.

  • Page 122

    Figure 35 Network diagram Configuration procedure Configure Device A: # Create VLAN 100, and assign port Ethernet 1/0/1 to VLAN 100. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] vlan 100 [DeviceA-vlan100] port ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-vlan100] quit # Create VLAN 200, and assign port Ethernet 1/0/2 to VLAN 200. [DeviceA] vlan 200 [DeviceA-vlan200] port ethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceA-vlan200] quit...

  • Page 123: Configuring Mac-based Vlans

    Tagged Ports: Ethernet1/0/3 Untagged Ports: Ethernet1/0/2 Configuring MAC-based VLANs Introduction to MAC-based VLAN The MAC-based VLAN feature assigns hosts to a VLAN based on their MAC addresses. This feature is usually used in conjunction with security technologies such as 802.1X to provide secure, flexible network access for terminal devices.

  • Page 124

    Configuration procedure To configure static MAC-based VLAN assignment: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Associate a specific mac-vlan mac-address MAC address with a mac-address vlan vlan-id VLAN. [ priority priority ] • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet Use either command. interface view: •...

  • Page 125: Mac-based Vlan Configuration Example

    MAC-based VLAN configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure • Ethernet 1/0/1 of Device A and Device C are each connected to a meeting room. Laptop 1 and Laptop 2 are used for meetings and might be used in either of the two meeting rooms. •...

  • Page 126

    # Associate the MAC address of Laptop 1 with VLAN 100, and associate the MAC address of Laptop 2 with VLAN 200. [DeviceA] mac-vlan mac-address 000d-88f8-4e71 vlan 100 [DeviceA] mac-vlan mac-address 0014-222c-aa69 vlan 200 # Configure Laptop 1 and Laptop 2 to access the network through Ethernet 1/0/1. Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a hybrid port that sends packets of VLANs 100 and 200 untagged, and enable the MAC-based VLAN feature on it.

  • Page 127: Configuring Protocol-based Vlans (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    -------------------------------------------------------- 000d-88f8-4e71 ffff-ffff-ffff 0014-222c-aa69 ffff-ffff-ffff Total MAC VLAN address count:2 Configuration guidelines MAC-based VLAN can be configured only on hybrid ports. MAC-based VLAN is usually configured on the downlink ports of access layer devices, and cannot be configured together with the link aggregation function. Configuring protocol-based VLANs (available only on the HPE 3100 v2 EI) Introduction to protocol-based VLAN...

  • Page 128: Protocol-based Vlan Configuration Example

    Step Command Remarks Enter system system-view view. If the specified VLAN does not exist, this Enter VLAN view. vlan vlan-id command creates the VLAN first. protocol-vlan [ protocol-index ] Create a protocol { at | ipv4 | ipv6 | ipx ethernetii | template for the Not configured by default.

  • Page 129

    Figure 37 Network diagram Configuration consideration Create VLANs 100 and 200. Associate VLAN 100 with IPv4, and associate VLAN 200 with IPv6. Configure protocol-based VLANs to isolate IPv4 traffic and IPv6 traffic at Layer 2. Configuration procedure Configure Device: # Create VLAN 100, and assign port Ethernet 1/0/11 to VLAN 100. <Device>...

  • Page 130

    Please wait... Done. # Associate port Ethernet 1/0/1 with the IPv4 protocol template of VLAN 100 and the IPv6 protocol template of VLAN 200. [Device-Ethernet1/0/1] port hybrid protocol-vlan vlan 100 1 [Device-Ethernet1/0/1] port hybrid protocol-vlan vlan 200 1 [Device-Ethernet1/0/1] quit # Configure Ethernet 1/0/2 as a hybrid port that forwards packets of VLANs 100 and 200 untagged, and associate Ethernet 1/0/2 with the IPv4 protocol template of VLAN 100 and the IPv6 protocol template of VLAN 200.

  • Page 131: Displaying And Maintaining Vlans

    Configuration guidelines Protocol-based VLAN configuration applies only to hybrid ports. Displaying and maintaining VLANs Task Command Remarks display vlan [ vlan-id1 [ to vlan-id2 ] | all | dynamic Available in any Display VLAN information. | reserved | static ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } view regular-expression ] display interface [ vlan-interface ] [ brief [ down |...

  • Page 132: Configuring A Voice Vlan (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Configuring a voice VLAN (available only on the HPE 3100 v2 EI) Overview A voice VLAN is configured for voice traffic. After assigning the ports that connect to voice devices to a voice VLAN, the system can configure quality of service (QoS) parameters for voice traffic, to improve the transmission priority of voice traffic and ensure voice quality.

  • Page 133: Automatically Identifying Ip Phones Through Lldp

    Automatically identifying IP phones through LLDP When you use OUI addresses to identify IP phones, the number of OUI addresses that can be configured is limited. Additionally, when there are plenty of IP phones in the network, you must configure many OUI addresses. If your IP phones support LLDP, you can configure LLDP to automatically identify IP phones.

  • Page 134: Ip Phone Access Methods

    IP phone access methods Connecting the host and the IP phone in series As shown in Figure 39, the host is connected to the IP phone, and the IP phone is connected to the device. In this scenario, the following requirements must be met: •...

  • Page 135

    When an IP phone is powered on, it sends out protocol packets. The system matches the source MAC address of the protocol packets against the device's OUI addresses. If the match succeeds, the system performs the following tasks: Assigns the receiving port of the protocol packets to the voice VLAN. Issues ACL rules to set the packet precedence.

  • Page 136: Security Mode And Normal Mode Of Voice Vlans

    Port Voice VLAN Support for link assignment untagged voice Configuration requirements type mode traffic Configure the voice VLAN as the PVID of the Manual port. Automatic Trunk Configure the voice VLAN as the PVID of the Manual port and assign the port to the voice VLAN. Automatic Configure the voice VLAN as the PVID of the Hybrid...

  • Page 137

    Table 17 How a voice VLAN-enabled port processes packets in security and normal mode Voice VLAN Packet type Packet processing mode mode • If the source MAC address of a packet matches an OUI address on the device, the packet is forwarded in the Untagged packets or voice VLAN.

  • Page 138: Configuring A Port To Operate In Automatic Voice Vlan Assignment Mode

    Step Command Remarks By default, an interface modifies the CoS value and the DSCP value marked for voice VLAN traffic into 6 and 46, • Configure the port to trust respectively. the QoS priority settings: Configure QoS voice vlan qos trust If a port trusts the QoS priority settings in priority settings for •...

  • Page 139: Configuring A Port To Operate In Manual Voice Vlan Assignment Mode

    Step Command Remarks Optional. Enable the voice VLAN voice vlan security enable By default, the voice VLAN security mode. security mode is enabled. Optional. By default, each voice VLAN has voice vlan mac-address oui Add a recognizable OUI default OUI addresses mask oui-mask [ description address.

  • Page 140: Enabling Lldp To Automatically Discover Ip Phones

    Step Command Remarks Optional. By default, each voice VLAN has voice vlan mac-address oui Add a recognizable OUI default OUI addresses mask oui-mask [ description address. configured. For the default OUI text ] addresses of different vendors, Table interface interface-type Enter interface view.

  • Page 141

    Configuration restrictions and guidelines When you enable the switch to automatically discover IP phones through LLDP, following these restrictions and guidelines: • A maximum of five IP phones can be connected to each port of the device. • Use this function only with the voice VLAN automatic assignment mode. •...

  • Page 142: Dynamically Advertising Server-assigned Vlans Through Lldp

    Dynamically advertising server-assigned VLANs through LLDP Overview This function works with 802.1X or MAC authentication, and is available only for LLDP-enabled IP phones. If 802.1X authentication is used, make sure the IP phones also support 802.1X authentication. To implement this function for an IP phone, perform the following configuration tasks: •...

  • Page 143: Voice Vlan Configuration Examples

    Task Command Remarks Display the OUI addresses that display voice vlan oui [ | { begin | exclude Available in any view the system supports. | include } regular-expression ] Voice VLAN configuration examples Automatic voice VLAN mode configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure...

  • Page 144

    [DeviceA] voice vlan mac-address 0011-2200-0001 mask ffff-ff00-0000 description IP phone B Configure Ethernet 1/0/1: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a hybrid port. [DeviceA] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type hybrid # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 to operate in automatic voice VLAN assignment mode. [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] voice vlan mode auto # Configure VLAN 2 as the voice VLAN for Ethernet 1/0/1.

  • Page 145: Manual Voice Vlan Assignment Mode Configuration Example

    Manual voice VLAN assignment mode configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure • Device A transmits only voice traffic. • IP phone A send untagged voice traffic. For correct voice traffic transmission, perform the following tasks on Device A: •...

  • Page 146

    <DeviceA> display voice vlan oui Oui Address Mask Description 0001-e300-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Siemens phone 0003-6b00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Cisco phone 0004-0d00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Avaya phone 0011-2200-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 test 00d0-1e00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Pingtel phone 0060-b900-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Philips/NEC phone 00e0-7500-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Polycom phone 00e0-bb00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 3com phone # Display the voice VLAN state.

  • Page 147: Configuring Gvrp

    Configuring GVRP The Generic Attribute Registration Protocol (GARP) provides a generic framework for devices in a switched LAN, such as end stations and switches, to register and deregister attribute values. The GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) is a GARP application that registers and deregisters VLAN attributes.

  • Page 148

    • Leave messages A GARP participant sends Leave messages when it wishes to withdraw declarations of its attribute values (because, for example, it has deregistered its attribute values), or receives Leave messages from other participants. Leave messages fall into LeaveEmpty and LeaveIn. A GARP participant sends LeaveEmpty messages to withdraw declarations of the attribute values that it has not registered.

  • Page 149

    GARP PDU format Figure 45 GARP PDU format Ethernet frame Length DSAP SSAP Ctrl GARP PDU Protocol ID Message 1 Message n End mark Attribute type Attribute list Attribute 1 Attribute n End mark Attribute length Attribute event Attribute value As shown in Figure 45, GARP PDUs are encapsulated in IEEE 802.3 Ethernet frames.

  • Page 150: Gvrp

    GVRP GVRP overview As a GARP application, GVRP uses the operating mechanism of GARP to maintain and propagate dynamic VLAN registrations throughout a switched LAN. In a switched LAN, each GVRP-enabled switch sends and receives VLAN declarations and withdrawals from other GVRP-enabled switches, and dynamically updates its local database, including active VLAN members and through which port each VLAN member can be reached.

  • Page 151

    Configuration restrictions and guidelines • GVRP can work with STP, RSTP, or MSTP CIST but not PVST. When GVRP runs on the CIST, blocked ports on the CIST cannot receive or send GVRP packets. For more information about STP, RSTP, MSTP CIST, and PVST, see "Configuring spanning tree protocols." •...

  • Page 152: Displaying And Maintaining Gvrp

    Step Command Remarks Optional. Configure the GARP 1000 centiseconds by default. garp timer leaveall timer-value LeaveAll timer. The LeaveAll timer applies to all ports. • Enter Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: Enter Ethernet interface view, Layer 2 aggregate interface interface-type Use either command.

  • Page 153: Gvrp Configuration Examples

    Task Command Remarks Display the local VLAN display gvrp local-vlan interface interface-type Available in information that GVRP interface-number [ | { begin | exclude | include } any view maintains on ports. regular-expression ] display gvrp state interface interface-type Display the current GVRP state Available in interface-number vlan vlan-id [ | { begin | exclude | in the specified VLANs on ports.

  • Page 154: Gvrp Fixed Registration Mode Configuration Example

    Configure Device B: # Enable GVRP globally. <DeviceB> system-view [DeviceB] gvrp # Configure port Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and assign it to all VLANs. [DeviceB] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-Ethernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on trunk port Ethernet 1/0/1.

  • Page 155

    <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] gvrp # Configure port Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and assign it to all VLANs. [DeviceA] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on Ethernet 1/0/1 and set the GVRP registration mode to fixed on the port. [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] gvrp [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] gvrp registration fixed [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] quit...

  • Page 156: Gvrp Forbidden Registration Mode Configuration Example

    GVRP forbidden registration mode configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure • Device A and Device B are connected through their ports Ethernet 1/0/1. • Enable GVRP and configure the forbidden registration mode on ports to prevent the registration and deregistration of all VLANs but VLAN 1 between the two devices.

  • Page 157

    Use the display gvrp local-vlan command to display the local VLAN information that GVRP maintains on ports. For example: # Display the local VLAN information that GVRP maintains on port Ethernet 1/0/1 of Device A. [DeviceA] display gvrp local-vlan interface ethernet 1/0/1 Following VLANs exist in GVRP local database: 1(default) According to the output, information about VLAN 1 is registered through GVRP, but static VLAN...

  • Page 158: Configuring Qinq

    Configuring QinQ Throughout this document, customer network VLANs (CVLANs), also called inner VLANs, refer to the VLANs that a customer uses on the private network; and service provider network VLANs (SVLANs), also called outer VLANs, refer to the VLANs that a service provider uses to carry VLAN tagged traffic for customers.

  • Page 159: Qinq Frame Structure

    Figure 49 Typical QinQ application scenario As shown in Figure 49, customer network A has CVLANs 1 through 10, and customer network B has CVLANs 1 through 20. The service provider assigns SVLAN 3 for customer network A, and assigns SVLAN 4 for customer network B.

  • Page 160: Implementations Of Qinq

    Figure 50 Single-tagged Ethernet frame header and double-tagged Ethernet frame header The default maximum transmission unit (MTU) of an interface is 1500 bytes. The size of an outer VLAN tag is 4 bytes. Hewlett Packard Enterprise recommends you to increase the MTU of each interface on the service provider network to at least 1504 bytes.

  • Page 161

    when sent to the public network, carry the TPID value identical to the value of a particular vendor, allowing interoperability with the switches of that vendor. The TPID in an Ethernet frame has the same position as the protocol type field in a frame without a VLAN tag.

  • Page 162: Enabling Basic Qinq

    Enabling basic QinQ A basic QinQ-enabled port tags an incoming packet with its PVID. To enable basic QinQ: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: Enter interface view interface interface-type interface-number Use either command.

  • Page 163: Configuring An Outer Vlan Tagging Policy In The Qos Policy-based Approach

    NOTE: • An inner VLAN tag corresponds to only one outer VLAN tag. • To change an outer VLAN tag, you must delete the old outer VLAN tag configuration and configure a new outer VLAN tag. Configuring an outer VLAN tagging policy in the QoS policy-based approach You can configure an outer VLAN tagging policy on the HPE 3100 v2 EI switches in the QoS policy-based approach.

  • Page 164: Configuring The Tpid Value In Vlan Tags

    Configuring the TPID value in VLAN tags Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Optional. Configure the TPID value. By default, the TPID value is 0x8100. qinq ethernet-type hex-value The configuration applies to all ports. QinQ configuration examples Basic QinQ configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure...

  • Page 165

    IMPORTANT: Make sure that you have configured the devices in the service provider network to allow QinQ packets to pass through. Configure PE 1: Configure Ethernet 1/0/1: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port and assign it to VLAN 100. <PE1>...

  • Page 166: Selective Qinq Configuration Example In Port-based Approach

    # Configure Ethernet 1/0/2 as a trunk port and assign it to VLAN 100 and VLAN 200. [PE2] interface ethernet 1/0/2 [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 100 200 # Set the TPID value in the outer VLAN tag to 0x8200 on the port. [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] quit [PE2] qinq ethernet-type 8200 Configure Ethernet 1/0/3:...

  • Page 167

    Figure 53 Network diagram Configuration procedure IMPORTANT: Make sure that you have configured the devices in the service provider network to allow QinQ packets to pass through. Configure PE 1: Configure Ethernet 1/0/1: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a hybrid port to permit frames of VLAN 100 and VLAN 200 to pass through untagged.

  • Page 168: Selective Qinq Configuration Example In Qos Policy-based Approach

    [PE1] qinq ethernet-type 8200 Configure PE 2: Configure Ethernet 1/0/1: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a hybrid port to permit frames of VLAN 100 and VLAN 200 to pass through untagged. [PE2] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [PE2-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type hybrid [PE2-Ethernet1/0/1] port hybrid vlan 100 200 untagged # Configure the port to tag VLAN 10 frames with outer VLAN ID 100.

  • Page 169

    Figure 54 Network diagram Configuration procedure IMPORTANT: Make sure that you have configured the devices in the service provider network to allow QinQ packets to pass through. Configure PE 1: Configure Ethernet 1/0/1: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 as a hybrid port to permit frames of VLAN 100 and VLAN 200 to pass through untagged.

  • Page 170

    # Create a QoS policy named qinq, associate traffic class A10 with traffic behavior P100, and associate traffic class A20 with traffic behavior P200. [PE1] qos policy qinq [PE1-qospolicy-qinq] classifier A10 behavior P100 [PE1-qospolicy-qinq] classifier A20 behavior P200 [PE1-qospolicy-qinq] quit # Apply QoS policy qinq to the incoming traffic globally.

  • Page 171

    [PE2-qospolicy-qinq] quit # Apply QoS policy qinq to the incoming traffic globally. [PE2] qos apply policy qinq global inbound # Enable selective QinQ on the port. [PE2-Ethernet1/0/1] qinq enable downlink Configure Ethernet 1/0/2: # Configure Ethernet 1/0/2 as a trunk port and assign it to VLAN 100 and VLAN 200. [PE2] interface ethernet 1/0/2 [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [PE2-Ethernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 100 200...

  • Page 172: Configuring Vlan Mapping (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Configuring VLAN mapping (available only on the HPE 3100 v2 EI) Overview VLAN mapping re-marks VLAN tagged traffic with new VLAN IDs. The HPE 3100 v2 EI switches provide the following types of VLAN mapping: • One-to-one VLAN mapping—Replaces one VLAN tag with another. You can use one-to-one VLAN mapping to sub-classify traffic from a particular VLAN for granular QoS control.

  • Page 173: Concepts And Terms

    Figure 56 Application scenario of many-to-one VLAN mapping Concepts and terms Figure 57 shows a simplified network to help explain the concepts and terms that you might encounter when you work with VLAN mapping. Figure 57 Basic concepts of VLAN mapping Network-side port Customer-side port Uplink traffic...

  • Page 174: One-to-one Vlan Mapping Implementation

    One-to-one VLAN mapping implementation This section describes how one-to-one VLAN mapping is implemented on the HPE 3100 v2 EI switches. Implementing one-to-one VLAN mapping with a global QoS policy Implement one-to-one VLAN mapping on the customer-side port through the following configurations, as shown in Figure •...

  • Page 175: Many-to-one Vlan Mapping Implementation

    Many-to-one VLAN mapping implementation Implement many-to-one VLAN mapping through the following configurations, as shown in Figure • Apply an uplink policy to the incoming traffic on the customer-side port to map different CVLAN IDs to one SVLAN ID. When a packet arrives, the switch replaces its CVLAN ID with the matching SVLAN ID.

  • Page 176: Configuring The Customer-side Port

    Step Command Enter system view. system-view a. Create a class and enter class view: traffic classifier tcl-name [ operator { and | or } ] Configure a class for a CVLAN. b. Specify a CVLAN as the match criterion: if-match customer-vlan-id vlan-id Return to system view.

  • Page 177: Configuring One-to-one Vlan Mapping With Port Qos Policies

    Step Command Remarks Configure the port as a trunk The default link type of ports is port link-type trunk port. access. By default, a trunk port belongs to port trunk permit vlan Assign the port to SVLANs. { vlan-id-list | all } VLAN 1 only.

  • Page 178: Configuring A Downlink Policy

    Step Command Associate the class with the behavior to map the CVLAN classifier tcl-name behavior behavior-name to the SVLAN. Configuring a downlink policy To configure a downlink policy to map SVLANs back to CVLANs: Step Command Enter system view. system-view a.

  • Page 179: Configuring Many-to-one Vlan Mapping

    Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface interface-type interface view. interface-number Configure the port as a trunk The default link type of ports is port link-type trunk port. access. By default, a trunk port belongs to port trunk permit vlan Assign the port to SVLANs.

  • Page 180

    Step Command Return to system view. quit Create a QoS policy and enter QoS qos policy policy-name policy view. Map the CVLANs to the SVLAN by classifier tcl-name behavior behavior-name mode associating the class with the dot1q-tag-manipulation behavior. Configuring the customer-side port Step Command Remarks...

  • Page 181

    Figure 61 Network diagram for one-to-one VLAN mapping configuration Configuration procedure In this example, one-to-one VLAN mappings are configured with a global QoS policy. # Create the CVLANs and SVLANs. <SwitchA> system-view [SwitchA] vlan 2 to 6 [SwitchA] vlan 101 to 102 [SwitchA] vlan 201 to 202 [SwitchA] vlan 301 to 302 # Configure uplink policy p1 to transmit one service of one customer in a unique SVLAN, and globally...

  • Page 182: Many-to-one Vlan Mapping Configuration Example

    [SwitchA-behavior-b4] remark service-vlan-id 102 [SwitchA-behavior-b4] traffic behavior b5 [SwitchA-behavior-b5] remark service-vlan-id 202 [SwitchA-behavior-b5] traffic behavior b6 [SwitchA-behavior-b6] remark service-vlan-id 302 [SwitchA-behavior-b6] quit [SwitchA] qos policy p1 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c1 behavior b1 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c2 behavior b2 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c3 behavior b3 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c4 behavior b4 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c5 behavior b5 [SwitchA-policy-p1] classifier c6 behavior b6...

  • Page 183

    Figure 62 Network diagram for many-to-one VLAN mapping configuration Configuration procedure # Create the CVLANs and SVLANs. <SwitchA> system-view [SwitchA] vlan 2 to 6 [SwitchA] vlan 101 to 102 # Configure uplink policies p1 and p2 to transmit all services of one customer in a unique SVLAN. [SwitchA] traffic classifier c1 operator or [SwitchA-classifier-c1] if-match customer-vlan-id 1 to 3 [SwitchA-classifier-c1] traffic classifier c2 operator or...

  • Page 184

    # Configure customer-side port Ethernet 1/0/2 as a trunk port, assign the port to CVLANs 4 through 6 and SVLAN 102, and apply uplink policy p2 to the incoming traffic of the port. [SwitchA] interface ethernet 1/0/2 [SwitchA-Ethernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [SwitchA-Ethernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 4 5 6 102 [SwitchA-Ethernet1/0/2] qos apply policy p2 inbound [SwitchA-Ethernet1/0/2] quit...

  • Page 185: Configuring Lldp

    Configuring LLDP Overview Background In a heterogeneous network, a standard configuration exchange platform ensures that different types of network devices from different vendors can discover one another and exchange configuration. The IETF drafted the Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) in IEEE 802.1AB. The protocol operates on the data link layer to exchange device information between directly connected devices.

  • Page 186

    Field Description Frame check sequence, a 32-bit CRC value used to determine the validity of the received Ethernet frame. • SNAP-encapsulated LLDP frame format Figure 64 SNAP-encapsulated LLDP frame format Table 22 Fields in a SNAP-encapsulated LLDP frame Field Description MAC address to which the LLDP frame is advertised.

  • Page 187

    Organizationally specific TLVs and LLDP-MED TLVs are used for enhanced device management. They are defined by standardization or other organizations and are optional for LLDPDUs. • Basic management TLVs Table 23 lists the basic management TLV types. Some of them are mandatory to LLDPDUs. Table 23 Basic management TLVs Type Description...

  • Page 188

    Table 25 IEEE 802.3 organizationally specific TLVs Type Description Contains the bit-rate and duplex capabilities of the sending port, support MAC/PHY Configuration/Status for auto negotiation, enabling status of auto negotiation, and the current rate and duplex mode. Contains the power supply capabilities of the port: •...

  • Page 189: Working Mechanism

    Type Description Allows a terminal device to advertise its asset ID. The typical case is Asset ID that the user specifies the asset ID for the endpoint to facilitate directory management and asset tracking. Allows a network device to advertise the appropriate location Location Identification identifier information for a terminal device to use in the context of location-based applications.

  • Page 190: Lldp Configuration Task List

    LLDP configuration task list LLDP-related configurations made in Layer 2 Ethernet interface view take effect only on the current port, and those made in port group view take effect on all ports in the current port group. Complete these tasks to configure LLDP: Task Remarks Enabling LLDP...

  • Page 191: Setting The Lldp Reinitialization Delay

    Step Command Remarks • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view: Enter Ethernet interface interface interface-type interface-number view or port group view. • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Optional. Set the LLDP operating lldp admin-status { disable | rx | tx | txrx } mode.

  • Page 192: Configuring The Management Address And Its Encoding Format

    Step Command Remarks lldp tlv-enable { basic-tlv { all | port-description | system-capability | system-description | system-name } | Optional. dot1-tlv { all | port-vlan-id | protocol-vlan-id [ vlan-id ] | vlan-name [ vlan-id ] } | dot3-tlv By default, all types of Configure the { all | link-aggregation | mac-physic | LLDP TLVs except...

  • Page 193: Setting An Encapsulation Format For Lldp Frames

    By setting the TTL multiplier, you can configure the TTL of locally sent LLDPDUs, which determines how long information about the local device can be saved on a neighboring device. The TTL is expressed by using the following formula: TTL = Min (65535, (TTL multiplier × LLDP frame transmission interval)) As the expression shows, the TTL can be up to 65535 seconds.

  • Page 194: Configuring Cdp Compatibility (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Step Command Remarks • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view: interface interface-type Enter Ethernet interface interface-number view or port group view. • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Set the encapsulation Ethernet II encapsulation format for LLDP frames lldp encapsulation snap format applies by default.

  • Page 195

    neighbor-information-related fields output from display lldp neighbor-information command show the CDP neighboring device information that can be recognized by the switch. To make your device work with Cisco IP phones, you must enable CDP compatibility. If your LLDP-enabled device cannot recognize CDP packets, it does not respond to the requests of Cisco IP phones for the voice VLAN ID configured on the device.

  • Page 196: Configuring Lldp Trapping

    Step Command Remarks Configure CDP-compatible LLDP to operate in TxRx Disable mode by default. lldp compliance admin-status cdp txrx mode. Configuring LLDP trapping LLDP trapping notifies the network management system (NMS) of events such as newly-detected neighboring devices and link failures. LLDP traps are sent periodically, and the interval is configurable.

  • Page 197: Lldp Configuration Examples

    Task Command Remarks display lldp tlv-config [ interface interface-type Display types of advertisable Available in any interface-number ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } optional LLDP TLVs. view regular-expression ] LLDP configuration examples Basic LLDP configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure...

  • Page 198

    <SwitchB> system-view [SwitchB] lldp enable # Enable LLDP on Ethernet1/0/1. By default, LLDP is enabled on ports. [SwitchB] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [SwitchB-Ethernet1/0/1] lldp enable # Set the LLDP operating mode to Tx. [SwitchB-Ethernet1/0/1] lldp admin-status tx [SwitchB-Ethernet1/0/1] quit Verifying the configuration: # Verify the following items: •...

  • Page 199: Cdp-compatible Lldp Configuration Example (available Only On The Hpe 3100 V2 Ei)

    Number of sent optional TLV Number of received unknown TLV : 3 # Remove the link between Switch A and Switch B. # Verify that Ethernet 1/0/2 of Switch A does not connect to any neighboring devices. [SwitchA] display lldp status Global status of LLDP: Enable The current number of LLDP neighbors: 1 The current number of CDP neighbors: 0...

  • Page 200: Verify The Configuration

    Configure voice VLAN 2 on Switch A. Enable CDP compatibility of LLDP on Switch A to allow the Cisco IP phones to automatically configure the voice VLAN. The voice VLAN feature performs the following actions: • Confines the voice traffic within the voice VLAN. •...

  • Page 201

    • Discovering the IP phones connected to Ethernet 1/0/1 and Ethernet 1/0/2. • Obtaining their LLDP device information. [SwitchA] display lldp neighbor-information CDP neighbor-information of port 1[Ethernet1/0/1]: CDP neighbor index : 1 Chassis ID : SEP00141CBCDBFE Port ID : Port 1 Software version : P0030301MFG2 Platform...

  • Page 202: Configuring Mvrp

    Configuring MVRP Overview Multiple Registration Protocol (MRP) is an attribute registration protocol and transmits attribute messages. Multiple VLAN Registration Protocol (MVRP) is a typical MRP application. MVRP propagates and learns VLAN configuration among devices. MVRP enables a device to propagate the local VLAN configuration to the other devices, receive VLAN configuration from other devices, and dynamically update the local VLAN configuration (including the active VLANs and the ports through which a VLAN can be reached).

  • Page 203

    • When a port receives the withdrawal of a VLAN attribute, the port deregisters the VLAN and leaves the VLAN. Figure 68 shows a simple MVRP implementation on an MSTI. In a network with multiple MSTIs, VLAN registration and deregistration are performed on a per-MSTI basis. MRP messages MRP exchanges information among MRP participants by advertising MRP messages, including Join, New, Leave, and LeaveAll.

  • Page 204: Mvrp Registration Modes

    You can enable or disable the Periodic timer at the CLI. When you disable the Periodic timer, MRP will not periodically send MRP messages, and MRP messages are sent only when the LeaveAll timer expires or the local participant receives LeaveAll messages from a remote participant.

  • Page 205

    Protocols and standards IEEE 802.1ak IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks – Amendment 07: Multiple Registration Protocol MVRP configuration task list Task Remarks Enabling MVRP Required. Configuring the MVRP registration mode Optional. Configuring MRP timers Optional.

  • Page 206: Configuring The Mvrp Registration Mode

    Step Command Remarks By default, MVRP is globally disabled. Enable MVRP globally. mvrp global enable To enable MVRP on a port, first enable MVRP globally. • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: interface interface-type Enter interface view.

  • Page 207: Enabling Gvrp Compatibility

    To configure MRP timers: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view • Enter Layer 2 Ethernet interface view or Layer 2 aggregate interface view: interface interface-type Enter interface view. Use one of the commands. interface-number • Enter port group view: port-group manual port-group-name Optional.

  • Page 208

    Configuration restrictions and guidelines • MVRP with GVRP compatibility enabled can work together with STP or RSTP, but cannot work together with MSTP. When MVRP with GVRP compatibility enabled works with MSTP, the network might operate improperly. • When GVRP compatibility is enabled for MVRP, Hewlett Packard Enterprise recommends disabling the Period timer.

  • Page 209

    Configure MVRP and set the MVRP registration mode to normal, so that Device A, Device B, Device C, and Device D can register and deregister dynamic and static VLANs and keep identical VLAN configuration for each MSTI. When the network is stable, set the MVRP registration mode to fixed on the port that connecting Device B to Device A, so that the dynamic VLANs on Device B are not de-registered.

  • Page 210

    # Configure Device A as the primary root bridge of MSTI 1. [DeviceA] stp instance 1 root primary # Globally enable the spanning tree feature. [DeviceA] stp enable # Globally enable MVRP. [DeviceA] mvrp global enable # Configure port Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and configure it to permit all VLANs. [DeviceA] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-Ethernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all...

  • Page 211

    [DeviceB] stp enable # Globally enable MVRP. [DeviceB] mvrp global enable # Configure port Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and configure it to permit VLANs 20 and 40. [DeviceB] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-Ethernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 20 40 # Enable MVRP on port Ethernet 1/0/1.

  • Page 212

    # Configure port Ethernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and configure it to permit all VLANs. [DeviceC] interface ethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceC-Ethernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceC-Ethernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable MVRP on port Ethernet 1/0/1. [DeviceC-Ethernet1/0/1] mvrp enable [DeviceC-Ethernet1/0/1] quit # Configure port Ethernet1/0/2 as a trunk port, and configure it to permit all VLANs.

  • Page 213

    Verifying the configuration Verify the normal registration mode configuration: Use the display mvrp running-status command to display the local MVRP VLAN information to verify whether the configuration takes effect. # Check the local VLAN information on Device A. [DeviceA] display mvrp running-status -------[MVRP Global Info]------- Global Status : Enabled...

  • Page 214

    -------[MVRP Global Info]------- Global Status : Enabled Compliance-GVRP : False ----[Ethernet1/0/1]---- Config Status : Enabled Running Status : Enabled Join Timer : 20 (centiseconds) Leave Timer : 60 (centiseconds) Periodic Timer : 100 (centiseconds) LeaveAll Timer : 1000 (centiseconds) Registration Type : Normal Local VLANs : 1(default),...

  • Page 215

    Running Status : Enabled Join Timer : 20 (centiseconds) Leave Timer : 60 (centiseconds) Periodic Timer : 100 (centiseconds) LeaveAll Timer : 1000 (centiseconds) Registration Type : Normal Local VLANs : 1(default), 10, 20, ----[Ethernet1/0/2]---- Config Status : Enabled Running Status : Enabled Join Timer : 20 (centiseconds)

  • Page 216

    Registration Type : Normal Local VLANs : 1(default), The output shows that: Port Ethernet 1/0/1 has learned VLAN 1 and dynamic VLAN 20 created on Device B through MVRP. Port Ethernet1/0/2 has learned only VLAN 1 through MVRP. Change the registration mode and verify the configuration: Set the MVRP registration mode to fixed on Ethernet 1/0/3 of Device B, so that the dynamic VLANs that Device B learns in VLAN 1 are not de-registered.

  • Page 217

    Local VLANs : 1(default), 10, The output shows that the dynamic VLAN information on Ethernet 1/0/3 is not changed after you set the MVRP registration mode to fixed on Ethernet 1/0/3.

  • Page 218: Document Conventions And Icons

    Document conventions and icons Conventions This section describes the conventions used in the documentation. Port numbering in examples The port numbers in this document are for illustration only and might be unavailable on your device. Command conventions Convention Description Bold text represents commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown. Boldface Italic text represents arguments that you replace with actual values.

  • Page 219: Network Topology Icons

    Network topology icons Convention Description Represents a generic network device, such as a router, switch, or firewall. Represents a routing-capable device, such as a router or Layer 3 switch. Represents a generic switch, such as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 switch, or a router that supports Layer 2 forwarding and other Layer 2 features.

  • Page 220: Support And Other Resources

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center More Information on Access to Support Materials page: www.hpe.com/support/AccessToSupportMaterials IMPORTANT: Access to some updates might require product entitlement when accessed through the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center. You must have an HP Passport set up with relevant entitlements.

  • Page 221: Websites

    Websites Website Link Networking websites Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library for www.hpe.com/networking/resourcefinder Networking Hewlett Packard Enterprise Networking website www.hpe.com/info/networking Hewlett Packard Enterprise My Networking website www.hpe.com/networking/support Hewlett Packard Enterprise My Networking Portal www.hpe.com/networking/mynetworking Hewlett Packard Enterprise Networking Warranty www.hpe.com/networking/warranty General websites Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library www.hpe.com/info/enterprise/docs Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center...

  • Page 222

    part number, edition, and publication date located on the front cover of the document. For online help content, include the product name, product version, help edition, and publication date located on the legal notices page.

  • Page 223: Index

    Index A B C D E G I L M N O P Q R S T V Configuring LLDP to advertise a specific voice VLAN,132 Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support,211 Configuring LLDP trapping,187 Accessing updates,211 Configuring load sharing for link aggregation Advertising the voice VLAN information to IP groups,40 phones,124...

  • Page 224

    Configuring the port link type,75 IP phone access methods,125 Configuring the port priority,75 Configuring the root bridge or a secondary root LLDP configuration examples,188 bridge,66 LLDP configuration task list,181 Configuring the timeout factor,70 Configuring the TPID value in VLAN tags,155 Conventions,209 MAC address table configuration example,24...

  • Page 225

    Testing the cable connection of an Ethernet VLAN mapping configuration examples,171 interface,12 Voice VLAN configuration examples,134...

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