HP 316095-B21 - StorageWorks Edge Switch 2/24 Planning Manual

Fw v06.xx/hafm sw v08.02.00 hp storageworks san high availability planning guide (aa-rs2dd-te, july 2004).
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Planning
Guide
hp StorageWorks
SAN High Availability
Product Version: FW v06.xx/HAFM SW v08.02.00
Fourth Edition (July 2004)
Part Number: AA–RS2DD–TE/623–000005–001
This guide introduces HP Fibre Channel switching products, storage area networks (SANs),
and Fibre Channel technologies. It describes HP StorageWorks directors and edge switches
High Availability Fabric Manager (HAFM)
and the
application. It also describes the firmware,
backup and restore features, and the graphical user interface delivered with the directors and
HAFM
application. Finally, it describes planning for Fibre Channel
topologies, physical planning considerations, and configuration planning tasks to ensure
taking advantage of director and switch features.

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   Summary of Contents for HP 316095-B21 - StorageWorks Edge Switch 2/24

  • Page 1

    Planning Guide hp StorageWorks SAN High Availability Product Version: FW v06.xx/HAFM SW v08.02.00 Fourth Edition (July 2004) Part Number: AA–RS2DD–TE/623–000005–001 This guide introduces HP Fibre Channel switching products, storage area networks (SANs), and Fibre Channel technologies. It describes HP StorageWorks directors and edge switches High Availability Fabric Manager (HAFM) and the application.

  • Page 2

    © Copyright 2001-2004 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Hewlett-Packard Company makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents Contents About this Guide...........11 Overview.

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Contents Product Management ..........39 Product Management Overview .

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents Core-to-Edge Fabric........... . . 95 Fabric Island.

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Contents Data Transmission Distance ......... . 134 Cost-Effectiveness .

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Contents SANtegrity Binding Planning Considerations......167 Open Trunking ............167 Full Volatility .

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    Contents 11 Edge Switch 2/32 (front view) ..........33 12 Edge Switch 2/32 (rear view).

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    Contents 49 iSCSI WAN Extension..........123 50 Port Properties Dialog Box .

  • Page 10

    Contents SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 11: About This Guide

    About This Guide About this Guide This planning guide provides information to help you plan the acquisition and installation of one or more of the following Hewlett-Packard (HP) products: About this Guide HP StorageWorks Director 2/64 HP StorageWorks Director 2/140...

  • Page 12: Overview, Intended Audience, Related Documentation

    About this Guide Overview This section covers the following topics: Intended Audience Related Documentation Intended Audience This book is intended for use by configuration and installation planners who are experienced with the following: System administration. Customer engineering. Project management. Related Documentation For a list of corresponding documentation, see the “Related Documents”...

  • Page 13: Conventions, Document Conventions, Text Symbols

    About this Guide Conventions Conventions consist of the following: Document Conventions Text Symbols Equipment Symbols Document Conventions This document follows the conventions in Table Table 1: Document Conventions Convention Element Blue text: Figure 1 Cross-reference links Bold Menu items, buttons, and key, tab, and box names Italics Text emphasis and document titles in...

  • Page 14: Equipment Symbols

    About this Guide Tip: Text in a tip provides additional help to readers by providing nonessential or optional techniques, procedures, or shortcuts. Note: Text set off in this manner presents commentary, sidelights, or interesting points of information. Equipment Symbols The following equipment symbols may be found on hardware for which this guide pertains.

  • Page 15

    About this Guide Power supplies or systems marked with these symbols indicate the presence of multiple sources of power. WARNING: To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock, remove all power cords to completely disconnect power from the power supplies and systems. Any product or assembly marked with these symbols indicates that the component exceeds the recommended weight for one individual to handle safely.

  • Page 16: Rack Stability

    About this Guide Rack Stability Rack stability protects personnel and equipment. To reduce the risk of personal injury or damage to the WARNING: equipment, be sure that: The leveling jacks are extended to the floor. The full weight of the rack rests on the leveling jacks. In single rack installations, the stabilizing feet are attached to the rack.

  • Page 17: Getting Help, Hp Technical Support, Hp Storage Web Site, Hp Authorized Reseller

    About this Guide Getting Help If you still have a question after reading this guide, contact an HP authorized service provider or access our web site: http://www.hp.com. HP Technical Support Telephone numbers for worldwide technical support are listed on the following HP web site: http://www.hp.com/support/.

  • Page 18

    About this Guide SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 19: Introduction To Hp Fibre Channel Products

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products This chapter introduces Hewlett-Packard (HP) Fibre Channel switching products that allow deployment and implementation of a storage area network (SAN) topology in a Fibre Channel Protocol (FCP) or IBM fiber connection (FICON) environment. HP offers several switch alternatives to build a robust and scalable SAN infrastructure that meets the customer’s data center requirements.

  • Page 20: Product Overview

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Product Overview HP provides three broad classes of Fibre Channel switching products, as follows: Directors — A director is a high port count, high-bandwidth switch designed with fully redundant, hot-swappable field replaceable units (FRUs) that provide an availability of 99.999% (approximately five minutes of down time per year).

  • Page 21

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Managed products and the HAFM appliance communicate on a local area network (LAN) through one or more HP-supplied 10/100 Base-T Ethernet hubs. Hubs are daisy-chained as required to provide additional Ethernet connections as more directors or switches are installed on a customer network.

  • Page 22: Directors, Director Performance

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Directors Directors provide high-performance, dynamic connections between end devices such as servers, mass storage devices, and peripherals in a Fibre Channel switched network. Directors also support mainframe and open systems interconnection (OSI) computing environments and provide data transmission and flow control between device node ports (N_Ports) as dictated by the Fibre Channel Physical and Signaling Interface (FC-PH 4.3).

  • Page 23

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Low latency — The latency is less than 2.5 microseconds between transmission of a frame at a source port to receipt of the frame at the corresponding destination port (with no port contention). Local control — Actions taking place at a device N_Port seldom affect operation of other ports;...

  • Page 24: Director 2/64, Director 2/64 (front View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products — Class F transmission service that is used by multiple directors to communicate across ISLs to configure, control, and coordinate the behavior of a multi-switch fabric. Director 2/64 The Director 2/64 is a second-generation, enterprise-class switch that provides switched fabric connectivity for up to 64 Fibre Channel devices.

  • Page 25: Director 2/64 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Redundant fan modules Redundant serial crossbar (SBAR) assemblies Power module assembly with AC power switch Figure 2: Director 2/64 (rear view) The director provides a modular design that enables quick removal and replacement of FRUs. The power module assembly at the rear of the director also provides a 9-pin, D-type subminiature (DSUB) maintenance port for connection to a local terminal or remote terminal.

  • Page 26: Director 2/140 (front View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Front bezel UPM cards (32) Power and system error LEDs CTP cards Figure 3: Director 2/140 (front view) SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 27: Director 2/140 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Figure 4 illustrates the rear of the director. Fan modules SBAR assemblies UPM cards (3) AC modules Maintenance port Power supplies Figure 4: Director 2/140 (rear view) The director provides a modular design that enables quick removal and replacement of FRUs.

  • Page 28: Edge Switches, Edge Switch Performance

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Edge Switches Like directors, edge switches also provide high-performance, dynamic connections between end devices in a Fibre Channel switched network. Edge switches also support mainframe and OSI computing environments. Through non-blocking architecture and limited FRU redundancy, edge switches also offer high availability and high-performance bandwidth.

  • Page 29: Edge Switch 2/16, Edge Switch 2/12 (front View), Edge Switch 2/12 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Shortwave laser transceivers are available for transferring data over multimode fiber-optic cable. Longwave laser transceivers are available for transferring data over single-mode fiber-optic cable. Fiber-optic cables attach to small form factor pluggable transceivers (SFP) with duplex LC connectors. Green and amber status light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are associated with each port.

  • Page 30: Edge Switch 2/16 (front View), Edge Switch 2/16 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Shortwave laser transceivers are available for transferring data over multimode fiber-optic cable. Longwave laser transceivers are available for transferring data over single-mode fiber-optic cable. Fiber-optic cables attach to switch port transceivers with duplex LC connectors. Green and amber status light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are associated with each port.

  • Page 31: Edge Switch 2/24, Edge Switch 2/24 (front View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Edge Switch 2/24 The Edge Switch 2/24 provides 2.125 Gbps fabric connectivity for to up to 24 Fibre Channel devices. Figure 9 illustrates the front of the switch. Shortwave laser transceivers are available for transferring data over multimode fiber-optic cable.

  • Page 32: Edge Switch 2/32, Edge Switch 2/24 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Power supplies with internal Maintenance Port cooling fans Figure 10: Edge Switch 2/24 (rear view) Edge Switch 2/32 The Edge Switch 2/32 provides 2.125 Gbps fabric connectivity for to up to 32 Fibre Channel devices. Figure 11 illustrates the front of the switch.

  • Page 33: Edge Switch 2/32 (front View), Edge Switch 2/32 (rear View)

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Initial machine load (IML) button Port LEDs Ethernet LAN connector Error LED (amber) SFP transceivers Power LED (green) Figure 11: Edge Switch 2/32 (front view) Figure 12 illustrates the rear of the switch. The FRUs on the rear panel include two power supplies and four individual cooling fan FRUs.

  • Page 34: Connectivity Features

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Product Features In addition to the characteristics and performance features described in this chapter, directors and switches managed by HP also provide a variety of: Connectivity Features Security Features Serviceability Features Connectivity Features Directors, switches, and the associated HAFM and Element Manager applications support the following Fibre Channel connectivity features: Any-to-any connectivity —...

  • Page 35: Security Features

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products State change notification — Directors and switches support a state change notification function that allows attached N_Ports to request notification when other N_Ports change operational state. Port binding — Directors and switches support a feature that binds an attached Fibre Channel device to a specified port through the device’s World Wide Name (WWN).

  • Page 36: Serviceability Features

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products SANtegrity™ Binding - This feature enhances data security in large and complex SANs that have numerous fabrics and devices provided by multiple OEMs. The feature allows or prohibits director or switch attachment to fabrics (fabric binding) and Fibre Channel device attachment to directors or switches (switch binding).

  • Page 37

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products Note: For directors and switches installed in some legacy environments, call-home notification requires installation of HP Proactive Service software. This service is offered at no additional charge for subsystems covered under an on-site warranty or on-site storage hardware support contract.

  • Page 38

    Introduction to HP Fibre Channel Products SNMP management using the Fibre Channel Fabric Element MIB (Version 3.1), Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), MIB-II definition (RFC 1213), or a product-specific MIB that runs on each director or switch. Up to six authorized management workstations can be configured through the associated Element Manager application to receive unsolicited SNMP trap messages.

  • Page 39: Product Management

    Product Management This chapter describes management of HP directors and edge switches. The chapter specifically describes: Product Management Overview, page 40 HAFM Appliance Description, page 43 Product Firmware, page 47 Backup and Restore Features, page 49 Product Software, page 50 Embedded Web Server Interface, page 56 Command Line...

  • Page 40: Product Management Overview

    Product Management Product Management Overview Out-of-band (non-Fibre Channel) management access to HP products is provided through two Ethernet LAN connections to director control processor (CTP) cards or a single connection to a director front panel. The following out-of-band management access methods are provided: Management through the HAFM application.

  • Page 41: Out-of-band Product Management

    Product Management Management through a PC-based Telnet session using the CLI. Any platform that supports Telnet client software can be used. Figure 13 illustrates an example of out-of-band product management. In the figure, the managed product is a Director 2/64. The customer intranet could be an HP Ethernet hub providing device connectivity.

  • Page 42: Inband Product Management

    Product Management Management through the product’s Fibre Connection (FICON) management server (FMS) that communicates with one of the following: ® — IBM System Automation for OS/390™ (SA OS/390™) operating ® system resident on a System/390 (S/390) Parallel Enterprise Server™ - Generation 5 or Generation 6.

  • Page 43: Hafm Appliance Description, Hafm Appliance

    Product Management HAFM Appliance Description The HAFM appliance is a one rack unit (1u) high, LAN-accessed, rack-mount unit that provides a central point of control for up to 48 LAN-connected directors or switches. However, note that the maximum number of switches per storage area network (SAN) fabric is different.

  • Page 44: Hafm Appliance Specifications

    Product Management United States English is the only language supported by the HAFM and Element Manager applications. The HAFM appliance provides two auto-detecting 10/100 Mbps Ethernet LAN connectors (RJ-45 adapters). The first adapter (LAN 1) attaches (optionally) to a public customer intranet to allow access from remote user workstations. The second adapter (LAN 2) attaches to a private LAN segment containing switches or managed HP products.

  • Page 45: Ethernet Hub, Hp Ethernet Hub

    — Linux-based system using an Intel Pentium III processor with a 1 GHz or greater clock speed, using the Red Hat® 7.3 or higher operating system. — Hewlett-Packard® PA-RISC® processor with a 400 MHz or greater clock speed, using the HP-UX® 11.0a or higher operating system.

  • Page 46

    Product Management Video card supporting 256 colors at 800 x 600 pixel resolution. Ethernet network adapter. Java-enabled Internet browser, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer (Version 4.0 or later) or Netscape Navigator (Version 4.6 or later). SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 47: Product Firmware

    Product Management Product Firmware Director or edge switch firmware provides services that manage and maintain Fibre Channel connections between ports. Although the product hardware transmits Fibre Channel frames between source and destination ports, the firmware maintains routing tables required by the hardware to perform these switching functions.

  • Page 48

    Product Management Operating System Services — This function includes boot and loader software, a command line monitor for engineering fault isolation, a serial maintenance port driver, and other support for the product operating system. Hardware Services (Edge Switch 2/16 and Edge Switch 2/32 Only) — This function supports the application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) embedded on the CTP card, provides frame handling for edge switch ports, and provides the application programming interface for light-emitting diodes...

  • Page 49: Backup And Restore Features

    Product Management Backup and Restore Features The HAFM appliance provides two backup and restore features. One feature backs up (to the HAFM appliance) or restores the configuration file stored in nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) on a director or switch CTP card. The other feature backs up to a backup drive or restores the entire HAFM data (HafmData) directory.

  • Page 50: Product Software, Management Services Application

    Product Management Product Software This section describes the Management Services and HAFM applications. The HAFM application includes the Element Manager application for each product (Director 2/64, Director 2/140, Edge Switch 2/16, Edge Switch 2/24, and Edge Switch 2/32). The applications provide a GUI and management services for monitoring and controlling directors and switches.

  • Page 51: Graphical User Interface, Hafm Application

    Product Management The HAFM appliance also provides hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) server functionality. Use of this protocol with a standard Web server allows the download of client HAFM and Element Manager applications from the HAFM appliance to remote workstations. The server is configured to limit the maximum number of concurrent connections to eight.

  • Page 52: Hafm Main Window

    Product Management HAFM Main Window The HAFM management application opens automatically when the management server desktop is accessed, and the HAFM application main window opens by default. Figure 17: HAFM Main Window The main window provides the following: Menu bar — Commands at the top of the window provide drop-down menu selections to perform functions for SAN devices, including editing, viewing, planning, discovery, configuration, and monitoring.

  • Page 53

    Product Management Product list — When the View tab is selected, the product list at the left side of the window displays a list of discovered devices and associated properties. Physical map — When the View tab is selected, the physical map at the right side of the window depicts the SAN topology, discovered devices, and color-coded links.

  • Page 54: Element Manager Application, Edge Switch Product Icon, Hardware View

    Product Management Element Manager Application The Element Manager application works in conjunction with the HAFM application, and is a Java-based GUI for managing and monitoring multiple directors or switches. The application operates locally on the HAFM appliance, or through a network connection from a remote PC or workstation. To open an Element Manager application, right-click the product icon (Figure at the HAFM application’s physical map, then select the Element Manager option...

  • Page 55

    Product Management The graphical representation of the product emulates the hardware configuration and operational status of the corresponding real product. For example, if a director or switch is fully redundant and fully populated, this configuration is reflected in the Hardware View. Colored symbols display on the graphical FRUs to represent failed or degraded status.

  • Page 56: Embedded Web Server Interface

    Product Management Embedded Web Server Interface With product firmware version 1.2 (or later) installed, administrators and operators with a browser-capable PC and an Internet connection can monitor and manage the director or switch through an EWS interface. The interface provides a GUI similar to the Element Manager application and supports product configuration, statistics monitoring, and basic operation.

  • Page 57: View Panel (embedded Web Server Interface)

    Product Management Figure 20: View Panel (Embedded Web Server interface) Task selection tabs display at the top of the panel, a graphical representation of product hardware (front and rear) displays at the right side of the panel, and menu selections (View, Configure, Monitor, Operations, and Help) display at the left side of the panel.

  • Page 58: Command Line Interface

    Product Management Command Line Interface The CLI provides a director and switch management alternative to the HAFM application, Element Manager application, and EWS user interface. The interface allows users to access application functions by entering commands through a PC-attached telnet session. Any platform that supports telnet client software can be used.

  • Page 59: Fibre Channel Topologies

    A storage area network (SAN) is typically defined as a network of shared storage resources that can be allocated throughout a heterogeneous environment. This chapter describes planning considerations for incorporating Hewlett-Packard (HP) switching products into Fibre Channel SAN topologies. This chapter specifically describes:...

  • Page 60

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Fibre Channel Topologies The Director 2/64, Director 2/140, Edge Switch 2/12, Edge Switch 2/16, Edge Switch 2/24, and Edge Switch 2/32 support point-to-point and multi-switch fabric topologies. The Edge Switch 2/12 and Edge Switch 2/24 indirectly support arbitrated loop topology.

  • Page 61

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Multiswitch fabric — This topology provides the ability to connect directors and edge switches through expansion ports (E_Ports) or interswitch links (ISLs) to form a Fibre Channel fabric. Director or switch elements receive data from a device, and, based on the destination N_Port address, route the data through the fabric (and possibly through multiple switch elements) to the destination device.

  • Page 62: Planning For Point-to-point Connectivity

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Planning for Point-to-Point Connectivity Point-to-point Fibre Channel topology consists of two device N_Ports communicating by a direct connection through a director or edge switch. The product-operational software provides the ability to configure a dedicated point-to-point connection by binding a director or switch port to a device World Wide Name (WWN).

  • Page 63: Characteristics Of Arbitrated Loop Operation, Shared Mode Versus Switched Mode

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Characteristics of Arbitrated Loop Operation When implementing Fibre Channel arbitrated loop topology, consideration must be given to switch operating mode, device connectivity, and loop configuration. This section describes the characteristics of arbitrated loop operation, including: Shared Mode Versus Switched Mode Public Versus Private Devices Public Versus Private Loops...

  • Page 64: Shared Mode Operation

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 21: Shared mode operation Switched mode — When set to switched mode or by default, the switch bypasses full loop arbitration and enables frame transmission through logical connected device pairs. Connections can be established between H_Port pairs, or between an H_Port and fabric loop port (FL_Port).

  • Page 65: Public Versus Private Devices, Switched Mode Operation

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 22: Switched mode operation Public Versus Private Devices Arbitrated loop switches support connection of public and private arbitrated loop devices as follows: Public device — A loop device that can transmit a fabric login (FLOGI) command to the switch, receive acknowledgement from the switch’s login server, register with the switch’s name server, and communicate with fabric-attached devices is a public device.

  • Page 66: Public Device Connectivity

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 23: Public device connectivity Public devices support normal fabric operational requirements, such as fabric busy and reject conditions, frame multiplexing, and frame delivery order. Private device — A loop device that cannot transmit an FLOGI command to the switch nor communicate with fabric-attached devices is a private device.

  • Page 67: Public Versus Private Loops, Private Device Connectivity

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 24: Private device connectivity Private devices communicate only with other devices on the same arbitrated loop, and interconnected public and private devices can communicate with each other. Such intermixed devices establish operating parameters and loop topology configuration through a port login (PLOGI) command exchange rather than through the switch’s name server.

  • Page 68: Public Loop Connectivity, Private Loop Connectivity

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies other, and public devices attached to the loop can communicate with fabric-attached devices. FL_Port operation is not affected by the switch operating mode (shared or switched). Public loop connectivity is illustrated in Figure Figure 25: Public loop connectivity Private loop —...

  • Page 69: Planning For Private Arbitrated Loop Connectivity, Shared Mode Operation, Shared Mode Operation And Logical Equivalent

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Planning for Private Arbitrated Loop Connectivity Private arbitrated loop topology supports the clustering of isolated servers and storage subsystems into workgroup or departmental SANs. This topology is well-suited to small-sized and mid-sized configurations where modest connectivity levels and high data transmission speeds are required.

  • Page 70: Device Private Arbitrated Loop

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies between device D and server S travels through a loop that consists of all eight H_Ports, device D , device D , and server S Each H_Port not participating in the communication pair and the NL_Port on device D provide a repeater function that allows frames to pass around the loop at the full switch bandwidth.

  • Page 71

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Although connection of additional devices to a loop does not impact switch bandwidth (1.0625 Gbps), it does adversely impact overall loop performance because part of the bandwidth is dedicated to overhead instead of information transmission.

  • Page 72: Switched Mode Operation, Switched Mode Operation And Logical Equivalent

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Although the architectural limit of a Fibre Channel arbitrated loop is 125 devices, 32 or fewer devices should be attached to the switch to avoid adversely impacting loop performance. In particular, avoid attaching an excess number of servers or high-bandwidth storage devices.

  • Page 73: Switched Mode Operation With Eight Independent Looplets

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Loop Switch H_Ports H_Ports Figure 30: Switched mode operation with eight independent looplets When communication within two or more looplets ceases, a device attached to one looplet can be switched to communicate with a device attached to another looplet.

  • Page 74

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Consider the data traffic capacity of the department or workgroup (normal and peak load) as part of the switch planning and installation process. Such capacity planning: — Ensures loop traffic is distributed and balanced across servers and storage devices.

  • Page 75: Planning For Fabric-attached Loop Connectivity, Connecting A San To A Switched Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Planning for Fabric-Attached Loop Connectivity Public arbitrated loop topology supports the connection of workgroup or departmental FC-AL devices to a switched fabric through a loop switch B_Port. This topology is well suited for: Providing connectivity between a workgroup or departmental SAN and a switched fabric, thus implementing connectivity of FC-AL devices to fabric devices at the core of the enterprise.

  • Page 76: Arbitrated Loop To Switched Fabric Connectivity

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies The switch B_Port provides a single 1.0625 Gbps ISL to an E_Port on a director or edge switch. Direct ISL connectivity between loop switches (with or without a redundant B_Port connection to a director or edge switch) is generally not supported.

  • Page 77: Server Consolidation, Isl Bandwidth Limitation

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies H_Ports Arbitration Cycle (30 M ps) Idle Burst Data (D ) (10 M ps) Burst Data (D ) Burst Data (D ) Burst Data (S ) (30 M ps) (30 M ps) ISL (1 Gbps) B_Port Figure 32: ISL bandwidth limitation Three 30-megabyte per second (MBps) tape drives and one 10-MBps server are...

  • Page 78: Tape Device Consolidation, Server Consolidation

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 33: Server consolidation Tape Device Consolidation Providing fabric connectivity for multiple FC-AL tape drives by attaching them individually to a Fibre Channel director is likewise not a cost-effective solution. A practical solution is to consolidate the tape drives on an inexpensive loop switch, and then connect the switch to a single director or edge switch E_Port.

  • Page 79: Tape Drive Consolidation

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 34: Tape drive consolidation SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 80: Planning For Multi-switch Fabric Support, Example Multi-switch Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Planning for Multi-Switch Fabric Support A Fibre Channel topology that consists of one or more interconnected director or switch elements is called a fabric. The product operational software provides the ability to interconnect directors and switches (through E_Port connections) to form a multi-switch fabric.

  • Page 81: Fabric Topology Limits

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies A multi-switch fabric is typically complex and provides the facilities to maintain routing to all device N_Ports attached to the fabric, handle flow control, and satisfy the requirements of the classes of Fibre Channel service that are supported. Fabric Topology Limits Operation of multiple directors or switches in a fabric topology is subject to the following topology limits.

  • Page 82: Factors To Consider When Implementing A Fabric Topology

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Note: The hop count is equal to the number of ISL connections traversed in a single path, not the total number of ISL connections between devices. As shown in Figure the number of ISL connections between Switch S and S is 4, while the number of hops is 1.

  • Page 83: Isl Transfer Rate Versus Fabric Port Availability (two-director Fabric)

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — Distance limitations can be increased by using multiple fabric elements. Each director or switch retransmits received signals, thus performing a repeater and multiplexer function. Distance limitations can also be increased by using a variety of local area network (LAN), metropolitan area network (MAN), or wide area network (WAN) extension technologies.

  • Page 84

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies OpenTrunking feature key. For information about the feature and managing multiple ISLs, refer to “Open Trunking” on page 167 and “Large Fabric Design Implications” on page 109. Preferred path — Preferred path is an option that allows a user to configure an ISL data path between multiple fabric elements (directors and switches) by configuring the source and exit ports of the origination fabric element, and the domain ID of the destination fabric element.

  • Page 85

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Zoning — For multi-switch fabrics, zoning is configured on a fabric-wide basis. Changes to the zoning configuration apply to all directors and switches in the fabric. To ensure the zoning configuration is maintained, certain rules are enforced when two or more elements are connected through ISLs to form a fabric, or when two or more fabrics are joined.

  • Page 86

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Fabric WWN assignment — The Fabric Manager application identifies fabrics using a fabric WWN. The fabric WWN is the same as the WWN of the fabric’s principal switch. If a new principal switch is selected because of a change to the fabric topology, the fabric WWN changes to the WWN of the newly selected principal switch.

  • Page 87

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Path selection — Directors and switches are not manually configured with data transmission paths to each other. Participating fabric elements automatically exchange information to determine the fabric topology and resulting minimum-hop data transfer paths through the fabric. These paths route Fibre Channel frames between devices attached to the fabric and enable operation of the fabric services firmware on each director or switch.

  • Page 88

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Note: Activating a preferred path can result in receipt of out-of-order frames if the preferred path differs from the current path, if input and output (I/O) is active from the source port, and if congestion is present on the current path. A rerouting delay parameter can be enabled at the Element Manager application to ensure the director or switch provides correct frame order delivery.

  • Page 89

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — No response from attached switch — After a fabric is created, each element in the fabric periodically verifies operation of all attached switches and directors. An ISL segments if a director or switch does not respond to a verification request.

  • Page 90

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — Fabric A zoned and Fabric B zoned — The fabrics join successfully only if the zone sets can be merged. If the fabrics cannot join, the connecting E_Ports segment and the fabrics remain independent. Zone sets for two directors or switches are compatible (the fabrics can join) only if the zone names for each fabric element are unique.

  • Page 91: Fabric Topologies, Cascaded Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Fabric Topologies Several topologies exist from which to build a Fibre Channel fabric infrastructure. This section describes the most effective fabric topologies and provides guidance on when to deploy each topology. The topologies are effective for a wide variety of applications, are extensively tested by HP, and are deployed in several customer environments.

  • Page 92: Ring Fabric, Cascaded Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 36: Cascaded fabric One design variation is to use more than one ISL between fabric elements. This eliminates ISLs as a single point of failure and greatly increases the fabric design reliability.

  • Page 93: Mesh Fabric, Ring Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 37: Ring fabric Ring fabrics are generally more expensive than cascaded fabrics, are also easy to deploy, provide a simple solution to add additional fabric devices, and can solve hop-count problems inherent to cascaded fabrics.

  • Page 94: Full Mesh Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 38: Full mesh fabric Full-mesh fabrics provide increased resiliency over cascaded or ring fabrics and are well suited for applications that require any-to-any connectivity. If a single ISL fails, traffic is automatically routed through an alternate path. Mesh fabrics also form effective backbones to which other SAN islands can be connected.

  • Page 95: Core-to-edge Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies A modified or partial-mesh fabric is similar to a full-mesh fabric, but each switch does not have to be directly connected to every other switch in the fabric. The fabric is still resilient to failure but does not carry a cost premium for unused or redundant ISLs.

  • Page 96: By-14 Core-to-edge Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Tier 2 Devices Edge Switches Tier 1 Tier 1 Device Core Device Core Director Director Edge Switches Tier 2 Devices Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 39: 2-by-14 Core-to-Edge fabric Subject to large fabric design constraints, core-to-edge fabrics are easy to scale through the addition of core elements.

  • Page 97: By-12 Core-to-edge Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Tier 3 Devices Edge Switches Core Tier 1 Core Tier 1 Directors Devices Directors Devices Edge Switches Tier 3 Devices Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 40: 4-by-12 Core-to-Edge fabric A core-to-edge topology offers any-to-any device connectivity, and evenly distributes traffic bandwidth throughout the fabric.

  • Page 98: Fabric Island

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Each edge switch connects (through at least one ISL) to each core switch but not to other edge switches. There are typically more device connections to an edge switch than ISL connections; therefore, edge switches act as consolidation points for servers and storage devices.

  • Page 99: Planning A Fibre Channel Fabric Topology, Fabric Performance, I/o Requirements

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Planning a Fibre Channel Fabric Topology To be effective, the fabric topology design must: Solve the customer’s business problem and provide the required level of performance. Meet the customer’s requirements for high availability. Be scalable to meet future requirements. Fabric Performance During the design phase of a Fibre Channel fabric, performance requirements of the fabric and of component directors, switches, and devices must be identified...

  • Page 100: Application I/o Profiles

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies However, when multiple directors or switches are connected through a fabric ISL that multiplexes traffic from several devices, significant potential for congestion arises. To minimize congestion, factors such as application I/O profiles, ISL oversubscription, and device locality must be included in the fabric design. Application I/O Profiles Understanding application I/O characteristics is essential to SAN, fabric, and ISL design.

  • Page 101: Isl Oversubscription, Isl Oversubscription

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies ISL Oversubscription ISL oversubscription (or congestion) occurs when multiplexed traffic from several devices is transmitted across a single ISL. When an ISL is oversubscribed, fabric elements use fairness algorithms to interleave data frames from multiple devices, thus giving fractional bandwidth to the affected devices.

  • Page 102: Device Locality, Device Locality

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Install an additional ISL — A second ISL can be installed to balance the traffic load between fabric elements. Two ISLs are sufficient to support the bandwidth of both NT servers operating at peak load. Upgrade the existing ISL —...

  • Page 103: Device Fan-out Ratio, Device Fan-out Ratio

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies When designing a core-to-edge fabric, servers and storage devices that support such bandwidth-intensive applications should be attached to core directors as Tier 1 devices. As a best practices policy (assuming 1.0625 Gbps ISLs), devices that generate a sustained output of 35 MBps or higher are candidates for Tier 1 connectivity.

  • Page 104: Performance Tuning, Fabric Performance Tuning

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Performance Tuning When designing or tuning a fabric for performance, it is critical to understand application I/O characteristics so that: Device output in Gbps does not oversubscribe ISLs, leading to fabric congestion. Device output in IOPS does not result in a connectivity scheme that exceeds fan-out ratios, leading to port congestion.

  • Page 105: Fabric Availability

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Local Tier 1 devices — A video server application with I/O capabilities of 40 MBps and 2,000 IOPS must be connected to the fabric. Because the application is critical and high bandwidth (in excess of 35 MBps), the server and associated storage are directly attached to the core director as Tier 1 devices.

  • Page 106: Redundant Fabrics

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Nonresilient single fabric — Directors and switches are connected to form a single fabric that contains at least one single point of failure (fabric element or ISL). Such a failure causes the fabric to fail and segment into two or more smaller fabrics.

  • Page 107: Fabric Scalability, Redundant Fabrics

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Fabric Fabric “A” “B” Interswitch Link Fabric Connection Figure 45: Redundant fabrics Some dual-attached devices support active-active paths, while others support only active-passive paths. Active-active devices use either output path equally, and thus use both fabrics and double the device bandwidth. Active-passive devices use the passive path only when the active path fails.

  • Page 108: Obtaining Professional Services

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Obtaining Professional Services Planning and implementing a multi-switch fabric can be a complex and difficult task. HP recommends that you obtain planning assistance from our professional services organization before implementing a fabric topology. SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 109: Fabric Topology Design Considerations, Large Fabric Design Implications

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Fabric Topology Design Considerations This section discusses additional fabric topology design considerations, including: Large Fabric Design Implications FCP and FICON in a Single Fabric Multiple Data Transmission Speeds in a Single Fabric Fibre Channel Distance Extension Large Fabric Design Implications Businesses are experiencing an unprecedented growth of information and the requirement to maintain that information online.

  • Page 110: Fcp And Ficon In A Single Fabric

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Because of these problems, a fabric with a high ISL count is more difficult to build. Note that the fabric problem is not directly related to the large number of fabric elements but to the large number of ISLs associated with the elements. Fabric build concerns currently limit the combined number of directors and switches to about 24.

  • Page 111: Director Or Switch Management

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Director or Switch Management When intermixing FCP and FICON protocols, it must be determined if the director or switch is to be managed through Open Systems management style or FICON management style. This setting affects only the management style used to manage the director or switch;...

  • Page 112: Port Numbering Versus Port Addressing, Director 2/64 Port Numbers And Logical Port Addresses

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Port Numbering Versus Port Addressing Consideration must be given to the implications of port numbering for the FCP protocol versus logical port addressing for the FICON protocol. FCP configuration attributes are implemented through zoning. Zones are configured through the associated Element Manager application by authorizing or restricting access to name server information associated with device N_Ports that attach to director or switch F_Ports.

  • Page 113: Management Limitations

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Although Figure 46 depicts a UPM card map only for the Director 2/64, physical port numbers and logical port addresses can be extrapolated for the Director 2/140 (140 ports), Edge Switch 2/12 (12 ports), Edge Switch 2/16 (16 ports), Edge Switch 2/24 (24 ports), and Edge Switch 2/32 (32 ports).

  • Page 114: Features That Impact Protocol Intermixing, Hardware-enforced Zoning

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies allowed with another fabric switch. The director or switch reports an attempted E_Port connection as invalid and prevents the port from coming online. — For later versions of director or switch firmware (version 4.0 and later), the domain field of the destination ID is added to the Fibre Channel link address, thus specifying the link address on source and target fabric elements and enabling E_Port (ISL) connectivity.

  • Page 115: Santegrity Binding, Ficon Cascading, Protocol Lntermixing Best Practices

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies SANtegrity Binding The SANtegrity Binding feature (including both fabric binding and switch binding) allows the creation of reliable SAN configurations and provides a mechanism for attached devices to query the user-configured security level employed in a SAN. The feature significantly reduces the impacts of accidental or operator-induced errors.

  • Page 116

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies However, the firmware and HAFM application do not prevent FCP and FICON device configurations that may interfere with each other. A successful intermix environment requires a set of best practice conventions as follows: 1. Upgrade fabric element firmware to a common version — Ensure fabric elements are operating at a common firmware level.

  • Page 117

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies director or switch incompatibility. In addition, the SANtegrity Binding feature (with Enterprise Fabric Mode enabled) is required to support FICON cascading. 4. Logically assign ports — To organize devices into manageable groups for zoning, director or switch ports should be logically assigned to FCP port groups and FICON port groups.

  • Page 118

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — On the Configure Allow/Prohibit Matrix - Active dialog box, assigning port names to logical port addresses is another practice that should be followed. For example, the port name for all FCP devices could begin with FCP or OS to indicate the associated port addresses attached to open-systems devices.

  • Page 119: Multiple Data Transmission Speeds In A Single Fabric, Fibre Channel Distance Extension

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — FICON port addressing provides the ability to swap ports for maintenance. In general, swapping ports in intermix environments does not affect the practices described. However, if a user implements zoning using a domain ID and port numbers, zoning information must be updated contiguous with the port swap operation.

  • Page 120: Fcip Protocol

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Data networks introduce variable delay and usually support high latency. SANs require minimal delay and latency. Data networks rely on a software protocol stack such as Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) to provide communications. Such stacks impose prohibitive performance penalties in SANs because data traffic quickly overloads servers.

  • Page 121: Ifcp Protocol, Fcip Wan Extension

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 47: FCIP WAN Extension FCIP supports existing Fibre Channel SAN hardware and software, while allowing SAN-connected data to be accessed over an IP network infrastructure. FCIP allows data to be accessed remotely without altering the SAN fabric and maintains critically valuable bandwidth, data integrity, and flow control.

  • Page 122: Iscsi Protocol, Ifcp Wan Extension

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies iFCP, each connected SAN fabric is maintained separately from the others, while the IP network provides connectivity, congestion control, error detection, and error recovery. Figure 48 illustrates iFCP WAN extension. Figure 48: iFCP WAN Extension iSCSI Protocol iSCSI is a TCP/IP-based protocol for establishing and managing connections between IP-based storage devices, hosts, and clients.

  • Page 123: Iscsi Wan Extension

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 49: iSCSI WAN Extension SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 124: Ficon Cascading, High-integrity Fabrics

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies FICON Cascading The initial FICON architecture did not permit connection of multiple directors or switches, because the protocol specified a single byte for the link (port) address definition in the input-output configuration program (IOCP). The link address only defined the Port_ID for a unique domain (director or switch).

  • Page 125: Minimum Requirements

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies incompatible list is isolated from the fabric. Membership list data eliminates duplicate domain IDs and other address conflicts and ensures a consistent, unified behavior across the fabric. Switch binding — Switch binding allows only specified devices and fabric elements to connect to specified director or switch ports.

  • Page 126: Ficon Cascading Best Practices

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies — eServer zSeries 990 (z990) processor. Note: FICON cascading is not supported for IBM S/390 Parallel Enterprise Servers (Generation 5 or Generation 6). The z/OS version 1.3 or version 1.4 operating system (with service as defined in PSP Buckets for device type 2032, 2042, 2064, or 2066) must be installed on the IBM server.

  • Page 127: Port Properties Dialog Box

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies b. If required, click the Hardware tab. The Hardware View (Figure displays. Verify that the status bar at the bottom left corner of the window displays a green circle, indicating director or switch status is operational. If a problem is indicated, go to MAP 0000: Start MAP in the product-specific Installation and Service Manual.

  • Page 128: Node List View

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies b. In the HAFM application, configure fabric binding. Refer to installation instructions in the HA-Fabric Manager User Guide. c. In the Element Manager application, configure switch binding. Refer to the installation instructions in the appropriate installation manual for your Director or Edge Switch.

  • Page 129: Enterprise Fabric Mode Dialog Box, Switch Binding - State Change Dialog Box

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies Figure 52: Enterprise Fabric Mode Dialog Box b. Select the fabric to be configured from the Fabric Name drop-down list. The selected fabric’s status displays in the Enterprise Fabric Mode field. c. Click Activate to close the dialog box and enable Enterprise Fabric Mode for the selected fabric.

  • Page 130

    Planning Considerations for Fibre Channel Topologies b. Ensure that the Enable Switch Binding check box is checked (enabled). c. Select the Restrict E_Ports radio button to restrict connections from specific fabric elements to E_Ports. WWNs can be added to the membership list to allow fabric element connection and removed from the list to prohibit fabric element connection.

  • Page 131: Physical Planning Considerations

    Considerations This chapter describes the physical planning considerations for incorporating Hewlett-Packard (HP) Director 2/64s, Director 2/140s, Edge Switch 2/12s, Edge Switch 2/16s, Edge Switch 2/24s, and Edge Switch 2/32s into storage area networks (SANs) and Fibre Channel fabric topologies. This chapter provides...

  • Page 132: Port Connectivity And Fiber-optic Cabling, Port Requirements

    Physical Planning Considerations Port Connectivity and Fiber-Optic Cabling This section provides planning recommendations for director and switch port connectivity and fiber-optic cabling. Recommendations are provided for: Port Requirements Optical Transceivers Extended-Distance Ports High-Availability Considerations Cables and Connectors Routing Fiber-Optic Cables Port Requirements Plan for sufficient shortwave laser ports and longwave laser ports to meet the needs of the SAN configuration.

  • Page 133: Optical Transceivers

    Physical Planning Considerations Director 2/140 — The director is configured from a minimum of 16 universal port module (UPM) cards (64 ports total) to a maximum of 35 UPM cards (140 ports total). UPM cards provide four 2.125 Gbps port connections and can be configured with shortwave transceivers, longwave transceivers, and extended longwave transceivers or a combination of all three.

  • Page 134: Data Transmission Distance, Cost-effectiveness, Device Or Cable Restrictions

    Physical Planning Considerations Consider the following when determining the number and type of each transceiver to use: Distance between a director or switch and the attached Fibre Channel device or between fabric elements communicating through an ISL. Cost effectiveness. Device restrictions or requirements with respect to existing fiber-optic cable (multimode or single-mode).

  • Page 135: Extended-distance Ports, High-availability Considerations

    Physical Planning Considerations Extended-Distance Ports Through longwave laser transceivers and repeaters or dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment, Directors and Edge Switches support Fibre Channel data transmission distances of up to 100 km at 1 Gbps, or 50 km at 2 Gbps.

  • Page 136: Cables And Connectors, Cables, Director And Switch Connectors

    Physical Planning Considerations Cables and Connectors This section provides Fibre Channel cable and connector planning information as follows: Cables for all directors and switches. SFP transceivers for Director 2/64, Director 2/140, Edge Switch 2/12, Edge Switch 2/16, Switch 2/24, and Edge Switch 2/32. Cables Fiber-optic jumper cables are required to connect director and switch ports to servers, devices, distribution panels, or other elements in a multi-switch fabric.

  • Page 137: Routing Fiber-optic Cables, Sfp Transceiver And Lc Duplex Connector

    Physical Planning Considerations Figure 54: SFP transceiver and LC duplex connector Routing Fiber-Optic Cables Follow a logical plan for routing fiber-optic cables to avoid confusing connections during installation and operation. Route cables from the access holes at the bottom or top of the equipment rack, and then to director and switch ports. Leave enough slack in the cables to allow cable movement for UPM card or optical transceiver removal and replacement or possible rerouting of the cable to another port.

  • Page 138

    Physical Planning Considerations other units, while maintaining its original connections. To account for these possibilities, consider installing excess fiber-optic cable, especially in hard-to-reach places like underground trenches. SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 139: Hafm Appliance, Lan, And Remote Access Support, Hafm Appliance

    Physical Planning Considerations HAFM Appliance, LAN, and Remote Access Support Out-of-band (non-Fibre Channel) console access to directors and switches is provided to perform a variety of operations and management functions. These functions are performed from one or more of the following consoles: Through the HAFM appliance attached to an Ethernet port on a director control processor (CTP) card or switch front panel.

  • Page 140: Hafm Appliance Connectivity, Connectivity Planning Considerations

    Physical Planning Considerations HAFM Appliance Connectivity The HAFM appliance provides an auto-detecting 10/100 Base-T Ethernet interface that connects to a hub. Each director CTP card or switch front panel also provides an auto-detecting 10/100 Base-T Ethernet interface that connects to a hub.

  • Page 141: Remote User Workstations

    Physical Planning Considerations Installing additional rack-mount products — When installing an additional director or switch, the length of Ethernet cable required to provide LAN connectivity is a function of rack position (top, bottom, or adjacent to the slide-out drawer). Ensure cable lengths provide sufficient cable inside the rack to route to the product’s Ethernet ports and to allow service clearance.

  • Page 142: Typical Network Configuration (one Ethernet Connection)

    Physical Planning Considerations This single Ethernet connection is supported by HP, is Open View-Storage Node Manager (OV-SNM) compatible, and is the recommended configuration for a typical HP installation at a customer site. LAN security is provided by restricting password access and disabling the SNMP agent, Embedded Web Server interface, and command line interface (Telnet access) for each managed director or switch.

  • Page 143: Snmp Management Workstations, Typical Network Configuration (two Ethernet Connections)

    Physical Planning Considerations segment is optional and depends on customer requirements. This type of network configuration using both Ethernet connections is shown in Figure Director 2/64s are used as an example. Although this dual Ethernet connection is supported by HP, it is not OV-SNM compatible, requires installation of an additional PCMCIA LAN adapter card (not supplied by HP), and is not the recommended configuration for a typical new HP installation at a customer site.

  • Page 144: Web Browser Access

    Physical Planning Considerations A subset of the standard transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP) MIB-II definition (RFC1213). The director or switch-specific private enterprise MIB. The director or switch SNMP agent can be configured to send trap messages to up to six recipients. SNMP management is intended only for product monitoring; therefore, the default state of all MIB variables is read-only.

  • Page 145: Inband Management Access (optional)

    Physical Planning Considerations Inband Management Access (Optional) Inband management console access (through a Fibre Channel port) is provided by enabling user-specified features that allow Open Systems or FICON host control of a director or switch. The features are mutually exclusive; only one can be installed at a time.

  • Page 146

    Physical Planning Considerations The minimum OS/390 level for a director or switch without the control unit port (CUP) feature is version 2.6, plus service listed in PSP bucket upgrade 2032, device subset 2032OS390G5+. The minimum OS/390 level for a director or switch with the CUP feature is version 2.1, plus service listed in the preceding PSP bucket for that function.

  • Page 147: Security Provisions, Password Protection, Types Of User Rights

    Physical Planning Considerations Security Provisions Security provisions are available to restrict unauthorized access to a director, switch, or attached Fibre Channel devices. Access to the director or switch (through the HAFM application, Element Manager application, and Web server interface) is restricted by implementing password protection. Access to attached computing resources (including applications and data) is restricted by implementing one or more of the following security provisions: SANtegrity Binding...

  • Page 148

    Physical Planning Considerations Table 3: Types of User Rights User Right Operator Access Allowed Product Administrator The product administrator can make control and Element Manager configuration changes through the application. System Administrator The system administrator can make control and configuration changes, define users and passwords, and HAFM add or remove products through the application.

  • Page 149: Santegrity Binding Planning Considerations, Pdcm Arrays

    Physical Planning Considerations Switch binding — Using the switch binding feature, an administrator allows only specified devices and fabric elements to connect to specified director or fabric switch ports. This provides security in environments that include a large number of devices by ensuring that only the intended set of devices attaches to a director or switch.

  • Page 150: Configure Allow/prohibit Matrix - Active Dialog Box

    Physical Planning Considerations Figure 57: Configure Allow/Prohibit Matrix - Active Dialog Box Figure 57 shows that port 1 (logical port address 05) is prohibited from communicating with port 6 (logical port address 0A), port 7 (logical port address 0B), and port 8 (logical port address 0C). When implementing an array that prohibits E_Port connectivity, be aware that ISLs can be configured as unavailable to attached devices, causing complex routing problems that can be difficult to fault isolate and be incorrectly diagnosed...

  • Page 151: Preferred Path, Pdcm Array - Example Problem

    Physical Planning Considerations Figure 58: PDCM Array - Example Problem A PDCM array configured for Director A prohibits logical port address 05 from communicating with logical port addresses 0A, 0B, and 0C. No PDCM array is configured for Director B. The PDCM array configured for Director A prohibits the source server from transmitting or receiving data across ISL 2.

  • Page 152

    Physical Planning Considerations configured, an exit port on the director or switch, and the domain ID of the destination director or switch. Each participating director or switch must be configured as part of a desired path. The following rules apply when configuring a preferred path: The switch domain ID must be set to Insistent.

  • Page 153: Preferred Path Configuration

    Physical Planning Considerations Figure 59: Preferred Path Configuration This procedure only specifies that data will enter and exit Director 1 through specific ports on the path to Director 3. The procedure must be repeated at the second director as follows: 1.

  • Page 154: Zoning, Product Zoning

    Physical Planning Considerations 4. Click OK to save the path configuration and close the dialog box. Activating a preferred path can result in receipt of out-of-order frames (especially in FICON environments) if the path differs from the current path, if input and output (I/O) are active from the source port, and if congestion is present on the current path.

  • Page 155: Benefits Of Zoning

    Physical Planning Considerations Software-enforced zoning — For earlier versions of director or switch firmware (prior to version 6.0), the device configuration on a fabric element enforces zoning by limiting access to name server information in response to a device query. Only devices in the same zone as the requesting device are returned in the query response.

  • Page 156: Configuring Zones

    Physical Planning Considerations Configuring Zones Zoning is configured through the HAFM application by authorizing or restricting access to name server information associated with device node ports (N_Ports) that attach to director or switch fabric ports (F_Ports). A device N_Port can belong to multiple zones.

  • Page 157: Joining Zoned Fabrics

    Physical Planning Considerations — When a specific zone set is activated, that zone set replaces the active zone set. — If the active zone set is disabled, all devices attached to the fabric become members of the default zone. — All devices not included as members of the active zone set are included in the default zone.

  • Page 158: Factors To Consider When Implementing Zoning, Obtaining Professional Services

    Physical Planning Considerations If the configurations cannot merge, E_Ports that form the ISL for each fabric element become segmented. The ports cannot transmit data frames between attached switches (Class 2 or 3 traffic) but can transmit control frames (Class F traffic).

  • Page 159: Server And Storage-level Access Control

    Physical Planning Considerations Server and Storage-Level Access Control To enhance the access barriers and network security provided by zoning through the director or switch, security measures for SANs should also be implemented at servers and storage devices. Server-level access control is called persistent binding. Persistent binding uses configuration information stored on the server and is implemented through the server’s HBA driver.

  • Page 160: Security Best Practices

    Physical Planning Considerations Is typically proprietary and protects only a specific vendor’s storage devices. Storage-level access control may not be available for many legacy devices. Security Best Practices When implementing a enterprise data security policy, establish a set of best practice conventions using methods described in this section in the following order of precedence (most restrictive listed first): 1.

  • Page 161

    Physical Planning Considerations Devices in common zones can be prohibited from communicating through SANtegrity Binding or PDCM arrays, but hard zoning takes precedence over preferred path configurations, allowed connectivity through soft zoning, or device-level access control. 4. Preferred path — A preferred path provides soft control of fabric routing decisions on a switch-by-switch or port-by-port basis.

  • Page 162

    Physical Planning Considerations Logically work in sequence from the most restrictive method to the least restrictive method, ensuring the most restrictive routing or connectivity paths override all other paths. SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 163: Optional Features

    Physical Planning Considerations Optional Features HP offers several operating features that are available for the switch as customer-specified options. Available features include: Open Systems Management Server or FICON Management Server — Inband director or switch management is provided through purchase of the OSMS or FMS feature.

  • Page 164: Inband Management Console Access, Open Systems Management Server

    Physical Planning Considerations Note: Director 2/64, Director 2/140, Edge Switch 2/16, and Edge Switch 2/32 do not provide CNT wide area network (WAN) support. Element Manager application — This feature enables director or switch management through the Element Manager user interface. Directors and switches are delivered with the application enabled for a 31-day grace period.

  • Page 165: Ficon Management Server, Flexport Technology

    Physical Planning Considerations FICON Management Server When the FMS feature key is enabled with the Element Manager application, host control and management of the director or switch is provided through a server attached to a product port. The server communicates with the product through a FICON channel.

  • Page 166: Enterprise Fabric Mode, Santegrity Binding

    Physical Planning Considerations Each port expansion kit includes eight SFP optical transceivers, upgrade instructions, and a feature key that enables the added port capacity through the Element Manager application. SANtegrity Binding SANtegrity Binding is a feature that enhances data security in large and complex SANs that have numerous fabrics and devices provided by multiple original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

  • Page 167: Open Trunking, Santegrity Binding Planning Considerations

    Physical Planning Considerations Domain RSCNs — Domain RSCNs provide connectivity information to all HBAs and storage devices attached to a fabric. RSCNs are transmitted to all registered device N_Ports attached to a fabric if either a fabric-wide event or zoning configuration change occurs. Insistent domain ID —...

  • Page 168: Full Volatility, Open Trunking Configuration

    Physical Planning Considerations Server 1 Storage 1 Trunk ISL 1 ISL 1 ISL 2 ISL 2 Server 2 Director A Director B Storage 2 Server 3 Figure 61: Open Trunking configuration The figure illustrates two Director 2/64 directors connected by two ISLs. Three servers use the ISLs to communicate with two storage devices.

  • Page 169: Cnt Wan Support, Element Manager Application, No Feature Key Dialog Box

    Physical Planning Considerations These Fibre Channel frames are then written to CD and included as part of the data collection procedure. This process constitutes a security breach if the frame data includes classified information. With the full-volatility feature installed and enabled, no frame data is stored, and the NV-RAM dump does not occur when the director or switch powers off or fails.

  • Page 170: Hardware View (with Element Manager Message)

    Physical Planning Considerations Note: The Edge Switch 2/12 is not supported by the HAFM appliance. In addition, the message Element Manager license key has not been installed - Please follow up instructions to update permanent key is splashed across views, indicating the Element Manager PFE key must be installed. The Hardware View (Figure 63) for an Edge Switch 2/24 is shown as an example.

  • Page 171: Configuration Planning Tasks

    Configuration Planning Tasks This chapter describes configuration planning tasks to be performed before installing the High Availability Fabric Manager (HAFM) server and one or more Director 2/64s, Director 2/140s, Edge Switch 2/12s, Edge Switch 2/16s, Edge Switch 2/24s, or Edge Switch 2/32s in a storage area network (SAN) configuration.

  • Page 172

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 15: Plan a Multi-Switch Fabric (Optional), page 196 Task 16: Plan Zone Sets for Multiple Products (Optional), page 197 SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 173: Task 1: Prepare A Site Plan

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 1: Prepare a Site Plan For each director, switch, or equipment rack installed, design a site plan that provides efficient work flow, operator convenience and safety, and adequate service clearances for the equipment rack. A customer manager should review the site plan with a service representative and consider: Location and relationship of the physical facilities, such as walls, doors, windows, partitions, furniture, and telephones.

  • Page 174

    Configuration Planning Tasks Security necessary to protect the installation’s physical integrity, while maintaining accessibility to the director or switch. Equipment rack front and rear service clearances, operator clearances, and maintenance access clearances. Weight of an equipment rack. Either multiple persons or a lift must be available during installation to remove the rack from the packing crate.

  • Page 175: Physical Planning And Hardware Installation Tasks

    Configuration Planning Tasks Table 4: Physical Planning and Hardware Installation Tasks Activity Comments Task Owner Date Locate the physical facilities. Connect the facility alternating If more than one director or current (AC) power circuits. switch, consider separate power circuits for availability. Obtain an uninterruptable power Recommended.

  • Page 176: Operational Setup Tasks

    Configuration Planning Tasks Table 5 lists operational setup tasks and includes the task owner, due date, and comments. Table 5: Operational Setup Tasks Task Activity Owner Date Comments Obtain IP address and subnet HAFM appliance (if installing on a mask. LAN with non-HP devices).

  • Page 177

    Configuration Planning Tasks Table 5: Operational Setup Tasks (Continued) Task Activity Owner Date Comments Determine SNMP access to Obtain SNMP trap recipient IP directors and switches. addresses. Determine SNMP information required (generic and product- specific). Determine if write permission is required for modifying SNMP variables.

  • Page 178: Task 2: Plan Fibre Channel Cable Routing

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 2: Plan Fibre Channel Cable Routing Plan for sufficient single-mode fiber-optic and multimode fiber-optic cabling to meet the connectivity requirements for all Fibre Channel servers and devices. If a multi-switch fabric is to be enabled, plan for sufficient fiber-optic cabling to meet interswitch link (ISL) connectivity requirements.

  • Page 179: Task 3: Consider Interoperability With Fabric Elements And End Devices

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 3: Consider Interoperability with Fabric Elements and End Devices HP conducts a substantial level of testing to ensure director and switch interoperability with fabric elements and end devices provided by multiple original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). New devices are tested and qualified on a continual basis.

  • Page 180: Task 4: Plan Console Management Support

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 4: Plan Console Management Support Plan to implement one or more of the following methods to provide console management and support for directors and switches: HAFM appliance — The rack-mounted HAFM appliance is used for product installation, initial software configuration, changing the configuration, and monitoring product operation.

  • Page 181

    Configuration Planning Tasks If director or switch management through an IBM host is planned, ensure that the FMS feature key is ordered with the Element Manager application. This feature key enables host control of the product from an IBM System/390 or zSeries 900 Parallel Enterprise server attached to a Fibre Channel port.

  • Page 182: Task 5: Plan Ethernet Access

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 5: Plan Ethernet Access Directors and the HAFM appliance can be ordered in an HP-supplied equipment rack in accordance with customer specifications; however, you may need to: Connect equipment racks — Customer-supplied Ethernet hubs in multiple equipment racks can be connected to provide HAFM appliance access to up to 48 managed HP products.

  • Page 183: Task 6: Plan Network Addresses

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 6: Plan Network Addresses Depending on the configuration of the LAN on which directors, switches, and the HAFM appliance are installed, plan network addressing as follows: If installing products and the HAFM appliance on a dedicated (private) LAN segment, there is no requirement to change any default network addresses.

  • Page 184

    Configuration Planning Tasks — Subnet mask is 255.0.0.0. — Gateway address is blank. SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 185: Task 7: Plan Snmp Support (optional)

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 7: Plan SNMP Support (Optional) As an option, network administrators can use the HAFM application to configure an SNMP agent that runs on the HAFM appliance. This agent can be configured to send generic SNMP trap messages to up to 12 SNMP management workstations.

  • Page 186: Task 8: Plan E-mail Notification (optional)

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 8: Plan E-Mail Notification (Optional) As an option, network administrators can configure director and switch e-mail support. The following support considerations are required if the e-mail notification feature is used: Determine if e-mail notification is to be configured and used for significant system events.

  • Page 187: Task 9: Establish Product And Hafm Appliance Security Measures

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 9: Establish Product and HAFM Appliance Security Measures Effective network security measures are recommended for directors, switches, and the HAFM appliance. Physical access to the network should be limited and monitored, and password control should be strictly enforced. When planning security measures, consider the following: Directors, switches, and the HAFM appliance are installed on a LAN segment and can be accessed by attached devices (including devices connected...

  • Page 188: Task 10: Plan Phone Connections

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 10: Plan Phone Connections Plan for one or more telephone connections near the HAFM appliance for service personnel use. While performing a diagnostic or repair action, a service representative or network administrator at the HAFM appliance may require voice technical support through a telephone connection.

  • Page 189: Task 11: Diagram The Planned Configuration

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 11: Diagram the Planned Configuration Determine peripheral devices that will connect to each director or switch, and determine whether and where connectivity should be limited (zoning). These devices may include servers, storage control devices, and other fabric elements in a multi-switch fabric.

  • Page 190: Task 12: Assign Port Names And Nicknames, Rules For Port Names, Rules For Nicknames

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 12: Assign Port Names and Nicknames During the planning process, consider assigning names to director and switch ports based upon devices connected to the ports. Though not required, port naming provides convenience and ease of use. Port naming also documents devices that connect through individual ports and identifies what is attached to each port.

  • Page 191: Task 13: Complete The Planning Worksheet, Product Planning Worksheet (page 1 Of 4)

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 13: Complete the Planning Worksheet The planning worksheet included in this task is a four-page form that depicts port assignments for a director or switch. The worksheet lists 64 ports and provides fields to identify devices that connect to the ports. Transfer information from the configuration diagram (completed while performing “Task 11: Diagram the Planned...

  • Page 192

    Configuration Planning Tasks Product Planning Worksheet (Page 2 of 4) Director or Switch Name: Attached Devices ____________________________ IP Address: ____________________________ Unit Name: ____________________________ Port Port Name Location Type Model IP Address Zone Product Planning Worksheet (Page 3 of 4) Director or Switch Name: Attached Devices ____________________________ IP Address:...

  • Page 193

    Configuration Planning Tasks Product Planning Worksheet (Page 3 of 4) Product Planning Worksheet (Page 4 of 4) Director or Switch Name: Attached Devices ____________________________ IP Address: ____________________________ Unit Name: ____________________________ Port Port Name Location Type Model IP Address Zone SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 194

    Configuration Planning Tasks Product Planning Worksheet (Page 4 of 4) SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 195: Task 14: Plan Ac Power

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 14: Plan AC Power Plan for facility power sources for each equipment rack. Directors and switches in the rack operate at 50 to 60 Hertz (Hz) and 100 to 240 volts alternating current (VAC) and require a minimum dedicated 5-ampere service. If two power sources are supplied (optional but recommended for high availability), the equipment rack contains two customer-specified external power cords.

  • Page 196: Task 15: Plan A Multi-switch Fabric (optional)

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 15: Plan a Multi-Switch Fabric (Optional) If a multi-switch fabric topology is to be implemented, carefully plan the physical characteristics and performance objectives of the topology. Include the proposed number of fabric elements, characteristics of attached devices, cost, nondisruptive growth requirements, and service requirements.

  • Page 197: Task 16: Plan Zone Sets For Multiple Products (optional)

    Configuration Planning Tasks Task 16: Plan Zone Sets for Multiple Products (Optional) If name server zoning is to be implemented, carefully plan the characteristics and security objectives (differentiation of operating systems, data sets, user groups, devices, or processes) of zone members, zones, and zone sets. If a fabric topology is implemented, zoning is configured on a fabric-wide basis.

  • Page 198

    Configuration Planning Tasks SAN High Availability Planning Guide...

  • Page 199: Index

    Index fabric 148, switch 149, addresses broadcast support director gateway address IP address capacity planning MAC address cascaded fabric topology subnet mask CD-ROM drive HAFM appliance gateway address CNT WAN support feature IP address command line interface MAC address congestion, ISL subnet mask connectivity arbitrated loop switch, see FC-AL switch...

  • Page 200

    Index core-to-edge fabric topology disk drive distance requirements document conventions data access type related documentation data collection domain ID data transmission distance assignment FCIP protocol dual fabric iFCP protocol dual-fabric solution iSCSI protocol WAN extension default director network addresses E_Port segmentation HAFM appliance network addresses Edge Switch 2/12 definition...

  • Page 201

    Index performance requirements Fibre Connection, see FICON redundant FICON ring product management scalability FICON cascading services best practices single definition topologies general description topology high-integrity fabrics design considerations minimum requirements implementation factors FICON management server WWN assignment description zoning configurations for joined fabrics field replaceable units, see FRUs fabric binding 148, firmware...

  • Page 202

    Index HAFM appliance default iSCSI protocol HAFM appliance description supported applications illustration HAFM application oversubscription introduction ISLs hard drive maximum number Hardware View FRUs Hardware view joined fabric zoning configurations description help, obtaining heterogeneous fabric high-availability latency director director fabric availability limit fabric topology hop count...

  • Page 203

    Index management state changes HAFM application number of loop tenancies out-of-band SNMP agent web server Open Trunking feature management information bases description director-specific MIB open-system management server Fabric Element MIB description Fibre Alliance MIB open-system management server, see OSMS management services application OpenTrunking feature functions planning considerations...

  • Page 204

    Index tuning planning inband access capacity OSMS fabric-attached loop connectivity profile Fibre Channel fabric topology multiswitch fabric support public arbitrated loop typology point-to-point connectivity public device private arbitrated loop connectivity public loop planning considerations planning tasks assign port names and nicknames rack stability, warning complete planning worksheet consider interoperability with end devices...

  • Page 205

    Index user restrictions Edge Switch 2/16 workstation restrictions description 29, zoning Edge Switch 2/32 security provisions description best practices fabric, definition PDCM arrays FC-AL, definition preferred path selection zoning switch binding 149, server switched mode 64, consolidation symbols in text service class support symbols on equipment director...

  • Page 206

    Index overview introduction planning web server interface web sites HP storage user workstation, planning support assignment utilization, loop Zip drive WAN extension zone set description naming conventions FCIP protocol zoning iFCP protocol configurations for joined fabrics iSCSI protocol description warning naming conventions rack stability planning...

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