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HP 5820X & 5800 Switch Series
Fundamentals
Abstract
This document describes the software features for the HP 5820X & 5800 Series products and guides you
through the software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration
examples to help you apply software features to different network scenarios.
This documentation is intended for network planners, field technical support and servicing engineers, and
network administrators working with the HP 5820X & 5800 Series products.
Part number: 5998-1620
Software version: Release 1211
Document version: 6W102-20130520

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  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    Configuration Guide Abstract This document describes the software features for the HP 5820X & 5800 Series products and guides you through the software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration examples to help you apply software features to different network scenarios.

  • Page 2

    The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional...

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents Configuring the CLI ······················································································································································ 1   Entering the CLI ································································································································································· 1   Command conventions ····················································································································································· 2   Undo form of a command ················································································································································ 3   CLI view description ·························································································································································· 3   Entering system view ················································································································································ 4   Exiting the current view ··········································································································································· 4  ...

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Configuring the SSH server ·································································································································· 47   Configuring the SSH client to log in to the SSH server ····················································································· 50   Logging in through modems ········································································································································· 51   Configuration requirements ·································································································································· 51   Login procedure ····················································································································································· 52   Modem login authentication modes ···················································································································· 54  ...

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    FTP client configuration example ························································································································· 91   Configuring the FTP server ············································································································································ 92   Configuring FTP server operating parameters ··································································································· 92   Configuring authentication and authorization on the FTP server ····································································· 93   FTP server configuration example ························································································································ 94   FTP server configuration example ························································································································...

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Backing up the startup configuration file ··················································································································· 121   Deleting a startup configuration file to be used at the next startup ········································································ 122   Restoring a startup configuration file ························································································································· 122   Displaying and maintaining a configuration file ······································································································ 123  ...

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Obtaining the configuration file from the TFTP server ····················································································· 176   Executing the configuration file ·························································································································· 178   Support and other resources ·································································································································· 179   Contacting HP ······························································································································································ 179   Subscription service ············································································································································ 179   Related information ······················································································································································ 179  ...

  • Page 8: Configuring The Cli

    (GUI) where you can use a mouse to perform configurations, the CLI allows you to enter more information in one command line. Figure 1 CLI example Entering the CLI HP devices provide multiple methods for entering the CLI, such as through the console port, through Telnet, or through SSH. For more information, see “Login methods.”...

  • Page 9: Command Conventions

    Command conventions Command conventions help you understand command meanings. Commands in HP product manuals comply with the conventions listed in Table Table 1 Command conventions Convention Description Boldface Bold text represents commands and keywords you enter literally as shown. Italic Italic text represents arguments you replace with actual values.

  • Page 10: Undo Form Of A Command

    Undo form of a command The undo form of a command restores the default, disables a function, or removes a configuration. Almost all configuration commands have an undo form. For example, info-center enable enables the information center and undo info-center enable disables the information center. CLI view description Commands are grouped into different classes by function.

  • Page 11: Entering System View

    Entering system view When you log in to the device, you automatically enter user view, where <Device name> is displayed. Perform limited operations in user view, for example, display operations, file operations, and Telnet operations. To perform further configuration for the device, enter system view. Step Command Remarks...

  • Page 12: Using Online Help

    Using online help Enter a question mark (?) to obtain online help. See the following examples. Enter ? in any view to display all commands available in this view and brief descriptions of these commands. For example: <sysname> ? User view commands: archive Specify archive settings backup...

  • Page 13: Editing Command Lines

    Entering commands Editing command lines Table 2 lists some shortcut keys you can use to edit command lines. Table 2 Editing functions Function If the edit buffer is not full, pressing a common key inserts the character at the Common keys position of the cursor and moves the cursor to the right.

  • Page 14: Configuring Cli Hotkeys

    If you press Tab after you enter the keyword of an alias, the original format of the keyword is displayed. • Replace only the first keyword of a non-undo command instead of the complete command; and replace • only the second keyword of undo commands. To configure command aliases: Step Command...

  • Page 15: Redisplaying Entered But Not Submitted Commands

    Hotkey Function Ctrl+P Displays the previous command in the history command buffer. Ctrl+R Redisplays the current line information. Ctrl+V Pastes the content in the clipboard. Ctrl+W Deletes all characters in a continuous string to the left of the cursor. Ctrl+X Deletes all characters to the left of the cursor.

  • Page 16: Checking Command Line Errors

    Checking command line errors If a command contains syntax errors, the CLI reports error information. Table 4 Common command line errors Error information Cause % Unrecognized command found at '^' position. The command was not found. % Incomplete command found at '^' position. Incomplete command % Ambiguous command found at '^' position.

  • Page 17: Controlling The Cli Display

    Configuring the history buffer size To configure the history buffer size: Step Command Remarks Enter system view system-view — user-interface { first-num1 Enter user interface view [ last-num1 ] | { aux | vty } — first-num2 [ last-num2 ] } Optional Set the maximum number of history-command max-size...

  • Page 18: Filtering Output Information

    Disabling multi-screen display Use the following command to disable the multi-screen display function. All of the output information is displayed at one time and the screen is refreshed continuously until the last screen is displayed. Step Command Remarks Required By default, a login user uses the settings of the screen-length.

  • Page 19

    A regular expression is a case-sensitive string of 1 to 256 characters. It supports the following special characters. Character Meaning Remarks For example, regular expression “^user” only Starting sign. string appears only at ^string matches a string beginning with “user," not the beginning of a line.

  • Page 20

    Character Meaning Remarks For example, [^16A] means to match a string containing any character except 1, 6 or A, and the Matches a single character not matching string can also contain 1, 6 or A, but contained within the brackets. cannot contain these three characters only.

  • Page 21: Configuring User Privilege And Command Levels

    Example of filtering output information Example of using the begin keyword # Display the configuration from the line containing “user-interface” to the last line in the current configuration (the output information depends on the current configuration). <Sysname> display current-configuration | begin user-interface user-interface aux 0 user-interface vty 0 15 authentication-mode none...

  • Page 22: Configuring A User Privilege Level

    Level Privilege Description Involves commands for system maintenance and service fault diagnosis. Commands at this level are not allowed to be saved after being configured. After the switch is restarted, the commands at this level are restored to the default Monitor settings.

  • Page 23

    Step Command Remarks parameters • For remote authentication, if Using remote you do not configure the user authentication privilege level, the user (RADIUS, Configure the user privilege level privilege level depends on the HWTACACS, on the authentication server default configuration of the and LDAP authentication server.

  • Page 24

    Step Command Remarks Optional By default, the user privilege level Configure the privilege level for for users logged in through the users that log in through the current user privilege level level AUX user interface is 3, and that user interface for users logged in through the VTY interfaces is 0.

  • Page 25

    After the user relogs in, the user privilege restores to the original level. To avoid problems, HP recommends that administrators log in to the switch by using a lower privilege • level and view switch operating parameters, and when they have to maintain the switch, they can...

  • Page 26

    Authentication Meaning Description mode Performs the local The switch authenticates a user by using the local password first. If password no local password is set, the privilege level is switched directly for authentication first local scheme the users logged in from the Console port, and remote AAA and then the authentication is performed on the users logged in from VTY user remote AAA...

  • Page 27: Modifying The Level Of A Command

    Modifying the level of a command CAUTION: HP recommends using the default command level or modify the command level under the guidance of professional staff. An improper change of the command level may bring inconvenience to your maintenance and operation, or even potential security problems.

  • Page 28: Saving The Current Configuration

    To modify the command level: Step Command Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Configure the command level in a command-privilege level level view specified view view command Table 1 for the default settings. Saving the current configuration On the device, enter the save command in any view to save all submitted and executed commands into the configuration file.

  • Page 29: Login Methods

    Login methods Log in to the switch by using the following methods. Table 4 Login methods Login method Default state Logging in By default, log in to a device through the console port, the through the authentication mode is None (no username or password required), console port and the user privilege level is 3.

  • Page 30: Users And User Interfaces

    Login method Default state By default, you cannot log in to a device through a network management station (NMS). To do so, log in to the device through the console port, and complete the following configuration: NMS login • Configure the IP address of the VLAN interface, and make sure the device and the NMS can reach each other (by default, your device does not have an IP address.).

  • Page 31: Numbering User Interfaces

    Numbering user interfaces User interfaces can be numbered by using absolute numbering or relative numbering. Absolute numbering Absolute numbering identifies a user interface or a group of different types of user interfaces. The specified user interfaces are numbered from number 0 with a step of 1 and in the sequence of AUX, and VTY user interfaces.

  • Page 32: Cli Login

    CLI login The CLI enables you to interact with a device by typing text commands. At the CLI, instruct your device to perform a given task by typing a text command and then pressing Enter to submit it to your device. Compared with the graphical user interface (GUI), where you can use a mouse to perform configuration, the CLI allows you to enter more information in one command line.

  • Page 33: Login Procedure

    Login procedure WARNING! Identify interfaces to avoid connection errors. As shown in Figure 2, use the console cable shipped with the device to connect the PC and the device. Plug the DB-9 connector of the console cable into the serial port of the PC, and plug the RJ-45 connector into the console port of your device.

  • Page 34

    Figure 4 Specify the serial port used to establish the connection Figure 5 Set the properties of the serial port...

  • Page 35: Console Login Authentication Modes

    Turn on the device. You are prompted to press Enter if the device successfully completes the power-on self-test (POST). A prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 6 Configuration page Execute commands to configure the device or check the running status of the device. To get help, enter ?.

  • Page 36: Configuring None Authentication For Console Login

    The following table lists console port login configurations for different authentication modes: Authenticat Configuration Remarks ion mode For more information, see None Configure not to authenticate users. “Configuring none authentication for console login.” Configure the device to authenticate users by using the For more information, see local password.

  • Page 37: Configuring Password Authentication For Console Login

    (optional).” After the configuration, the next time you log in to the device through the console port, you are prompted to press enter. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 7 Configuration page...

  • Page 38

    (optional).” When you log in to the device through the console port after the configuration, you are prompted to enter a login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the password and press Enter, as shown Figure...

  • Page 39: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Console Login

    Configuring scheme authentication for console login Prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, see “Configuration requirements.”...

  • Page 40

    Step Command Remarks Optional. • By default, command accounting is disabled. The accounting server does not record the commands executed by users. • Command accounting allows the HWTACACS server to record all commands executed by users, regardless of command execution results. This helps control and monitor user operations on the device.

  • Page 41

    • When you log in to the device through the console port after the configuration, you are prompted to enter a login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the password and username Figure and press Enter, as shown in...

  • Page 42: Configuring Common Settings For Console Login (optional)

    Configuring common settings for console login (optional) CAUTION: The common settings configured for console login take effect immediately. If you configure the common settings after you log in through the console port, the current connection may be interrupted, so you should use another login method.

  • Page 43: Logging In Through Telnet

    Optional By default, the terminal display type is ANSI. The device supports two types of terminal display: ANSI and VT100. HP recommends setting the display type of both the device and Configure type the client to VT100. If the device and the client...

  • Page 44: Telnet Login Authentication Modes

    The following table shows the configuration requirements of Telnet login. Object Requirements Configure the IP address of the VLAN interface, and make sure the Telnet server and client can reach each other. Telnet server Configure the authentication mode and other settings. Run the Telnet client program.

  • Page 45: Configuring None Authentication For Telnet Login

    Authentication Configuration Remarks mode Configure the authentication scheme. Configure RADIUS/HWT ACACS scheme. Configure AAA scheme Remote AAA used by the authentication domain. Configure For more information, see username and Select Scheme “Configuring scheme authentication password on authentication for Telnet login.” the AAA scheme.

  • Page 46

    Step Command Remarks Required. Configure the command level for login users on the current user privilege level level By default, the default command level is 0 user interfaces. for VTY user interfaces. Optional. Configure common settings — “Configuring common settings for VTY for VTY user interfaces.

  • Page 47: Configuring Password Authentication For Telnet Login

    VTY user interfaces (optional).” When you log in to the device through Telnet again: You are required to enter the login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the • correct password and press Enter, as shown in Figure If “All user interfaces are used, please try later!”...

  • Page 48: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Telnet Login

    Figure 12 Configuration page Configuring scheme authentication for Telnet login Prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, see “Configuration requirements.”...

  • Page 49

    Step Command Remarks Optional. • By default, command authorization is not enabled. • By default, the command level depends on the user privilege level. A user is authorized a command level not higher than the user privilege level. With command authorization enabled, the command level for a login user is determined by both the user privilege level and Enable command...

  • Page 50

    For more information about AAA, RADIUS, and HWTACACS, see Security Configuration Guide. When you log in to the device through Telnet again: You are required to enter the login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you •...

  • Page 51: Configuring Common Settings For Vty User Interfaces (optional)

    Figure 13 Configuration page Configuring common settings for VTY user interfaces (optional) CAUTION: The auto-execute command command may disable you from configuring the system through the user interface to which the command is applied. Use it with caution. Before executing the auto-execute command command and saving the configuration (by using save). Be sure you can access the device through VTY and AUX user interfaces so you can remove the configuration when a problem occurs.

  • Page 52

    Step Command Remarks Optional. Enable the terminal shell service. Enabled by default. Optional. Enable the current user interfaces to support protocol inbound By default, both protocols are supported. either Telnet, SSH, or { all | ssh | telnet } The configuration takes effect next time you both of them.

  • Page 53: Configuring The Device To Log In To A Telnet Server As A Telnet Client

    Configuring the device to log in to a Telnet server as a Telnet client Prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login.

  • Page 54: Logging In Through Ssh

    Logging in through SSH SSH offers an approach to log into a remote device securely. By providing encryption and strong authentication, it protects devices against attacks such as IP spoofing and plain-text password interception. The device supports SSH, and you can log in to the device through SSH to remotely manage and maintain the device, as shown in Figure Figure 15 SSH login diagram...

  • Page 55

    Procedure To configure the device that serves as an SSH server: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. public-key local create Create local key pairs. { dsa | rsa } By default, no local key pairs are created. Required.

  • Page 56

    Step Command Remarks Optional • By default, command accounting is disabled. The accounting server does not record the commands executed by users. • Command accounting allows the HWTACACS server to record all executed commands that are supported by the device, regardless of the command execution result.

  • Page 57: Configuring The Ssh Client To Log In To The Ssh Server

    Step Command Remarks ssh user username service-type stelnet Required. Create an SSH user, and authentication-type specify the authentication { password | { any | By default, no SSH user exists, and no mode for the SSH user. password-publickey | authentication mode is specified. publickey } assign publickey keyname } Optional.

  • Page 58: Logging In Through Modems

    Procedure Configure other settings for the SSH client to work with the SSH server. For more information, see Security Configuration Guide. To configure the SSH client to log in to the SSH server: Step Command Remarks Required Log in to an IPv4 SSH server. ssh2 server server is the IPv4 address or host name of the server.

  • Page 59

    Login procedure Set up a configuration environment as shown in Figure 2: connect the serial port of the PC and the Console port of the device to a modem respectively. Figure 2 Set up a configuration terminal Configuration on the administrator side The PC and the modem are correctly connected, the modem is connected to a telephone cable, and the telephone number of the remote modem connected to the Console port of the remote switch is obtained.

  • Page 60

    Figure 3 Connection Description Figure 4 Enter the phone number Figure 5 Dial the number...

  • Page 61: Modem Login Authentication Modes

    Character string CONNECT9600 is displayed on the terminal. Then a prompt appears when you press Enter. Figure 6 Configuration page If the authentication mode is password, a prompt (for example, HP) appears when you enter the configured password on the remote terminal. Then configure or manage the router. To get help, enter ?.

  • Page 62: Configuring None Authentication For Modem Login

    password on the remote authentication server. For more information about authentication modes and parameters, see Security Configuration Guide. Keep your username and password. The following table lists modem login configurations for different authentication modes: Authentication Configuration Remarks mode For more information, see “Configuring none None Configure not to authenticate users.

  • Page 63: Configuring Password Authentication For Modem Login

    (optional).” When you log in to the device through modems after the configuration, you are prompted to press Enter. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 7 Configuration page Configuring password authentication for modem login Prerequisites You have logged in to the device.

  • Page 64

    (optional).” When you log in to the device through modems after the configuration, you are prompted to enter a login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the password and press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 8 Configuration page...

  • Page 65: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Modem Login

    Configuring scheme authentication for modem login Prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, see “Configuration requirements.”...

  • Page 66

    Step Command Remarks Optional. • By default, command accounting is disabled. The accounting server does not record the commands executed by users. • Command accounting allows the HWTACACS server to record all executed commands that are supported by the device, regardless of the command execution result.

  • Page 67

    When you log in to the device through modems after the configuration, you are prompted to enter a login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the password and username and press Enter, as shown in...

  • Page 68: Configuring Common Settings For Modem Login (optional)

    Configuring common settings for modem login (optional) CAUTION: The common settings configured for Console login take effect immediately. If you configure the common • settings after you log in through the Console port, the current connection may be interrupted. To avoid this problem, use another login method.

  • Page 69

    Optional By default, the terminal display type is ANSI. The device supports two types of terminal display: ANSI and VT100. HP recommends setting the display type of both the device Configure and the client to VT100. If the device and the...

  • Page 70: Displaying And Maintaining Cli Login

    Displaying and maintaining CLI login Task Command Remarks display telnet client Display the source IP address/ configuration [ | { begin interface specified for Telnet Available in any view. | exclude | include } packets. regular- expression ] display users [ | { begin Display information about the user | exclude | include } Available in any view.

  • Page 71: Web Login

    Web login Overview The device provides a built-in web server. It enables you to log in to the web interface of the device from a PC. Web login is disabled by default. To enable web login, log in to the device via the console port, and perform the following configuration: Enable HTTP or HTTPS service.

  • Page 72: Configuring Http Login

    Configuring HTTP login Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. Enable the HTTP service. ip http enable Enabled by default. Optional. Configure the HTTP service port 80 by default. ip http port port-number number. If you execute the command multiple times, the last one takes effect.

  • Page 73: Configuring Https Login

    Configuring HTTPS login Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required By default, PKI and SSL are not configured. Configure PKI and • For more information about PKI, see Security — SSL related features. Configuration Guide. • For more information about SSL, see Security Configuration Guide.

  • Page 74

    Step Command Remarks Optional. By default, the HTTPS service is not associated with any certificate-based attribute access control policy. • Associating the HTTPS service with a certificate-based attribute access control policy enables the device to control the access rights of Associate the HTTPS clients.

  • Page 75: Displaying And Maintaining Web Login

    Displaying and maintaining web login Task Command Remarks Display information about web display web users [ | { begin | exclude | Available in any view. users. include } regular-expression ] display ip http [ | { begin | exclude | Display HTTP state information.

  • Page 76: Https Login Example

    Configuration on the PC # On the PC, run the web browser. Enter the IP address of the device in the address bar, 192.168.20.66 in this example. The web login page appears, as shown in Figure Figure 4 Web login page # Enter the user name, password, verify code, select English, and click Login.

  • Page 77

    Figure 5 Network diagram for configuring HTTPS login Procedure Configure the device that acts as the HTTPS server # Configure a PKI entity, configure the common name of the entity as http-server1, and the FQDN of the entity as ssl.security.com. <Device>...

  • Page 78

    # Create a certificate attribute group mygroup1, and configure a certificate attribute rule, specifying that the Distinguished Name (DN) in the subject name includes the string of new-ca. [Device] pki certificate attribute-group mygroup1 [Device-pki-cert-attribute-group-mygroup1] attribute 1 issuer-name dn ctn new-ca [Device-pki-cert-attribute-group-mygroup1] quit # Create a certificate attribute-based access control policy myacp.

  • Page 79: Nms Login

    NMS login Overview A Network Management Station (NMS) runs the SNMP client software. It offers a user-friendly interface to facilitate network management. An agent is a program that resides in the device. It receives and handles requests from the NMS. An NMS is a manager in an SNMP enabled network, whereas agents are managed by the NMS.

  • Page 80: Configuring Snmpv1 And Snmpv2c Settings

    Configuring SNMPv1 and SNMPv2c settings Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Optional. Disabled by default. Enable SNMP agent. snmp-agent Enable SNMP agent with this command or any command that begins with snmp-agent. Optional. snmp-agent mib-view { excluded | included } By default, the MIB view Create or update MIB view information.

  • Page 81: Configuring Snmpv3 Settings

    Configuring SNMPv3 settings Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Optional. Disabled by default. Enable SNMP agent. snmp-agent Enable SNMP agent with this command or any command that begins with snmp-agent. snmp-agent group v3 group-name Required. Configure an SNMP [ authentication | privacy ] [ read-view group and specify its By default, no SNMP group is...

  • Page 82

    Configuration on the NMS On the PC, start the browser. In the address bar, enter http://192.168.20.107:8080/imc, where 192.168.20.107 is the IP address of the iMC. Figure 7 iMC login page...

  • Page 83

    Enter the username and password, and then click Login. The iMC homepage appears, as shown in Figure 8. Figure 8 iMC homepage Log in to the iMC and configure SNMP settings for the iMC to find the device. After the device is found, manage and maintain the device through the iMC.

  • Page 84: User Login Control

    User login control Overview The device provides the following login control methods. Login Through Login control methods ACL used Configuring source IP-based login control over Telnet Basic ACL users Configuring source and destination IP-based login Telnet Advanced ACL control over Telnet users Configuring source MAC-based login control over Ethernet frame header ACL Telnet users...

  • Page 85: Configuring Source And Destination Ip-based Login Control Over Telnet Users

    Step Command Remarks Exit the basic ACL view. quit — user-interface [ type ] Enter user interface view. — first-number [ last-number ] Required. • inbound—Filters incoming Use the ACL to control user login by acl [ ipv6 ] acl-number Telnet packets.

  • Page 86: Source Mac-based Login Control Configuration Example

    To configure source MAC-based login control over Telnet users: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. Create an Ethernet frame header acl number acl-number By default, no advanced ACL and enter its view. [ match-order { config | auto } ] ACL exists.

  • Page 87: Configuring Source Ip-based Login Control Over Nms Users

    Procedure # Configure basic ACL 2000, and configure rule 1 to permit packets sourced from Host B, and rule 2 to permit packets sourced from Host A. <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] acl number 2000 match-order config [Sysname-acl-basic-2000] rule 1 permit source 10.110.100.52 0 [Sysname-acl-basic-2000] rule 2 permit source 10.110.100.46 0 [Sysname-acl-basic-2000] quit # Reference ACL 2000 in user interface view to allow Telnet users from Host A and Host B to access the...

  • Page 88: Source Ip-based Login Control Over Nms Users Configuration Example

    Step Command Remarks when creating the snmp-agent group { v1 | v2c } group- community, the SNMP name [ read-view read-view ] [ write- group, and the user. view write-view ] [ notify-view notify- view ] [ acl acl-number ] For more information Associate the SNMP group with the about SNMP, see...

  • Page 89: Configuring Source Ip-based Login Control Over Web Users

    # Associate the ACL with the SNMP community and the SNMP group. [Sysname] snmp-agent community read aaa acl 2000 [Sysname] snmp-agent group v2c groupa acl 2000 [Sysname] snmp-agent usm-user v2c usera groupa acl 2000 Configuring source IP-based login control over web users Log in to the web management page of the device through HTTP/HTTPS to remotely manage the devices.

  • Page 90: Logging Off Online Web Users

    Logging off online web users Step Command Remarks Required. free web-users { all | user-id Log off online web users. Execute the command in user user-id | user-name user-name } interface view. Source IP-based login control over web users configuration example Network requirements As shown in...

  • Page 91: Configuring Ftp

    Configuring FTP Overview FTP is an application layer protocol for sharing files between server and client over a TCP/IP network. FTP uses TCP ports 20 and 21 for file transfer. Port 20 is used to transmit data, and port 21 to transmit control commands.

  • Page 92: Configuring The Ftp Client

    Device Configuration Remarks Enable FTP server on the PC, and PC (FTP server) configure the username, password, — user privilege level, and so on. When the device serves as the FTP server, you must perform the following configuration: Table 6 Configuration when the device serves as the FTP server Device Configuration Remarks...

  • Page 93

    To establish an IPv4 FTP connection: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Optional. A switch uses the IP address ftp client source { interface of the interface determined Configure the source address of the FTP interface-type interface-number by the matched route as the client.

  • Page 94: Operating Ftp Server Directories

    Operating FTP server directories After the switch serving as the FTP client has established a connection with an FTP server, create or delete folders under the authorized directory of the FTP server. For more information about establishing an FTP connection, see “Establishing an FTP connection.”...

  • Page 95: Using Another Username To Log In To An Ftp Server

    To operate the files on an FTP server: Task Command Remarks Optional. The ls command only displays Display detailed information about a directory or file dir [ remotefile the name of a directory or file. on the remote FTP server. [ localfile ] ] The dir command displays detailed information such as the...

  • Page 96: Maintaining And Debugging An Ftp Connection

    Maintaining and debugging an FTP connection After a switch serving as the FTP client has established a connection with the FTP server, perform the following operations to locate and diagnose problems encountered in an FTP connection. For more information about establishing an FTP connection, see “Establishing an FTP connection.”...

  • Page 97

    Figure 13 Network diagram for FTPing a boot file from an FTP server Procedure CAUTION: The boot file used for the next startup must be saved under the root directory of the storage medium. • Copy or move a file to the root directory of the storage medium. For more information about Fundamentals Command Reference.

  • Page 98: Ftp Client Configuration Example, Network Requirements

    FTP client configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure 14, use Device as an FTP client and PC as the FTP server. Their IP addresses are • 10.2.1.1/16 and 10.1.1.1/16 respectively. Device and PC are reachable to each other. •...

  • Page 99: Configuring The Ftp Server

    Download the boot file newest.bin from PC to the root directory of the storage medium of a subordinate • switch (with member ID of 2). [ftp] get newest.bin slot2#flash:/newest.bin # Upload the configuration file config.cfg of the device to the server for backup. [ftp] ascii [ftp] put config.cfg back-config.cfg 227 Entering Passive Mode (10,1,1,1,4,2).

  • Page 100: Configuring Authentication And Authorization On The Ftp Server

    To configure the FTP server: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. Enable the FTP server ftp server enable Disabled by default. Optional. Use an ACL to control FTP ftp server acl By default, no ACL is used to control FTP clients’...

  • Page 101: Ftp Server Configuration Example

    To configure authentication and authorization for FTP server: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. No local user exists by default, and the system does not Create a local user local-user user-name support FTP anonymous user access. and enter its view. For more information about local-user, see Security Command Reference.

  • Page 102

    Procedure CAUTION: The boot file used for the next startup must be saved under the root directory of the storage medium (For a device that has been partitioned, the boot file must be saved on the first partition). Copy or move a file Fundamentals to the root directory of the storage medium.

  • Page 103

    ftp> put newest.bin ftp> bye Take the same steps to upgrade configuration file with FTP. When upgrading the configuration file with FTP, put the new file under the root directory of the storage medium. After you finish transferring the Boot ROM program through FTP, you must run bootrom update to upgrade the Boot ROM.

  • Page 104

    Procedure CAUTION: If the available memory space of the master and subordinate switches is insufficient, use fixdisk to clear • file the memory or use delete /unreserved to delete the files not in use and then perform the following operations. •...

  • Page 105: Displaying And Maintaining Ftp

    Upgrade the IRF virtual device # Copy the boot file newest.bin to the root directory of the storage medium on a subordinate switch (with the member ID 2). <Sysname> copy newest.bin slot2#flash:/ # Specify newest.bin as the main boot file to be used at the next startup for all member devices. <Sysname>...

  • Page 106: Configuring Tftp

    Configuring TFTP Overview TFTP provides functions similar to those provided by FTP, but it is less complex than FTP in interactive access interface and authentication. It is more suitable in environments where complex interaction is not needed between client and server. TFTP uses the UDP port 69 for data transmission.

  • Page 107: Configuring The Tftp Client

    This mode is more secure but consumes more memory. HP recommends using the secure mode or, if you use the normal mode, specify a filename not existing in the current directory as the target filename when downloading the boot file or the startup configuration file.

  • Page 108: Displaying And Maintaining The Tftp Client

    To configure the TFTP client: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Optional. Use an ACL to control the device’s tftp-server [ ipv6 ] acl By default, no ACL is used to control the access to TFTP servers. acl-number device’s access to TFTP servers.

  • Page 109: Tftp Client Configuration Example

    TFTP client configuration example Network requirements • As shown in Figure 3, use a PC as the TFTP server and Device as the TFTP client. Their IP addresses are 1.2.1.1/16 and 1.1.1.1/16 respectively. Device and PC are reachable to each other. •...

  • Page 110: Tftp Client Configuration (irf Mode) Example

    TFTP client configuration (IRF mode) example Network requirements • As shown in Figure 2, an IRF virtual device comprises a master and a subordinate switch. The member ID of the master is 1 and that of the subordinate switch is 2. •...

  • Page 111

    # Upload a configuration file config.cfg to the TFTP server. <Sysname> tftp 1.2.1.1 put config.cfg configback.cfg # Specify newest.bin as the main boot file to be used at the next startup for all member devices. <Sysname> boot-loader file newest.bin slot all main This command will set the boot file of the specified board.

  • Page 112: File Management

    File management Files such as host software and configuration files that are necessary for the operation of the device are saved in the storage media of the device. manage files on your device through these operations: Performing directory operations, Performing file operations, Performing batch operations,...

  • Page 113: Displaying Directory Information

    Displaying directory information Task Command Remarks Required. Display directory or file information. dir [ /all ] [ file-url ] Available in user view. Displaying the current working directory Task Command Remarks Required. Display the current working directory. Available in user view. Changing the current working directory Task Command...

  • Page 114: Performing File Operations

    Performing file operations Display the specified directory or file information; display file contents; rename, copy, move, remove, restore, and delete files. Create a file by copying, downloading or using save. Displaying file information Task Command Remarks Required. Display file or directory information. dir [ /all ] [ file-url ] Available in user view.

  • Page 115: Deleting A File

    The files in the recycle bin still occupy storage space. To delete a file in the recycle bin, run reset recycle-bin in the directory to which the file originally belongs. HP recommends you to empty the recycle bin periodically with reset recycle-bin to save storage space.

  • Page 116: Performing Storage Media Operations

    A batch file is a set of executable commands. Executing a batch file is the same as executing the commands in the batch file one by one. Before executing a batch file, edit the batch file on your PC, and then download the batch file to the device. If the suffix of the file is not .bat, use rename to change the suffix to .bat.

  • Page 117: Setting Prompt Modes

    • quiet—The system does not prompt confirmation for any operation. HP recommends using the alert mode. To set the operation prompt mode: Step Command Remarks Enter system view.

  • Page 118: File Operation Example

    File operation example # Display the files and the subdirectories in the current directory. <Sysname> dir Directory of flash:/ drw- Feb 16 2006 11:45:36 logfile -rw- 1218 Feb 16 2006 11:46:19 config.cfg drw- Feb 16 2006 15:20:27 test -rw- 184108 Feb 16 2006 15:30:20 aaa.bin 515712 KB total (2521 KB free)

  • Page 119: Configuration File Management

    Configuration file management The device provides the configuration file management function. Manage configuration files on the user-friendly command line interface (CLI). Overview A configuration file contains a set of commands. Save the current configuration to a configuration file so that the configuration can take effect after a device reboot.

  • Page 120: Configuration File Format And Content

    Configuration file format and content A configuration file is saved as a text file; the following rules apply: • Only non-default configuration settings are saved. • Commands in a configuration file are listed in sections by views, usually in the order of system view, interface view, routing protocol view, and user interface view.

  • Page 121: Startup With The Configuration File

    Specifying a startup configuration file to be used at the next system startup. Startup with the configuration file The device takes the following steps when it starts up: If the main startup configuration file you specified exists, the device starts up with this configuration file.

  • Page 122

    Safe mode—This is the mode when using save with the safely keyword. The file saves more slowly but • can retain the configuration file in the device even if the device reboots or the power fails during the process. The fast saving mode is suitable for environments where the power supply is stable. The safe mode is preferred in environments where a stable power supply is unavailable or remote maintenance is involved.

  • Page 123

    To save the current configuration: Step Command Remarks Save the current configuration to the specified file, save file-url [ all | slot but the configuration file is not set as the file to be slot-number ] Required. used at the next startup. Use either command.

  • Page 124: Setting Configuration Rollback

    If a configuration file is generated by another device, the configuration file must comply with the format of the configuration file on the current device. HP recommends using the configuration file that is generated by using the backup function (manually or automatically).

  • Page 125: Configuring Parameters For Saving The Running Configuration

    Configuring parameters for saving the running configuration Before the running configuration is saved manually or automatically, the file path and filename prefix must be configured. After that, the system saves the running configuration with the specified filename (filename prefix_serial number.cfg) to the specified path. The filename of a saved configuration file is like 20080620archive_1.cfg, or 20080620archive_2.cfg.

  • Page 126: Enabling Automatic Saving Of The Running Configuration

    To configure parameters for saving the running configuration: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. archive configuration Configure the path and By default, the path and filename for saving location directory filename prefix for saving configuration files are not configured, and filename-prefix configuration files.

  • Page 127: Manually Saving The Running Configuration

    Manually saving the running configuration Automatic saving of the running configuration occupies system resources, and frequent can saving greatly affect system performance. If the system configuration does not change frequently, disable the automatic saving of the running configuration and save it manually. In addition, automatic saving of the running configuration is performed periodically, while manual saving can immediately save the running configuration.

  • Page 128: Specifying A Startup Configuration File To Be Used At The Next System Startup

    Specifying a startup configuration file to be used at the next system startup CAUTION: A configuration file must use .cfg as its extension name and the startup configuration file must be saved in the root directory of the storage media. To specify a startup configuration file to be used at the next system startup, use the following guidelines: Use save.

  • Page 129: Deleting A Startup Configuration File To Be Used At The Next Startup

    Deleting a startup configuration file to be used at the next startup CAUTION: This command permanently deletes startup configuration files to be used at the next startup from all member devices. Use it with caution. Delete a startup configuration file to be used at the next startup at the CLI. On a device that has main and backup startup configuration files, you can choose to delete the main, the backup, or both.

  • Page 130: Displaying And Maintaining A Configuration File

    Displaying and maintaining a configuration file Task Command Remarks Display the information about display archive configuration [ | { begin | Available in any view configuration rollback. exclude | include } regular-expression ] Display the factory defaults of the display default-configuration [ | { begin | Available in any view device.

  • Page 131: Configuring Software Upgrade

    Configuring software upgrade Overview Device software includes the Boot ROM program and the system boot file. After powered on, the device runs the Boot ROM program, initializes the hardware, and displays the hardware information. Then the device runs the boot file. The boot file provides drivers and adaption for hardware, and implements service features. The Boot ROM program and system boot file are required for the startup and running of a device.

  • Page 132: Software Upgrade Methods

    Software upgrade methods The Boot ROM program and system boot file can both be upgraded at the Boot ROM menu or at the CLI. The following sections describe upgrading through command lines. For instructions about how to upgrade through the Boot ROM menu, see the release notes of your switch. Upgrading at the CLI falls into the following categories: Upgrade Upgrade method...

  • Page 133: Upgrading The Boot Rom Program Through A System Reboot

    Upgrading the boot ROM program through a system reboot CAUTION: To execute the bootrom command successfully, save the Boot ROM file in the root directory of the storage media on a member device. To upgrade the Boot ROM program: Step Command Remarks Enter system view.

  • Page 134: Upgrading The Boot File Through A System Reboot

    Upgrading the boot file through a system reboot CAUTION: You must save the file to be used at the next device boot in the root directory of the device. Copy or move • a file to change the path of it to the root directory. To run boot-loader successfully, save the file to be used at the next device boot in the root directory of •...

  • Page 135: Upgrading Irf Member Switch Boot File

    Upgrading IRF member switch boot file CAUTION: If the free Flash space on the member switch is not enough when you upgrade the boot file of an IRF member switch, the system automatically compares the sum of the space occupied by the current boot file and the remaining space with the size of the new boot file: If the sum is greater than the size of the new boot file, the member switch automatically deletes the •...

  • Page 136: Software Upgrade By Installing Hotfixes

    Software upgrade by installing hotfixes A hotfix is a fast, cost-effective method to repair the software defects of a device. Compared with other methods of software version upgrade, a hotfix can upgrade the software without interrupting the running services of the device. It can repair software defects of the current version without rebooting the device. Patch and patch file A patch, also called “patch unit,"...

  • Page 137

    Figure 3 Relationship between patch state changes and command actions IDLE state Patches in the IDLE state are not loaded. You cannot install or run the patches, as shown in Figure 4 (suppose the memory patch area can load up to eight patches). The memory patch area supports up to 200 patches. Figure 4 Patches are not loaded to the memory patch area...

  • Page 138

    DEACTIVE state Patches in the DEACTIVE state have been loaded to the memory patch area but have not run in the system yet. Suppose that the patch file to be loaded has seven patches. After the seven patches successfully pass the version check and CRC check, they are loaded to the memory patch area and are in the DEACTIVE state.

  • Page 139: Configuration Prerequisites

    The following table describes the default patch name for 5820X&5800 Switch Series. Device PATCH-FLAG Default patch name PATCH-MPU patch_mpu.bin HP 5820X&5800 Switch Series PATCH-LPU patch_lpu.bin...

  • Page 140: One-step Patch Installation

    One-step patch installation To install patches in one step, use patch install. After you execute the command, the system displays the message "Do you want to continue running patches after reboot? [Y/N]:" Entering Y: All specified patches are installed, and turn to the RUNNING state from IDLE. This equals •...

  • Page 141: Step-by-step Patch Uninstallation

    This operation applies to patches in the ACTIVE state only. Step-by-step patch uninstallation Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required. patch deactive Stop running the When you stop running a patch, the patch state becomes patch-number specified patches. DEACTIVE, and the system runs in the way before it is slot slot-number installed with the patch.

  • Page 142

    Configuration on the TFTP server (Configurations may vary with different types of servers) Obtain the boot file and configuration file through legitimate channels, such as the official HP website, agents, and technical staff. Save these files under the working path of the TFTP server for the TFTP client access.

  • Page 143: Hotfix Configuration Example

    # Specify file new-config.cfg as the configuration file to be used at the next boot of all members of the IRF virtual device. <IRF> startup saved-configuration new-config.cfg main Please wait ... Setting the master board ..Done! Setting the slave board ... Slot 1: Set next configuration file successfully.

  • Page 144

    Procedure CAUTION: Make sure the free Flash space of the device is big enough to store the patch files. Configure the TFTP server. The configuration varies depending on server type, and the configuration procedure is omitted. Enable the TFTP server function. Save the patch file patch_mpu.bin and patch_lpu.bin to the directory of TFTP server.

  • Page 145: Configuring Issu

    Configuring ISSU Overview ISSU enables software upgrade and ensures continuous packet forwarding. As shown in Figure 2, to ensure high availability for user networks, cross-device link aggregation is configured on the IRF member switches at the distribution layer so that every three physical links with the same color between the IRF member switches and access switches are aggregated as one logical link.

  • Page 146: Issu Process

    ISSU process ISSU follows a strict procedure, as shown in Figure Figure 3 ISSU flow chart Do not modify the current configuration, plug or unplug cables connected to IRF ports, or delete or modify the boot file during ISSU. Otherwise, an upgrade failure may occur. To upgrade the boot files of IRF member switches through ISSU, the member switches must form a ring topology.

  • Page 147: Boot File Version Rollback

    Boot file version rollback The HP 5820X&5800 switch series support version rollback during ISSU. When ISSU fails to proceed on an IRF member switch (for example, the new boot file is broken), use this feature to revert the boot file to the previous version.

  • Page 148

    Configuring ISSU Configuration task list Task Remarks Download the new boot file to the Flash of all IRF member switches. Required Prerequisites for performing ISSU. Required Enabling version compatibility check. Required Configuring compatible ISSU. Required Configuring ISSU. Use either approach Configuring incompatible ISSU.

  • Page 149: Enabling Version Compatibility Check

    Enabling version compatibility check Before performing an ISSU upgrade, you must check the version compatibility between the new and current boot files, to determine whether ISSU can be performed, and which ISSU method is adopted. After downloading and saving the new boot file, select an ISSU upgrade method according to one of the following version compatibility check results: Compatible—The running boot file is compatible with the new boot file.

  • Page 150

    Configuring incompatible ISSU. • Unknown—The current and new boot files have big differences, or the current boot file does not support ISSU. You cannot upgrade the boot file through ISSU. To enable version compatibility check: Step Command Remarks Enters system view. system-view —...

  • Page 151

    To configure compatible ISSU: Step Command Remarks Enter system view. system-view — Required Upgrade the slot-number is the member ID of the subordinate switch. issu load file specified upgrading-filena The specified subordinate switch reboots with the new boot file subordinate switch me slot when this command is executed.

  • Page 152: Configuring The Issu Version Rollback Timer

    Configuring incompatible ISSU Use display version comp-matrix file upgrading-filename to view the versions of the new and current boot files. If they are incompatible, perform an incompatible ISSU. To configure incompatible ISSU: Step Command Remarks Enters system view. system-view — Required.

  • Page 153: Performing Manual Version Rollback

    Performing manual version rollback Step Command Remarks Enters system view. system-view — Optional By default, automatic rollback is performed to revert Perform a manual version issu rollback slot to the previous version. rollback. slot-number The slot-number argument provided in this command must be the same as that specified in the issu load.

  • Page 154: Network Diagram

    • On Switch C, create aggregation group 3 that corresponds to aggregation group 3 on the IRF virtual switch. Network requirements You must upgrade the boot files of the IRF member switches and ensure packet forwarding for user network using the following guidelines: •...

  • Page 155: Configuration Procedure

    Configuration procedure Configure link aggregation Configuration on the IRF virtual switch # Create three dynamic aggregation groups 1, 2, and 3. <IRF> system-view [IRF] interface bridge-aggregation 1 [IRF-Bridge-Aggregation1] link-aggregation mode dynamic [IRF-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit [IRF] interface bridge-aggregation 2 [IRF-Bridge-Aggregation2] link-aggregation mode dynamic [IRF-Bridge-Aggregation2] quit [IRF] interface bridge-aggregation 3 [IRF-Bridge-Aggregation3] link-aggregation mode dynamic...

  • Page 156

    [IRF] interface GigabitEthernet 3/0/3 [IRF-GigabitEthernet3/0/3] port link-aggregation group 3 [IRF-GigabitEthernet3/0/3] quit Configuration on Switch A # Create dynamic aggregate interface 1. <SwitchA> system-view [SwitchA] interface bridge-aggregation 1 [SwitchA-Bridge-Aggregation1] link-aggregation mode dynamic [SwitchA-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit #Add ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, GigabitEthernet 1/0/2, and GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 that connect to IRF member switches to aggregation group 1 (corresponding to aggregate interface 1).

  • Page 157: Issu Upgrade Preparation

    # Add ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, GigabitEthernet 1/0/2, and GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 that connect to IRF member switches to aggregation group 3 (corresponding to aggregate interface 3). [SwitchC] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 [SwitchC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-aggregation group 3 [SwitchC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [SwitchC] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 [SwitchC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-aggregation group 3 [SwitchC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit [SwitchC] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/3...

  • Page 158

    Check whether the current boot files on IRF member switches are the same. If not, the ISSU upgrade cannot be performed. <IRF> display boot-loader Slot 1 The current boot app is: flash:/soft-version1.bin The main boot app is: flash:/soft-version1.bin The backup boot app is: flash:/ Slot 2 The current boot app is:...

  • Page 159

    Check whether the new boot file has been saved in the Flash of each IRF member switch. If not, the ISSU upgrade cannot be performed. # Verify that the new boot file soft-version2.bin has been saved to the Flash of the master. <IRF>...

  • Page 160

    <IRF> display version comp-matrix file soft-version2.bin If they are compatible, the following output is displayed (The output of this command varies with devices.): Number of Matrices in Table = 1 Matrix for HP A5800-24G-PoE+ Switch Running Version:R1211 Version Compatibility List: A1210 (Compatible) The output shows that the new and current versions are fully compatible.

  • Page 161: Performing Compatible Issu Upgrade

    Performing compatible ISSU upgrade # Upgrade the specified subordinate switch (the new master after the upgrade), which is subordinate switch 2 in this example. <IRF> system-view [IRF] issu load file soft-version2.bin slot 2 This command will begin ISSU, and the specified board will reboot and be upgraded. Please save the current running configuration first;...

  • Page 162: Performing Incompatible Issu Upgrade

    # Verify that the current boot files on the IRF member switches are soft-version2.bin. [IRF] display boot-loader Slot 1 The current boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The main boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The backup boot app is: flash:/ Slot 2 The current boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The main boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin...

  • Page 163

    # Verify that the current boot files on the IRF member switches are soft-version2.bin. [IRF] display boot-loader Slot 1 The current boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The main boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The backup boot app is: flash:/ Slot 2 The current boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin The main boot app is: flash:/soft-version2.bin...

  • Page 164: Configuring Device Management

    Optional. Configure the device name. sysname sysname The device name is HP by default. Configuring the system clock The system clock, displayed by the system timestamp, is determined by configured relative time, time zone, and daylight saving time. To view the system clock, use display clock.

  • Page 165: Displaying The System Clock

    Step Command Remarks clock summer-time zone-name repeating Adopt daylight saving start-time start-date time repeatedly. end-time end-date add-time Displaying the system clock The system clock is determined by clock datetime, clock timezone and clock summer-time. If these three commands are not configured, display clock displays the original system clock. If you combine these three commands in different ways, the system clock is displayed in the ways as shown in Table 2.

  • Page 166

    Configuration System clock configured Example Configure: clock summer-time ss one-off 00:30 2005/1/1 1:00 2005/8/8 2 System clock configured:: 03:00:00 ss Sat 01/01/2005 If the the original system clock + If the original system clock is in the daylight “summer-offset” is not in the daylight saving time range, the system clock configured is saving time range, the system clock the original system clock + “summer-offset."...

  • Page 167

    Configuration System clock configured Example Configure: clock timezone zone-time If the value of the original system clock ± add 1 and clock summer-time ss one-off “zone-offset” is not in the summer-time range, the 1:00 2007/1/1 1:00 2007/8/8 2 system clock configured is the original system System clock configured: 02:00:00 clock ±...

  • Page 168: Enabling The Display Of Copyright Information

    Enabling the display of copyright information With the display of copyright information enabled, the copyright information is displayed when a user logs in through Telnet or SSH, or when a user quits user view after logging in to the device through the console port.

  • Page 169: Input Modes

    Configure the banner to be displayed before login. header motd text Optional Banner configuration example # Configure the banner to be displayed when a user enters user view as Welcome to HP! Single-line input mode: • <System> system-view [System] header shell %Welcome to HP!%...

  • Page 170: Configuring The Exception Handling Method

    Multiple-line input mode (method I): • <System> system-view [System] header shell Please input banner content, and quit with the character '%'. Welcome to HP! Multiple-line input mode (method II): • <System> system-view [System] header shell W Please input banner content, and quit with the character 'W'.

  • Page 171

    • Method II—Trigger the immediate reboot at the CLI. • Method III—Enable the scheduled reboot function at the CLI. Set a time at which the device can automatically reboot, or set a delay so that the device can automatically reboot within the delay. The last two methods are command line operations.

  • Page 172: Configuring Scheduled Tasks

    Configuring scheduled tasks A scheduled task defines a command or a group of commands and when such commands are to be executed. It allows a device to execute specified commands at a time when no person is available to maintain the device. With a scheduled task configured, the device checks the configured task list every minute.

  • Page 173

    Task Command Remarks schedule job at time Required Specify a command to be [ date ] view view Use either command. executed at the specified time. command Available in user view. • If you use schedule job at, changing the system time will change the scheduled task execution Specify a command to be schedule job delay...

  • Page 174: Configuring The Fan Ventilation Direction

    Configuring the fan ventilation direction Some switch models accommodate two fan trays to provide good ventilation. The two fan trays must be the same model. Two fan models are available for the switch. One model has air flow from the port side to the PSU side.

  • Page 175

    • If the temperature reaches the alarming threshold, the device not only repeatedly outputs the log information and trap information in the terminal display, but also alerts users through the LED on the device panel. To configure temperature alarm thresholds for a member device: Step Command Remarks...

  • Page 176: Clearing The 16-bit Interface Indexes Not Used In The Current System

    Lower Warning Alarm Device Sensor limit limit limit 5800AF-48G Switch(JG225A) Clearing the 16-bit interface indexes not used in the current system CAUTION: A confirmation is required when you execute this command. If you fail to make a confirmation within 30 seconds or enter N to cancel the operation, the command will not be executed.

  • Page 177: Identifying Pluggable Transceivers

    Whether can Whether can Transceiver type Application environment be an optical be an electrical transceiver transceiver SFP+(Enhanced 8.5 and 10 Generally used for 10G Ethernet Gigabit Small Form-factor interfaces Pluggable) Identifying pluggable transceivers Pluggable transceivers might be of various types and from different vendors. Use the following commands to view the key parameters of the pluggable transceivers, including transceiver type, connector type, central wavelength of the laser sent, transfer distance and vendor name to identify the pluggable transceivers.

  • Page 178: Displaying And Maintaining Device Management Configuration

    Displaying and maintaining device management configuration Task Command Remarks display version [ | { begin | exclude Display the system version information. Available in any view | include } regular-expression ] display clock [ | { begin | exclude | Display the system clock information.

  • Page 179

    Task Command Remarks display rps [ slot slot-number Display RPS state. [ rps-id ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | Available in any view include } regular-expression ] display reboot-type [ slot slot- Display device reboot mode. number ] [ | { begin | exclude | Available in any view include } regular-expression ] display schedule job [ | { begin |...

  • Page 180: Automatic Configuration

    Automatic configuration Overview Automatic configuration enables a device without any configuration file to automatically obtain and execute a configuration file during startup. Automatic configuration simplifies network configuration, facilitates centralized management, and reduces maintenance workload. To implement automatic configuration, the network administrator saves configuration files on a server and a device automatically obtains and executes a specific configuration file.

  • Page 181: How Automatic Configuration Works

    How automatic configuration works To implement automatic configuration, you must configure the DHCP server, DNS server and TFTP server, but you do not need to perform any configuration on the device that performs automatic configuration. The configuration of these servers varies with device models and is omitted. Before starting the device, connect only the interface needed in automatic configuration to the network.

  • Page 182: Using Dhcp To Obtain An Ip Address And Other Configuration Information

    Using DHCP to obtain an IP address and other configuration information Address acquisition process As mentioned before, a device sets the first up interface as the DHCP client during startup. The DHCP client broadcasts a DHCP request, where the Option 55 field specifies the information that the client wants to obtain from the DHCP server such as the configuration file name, domain name and IP address of the TFTP server, and DNS server IP address.

  • Page 183: Obtaining The Configuration File From The Tftp Server

    address pools, you must obtain client IDs. To obtain a device’s client ID, use display dhcp server ip-in-use to view address binding information on the DHCP server after the device obtains its IP address through DHCP. Obtaining the configuration file from the TFTP server File types CAUTION: There must be a space before the keyword ip host.

  • Page 184

    Obtaining the configuration file Figure 4 Obtain the configuration file A device obtains its configuration file by using the following workflow: If the DHCP response contains the configuration file name, the device requests the specified • configuration file from the TFTP server. If the DHCP response does not contain the configuration file name, the device tries to get its host name •...

  • Page 185: Executing The Configuration File

    After broadcasting a TFTP request, the device selects the TFTP server that responds first to obtain the configuration file. If the requested configuration file does not exist on the TFTP server, the request operation fails, and the device removes the temporary configuration and starts up with factory defaults. If the device and the TFTP server reside in different subnets, you must configure the UDP Helper function for the gateway to change the broadcast TFTP request from the device to a unicast packet and forward the unicast packet to the specified TFTP server.

  • Page 186: Support And Other Resources

    After registering, you will receive email notification of product enhancements, new driver versions, firmware updates, and other product resources. Related information Documents To find related documents, browse to the Manuals page of the HP Business Support Center website: http://www.hp.com/support/manuals For related documentation, navigate to the Networking section, and select a networking category. •...

  • Page 187: Conventions

    Conventions This section describes the conventions used in this documentation set. Command conventions Convention Description Boldface Bold text represents commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown. Italic Italic text represents arguments that you replace with actual values. Square brackets enclose syntax choices (keywords or arguments) that are optional. Braces enclose a set of required syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from which { x | y | ...

  • Page 188

    Network topology icons Represents a generic network device, such as a router, switch, or firewall. Represents a routing-capable device, such as a router or Layer 3 switch. Represents a generic switch, such as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 switch, or a router that supports Layer 2 forwarding and other Layer 2 features.

  • Page 189: Index

    Index obtaining configuration file from TFTP server, 177, 16-bit interface indexes, 170 ACTIVE state (patch status), 132 overview, 174 address selection principles for DHCP server address pool, acquisition process (DHCP), 176 selection principles for DHCP server address pool, TFTP server file types, 177 using DHCP to obtain an IP address, 176 alarm threshold (temperature), 168 using DHCP to obtain configuration information, 176...

  • Page 190

    setting configuration rollback, 1 18 configuring, 25 displaying login, 63 specifying startup configuration file, 122 maintaining login, 63 startup, 1 15 overview, 25 startup configuration, 1 12 client configuring automatic device configuration, 174 configuring device login as Telnet client, 46 configuring FTP client, 85 banner, 162, 163 CLI, 25...

  • Page 191

    25 scheduled task with time command, 167 login authentication modes, 28 software upgrade, 125, 135 contacting HP, 180 source and destination IP-based Telnet user login content (configuration file), 1 13 control, 78 copying file, 107...

  • Page 192

    NAND flash memory, 109 configuring member device temperature alarm threshold, 168 software upgrade, 135 configuring name, 158 system clock, 159 configuring scheduled task, 166 TFTP client, 101 configuring system clock, 158 web login, 68 displaying management configuration, 172 documentation displaying system clock, 159 conventions used, 181 enabling copyright information display, 162 website, 180...

  • Page 193

    terminating connection, 89 ISSU boot file version rollback, 141 management, 105 using another username for server login, 88 management configuration, 1 12 hotfix moving, 107 ACTIVE state patch, 132 name format, 105 DEACTIVE state patch, 132 IDLE state patch, 131 operating FTP server files, 87 patch file, 130 one-step patch installation, 134...

  • Page 194

    HTTPS login configuration, 66, 69 software upgrade by hotfix installation, 130 software upgrade by patch installation, 130 logging off online web users, 83 uninstalling patch (step-by-step), 135 modem, 51 modem login authentication modes, 54 configuring source and destination IP-based Telnet NMS login configuration, 72, 74 login control, 78 SSH, 47...

  • Page 195

    configuring SNMPv3 login settings, 74 input mode (banner), 163 multiple-line input mode (banner), 163 configuring source IP-based user login control, 80, single-line input mode (banner), 163 configuring source IP-based web user login control, method (software upgrade), 126 82, 83 mode logging off online web users, 83 banner message input mode, 163 login configuration, 72, 74...

  • Page 196

    configuring device login as Telnet client, 46 file, 130 one-step installation, 134 configuring device management, 158 software upgrade by installing patches, 130 configuring device name, 158 status, 130 configuring exception handling method, 164 step-by-step installation, 134 configuring fan ventilation direction, 168 configuring FTP, 84 step-by-step uninstallation, 135 types, 130...

  • Page 197

    displaying directory information, 106 configuring software upgrade, 125, 135 configuring source and destination IP-based Telnet displaying file contents, 107 user login control, 78 displaying file information, 107 configuring source IP-based NMS user login control, displaying FTP, 98 80, 81 displaying ISSU, 147 configuring source IP-based Telnet user login control, displaying software upgrade, 135 displaying system clock, 159...

  • Page 198

    startup configuration file, 123 performing manual ISSU version rollback, 147 performing storage media operations, 109 rollback rebooting device, 164 setting configuration rollback, 1 18 removing directory, 106 running configuration, 1 12 renaming file, 107 RUNNING state (patch status), 133 saving restoring file from recycle bin, 108 restoring startup configuration file, 123 configuration file save mode, 1 16...

  • Page 199

    status (hotfix patch), 130 SNMPv1 (NMS login configuration), 73 SNMPv2c (NMS login configuration), 73 step-by-step patch installation (hotfix), 134, 135 SNMPv3 (NMS login configuration), 74 storage media software upgrade displaying NAND flash memory, 109 configuration, 125, 135 maintaining NAND flash memory, 109 managing space, 109 displaying, 135 hotfix installation, 130...

  • Page 200

    software upgrade with incompatible ISSU, 146 displaying client, 101 executing configuration file from TFTP server, 179 software upgrade with ISSU, 139, 144, 147, 149 ISSU configuration on TFTP server, 151 user obtaining configuration file from TFTP server, 177, configuring source and destination IP-based Telnet login control, 78 request sending mode, 178 configuring source IP-based NMS login control, 80,...

This manual also for:

5820x series, A5820x series, A5800 series

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