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HP A5820X & A5800 Switch Series
IRF
Abstract
This document describes the software features for the HP A Series products and guides you through the
software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration examples to
help you apply software features to different network scenarios.
This documentation is intended for network planners, field technical support and servicing engineers,
and network administrators working with the HP A Series products.
Part number: 5998-1626
Software version: Release 1211
Document version: 5W100-20110430

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   Also See for HP A5820X Series

   Summary of Contents for HP A5820X Series

  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    Configuration Guide Abstract This document describes the software features for the HP A Series products and guides you through the software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration examples to help you apply software features to different network scenarios.

  • Page 2

    The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an...

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    LACP MAD detection-enabled IRF configuration example ················································································ 30 BFD MAD detection-enabled IRF configuration example ·················································································· 32 ARP MAD detection-enabled IRF configuration example ·················································································· 35 Support and other resources ····································································································································· 38 Contacting HP ································································································································································ 38 Subscription service ·············································································································································· 38 Related information ························································································································································ 38 Documents ······························································································································································ 38 Websites ································································································································································...

  • Page 4: Irf Configuration

    IRF configuration Establish an IRF virtual device that comprises switches of the HP A5820X series or A5800 series, or establish a mixed IRF virtual device that comprises both the HP A5820X and A5800 switches. IRF overview The HP proprietary IRF technology creates a large IRF virtual device from multiple switches to provide data center class availability and scalability.

  • Page 5: Application Scenario

    Application scenario Figure 1 shows an IRF virtual device that comprises two switches, which appear as a single node to the upper and lower layer devices. Figure 1 IRF application scenario IP network IP network Slave Master IRF virtual device Equal to IRF link IRF topologies...

  • Page 6

    Basic concepts IRF member switch roles IRF uses two member switch roles: master and subordinate (slave). When switches form an IRF virtual device, they elect a master to manage the IRF virtual device, and all other switches back up the master. When the master switch fails, the other switches automatically elect a new master from among them to avoid service interruption.

  • Page 7: Establishment, Operation, And Maintenance Of An Irf Virtual Device

    Member priority Member priority determines the role that a member switch can play in an IRF virtual device. A member with a higher priority is more likely to be a master. The member priority of a switch is user configurable, and defaults to 1.

  • Page 8

    No location limitation to the physical IRF TAA-compliant Switch panel ports. (JG243A) HP A5820AF-24XG Switch For a complete list of supported SFP+ ports and interface cards, see HP A5800 Switch Series Installation Guide and HP A5820X Switch Series Installation Guide.

  • Page 9

    Table 2 lists the SFP+ transceiver modules, optical fibers, and SFP+ cables available for connecting the physical IRF ports on the HP A5800 and A5820X switches. Table 2 SFP+ transceivers, optical fibers, and SFP+ cables available for physical IRF ports...

  • Page 10: Topology Collection

    Guide. The SFP+ modules and SFP+ cables available for this switch series are subject to change over time. For the most up-to-date list of SFP+ modules and cables, contact HP technical support or marketing staff. Topology collection Each member switch exchanges IRF hello packets with its directly connected neighbors to collect topology data, including IRF port connection states, member IDs, priorities, and bridge MAC addresses.

  • Page 11

    The subslot number is the number of the slot in which the interface card resides. On the A5800 • series or A5820X series, the subslot for the fixed ports on the front panel is numbered 0. If the switch has one expansion slot, the number of the slot is 1. If the switch has two expansion slots, their numbers are 1 and 2, from left to right.

  • Page 12: Irf Multi-active Detection

    <Master> cd slot3#flash:/ <Master> mkdir test %Created dir slot3#flash:/test. To copy the test.app file on the master to the root directory of the Flash on member switch 3, perform the following steps: <Master> pwd slot3#flash: //The current working path is the root directory of the Flash on slave 3. <Master>...

  • Page 13: Irf Virtual Device Configuration Task List

    BFD, see High Availability Configuration Guide. For information about gratuitous ARP, see Layer 3—IP Services Configuration Guide. IRF virtual device configuration task list Before configuring an IRF virtual device, plan the roles and functions of all member switches. HP recommends the configuration procedure in Figure Figure 6 IRF configuration flow chart Connect physical IRF ports with SFP+ cables or fibers after activating IRF port configurations.

  • Page 14: Configuring An Irf Virtual Device

    Task Remarks Configuring load sharing criteria for IRF links Optional. Specifying the preservation time of bridge MAC address Optional. Enabling automatic boot file updating Optional. Setting the IRF link down report delay Optional. Connect the physical IRF ports of devices and make sure that the physical IRF ports are interconnected (a ring connection is recommended).

  • Page 15

    You must assign a domain ID for an IRF virtual device before enabling LACP MAD detection. Although switches with different domain IDs can form an IRF virtual device, HP recommends that you assign the same domain ID to the members of the same IRF virtual device. Otherwise, the LACP MAD detection function cannot function properly.

  • Page 16: Changing The Irf Member Id Of A Switch

    Changing the IRF member ID of a switch CAUTION: Change member ID for the switches in an IRF virtual device with caution. The change might cause configuration change and even data loss. Consider an IRF virtual device that comprises three member switches of the same model with member IDs 1, 2, and 3.

  • Page 17

    To configure an IRF port: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter the view of the port interface interface-type interface- you are binding to the IRF — number port Shut down the port shutdown Required. Return to system view quit —...

  • Page 18: Specifying A Priority For A Member Switch

    Specifying a priority for a member switch The greater the priority value, the higher the priority. A member with a higher priority is more likely to be a master. To specify a priority for a member switch: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view —...

  • Page 19

    | source-mac } * number. • Other models in the A5800 and A5820X series use the combination of the source and destination MAC addresses as the load sharing criteria for Layer 2 packets, and the combination of the source and destination IP addresses for Layer 3 packets.

  • Page 20: Specifying The Preservation Time Of Bridge Mac Address

    | source-mac } * number. • Other models in the A5800 and A5820X series use the combination of source and destination MAC addresses as the load sharing criteria for Layer 2 packets, and the combination of source and destination IP addresses for Layer 3 packets.

  • Page 21: Enabling Automatic Boot File Updating

    To specify the preservation time of the bridge MAC address of an IRF virtual device: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enable the IRF virtual device to preserve its bridge MAC irf mac-address persistent always address permanently even after the master leaves Optional.

  • Page 22: Setting The Irf Link Down Report Delay

    To enable an IRF virtual device to automatically synchronize the boot file of the master to the switch you are adding to the IRF virtual device: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enable automatic upgrade Optional of boot files for an IRF virtual irf auto-update enable...

  • Page 23: Configuring Lacp Mad

    Figure The intermediate switch must be an HP switch capable of handling extended LACPDUs that carry the Active ID field. For more information about LACP and the support of the switch for extended LACPDUs, see Layer 2—LAN Switching Configuration Guide.

  • Page 24

    Figure 8 Network diagram for LACP MAD detection Terminal network Device Dynamic aggregation group on Device, used for LACP MAD detection and forwarding service packets IRF virtual Dynamic aggregation group of device the IRF virtual device, used for LACP MAD detection and forwarding services packets IRF link Slave...

  • Page 25: Configuring Bfd Mad

    To configure LACP MAD detection: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required. Assign a domain ID to the irf domain domain-id By default, the domain ID of an IRF virtual device IRF virtual device is 0. Create a Layer 2 aggregate interface bridge-aggregation interface and enter...

  • Page 26

    When the IRF virtual device operates normally, only the MAD IP address of the master is effective • and the BFD session is down. When the IRF virtual device partitions, the MAD IP addresses of the masters in different IRF virtual •...

  • Page 27

    To configure BFD MAD: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required. Create a new VLAN dedicated for the BFD MAD vlan vlan-id The default VLAN on the device detection is VLAN 1. Return to system view quit —...

  • Page 28

    Configuring ARP MAD CAUTION: If the intermediate device is in an IRF virtual device, you must assign this virtual device a different domain ID than the ARP MAD-enabled virtual device to avoid false detection of IRF partition. ARP MAD detection mechanism With ARP MAD, an IRF member switch sends extended gratuitous ARP packets that convey the domain ID and active ID of the IRF virtual device for detecting an IRF split.

  • Page 29

    Configuring ARP MAD detection To configure ARP MAD: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required. Assign a domain ID to the irf domain domain-id By default, the domain ID of an IRF virtual device IRF virtual device is 0. Required.

  • Page 30

    Physical IRF ports are not shut down when the IRF virtual device transits to recovery state. If a certain VLAN interface is required to go on receiving and sending packets (for example, the VLAN interface is used for remote login) after the IRF virtual device transits to recovery state, you need to configure this VLAN interface and its corresponding Layer 2 Ethernet interface not to shut down when the IRF virtual device transits to recovery state.

  • Page 31: Accessing An Irf Virtual Device

    Figure 12 Recover the IRF virtual device when the IRF link failure occurs and the IRF virtual device in active state fails To manually recover an IRF virtual device in recovery state: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view —...

  • Page 32: Displaying And Maintaining An Irf Virtual Device

    Accessing a slave switch When you log in to an IRF virtual device, actually you log in to the master. The operation interface of the access terminal displays the master console. To print the logs or debugging information of a subordinate switch, redirect to the specified subordinate switch.

  • Page 33: Irf Virtual Device Configuration Examples

    To do… Use the command… Remarks display irf-port load-sharing mode Display the load sharing criteria [ irf-port [ member-id/port-number Available in any view for IRF links ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] display switchover state [ slot Display the master/subordinate member-id ] [ | { begin | exclude Available in any view...

  • Page 34: Configuration Procedure

    addition, for the purpose of LACP MAD, an intermediate device that supports extended LACPDUs must be used. Configuration procedure This example assumes that the system names of Device A, Device B and Device C are DeviceA, DeviceB, and DeviceC, respectively, before the IRF virtual device is formed. Set member IDs # Keep the default member ID of Device A unchanged.

  • Page 35: Bfd Mad Detection-enabled Irf Configuration Example

    Configure LACP MAD detection # Create a dynamic aggregation interface and enable LACP MAD detection. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] interface bridge-aggregation 2 [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] link-aggregation mode dynamic [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] mad enable [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] quit # Add ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 2/0/1 to the aggregation interface and they are dedicated to the LACP MAD detection for Device A and Device B.

  • Page 36

    Figure 14 Network diagram for an IRF virtual device that uses BFD MAD detection Configuration considerations Device A is located at the distribution layer of the network. To improve the forwarding capability at • this layer, additional devices are needed. In this example, Device B is added. To address the requirements for high availability, ease of management and maintenance, use IRF2 •...

  • Page 37

    [DeviceA] interface ten-gigabitethernet 1/0/25 [DeviceA-Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/25] shutdown [DeviceA] irf-port 1/2 [DeviceA-irf-port1/2] port group interface ten-gigabitethernet 1/0/25 [DeviceA-irf-port1/2] quit [DeviceA] interface ten-gigabitethernet 1/0/25 [DeviceA-Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/25] undo shutdown [DeviceA-Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/25] save # Create IRF port 1 on Device B, and bind it to the physical IRF port Ten-GigabitEthernet 2/0/26. Then save the configuration.

  • Page 38

    ARP MAD detection-enabled IRF configuration example Network requirements The network (see Figure 15) is outgrowing the forwarding capability of the existing core switch Device A. To accommodate to business growth, the network must be scaled up to extend its forwarding capability while the present network investments are protected.

  • Page 39

    Power off the two devices and connect IRF links and ARP MAD detection links according to Figure 14. Then power on the two devices. # Create IRF port 2 on Device A, and bind it to the physical IRF port Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/25. Then save the configuration.

  • Page 40

    # Create VLAN-interface 3, assign it an IP address, and enable ARP MAD on the interface. [DeviceA] interface vlan-interface 3 [DeviceA-Vlan-interface3] ip address 192.168.2.1 24 [DeviceA-Vlan-interface3] mad arp enable Configure Device C # Enable MSTP globally on Device C to prevent loops. <DeviceC>...

  • Page 41: Support And Other Resources

    Related information Documents To find related documents, browse to the Manuals page of the HP Business Support Center website: http://www.hp.com/support/manuals For related documentation, navigate to the Networking section, and select a networking category. •...

  • Page 42: Conventions

    Conventions This section describes the conventions used in this documentation set. Command conventions Convention Description Boldface Bold text represents commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown. Italic Italic text represents arguments that you replace with actual values. Square brackets enclose syntax choices (keywords or arguments) that are optional. Braces enclose a set of required syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from which { x | y | ...

  • Page 43

    Network topology icons Represents a generic network device, such as a router, switch, or firewall. Represents a routing-capable device, such as a router or Layer 3 switch. Represents a generic switch, such as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 switch, or a router that supports Layer 2 forwarding and other Layer 2 features.

  • Page 44: Basic Concepts

    IRF multi-active detection, 9 connecting the IRF member switches, 4 IRF overview, 1 connecting the neighbor switches, 6 IRF partition, 3 contacting HP, 38 IRF ports, 3, 13 IRF topologies, 2 description for a member switch, 15 IRF virtual device, 11, 28...

  • Page 45: Table Of Contents

    setting the IRF link down report delay, 19 support and other resources, 38 slave switch, 29 symbols, 39 specifying a priority for a member switch, 15 topology collection, 7 subscription service, 38 websites, 38...

This manual also for:

A5800 series

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