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Cisco NSS2000 - Gigabit Storage System Chassis Administration Manual

Cisco nss2000 series network storage system administration guide.
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ADMINISTRATION
GUIDE
Cisco Small Business
NSS2000 Series Network Storage System

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Table of Contents

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   Summary of Contents for Cisco NSS2000 - Gigabit Storage System Chassis

  • Page 1 ADMINISTRATION GUIDE Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Network Storage System...
  • Page 2 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. OL-17960-01...
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents Chapter 1: Introduction Benefits Using the Help Audience About the NSS Configuration Interface Getting Help Refreshing the GUI Pages Using the Quick Setup Wizards Approved Vendor List for Drives Chapter 2: Managing the System System Alerts Storage Status Network Status Shares Status Backup Status Power Status...
  • Page 4 Contents Changing a VLAN Configuration Removing a VLAN’s Access to the NSS Configuring the NSS Network Identification Configuring DNS or WINS for Name Resolution Joining the NSS to a Network Information System (NIS) Domain Editing Access Control Lists (ACLs) from Windows Explorer: Restrictions Running Diagnostics of your Physical Link Configuring the Network Ports...
  • Page 5 Contents Deleting a Volume Volume Encryption Overview Locking an Encrypted Volume Unlocking a Locked Volume Changing the Password for an Encrypted Volume Storage Options Chapter 5: Setting up End-User Access Managing your NSS Users Creating a User Profile Editing a User Profile Integrating Users from an ADS, NTv4, or NIS Domain Logging into the NSS as a Local User Deleting a User Profile...
  • Page 6 Contents Deleting a Network Filter Configuring the User/Group Ranges and Home Directory Location94 Chapter 6: Managing the Shares Creating a Share Editing an Existing Share Adding a DFS Shared Folder Restrictions using Microsoft DFS from the NSS Setting up CIFS Access Setting up Network Filesystem (NFS) Access Configuring the NSS for FTP Access Creating or Running a Backup of a Share...
  • Page 7 Contents Changing the Administrator Password Chapter 8: Instructing your End-Users Logging into the CIFS Shares with Administrator Privileges Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage using CIFS/SMB Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage through FTP Mac Users: Accessing Storage through CIFS/SMB Mac Users: Accessing Storage through FTP UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through NFS UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through FTP...
  • Page 8 Contents Boosting the Performance of NFS Transfers Appendix B: Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms Appendix C: Environmental Specifications Appendix D: Additional Information Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information Warranty End User License Agreement (EULA) Appendix E: Support Contacts Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...
  • Page 9: Chapter 1: Introduction

    Introduction Thank you for choosing the Cisco Small Business Network Storage System (NSS). Administering a network can be a difficult job. Finding low-cost ways to simplify your data-management tasks means that you have more resources to dedicate elsewhere. The NSS is a Network Attached Storage (NAS) unit that appears as a native file server for the various clients within your network, including Windows, Apple Macintosh, UNIX, and Linux platforms.
  • Page 10: Using The Help

    Introduction Using the Help Using the Help The NSS (Network Storage System) help file provides information about using the configuration interface to configure the NSS. Audience The information contained in these help pages is intended for use by network administrators. It assumes a basic understanding of storage-related concepts, including RAID, filesystems, and networking.
  • Page 11: Refreshing The Gui Pages

    Introduction Using the Help • A context-sensitive help button appears in the upper-right corner of the topic page. Click it to display help on the specific configuration area. For example, if the current configuration topic is about the status of your system, click the Help button for information about the details that appear on the System Status page.
  • Page 12: Using The Quick Setup Wizards

    Introduction Using the Quick Setup Wizards Using the Quick Setup Wizards There are three wizards available from the Manager Menu of the configuration interface: • Initial Setup: This wizard automatically appears when you log into the configuration interface for the first time. Although you can access it at any time from the Manager Menu, if you have saved any configuration settings before you run the wizard, note that running the wizard will erase any saved data.
  • Page 13: Approved Vendor List For Drives

    Introduction Approved Vendor List for Drives Approved Vendor List for Drives If you are purchasing disk drives to install in the NSS, refer to the product support information offered on the Cisco website (www.cisco.com) for a list of recommended disk drives. When you select a disk drive, consider the type of RAID levels required to service your business needs.
  • Page 14: Chapter 2: Managing The System

    Managing the System The System Status page provides an overview of the current operating condition of the NSS. For example, you can view system alert messages such as if a disk drive is failing or has failed, if a volume is approaching its full capacity, and if an array rebuild is complete.
  • Page 15: System Alerts

    Managing the System System Alerts The System Alerts section shows any system messages issued since the last time they were cleared. Messages can range in severity from informational to immediate action required. There are three type of alerts that can appear in this area of the System Status page: •...
  • Page 16: Network Status

    Managing the System Network Status The Network area displays the following: • Link: The current status of the Ethernet link. The only status that is visible is if the link is up. If the link is down, you cannot access the Configuration Manager.
  • Page 17: Power Status

    Managing the System Power Status The Power area displays the following: • UPS: The following options are available depending on the current operating condition of the UPS. For more information about the functioning of the UPS, refer to the UPS documentation. Disabled: A UPS is not currently connected to the NSS or is not enabled.
  • Page 18: Viewing The Hardware Monitor

    Managing the System Viewing the Hardware Monitor Viewing the Hardware Monitor The Hardware Monitor page displays details about the following physical conditions related to the NSS: • Voltages: The current voltage reading for all voltage rails in the system. The reading is color-coded depending on if the voltage level is within specification (green) or out of specification and in need of attention (red).
  • Page 19: Viewing And Managing The System Logs

    Managing the System Viewing and Managing the System Logs Viewing and Managing the System Logs The NSS captures various types of information into log files, such as user access details. You can store the logs locally or on a remote server on the network. Since local space allocated for log files is limited, the logs are overwritten once the space is filled.
  • Page 20 • CIFS Sharing: A time-stamped event log of events initiated by users accessing shares through CIFS. • FTP Access: A time-stamped log of FTP actions, including user logins, file transfers, and user logouts. • All Logs: A concatenation of all the log files. You can download and save this file.
  • Page 21: Configuring The System For Ups Support

    Managing the System Configuring the System for UPS Support Configuring the System for UPS Support The Power Status page provides an overview of the current power condition of the NSS. You can set up the NSS to use an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) if one is connected directly to the UPS port on the NSS.
  • Page 22: Nss-supported Ups Product Families

    Managing the System Configuring the System for UPS Support To enable the UPS: From the Manager Menu, click System Power. STEP 1 The System Power page appears. Select Enable UPS support. STEP 2 Click Update. STEP 3 NSS-supported UPS Product Families The NSS supports the following UPS product families: •...
  • Page 23: Chapter 3: Adding The Nss To Your Network

    Adding the NSS to your Network The Network Device Settings page displays the current status of the NSS’s physical and virtual network interfaces. Physical Interfaces The Network Device Status table displays the current status of the physical Ethernet link connected to the NSS. •...
  • Page 24: Virtual Interfaces

    Adding the NSS to your Network ”Running Diagnostics of your Physical Link” section on page 33). This status is not visible as you cannot access the Configuration Manager when the link has failed. • Speed: The configured speed, in Mbps, of the physical link. Options include: 10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, 1000 Mbps.
  • Page 25: Viewing The Network Settings

    Adding the NSS to your Network Viewing the Network Settings Viewing the Network Settings The Network Device Settings page displays information about the physical and virtual interfaces currently configured on the NSS. NOTE: If you hotplug the Ethernet link after the initial installation of the NSS, make sure you wait 15 seconds between the time you unplug the cable and then plug it back in.
  • Page 26: Configuring The Network Link Ip

    Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the Network Link IP • Assign Via: The method used to assign an IP configuration to the physical or virtual interface. Options include: DHCP: The IP configuration was assigned by a DHCP server. Or, if the interface was configured to use DHCP for IP configuration but no DHCP server was found, the IP address was assigned by the AutoIP protocol.
  • Page 27 Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the Network Link IP Click Edit on the row of the interface you want to configure. STEP 2 The Network Link Configuration page appears. Select one of the following: STEP 3 • Obtain IP Address Automatically: Use a DHCP server to retrieve the IP address, netmask, and gateway address for the interface.
  • Page 28: Resetting The Dhcp Lease On A Link

    Adding the NSS to your Network Resetting the DHCP Lease on a Link Resetting the DHCP Lease on a Link You can force a renewal of the DHCP lease on the physical link or VLAN that is configured for DHCP: From the Manager Menu, click Network STEP 1 The Network IP page appears listing each physical and virtual interface.
  • Page 29: Viewing Vlans Configured On The Nss

    Adding the NSS to your Network Viewing VLANs Configured on the NSS Viewing VLANs Configured on the NSS When you first display the Network VLAN page, the currently configured VLANs appear. Configuring a VLAN to connect to the NSS depends if it is trunk-based or port-based.
  • Page 30: Allowing A Vlan Access To The Nss

    Adding the NSS to your Network Allowing a VLAN Access to the NSS • Priority: The quality of service (QoS) as defined in the IEEE 802. 1 p standard for the VLAN traffic. VLAN Ethernet frames contain a three-bit priority tag ranging from 0 to 7 (where 0 is best effort and 7 is network-critical traffic).
  • Page 31 Adding the NSS to your Network Allowing a VLAN Access to the NSS • Link: This shows as "1" for the Ethernet link. • VLAN: Enter the ID of the VLAN as it is defined within your network. The range of valid VLAN IDs is from 1 to 4095. •...
  • Page 32: Changing A Vlan Configuration

    Adding the NSS to your Network Changing a VLAN Configuration Click one of the following, depending on how you want to assign the VLAN IP STEP 6 addressing: • Obtain IP Address Automatically: Use a DHCP server to retrieve the IP address, netmask address, and gateway address for the VLAN.
  • Page 33: Removing A Vlan's Access To The Nss

    Adding the NSS to your Network Removing a VLAN’s Access to the NSS The Edit VLAN page appears. Make changes to any of the VLAN configuration fields as required. STEP 3 Click Update. STEP 4 Removing a VLAN’s Access to the NSS All connected VLANs appear when you first display the VLAN Configuration page.
  • Page 34 Adding the NSS to your Network Removing a VLAN’s Access to the NSS From the Manager Menu, click Network VLAN. STEP 1 The VLAN Configuration page appears. From the VLAN Configuration table, click Delete for the VLAN you want to remove. STEP 2 The VLAN disappears from the VLAN Configuration table and can no longer access the NSS.
  • Page 35: Configuring The Nss Network Identification

    Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the NSS Network Identification Configuring the NSS Network Identification The Network Identification page is where you configure the network identity of the NSS, including the hostname and domain membership. Before you join the NSS to an NTv4 or Active Directory Service (ADS) domain, do NOTE the following: —...
  • Page 36 Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the NSS Network Identification From the Manager Menu, click Network Identification. STEP 1 The Network Identification page appears. In the Hostname field, enter the name you want to use for the NSS. Note any STEP 2 special naming restrictions or conventions enforced by the domain(s) into which the NSS is being joined.
  • Page 37 Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the NSS Network Identification • Workgroup: Make the NSS part of a peer-to-peer network. • NTv4 Domain: Make the NSS a part of a pre-Windows 2000 domain. If you select this option, set up the following fields: NTv4 Domain: Enter the domain name.
  • Page 38: Configuring Dns Or Wins For Name Resolution

    Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring DNS or WINS for Name Resolution Click Update. STEP 6 If you configured the NSS to join a domain, when you click Update, the domain join occurs. The NSS configuration interface displays the status of the domain join (that is, successful or not successful).
  • Page 39 Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring DNS or WINS for Name Resolution Based on your network setup, configure the following fields: STEP 2 • Search Domain: Enter the address of the DNS search domain accessible by the NSS. For example, "mycompany.com". •...
  • Page 40: Joining The Nss To A Network Information System (nis) Domain

    Adding the NSS to your Network Joining the NSS to a Network Information System (NIS) Domain Joining the NSS to a Network Information System (NIS) Domain To join the NSS to a NIS domain, you need to configure and enable it. NOTE: Before you join a NIS domain, make sure you set up or make changes to the NIS domain users and groups ID range on the User/...
  • Page 41: Editing Access Control Lists (acls) From Windows Explorer: Restrictions

    Adding the NSS to your Network Running Diagnostics of your Physical Link • Broadcast for NIS Server: Click this option to have the NSS search until it finds the NIS server on the network. • Use the following NIS Servers: To manually identify the NIS server you want the NSS to use, click this option, and then enter the address of up to three different NIS servers.
  • Page 42: Configuring The Network Ports

    Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the Network Ports From the Manager Menu, click Network Diagnostics. STEP 1 The Network Diagnostics page appears. View the Link Status area for the test result. If the link is down, you cannot access STEP 2 the Configuration Manager.
  • Page 43 Adding the NSS to your Network Configuring the Network Ports To set up the network services: From the Manager Menu, click Network Ports. STEP 1 The Network Ports Configuration page appears. Change the port assignment for any of the following service types: STEP 2 •...
  • Page 44: Setting Up The Ethernet Frame Size & Advertising Modes

    Adding the NSS to your Network Setting up the Ethernet Frame Size & Advertising Modes Setting up the Ethernet Frame Size & Advertising Modes The Network Properties page lets you set the Ethernet frame size and determine how you want to advertise the presence of the NSS within your network. To configure the network properties: From the Manager Menu, click Network Properties.
  • Page 45 Adding the NSS to your Network Setting up the Ethernet Frame Size & Advertising Modes Click Update. STEP 5 Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...
  • Page 46: Chapter 4: Configuring Your Storage

    Configuring your Storage The Storage Status page shows the current state of the disk drives, arrays, and volumes currently installed or exported to the NSS. You can also view the S.M.A.R.T. health report for each physical disk. To display the Storage Status page, from the Manager Menu, click Storage Status.
  • Page 47: Raid Arrays Table

    Configuring your Storage • Model: The model of the disk drive. This information is read from the disk drive. • Size: The size of the disk drive. • Health: The system monitors each disk drive and reports the condition of the disk drive.
  • Page 48: Volumes Table

    Configuring your Storage Degraded: For RAID arrays with redundancy (i.e., RAID levels 1), one or more of the redundant disk drives is removed from the system or is failed. In this state, the array is fully recoverable. The status is color- coded orange.
  • Page 49: Usb Storage Status

    Configuring your Storage USB Storage Status If you mount a USB flash device by inserting it into the AUX-1 port on the back of the chassis, the USB Storage Status table appears. If there is no USB flash device mounted, the USB Storage Status table does not appear. You can use the USB flash device to save a backup of the configuration file.
  • Page 50: Managing Raid Arrays

    Configuring your Storage Managing RAID Arrays Managing RAID Arrays RAID is an acronym for Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks. In storage environments, a RAID array uses multiple physical disk drives to create a single logical unit from which data can be shared or replicated between the drives. A RAID array also simplifies the data management as the data appears in one logical unit.
  • Page 51 Configuring your Storage Choosing a RAID Array Level RAID, referred to as RAID levels. Some RAID levels increase the performance of the array, some increase the reliability, and others do a mixture of both. The NSS supports the following RAID levels: 0 and 1. The NSS also supports JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks), which is technically not a RAID level.
  • Page 52 Configuring your Storage Choosing a RAID Array Level JBOD: JBOD lets you combine multiple disks of mixed capacities into a single logical storage device. The capacity of the JBOD array is the sum of the total capacities of the individual component disks (that is, it does not have the limitation of RAID0 where you lose some capacity when using mixed sized disks).
  • Page 53: Creating A Raid Array

    Configuring your Storage Creating a RAID Array Creating a RAID Array After you install the physical disks, you can create the RAID arrays. Before you create a RAID array, either for the first time, or when you are rebuilding it as a result of failed disks in the array, it is a good idea to set the Rebuild Priority (see ”Storage Options”...
  • Page 54: Deleting An Array

    Configuring your Storage Deleting an Array The available disks appear in the New RAID Device table. Select each disk that STEP 2 you want to include in the array. From the RAID Level drop-down menu, click the RAID level of the RAID array you STEP 3 want to create.
  • Page 55 Configuring your Storage Deleting an Array To delete an existing array: From the Manager Menu, click Storage RAID. STEP 1 Click Delete in the row of the RAID array that you want to delete. STEP 2 A warning message appears. To continue, click OK.
  • Page 56: Migrating A Raid Array To Another Storage Device

    Configuring your Storage Migrating a RAID Array to another Storage Device Migrating a RAID Array to another Storage Device After you build a RAID array, you can migrate it to a different NSS as required. Note that you cannot migrate a RAID to or from the NSS4000. You can migrate a RAID array to or from any of the other NSS models.
  • Page 57: Virtualizing Storage Within Your Network

    Configuring your Storage Virtualizing Storage within your Network Virtualizing Storage within your Network NOTE: After you configure a virtual RAID, you cannot migrate the disks used for that RAID to another NSS. You also cannot export storage from a device that uses imported storage. Currently Exported Storage When you display the Storage Virtualization page, the Currently Exported Storage table appears.
  • Page 58: Exporting Storage To Your Network

    Configuring your Storage Exporting Storage to your Network Exporting Storage to your Network If you have multiple NSS units in your network, you can easily export the storage to form a large, logical storage unit that can be managed from the master NSS. The first step in creating virtualized storage is to export the disk(s) or array to the network.
  • Page 59: Creating Virtualized Storage

    Configuring your Storage Creating Virtualized Storage From the Export a device area, select each device that you want to export from the STEP 3 list of available devices. From the Link field, select the physical link that you want to use to export the STEP 4 storage.
  • Page 60 Configuring your Storage Creating Virtualized Storage The RAID page appears Exported disks from other NSS units in the network appear in the New RAID Device table. From the New RAID Device table, click the disks or arrays that you want to include STEP 3 in the JBOD.
  • Page 61: Unexporting Storage

    Configuring your Storage Unexporting Storage Unexporting Storage You can choose to unexport pieces of the storage currently exported to the network. Note that you can only unexport storage that has not yet been used. To unexport a piece of storage: From the Master device, delete any RAID arrays (see the ”Deleting an Array”...
  • Page 62: Volume Management

    Configuring your Storage Volume Management Volume Management A volume is a way to partition storage space available on an array. The Storage Volumes page shows the following details about configured volumes or create additional volumes. The Volumes table displays the following: •...
  • Page 63: Creating A Volume

    Configuring your Storage Creating a Volume Creating a Volume After you define at least one RAID array, you can create a volume. You need to create at least one volume before you can create users, groups, or shares. To create a volume: From the Manager Menu, click Storage Volumes.
  • Page 64 Configuring your Storage Creating a Volume enter in this field due to filesystem overhead. The minimum volume size is 32 MB. Volume sizes are rounded down to the nearest 32 MB increment. NOTE: Once the volume is created, you can expand the volume but you cannot reduce its size.
  • Page 65: Expanding A Volume

    Configuring your Storage Expanding a Volume Expanding a Volume After a volume is created, you can increase its size, provided there is available space on the array. To increase the size of a volume: From the Manager Menu, click Storage Volumes.
  • Page 66 The Grow File System page appears for the selected volume. In the Resize by field, select one of the following: STEP 3 • Grow By: Select this option to add the space allocated in the Size field to the existing space for the volume. For example, if the volume currently has 224 MB of space and you want to add another 224 MB, select "Grow By", then enter 224 in the Size field, and then set the unit field to MB.
  • Page 67: Deleting A Volume

    Configuring your Storage Deleting a Volume Deleting a Volume You can choose to delete a volume at any time. CAUTION: Deleting the volume removes any shares or data currently saved to that volume. If the volume was assigned as the users’ Home Directory Location, you must reassign the Home Directory Location to another volume.
  • Page 68: Volume Encryption Overview

    Configuring your Storage Volume Encryption Overview Volume Encryption Overview The Volumes page lists both the encrypted and unencrypted volumes and lets you create a volume, and lock, unlock, or change the password for encrypted volumes. NOTE: File transfer performance to encrypted volumes is generally lower than non-encrypted volumes.
  • Page 69: Locking An Encrypted Volume

    Configuring your Storage Locking an Encrypted Volume Locking an Encrypted Volume You can manually lock an encrypted volume at any time. Locking a volume means that it becomes unmounted and is unusable (you cannot create or use shares stored on the locked volume). This provides an extra layer of security against the theft of data.
  • Page 70: Unlocking A Locked Volume

    Configuring your Storage Unlocking a Locked Volume Unlocking a Locked Volume When an encrypted volume is locked, either automatically as a result of the NSS being rebooted or manually locked through the configuration interface, you must unlock it before it can be used for tasks such as creating shares or quotas. To unlock a volume: From the Manager Menu, click Storage Volumes.
  • Page 71: Changing The Password For An Encrypted Volume

    Configuring your Storage Changing the Password for an Encrypted Volume Enter the password for the volume in the Password field. STEP 3 Click OK. STEP 4 The Volume Encryption page appears. The volume is now unlocked. Changing the Password for an Encrypted Volume A password must be set up when you create an encrypted volume.
  • Page 72 Configuring your Storage Changing the Password for an Encrypted Volume From the Manager Menu, click Storage Volumes. STEP 1 The Volumes page appears. Click Edit for the volume you want to change. STEP 2 The Edit Volume page appears. Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...
  • Page 73: Storage Options

    Configuring your Storage Storage Options In Current Password field, enter the password. STEP 3 In the New Password field, enter the new password. The password can be any STEP 4 alphanumeric characters (with the exception of the ";" | " , and "&"). It cannot contain any spaces and must be a minimum of one character (no maximum).
  • Page 74 Configuring your Storage Storage Options • Degraded Mode Grace Period: Set the period of time after which the system automatically shuts down degraded arrays. You can manually restart a RAID array that has been automatically stopped by the degraded mode management feature. Warning messages are sent out periodically while the RAID array is degraded.
  • Page 75: Chapter 5: Setting Up End-user Access

    Setting up End-User Access The Access Status page shows the current end-user connections to the NSS, grouped by the file-sharing protocol used. The page displays the username, the name of the host from which the user is currently connected, and the share or path that the user is accessing.
  • Page 76: Managing Your Nss Users

    Setting up End-User Access Managing your NSS Users Managing your NSS Users You can create, view, and maintain the list of users who can access the NSS. The Configured Users page displays the Configured Users table. This table lists each defined user whether the user was created locally via the NSS configuration interface or imported from an NTv4, Active Directory, or NIS domain.
  • Page 77 Setting up End-User Access Creating a User Profile From the Manager Menu, click Access Users. STEP 1 The Configured Users page appears. Users created from the NSS configuration interface and provided by the ADS, NTv4, or NIS domain appear in the Configured Users table. Click Add to create a user.
  • Page 78 Setting up End-User Access Creating a User Profile Assign a password by entering any valid (ASCII table) characters in the Password STEP 5 field. The password is required. To verify the password, re-enter it in the Confirm Password field. STEP 6 NOTE: All password changes to end-user accounts set up through the NSS configuration pages must be made by the administrator.
  • Page 79: Editing A User Profile

    Setting up End-User Access Editing a User Profile Editing a User Profile You can change certain aspects of the user’s profile. Note that once you create a username, the only way to "rename" that user is to delete the existing user profile and then create a new one.
  • Page 80: Integrating Users From An Ads, Ntv4, Or Nis Domain

    Setting up End-User Access Integrating Users from an ADS, NTv4, or NIS Domain The end user’s profile appears in the Edit User page. The username is read-only. You can make changes to any of the other fields in the STEP 3 user’s profile.
  • Page 81: Logging Into The Nss As A Local User

    Setting up End-User Access Deleting a User Profile Logging into the NSS as a Local User When the NSS is joined to an NTv4 or ADS domain, local users must prefix their username with the hostname of the NSS. Users who log in without the hostname prefix are automatically assumed to be domain users.
  • Page 82: Working With Groups

    Setting up End-User Access Working with Groups • Shift-click: To select a contiguous group of users that you want to delete, hold down the Shift key, then click the first user, and then the last user in the series. Click Delete to delete the highlighted users. •...
  • Page 83 Setting up End-User Access Creating a Group From the Manager Menu, click Access Groups. STEP 1 The Configured Groups page appears. Click Add. STEP 2 The New Group page appears. In the Group Name field, type the name you want to assign to the group. The name STEP 3 can only contain lower-case alphanumeric characters and underscores (i.e., a-z, 0- 9, _) to a maximum of 32 characters.
  • Page 84: Changing The Users Assigned To A Group

    Setting up End-User Access Changing the Users Assigned to a Group Move the users you want to assign to the group from the Users Available list to the STEP 4 Users in Group list. Note that a user can be assigned to multiple groups. (The single angled bracket "<"...
  • Page 85: Integrating Groups From An Active Directory, Ntv4, Or Nis Domain

    Setting up End-User Access Integrating Groups from an Active Directory, NTv4, or NIS Domain Click Edit. STEP 3 The Edit Group page appears. Set up the Users in Group list as required. (The single angled bracket "<" or ">" STEP 4 moves the selection in the direction of the bracket.
  • Page 86: Deleting A Group

    Setting up End-User Access Deleting a Group Deleting a Group When you delete a group, the group is automatically removed from having access to any configured shares. To delete a group: From the Manager Menu, click Access Groups. STEP 1 The Configured Groups page appears.
  • Page 87: Managing Volume Quotas

    Setting up End-User Access Managing Volume Quotas Managing Volume Quotas You can set up specific space limits for each user or group who has write access to a volume. Defining a user or group’s quota means that you can set a space limit (referred to as a soft quota) that, when reached, sends a warning to the administrator and initiates a countdown of the defined grace period.
  • Page 88: About The Volume Quota Page

    Setting up End-User Access Creating Volume Quota for a User or Group About the Volume Quota Page The Volume Quota page is where you manage user and group quotas for each volume. To display the Volume Quota page, from the Manager Menu, click Access Quota.
  • Page 89 Setting up End-User Access Creating Volume Quota for a User or Group To create a quota for a user or group: From the Manager Menu, click Access Quota. STEP 1 The Filesystem Quota page appears. Click Create Quota. STEP 2 The New Filesystem Quota page appears.
  • Page 90 Setting up End-User Access Creating Volume Quota for a User or Group Select the user or group for which you are creating the quota from the For User/ STEP 4 Group drop-down list. In the Warning at field, enter the threshold of space that, when exceeded, triggers STEP 5 a warning that the quota is close to being used up.
  • Page 91: Setting Up The Grace Period For A Volume Quota

    Setting up End-User Access Setting up the Grace Period for a Volume Quota Setting up the Grace Period for a Volume Quota You can set up a limit on the amount of space available to your users or groups. This limit can be set as a soft quota and hard quota. When the users reach their "soft quota", a warning is issued and the grace period begins.
  • Page 92: Changing A Volume Quota For A User Or Group

    Setting up End-User Access Changing a Volume Quota for a User or Group to warn the user or group that they have reached their soft limit and have three days to reduce it, enter "3" and then select "days". Normally, when the quota is under the limit, it appears in black type.
  • Page 93 Setting up End-User Access Changing a Volume Quota for a User or Group Click Edit for the user or group for which you want to change the quota. STEP 2 The Edit Quota page appears. Make the required changes to the soft (warning) or hard quota (space limit) limits. STEP 3 Click Update.
  • Page 94: Clearing A Quota

    Setting up End-User Access Clearing a Quota Clearing a Quota After a quota has been set up, you can clear it. Clearing a quota means that the user or group no longer has a space limitation on their use of the associated volume (other than the actual unused storage space on the volume).
  • Page 95: Network Filters Overview

    Setting up End-User Access Network Filters Overview Network Filters Overview In addition to providing storage for your data, the NSS provides a configurable firewall to protect that data. Defining network filters lets you specify which network hosts have access to the NSS via the various supported protocols. To view the network filters: From the Manager Menu, click Access Network.
  • Page 96: Defining The Default Network Policy

    Setting up End-User Access Defining the Default Network Policy Defining the Default Network Policy The default network policy is the overarching policy that defines the gateway for communication to the NSS. It specifies how traffic that is not covered by defined filters is handled.
  • Page 97: Creating A Network Filter

    Setting up End-User Access Creating a Network Filter select those filters that "allow" certain types of connections. For example, you might only want to allow FTP connections. NOTE: If you set the default policy to Drop and you want to enable FTP connections, make sure you set the FTP connection type on the host to "active".
  • Page 98 Setting up End-User Access Creating a Network Filter To add a network filter: From the Manager Menu, click Access Network. STEP 1 The Network Filters page appears. From the New Network Access Filter table, type the IP/MAC address to which you STEP 2 are applying the filter, in the IP/MAC address field.
  • Page 99: Available Access Filters

    Setting up End-User Access Available Access Filters Available Access Filters When you configure network filters, determine which protocols can or cannot access the NSS. To display the list of available filters, click the drop-down arrow next to the Filter field on the Network Filters page. NOTE: Rejecting versus Dropping Traffic: When incoming traffic matches a "reject"...
  • Page 100 Setting up End-User Access Available Access Filters • Allow FTP: Allow FTP access. • Allow FTPS: Allow FTPS access. • Allow HTTP: Allow access to the NSS configuration interface via a Web browser via HTTP. • Allow HTTPS: Allow access to the NSS configuration interface via a Web browser via HTTPS.
  • Page 101: Deleting A Network Filter

    Setting up End-User Access Deleting a Network Filter • Drop HTTP: Do not allow access to the NSS configuration interface via a Web browser through HTTP. The NSS does not inform the system initiating the connection about the denial of service. •...
  • Page 102 Setting up End-User Access Configuring the User/Group Ranges and Home Directory Location Configuring the User/Group Ranges and Home Directory Location To avoid conflicts between your user and group IDs, it is important to set up the ranges for the various types of users and groups (i.e., local, NIS domain, and Windows domain).
  • Page 103 Setting up End-User Access Configuring the User/Group Ranges and Home Directory Location • Windows Domain Users and Groups ID Range: This ID range must be at least 10,000 in size. Users and groups from your NTv4 and ADS domain are mapped to local user or group IDs within this range.
  • Page 104: Chapter 6: Managing The Shares

    Managing the Shares To display a list of your defined file shares, from the Manager Menu, click Shares Shares. The File Shares page appears. This page displays read-only details about the shares currently defined on the NSS. You can add new shares by clicking the Create Share button.
  • Page 105: Creating A Share

    Managing the Shares Creating a Share Creating a Share After you define at least one volume, you can create the shares that can be accessed by your users when they log into the NSS. There is a limit of 21 users and groups (the combined total) that you can assign access privileges to a share.
  • Page 106 Managing the Shares Creating a Share To add a share: From the Manager Menu, click Shares Shares. STEP 1 Click Create Share. STEP 2 The New Share page appears. In the Share field, enter a name for the share. STEP 3 From the Location field, select the volume on which you want to configure the STEP 4 share.
  • Page 107 Managing the Shares Creating a Share • Public: Enable all users to access the share. To make an NFS share world readable/writable, select this checkbox, and ensure the Read-Only checkbox is also deselected. To make an NFS share world readable, select this checkbox, and ensure the Read-Only checkbox is selected.
  • Page 108 Managing the Shares Creating a Share then attempts to delete it and replace it with the new version. Not all applications work this way. It is important to consider the applications used by your users to determine how you want to set this field. •...
  • Page 109 Managing the Shares Creating a Share To assign a group access to the share, move the users into one of the following STEP 11 boxes. (The single angled bracket "<" or ">" moves the selection in the direction of the bracket. The double angled bracket "<<" or ">>" moves the entire list in the direction of the bracket.) •...
  • Page 110: Editing An Existing Share

    Managing the Shares Editing an Existing Share Editing an Existing Share After a share is created, you can make changes to it, such as changing user or group permissions, changing the share attributes, and adding a DFS shared folder for shares set up to be a DFS root. There is a limit of 21 users and groups (the combined total) that you can assign access privileges to a share.
  • Page 111 Managing the Shares Editing an Existing Share attempts to delete it and replace it with the new version. Not all applications work this way. It is important to consider the applications used by your users to determine how you want to set this field. •...
  • Page 112 Managing the Shares Editing an Existing Share • Everyone Writable: All authenticated users have read-write permissions for the file. From the Protocol field, click the checkboxes to select the protocols that can be STEP 7 used to access the share: •...
  • Page 113: Adding A Dfs Shared Folder

    Managing the Shares Adding a DFS Shared Folder Adding a DFS Shared Folder Microsoft DFS lets users within your network easily access data stored on multiple remote computers. Through DFS, your users can view and access shares through a familiar, unified folder hierarchy, even when those resources are located on different servers.
  • Page 114 Managing the Shares Adding a DFS Shared Folder The Edit Share page appears. Click Add Shared Folder. STEP 4 The Add Folder page appears. Select one of the following: STEP 5 • Add a Folder to DFS: Select this option to create a single DFS shared folder. Fill in the following fields from the Add DFS Shared Folder table: Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...
  • Page 115: Restrictions Using Microsoft Dfs From The Nss

    Managing the Shares Adding a DFS Shared Folder Link Name: This is the name of the link that appears as a folder within the share. When users click this link, they are redirected to the target share on the remote server. Enter any name of up to 255 characters. Server Name: Enter the name of the remote server on which the target share is located.
  • Page 116: Setting Up Cifs Access

    Managing the Shares Setting up CIFS Access • Windows Operating System Version: MSDFS is not supported by Windows 98 clients. • Windows Clients must be Restarted: After you set up a DFS root, any Windows clients that were connected must be restarted. Setting up CIFS Access Although you cannot globally disable CIFS as you can for NFS and FTP, you can allow or disallow CIFS access on a per-share basis.
  • Page 117: Setting Up Network Filesystem (nfs) Access

    Managing the Shares Setting up Network Filesystem (NFS) Access Setting up Network Filesystem (NFS) Access The first step to enable NFS access to the NSS is to enable it globally. You then need to enable it on a per-share basis. NOTE: The NSS only supports NFSv3.
  • Page 118: Configuring The Nss For Ftp Access

    Managing the Shares Configuring the NSS for FTP Access sent immediately. The benefit of enabling this feature is that it is more efficient. The downside of enabling this feature is that there is a potential for permanent data loss should the NSS suffer an unexpected power loss or if the NFS client crashes. Click Update.
  • Page 119 Managing the Shares Configuring the NSS for FTP Access From the Manager Menu, click Shares FTP Setup. STEP 1 The FTP Setup page appears. To enable FTP, click Enable FTP. This enables both FTP and FTPS access and STEP 2 activates the remaining FTP configuration settings on this page.
  • Page 120 Managing the Shares Configuring the NSS for FTP Access To set a maximum transfer rate for anonymous users, enter it in KB/s in the STEP 9 Maximum Anonymous Transfer Rate field. For no maximum, set the rate as 0. To disconnect the FTP connection after a period of time when the connection is STEP 10 idle, select the number of minutes in the Disconnect Idle Sessions drop-down menu.
  • Page 121 Managing the Shares Configuring the NSS for FTP Access • Select this field: By selecting this field, users with write permissions can rename or delete files or folders within the assigned share even though they are not the owners of the files or folders. •...
  • Page 122: Creating Or Running A Backup Of A Share

    Managing the Shares Creating or Running a Backup of a Share Creating or Running a Backup of a Share The Scheduled Backup page displays any backups that have been configured. It lets you schedule further backups or initiate a manual backup. Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...
  • Page 123: Creating A Scheduled Backup For A Share

    Managing the Shares Creating a Scheduled Backup for a Share Creating a Scheduled Backup for a Share You can quickly configure a backup to run at a scheduled time interval for a share or group of shares. The backup can be saved to a remote CIFS server or to another share on the NSS.
  • Page 124 Managing the Shares Creating a Scheduled Backup for a Share To create a compressed backup, check Compress backup image. STEP 5 Note: Compressed backup images are smaller than non-compressed images but take longer to create. Click Next. STEP 6 The Select Backup Schedule page appears. Select the backup frequency as one of the following: STEP 7 •...
  • Page 125: Initiating A Backup For A Share

    Managing the Shares Initiating a Backup for a Share Initiating a Backup for a Share You can initiate a backup on a share or group of shares at any time. You can save the backup to a remote CIFS server or to another share on the NSS. To initiate a backup manually: From the Manager Menu, click Shares Backup.
  • Page 126: Deleting Backup Images

    Managing the Shares Deleting Backup Images Click one of the following to determine the destination for the backup: STEP 4 • Remote CIFS Filer: To save the backup on a remote CIFS server, click this option and then configure the hostname of the remote server, the remote share, as well as the login information to that share.
  • Page 127: Configuring The Connection Profile

    Managing the Shares Configuring the Connection Profile Configuring the Connection Profile The NSS has a default connection profile (maximum number of simultaneous CIFS and FTP connections) that is appropriate for normal filesharing use. If you use the NSS primarily to store security images and have more than two IP cameras accessing the NSS at one time, you can set the connection profile to allow a greater number of simultaneous FTP connections and less simultaneous CIFS connections.
  • Page 128: Chapter 7: Maintaining The Nss

    Maintaining the NSS There are a number of maintenance tasks that you can do from the System Details page. • Rebooting or Shutting down the system. See ”Rebooting or Shutting Down the NSS” section on page121. • Upgrading the firmware. See ”Upgrading the NSS Firmware”...
  • Page 129: Rebooting Or Shutting Down The Nss

    Maintaining the NSS Rebooting or Shutting Down the NSS Rebooting or Shutting Down the NSS In situations where you might need to reboot or shut down the NSS, note that doing so disconnects all active user sessions. If the power to the NSS is interrupted unexpectedly (i.e., an unclean shutdown), your system settings might become corrupted.
  • Page 130: Upgrading The Nss Firmware

    Maintaining the NSS Upgrading the NSS Firmware • Shut Down System: This does a "clean" shutdown of the NSS. You can also shut down the NSS to: Restore the network setting system defaults: You need to do this if the configuration interface becomes inaccessible.
  • Page 131 Maintaining the NSS Upgrading the NSS Firmware • The firmware must be installed in a specific order if upgrading within a virtualized setup. CAUTION: When you upgrade the firmware, avoid using a wireless connection to the NSS as wireless connections can be unreliable and cause image corruption.
  • Page 132 Maintaining the NSS Upgrading the NSS Firmware Click Upgrade Firmware to initiate the upgrade process. During the upgrade, the STEP 5 Power LED alternates from yellow to green. When the firmware upgrade completes, the system automatically reboots. Wait STEP 6 until the Power LED is solid green before you log back into the configuration interface.
  • Page 133: Restoring The Factory Default Configuration

    Maintaining the NSS Restoring the Factory Default Configuration Restoring the Factory Default Configuration There are two ways to restore configuration settings when you run into a problem with the NSS: preserve the specific storage configuration but restore everything else to factory defaults, or reset just the network settings so that you can log into the NSS configuration interface.
  • Page 134: Managing The Nss Configuration

    Maintaining the NSS Managing the NSS Configuration • Reset the Network Settings to Enable you to Access the Configuration Interface: If there is a problem with the NSS that results in your not being able to access the NSS configuration interface, you might need to reset the network settings.
  • Page 135: Saving The Current Configuration

    Maintaining the NSS Saving the Current Configuration Configuration Manager page. After you mount the USB flash device by inserting it into the AUX-1 port, make sure you unmount the USB flash device before you remove it. (To unmount the USB flash device, display the Storage Status page and then click Unmount.) To display the Configuration Manager page, from the Manager Menu, click Admin Configuration.
  • Page 136 Maintaining the NSS Saving the Current Configuration If you are saving the configuration file to a USB flash device, insert a USB flash STEP 1 device into the AUX-1 port on the NSS chassis. From the Manager Menu, click Admin Configuration.
  • Page 137 Maintaining the NSS Saving the Current Configuration If you saved the file to the USB flash device, display the Storage Status page. STEP 6 Click Unmount. STEP 7 NOTE: Removing the USB flash device in a mounted state means that you risk causing file or filesystem corruption.
  • Page 138: Restoring A Configuration File

    Maintaining the NSS Restoring a Configuration File Restoring a Configuration File You can easily overwrite the current configuration settings with the configuration settings in a saved configuration file. NOTE: If you restore a configuration file that was saved in an older version of the NSS firmware than the current version, check the settings after you restore the file to ensure they were updated correctly.
  • Page 139 Maintaining the NSS Restoring a Configuration File Click Restore. STEP 5 A list of saved configuration files appear. Each saved configuration file is named according to the time and date it was saved. The naming format is: HH.MM.SS.NN.DD.YY.tar.gz where HH = hour, MM=minute, SS=second, NN=month, DD=day, and YY=year.
  • Page 140 Maintaining the NSS Restoring a Configuration File If you saved the file to the USB flash device, display the Storage Status page. STEP 11 Click Unmount. STEP 12 NOTE: Removing the USB flash device in a mounted state means that you risk causing file or filesystem corruption.
  • Page 141: Deleting A Configuration File

    Maintaining the NSS Deleting a Configuration File Deleting a Configuration File Each time you save a configuration file, a copy of it is time and date stamped and saved to the specified location. You can choose to delete a configuration file. To delete a configuration file: From the Manager Menu, click Admin Configuration.
  • Page 142: Configuring The Timing Settings

    Maintaining the NSS Configuring the Timing Settings Configuring the Timing Settings When you first configure the NSS, ensure that the NSS has successfully synchronized the time with the NTP server. When the NSS is synchronizing with the NTP time server, the "Synchronizing time with NTP server" message appears and the Update button is grayed out.
  • Page 143: Configuring The Email Alerts For A Recipient

    Maintaining the NSS Configuring the Email Alerts for a Recipient If your DHCP server is configured to provide NTP settings, select "Assign STEP 3 automatically via DHCP". If not, manually configure the NTP settings. In the NTP Server fields, enter the IP address or hostname for the NTP servers you wish to synchronize.
  • Page 144 Maintaining the NSS Configuring the Email Alerts for a Recipient From the Manager Menu, click Admin Email Alerts. STEP 1 The Email Alerts page appears. Enter the SMTP server IP address or name in the SMTP Server field. STEP 2 In the From Address field, enter the email address that you want to appear in the from: field of the STEP 3 email header of each email alert.
  • Page 145: Changing The Email Alerts For A Recipient

    Maintaining the NSS Changing the Email Alerts for a Recipient Click Add. Click Test All to send a test notification for all checked options to the STEP 6 defined recipients. Changing the Email Alerts for a Recipient After you define a recipient to receive email alerts, you can only edit the alert profile by first deleting the existing profile and then recreating it.
  • Page 146: Deleting An Email Alert Recipient Profile

    Maintaining the NSS Deleting an Email Alert Recipient Profile Deleting an Email Alert Recipient Profile To stop sending all email alerts to a user, you can delete the profile at any time. This is also one of the steps you must take if you want to make changes to the types of email alerts the user receives.
  • Page 147: Configuring Snmp Alerts

    Maintaining the NSS Configuring SNMP Alerts Configuring SNMP Alerts The NSS can send SNMP traps to alert you of various system events. If you download and install the NSS’s SNMP MIB, you get a more human readable version of alerts displayed on your SNMP management station. To define SNMP Trapsinks: From the Manager Menu, click Admin SNMP.
  • Page 148 Maintaining the NSS Configuring SNMP Alerts advises the time at which the RAID will be deactivated), 3) a RAID goes into a failed state, 4) a RAID is deactivated, 5) a RAID is rebuilt, 6) a RAID is created. • Quota: When a user or group is over their quota.
  • Page 149: Changing The Administrator Password

    Maintaining the NSS Changing the Administrator Password Changing the Administrator Password You should change the administrator password from the default to ensure that only authorized individuals can access the NSS configuration interface. If you forget the administrator password, you can only reset it by pressing the Reset button on the NSS chassis and restoring the factory defaults.
  • Page 150: Chapter 8: Instructing Your End-users

    Instructing your End-Users End users, using a Windows, UNIX, Linux, or Mac computer can easily access NSS storage. Once the end user logs into the NSS using their username and password, the shares to which the end user has read or read-write privileges appear. The NSS supports three file-sharing protocols: CIFS, NFS, and FTP.
  • Page 151: Windows Users: Accessing The Nss Storage Using Cifs/smb

    Instructing your End-Users Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage using CIFS/SMB Click OK. STEP 3 Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage using CIFS/SMB Windows users who have a user profile set up can access any shares to which they have privileges on the NSS storage using CIFS/SMB. To access the NSS storage using CIFS/SMB: There are a variety of ways to access the NSS: STEP 1...
  • Page 152: Windows Users: Accessing The Nss Storage Through Ftp

    Instructing your End-Users Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage through FTP The Windows Explorer window opens with a directory listing of the available shares. Depending on your privileges to the share, you can begin using the NSS storage. STEP 4 Windows Users: Accessing the NSS Storage through FTP Windows users who have a user profile set up can access any shares to which they have privileges on the NSS storage using CIFS/SMB or FTP.
  • Page 153: Mac Users: Accessing Storage Through Ftp

    Instructing your End-Users Mac Users: Accessing Storage through FTP From the Finder’s Go menu, click Connect to Server. STEP 1 Enter "smb://<hostname or IP address of the NSS>/<sharename>. (Where the STEP 2 information in the brackets is meant to be replaced with the applicable information. Do not type the brackets.) Click the "+"...
  • Page 154: Unix/linux Users: Accessing Storage Through Nfs

    Instructing your End-Users UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through NFS Enter your username and password when prompted by your FTP client. STEP 4 When your FTP client has logged in, a list of accessible shares appears as individual directories. Depending on your privileges to the share, you can begin using the NSS storage. STEP 5 UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through NFS UNIX and Linux users can access shares on the NSS via NFS.
  • Page 155: Unix/linux Users: Accessing Storage Through Ftp

    Instructing your End-Users UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through FTP UNIX/Linux Users: Accessing Storage through FTP UNIX and Linux users who have a user profile set up can access any shares to which they have privileges on the NSS storage using NFS or FTP. Note that when using FTP to access the NSS storage, users cannot rename folders.
  • Page 156: Appendix A: Troubleshooting

    Troubleshooting LEDs & Buttons The LEDs on the front and back of the NSS chassis help you troubleshoot a variety of conditions on the NSS---from normal operating conditions, alerts, to serious error conditions. The Reset button lets you restore the network defaults in situations where you can no longer log into the configuration interface.
  • Page 157: System Led (front Panel)

    Troubleshooting • Graceful Shutdown: Press the Power button and hold for about 1 to 2 seconds to trigger a graceful shutdown of the NSS. • Hard Shutdown: Press the Power button and hold for about eight seconds. You would choose this option only if the NSS is not responding to a graceful shutdown.
  • Page 158: Lan Led (front Panel)

    Troubleshooting • To reset the box: Press and hold the Reset button while the system is running until the Power LED begins to blink green. Release the Reset button. LAN LED (Front Panel) Solid Green: The LAN link is up and running at 1000 link speed, but is currently idle. Flickering Green: The LAN link is up and running at 1000 link speed and is currently active.
  • Page 159: Ups Led (back Panel)

    Troubleshooting Repairing a Degraded Array UPS LED (Back Panel) Off: There is either no UPS attached to the NSS or the UPS function has been disabled in the System Power page. See the ”Configuring the System for UPS Support” section on page13 in the configuration interface.
  • Page 160 Troubleshooting Repairing a Degraded Array The RAID page appears. In the RAID Arrays table, click Edit for the applicable RAID array. STEP 3 The RAID Configuration page appears. Click Add to add the disk drive it to the array. STEP 4 The RAID array is rebuilt for the added or changed redundant disk drive.
  • Page 161: Working With A Failed Array

    Troubleshooting Working with a Failed Array Working with a Failed Array If a RAID is in a failed state, the data on the array is not recoverable. You need to delete the array, replace the disk drive, and then configure a new array. To create an array when an array fails: Remove the failed drive from the NSS and install the replacement disk.
  • Page 162: Drive Error Led Remains On

    Troubleshooting Drive Error LED Remains On Drive Error LED Remains On If a drive that is part of a RAID array is accidentally removed and then subsequently reinserted into the chassis, it is possible that the drive Error LED will become lit.
  • Page 163: Free Bound Virtualized Storage When The Master System Fails

    Troubleshooting Free Bound Virtualized Storage when the Master System Fails Go through the steps to upgrade the firmware ensuring that the conditions listed STEP 2 previously are met. Free Bound Virtualized Storage when the Master System Fails Problem Scenario: A storage system is bound to a failed storage system and rejects any bind requests from other systems.
  • Page 164: Hotplugging The Ethernet Link Doesn't Reset Ip Or Link Rate

    Troubleshooting Hotplugging the Ethernet Link doesn’t Reset IP or Link Rate Hotplugging the Ethernet Link doesn’t Reset IP or Link Rate Problem Scenario: When you disconnect an Ethernet link and reconnect it, the IP address and link rate should reset. For example, if you unplug a cable from the NSS to a 100 Mbps switch and then reconnect the NSS to a 1 Gps switch, the link is not restored.
  • Page 165: Cannot Access The Nss Through Ftp

    Troubleshooting Cannot Access the NSS through FTP Cannot Access the NSS through FTP Problem Scenario: Users attempt to log into the NSS through FTP but are unable to access their home directory or shares on the NSS. Resolution: There are several configuration settings that must be defined to enable FTP access.
  • Page 166: Configuration Page Does Not Appear In Internet Explorer

    Troubleshooting Configuration Page does not Appear in Internet Explorer Configuration Page does not Appear in Internet Explorer Problem Scenario: When you click a configuration page, the page does not appear. This is a known caching problem with the Internet Explorer browser. Resolution: The problem can be resolved by changing the Internet Explorer settings.
  • Page 167: Boosting The Performance Of Nfs Transfers

    Troubleshooting Boosting the Performance of NFS Transfers Following an unclean shutdown of the NSS: Do one of the following: STEP 1 • Review/Edit the System Settings Manually: Go through each setting, including the time setting to ensure nothing has been negatively altered. If you make changes to the settings, we highly recommend you take a USB backup.
  • Page 168: Appendix B: Glossary Of Storage-related Terms & Acronyms

    Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms ACL: Access Control List. Used within network security systems to allow selective use of services. An Access Control List is used to control access to, and denial of, services. It lists the services available with a corresponding list of the hosts permitted to use the service.
  • Page 169 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms CIFS: Common Internet Filesystem. A protocol that evolved out of SMB (Server Message Block). CIFS is an application-level network protocol mainly used to share files, printers, serial ports, and miscellaneous communications between nodes on a network. It also provides an authenticated Inter-process communication mechanism.
  • Page 170 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms Disk Tax/Disk Overhead: The limitation of hard disk drive (HDD) capacity when specific RAID configurations that use mirroring or redundancy are applied to an array. DNS: Domain Name System (or Service or Server). An Internet service that translates domain names into IP addresses.
  • Page 171 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms ext3: Third Extended Filesystem. A journalled filesystem that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. Unlike its predecessor, ext2, the journaling support alleviates lengthy filesystem checks (fsck) at bootup after a sudden system crash, reset, or power loss.
  • Page 172 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms FTPS: File Transfer Protocol over SSL. FTPS is similar to the standard FTP but because it operates over an encrypted link (SSL), it is a more secure way to transfer files over the Internet. The NSS supports Explicit FTPS (versus Implicit FTPS).
  • Page 173 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms Gigabit: Also Gbit or Gb. A unit of information or data storage equivalent to 1,000,000,000 (1 billion) bits. Gigabtye (GB): A unit of information or data storage equivalent to 1,000,000,000 (1 billion) bytes. High Availability: A term applied to a class of electronic devices where a system design protocol has been applied and implemented to ensure a higher/improved degree of operational continuity during a given measurement period.
  • Page 174 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms IEEE 802. 1 X: Standard for port-based network access control that authenticates devices attached to a LAN port. This standard establishes connection to a network and its connected resources if authentication is approved, and conversely, prevents access to the network if authentication fails.
  • Page 175 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms MDFS (Microsoft Distributed Filesystem): see DFS. Mirroring: For NAS devices, the automated process of simultaneously writing data to two (or more) hard disk drives. Mirroring creates a redundant repository of data, such that if one of the hard disk drives (HDD) fails, the redundant drive continues to provide access to the stored data for connected users.
  • Page 176 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms NAS (Network Attached Storage): A data storage device on a computer network to provide a centralized repository of data that can be shared and accessed by other end-users or workgroups on the network. The Cisco Small Business NSS products are NAS devices.
  • Page 177 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms capacity. The types of RAID levels and combinations of these levels is constantly changing as new methods and technologies continue to improve. Currently, the NSS offers the choice of five different RAID levels (including JBOD) with two options for adding a hot spare to an existing RAID level.
  • Page 178 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms SAN (Storage Area Network): A network of storage and server devices typically found in large, enterprise environments with high volume or high data traffic requirements. SANs are architected to be scalable so that computer storage devices (such as disk array controllers, tape libraries, and servers) can be added and incorporated into the system.
  • Page 179 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms S.M.A.R.T. : Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology. This industry- standard technology was developed by a number of major hard disk drive manufacturers to try to increase the reliability of drives. Using this technology, the NSS can predict the future failure of hard disk drives.
  • Page 180 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms SMB (Server Message Block): An application-level networking protocol that gives shared access to files, serial ports, printers, and other data transfer between nodes on a network. SMB can also be used to access different subnets over the Internet.
  • Page 181 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms TLS: Transport Layer Security. A security protocol from the IETF that is based on the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) 3.0 protocol developed by Netscape. TLS uses digital certificates to authenticate the user and the network. The TLS client uses the public key from the server to encrypt a random number and send it back to the server.
  • Page 182 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms UPnP: Universal Plug and Play. A family of protocols from the UPnP Forum that automatically configure devices, discovering services and providing peer-to-peer data transfer over an IP network. Like Zeroconf, UPnP uses link-local addressing for IP assignment and provides service discovery.
  • Page 183 Glossary of Storage-Related Terms & Acronyms XFS: A high-performance journaling filesystem created by Silicon Graphics for their IRIX operating system. XFS has been merged into the mainline Linux 2.4 and 2.6 kernels, making it almost universally available on Linux systems. Installation programs for the SuSE, Gentoo, Mandriva, Slackware, Zenwalk, Fedora, Ubuntu and Debian Linux distributions all offer XFS as a choice of filesystem.
  • Page 184: Appendix C: Environmental Specifications

    Environmental Specifications NSS2000 Device 3.23 x 11.38” x 9.21” (82 x 289 x 234 mm) Dimensions Unit Weight 7.28 lb (3.3 kg) Power 60W, 12V external AC power Certificatio FCC Class B ° ° Operating 41 to 104 F(5 to 40 Temp °...
  • Page 185: Appendix D: Additional Information

    Additional Information Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for this product is available on Cisco.com at the following location: www.cisco.com/go/smallbiz Warranty Warranty information that applies to this product is available on Cisco.com at the following location: www.cisco.com/go/smallbiz End User License Agreement (EULA) Licensing information that applies to this product is available on Cisco.com at the...
  • Page 186: Appendix E: Support Contacts

    Support Contacts Support contact information for this product is available on Cisco.com at the following location: www.cisco.com/go/smallbiz Cisco Small Business NSS2000 Series Administration Guide...

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