Download  Print this page

NEC Express5800 series User Manual

Hide thumbs

Advertisement

E
5800/140Hc
XPRESS
()
U s e r ' s G u i d e

Advertisement

Table of Contents
loading

  Also See for NEC Express5800 series

  Summary of Contents for NEC Express5800 series

  • Page 1 5800/140Hc XPRESS U s e r ’ s G u i d e...
  • Page 3 5800/140Hc XPRESS U s e r ’ s G u i d e...
  • Page 4 NEC Solutions (America), Inc. To allow for design and specification improvements, the information in this document is subject to change at any time, without notice.
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents Proprietary Notice Using This Guide Text Conventions ........................x Related Documents ......................xi Safety Notices ........................xii Safety Notices for Users Outside of the U.S.A. and Canada ........xiii Care and Handling......................xiv 1 System Overview Overview ..........................1-2 System Chassis........................
  • Page 6 System Security ........................1-24 Security with Mechanical Locks and Monitoring ............1-24 Software Locks via the BIOS Setup Utility..............1-25 Reconfiguration ........................1-25 2 Setting Up the System Overview ..........................2-2 Selecting a Site ........................2-2 Server Physical Specifications....................2-3 Unpacking the System ......................2-3 Getting Familiar with the System ..................2-3 Making Connections......................2-4 Connecting the Power Cord(s)....................2-5 Using the System ........................2-6...
  • Page 7 Before You Begin ....................... 3-25 System Board Jumper Block..................3-25 Moving System Jumpers..................... 3-26 Clearing CMOS......................3-27 Clearing the Password....................3-28 4 Upgrading Your System Precautions ......................... 4-3 Preparing Your System for Upgrade .................. 4-5 Equipment Log........................4-5 Removing the Front Door ....................4-5 Installing the Front Door ....................
  • Page 8 Replacing a Fan Module....................4-43 5.25-Inch Peripheral Drives....................4-44 Preliminary Considerations ..................4-44 Drive Cables ........................4-44 IDE Requirements .......................4-44 SCSI Requirements .....................4-44 EMC Compliance of 5.25-inch Removable Media Device Bays ........4-44 Removing a 5 1/4-Inch Device..................4-48 5 Problem Solving Problem Solving .........................5-2 Static Precautions .......................5-2 Troubleshooting Checklists ....................5-3 Initial System Startup ....................5-3 Running New Application Software ................5-4...
  • Page 9 Glossary Equipment Log Contents vii...
  • Page 11: Using This Guide

    Using This Guide This User’s Guide provides a quick reference to information about your server system. Its goal is to familiarize you with your system and the tasks necessary for system configuring and upgrading. This guide contains the following information: Chapter 1, “System Overview”...
  • Page 12: Text Conventions

    Text Conventions This guide uses the following text conventions. Warnings, cautions, and notes have the following meanings: WARNING Warnings alert you to situations that could result in serious personal injury or loss of life. ! CAUTION Cautions indicate situations that can damage the system hardware or software. Note: Notes give important information about the material being described.
  • Page 13: Related Documents

    Related Documents In addition to this guide, the following system documentation is included with your server either as electronic files on E or as paper copy shipped with your server. XPRESS UILDER System Release Notes Release Notes provide you with the latest information about your system. This information was not available to be included in your user's guide at the time it was developed and released.
  • Page 14: Safety Notices

    Safety Notices Caution: To reduce the risk of electric shock which could cause personal injury, follow all safety notices. The symbols shown are used in your documentation and on your equipment to indicate safety hazards. Warning: Lithium batteries can be dangerous. Improper handling of lithium batteries may result in an explosion.
  • Page 15: Safety Notices For Users Outside Of The U.s.a. And Canada

    Safety Notices for Users Outside of the U.S.A. and Canada PELV (Protected Extra-Low Voltage) Integrity: To ensure the extra-low voltage integrity of the equipment, connect only equipment with mains-protected electrically- compatible circuits to the external ports. Remote Earths: To prevent electrical shock, connect all local (individual office) computers and computer support equipment to the same electrical circuit of the building wiring.
  • Page 16: Care And Handling

    Care and Handling Use the following guidelines to properly handle and care for your system. Protect the system from extremely low or high temperatures. Let the system warm (or cool) to room temperature before using it. Keep the system away from magnetic forces. Keep the system dry.
  • Page 17: System Overview

    System Overview Overview System Chassis System Board Set System Board Set Features System Power Peripheral Bays Disk Array System Functions System Security Reconfiguration...
  • Page 18 Overview This server is a highly reliable, high-powered, highly available, high-capacity  ™ multiprocessing system based on the Intel Xeon processor family. It is a solid performer and offers the latest technology. The server system is conveniently housed and available as a tower-based system (see Figure 1-1). The combination of superior computing performance, high memory capacity, and integrated I/O provides a high performance environment for the many sophisticated applications available to network servers.
  • Page 19 Hot-swap SCSI disk drive backplane; a failed drive can be removed and replaced with a new drive without system power being turned off (if an optional Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) controller is installed.) High degree of SCSI disk fault tolerance and advanced disk array management features through the use of RAID technology, if an optional RAID controller is installed.
  • Page 20: Main System Components

    System Chassis The system chassis is an easy-to-access, fabricated metal structure. The following subsections describe the main system components, the electronics bay components, the front panel controls and indicators and the rear panel connectors and indicators. Main System Components Figure 1-2 illustrates the main system components. Power supply bay Fan bays Hot-plug PCI add-in cards...
  • Page 21: Electronics Bay Components

    Electronics Bay Components Figure 1-3 illustrates the electronics bay components. Hot-plug PCI-X slots (4) System board Non-hot-plug PCI slots (4) Processor board Figure 1-3. Electronics Bay Components System Overview 1-5...
  • Page 22: Front Control Panel

    Front Control Panel Figure 1-4 shows the front chassis features and controls. Power button To turn power on, press the power button momentarily. If the system is in sleep state, pressing the power button momentarily brings the system out of the sleep state. To turn power off, press and hold the power button for more than four seconds.
  • Page 23: Rear Panel

    Rear Panel Figure 1-5 shows the rear panel connectors and indicators. Optional ICMB ports 1 (bottom) and 2 (top) Serial port A 9-pin connector Hot-plug PCI LEDs PS/2-compatible mouse port Hot-plug 64-bit, 100 MHz PCI-X add-in card slots PS/2-compatible keyboard port Non-hot-plug 64-bit, 100 MHz PCI-X add-in card Chassis ID LED slots...
  • Page 24: Status Led Indicator Descriptions

    Status LED Indicator Descriptions Table 1-1 lists the system status LED indicators along with a description of each LED indicator. Table 1-2 lists the disk drive status LED panel indicators along with a description of each LED indicator. Table 1-3 lists the power supply status LED panel indicators along with a description of each LED indicator.
  • Page 25 Table 1-2. Disk Drive Status LED Panel Indicators Status Description Response Disk Drive Disk drive Remount the disk drive Power power off Green Disk drive None required (normal) power on Disk Drive Not accessing disk None required (normal) Access/Error drive Green Accessing disk drive None required (normal)
  • Page 26 Table 1-4. System Status Abnormal Conditions Status LED Description Response POST is in progress. Wait for a while. It lights in green a few seconds after completion of POST. CPU error is detected. Turn the server off and then back on. If an error message appears during POST, take note of the error message and contact your technical support representative.
  • Page 27: Peripheral Device Bay

    Peripheral Device Bay Opening the bezel door provides access to the peripheral bay. The peripheral bay consists of four bays for removable media: A 3.5-inch bay comes with a 3.5-inch diskette drive installed. Three half-height bays accommodate 5.25-inch drives. One bay comes with a CD- ROM drive installed.
  • Page 28: System Board Set

    System Board Set The system board set inside the server includes the system board, memory board, and processor board. Figures 1-7, 1-8 and 1-9 show the major components on the system board, memory board, and processor board. Table 1-5 summarizes the features of the board set. Table 1-5.
  • Page 29 CC DD EE 64-bit, 100-MHz, hot-plug PCI-X slots 14-pin Power Control connector (P35) 64-bit, 100-MHz, non-hot-plug PCI-X slots 24-pin Power connector (P32) 32 bit, 33-MHz, non-hot-plug PCI slots 20-pin Power connector (P28) Intelligent Chassis Management Bus Serial port B connector (P17) (ICMB) connector (P24) Hot-Plug Indicator Board Connector (P23) USB #3 Header (P18)
  • Page 30 DIMM Group 3 DIMM Group 3 DIMM Group 2 DIMM Group 2 DIMM Group 1 DIMM Group 1 Note: DIMMs are grouped into four and must be installed in multiples of four. Group 1 DIMMs are installed in the system. When adding DIMMs, install DIMMs into Group 2, then Group 3.
  • Page 31: System Board Set Features

    System Board Set Features The following subsections provide a description of the system board set features. Intel Xeon Processor Depending on system configuration, your server includes one or two Intel Xeon processors. Each Intel Xeon processor plugs into a ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket on the system board.
  • Page 32: Controllers

    Controllers The following provides a description of the controllers. IDE Controller The system includes a single channel enhanced IDE 32 bit interface. The IDE controller provides support for the internally mounted CD-ROM. The device controls: PIO and DMA transfer modes Mode 4 timings Transfer rates up to 100 MB/s Buffering for PCI/IDE burst transfers.
  • Page 33: Scsi Controller

    Descriptor ring management architecture optimized to deliver both high performance and PCI/PCI-X bus efficiency Low power +3.3 V device IP and TCP/UDP checksum off-loading. SCSI Controller The baseboard includes an embedded Adaptec 7899 SCSI controller, which contains two independent SCSI channels. You can disable the SCSI controller in BIOS Setup. Both channels support 16-bit SE or LVD SCSI operations at the following speeds: Ultra160 (160 MB/sec) Ultra2 (80 MB/sec)
  • Page 34: External Device Connectors

    One major function of the BMC is to autonomously monitor system management events, and log their occurrence in the nonvolatile System Event Log (SEL). The events being monitored include overtemperature and overvoltage conditions, fan failure, or chassis intrusion. To enable accurate monitoring, the BMC maintains the nonvolatile Sensor Data Record (SDR), from which sensor information can be retrieved.
  • Page 35: System Power

    System Power The server may be configured with up to three 600-Watt power supplies. Each supply has autoranging input 50/60 Hz and automatically switches between the following input voltage ranges: 100-127 VAC at 50/60 Hz 200-240 VAC at 50/60 Hz All output grounds connect to the power supply chassis and to earth ground through the AC line cord.
  • Page 36: Disk Array

    Disk Array The optional disk array controller board is a PCI board that improves data reliability. The disk array controller board allows the hard disk drives in the SCSI hard disk drive bays and additional optional disk expansion unit to support disk array configuration RAID levels 0, 1, and 5.
  • Page 37: Automatic Rebuilding Function

    Automatic Rebuilding Function The server supports the disk array automatic rebuilding function for data recovery. Note: The automatic rebuilding function supports RAID levels RAID1 or RAID5. Rebuilding is to regenerate all data from a failed disk to a replacement disk. A rebuild is necessary after a failed disk drive is replaced with a new one.
  • Page 38: System Functions

    System Functions The following subsections describe select system functions. Hot Swapping Hot swapping allows a device to be replaced, such as a hard disk drive while its power is on, as listed below. Disk array system: Any failed hard disk drive can be replaced while the system is running. Hot swap fans: Any one of the four system fan modules (one or two fans per module) can be replaced while the system power is on.
  • Page 39: Sleep Mode

    Sleep Mode The SLEEP mode switch on the front of the server is used for saving power. If the SLEEP mode switch is pressed, then the server enters into the sleep state (the Drive Bay Power lamp and the Power lamp will blink simultaneously). In the power saving mode, the memory data and the states of the jobs are kept unchanged.
  • Page 40: Ac Link Mode

    AC Link Mode The AC link mode allows the system to monitor its AC input power so that when the AC input power is lost and then restored the system will return itself to one of three pre- selected settings, listed as follows: Power On Last State (Factory Default Setting) Stay Off.
  • Page 41: Software Locks Via The Bios Setup Utility

    Software Locks via the BIOS Setup Utility The BIOS Setup Utility provides a number of security features to prevent unauthorized or accidental access to the system. Once the security measures are enabled, access to the system is allowed only after the user enters the correct password(s). For example: Enable the keyboard lockout timer so that the server requires a password to reactivate the keyboard and mouse after a specified time-out period1 to 120 minutes.
  • Page 42 1-26 System Overview...
  • Page 43: Setting Up The System

    Setting Up the System Overview Selecting a Site Server Physical Specifications Unpacking the System Getting Familiar with the System Making Connections Connecting the Power Cord(s) Using the System...
  • Page 44 Overview This chapter describes how to select a site, unpack the system, make cable connections, and power on the server system. Selecting a Site The system operates reliably in a typical office environment. Choose a site that is: Near grounded, three-pronged power outlets. Note : For the United States and Canada, this means NEMA 5-15R outlets for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6-15R...
  • Page 45 Server Physical Specifications Table 2-1 details your server’s physical specifications. Height 18.09 inches (459 mm) Width 12.24 inches (311 mm) Depth 25.25 inches (641 mm) Weight Minimum configuration 96 pounds (44 kg) Maximum configuration 125 pounds (57 kg) Required front clearance 12 inches (305 mm) Required rear clearance 9 inches (229 mm)
  • Page 46: Making Connections

    Making Connections If your system normally operates without a video display or keyboard (for example, as a network server), you must install a video display and keyboard to configure the system. You may remove them after running the BIOS Setup Utility.
  • Page 47: Connecting The Power Cord(S)

    Connecting the Power Cord(s) Plug the female end of each AC power cord into the input receptacle(s) on the rear of the server chassis. Plug the male end of the power cord into NEMA 5- 15R outlet for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6-15R outlet for 200-240 VAC. If the power cord(s) supplied with the system are not compatible with the AC wall outlet in your region, obtain a suitable power cord that meets the following criteria.
  • Page 48: Using The System

    Using the System The following subsections describe how to use this server system properly and safely, including an explanation of the server system power on/off sequences, what the POST program checks in the server, and how to perform a forced power shutdown.
  • Page 49: Opening The Front Door Of The Tower Cabinet

    Opening the Front Door of the Tower Cabinet You must open the front door of the cabinet to turn the server power on or off, place the server in sleep mode, mount or dismount a floppy disk, mount or dismount a hard disk drive, or mount or dismount 5 1/4-inch removable media devices.
  • Page 50 3. Press the push-button power on/off switch on the front panel (see Figure 2-3). Verify that the server power-on LED is lit. Note: The server management logic on your system board monitors and logs system voltage changes. When powering up or down your system you may experience a 1–5 second delay from the time you press the push-button power on/off switch on the front panel and your system powering up or down.
  • Page 51: Powering Off The Server System

    Note: For error messages that appear on the display unit, refer to subsection POST Error Codes and Messages in Chapter 5 of this Guide. ! CAUTION Always allow POST to complete before powering down your system. If you have problems powering on your system, refer to Problem Solving in Chapter 5 of this User’s Guide.
  • Page 53: Configuring Your System

    Configuring Your System Configuring Your System BIOS Setup Utility SCSISelect Utility Configuring the RAID Controller Configuring System Jumpers...
  • Page 54 Configuring Your System Configuration and setup utilities are used to change your system configuration. You can configure your system, as well as option boards you may add to your system, using the BIOS Setup Utility. Several unique system parameters are configured using the BIOS Setup, which is stored in the system FLASH memory.
  • Page 55: Bios Setup Utility

    BIOS Setup Utility The BIOS Setup Utility is used to change system configuration parameters. The utility is resident in the system FLASH memory and does not require a diskette or an operating system present to run. Using the BIOS Setup Utility You access the BIOS Setup utility when you turn on or reboot your system.
  • Page 56: Bios Setup Configuration Settings

    Table 3-1 Setup Menu Value Keys Function in Setup Menu F1 or Alt-H Get Help about an item. Exit the current menu and return to the previous menu. Left or right arrow keys Move between menus. Up or down arrow keys Move cursor up and down.
  • Page 57: Main Menu

    Main Menu Option Parameter Description Your Setting System Time HH:MM:SS Set the time. System Date MM/DD/YYYY Set the date. Legacy Floppy A Disabled Select the settings of floppy disk 720Kb 3.5" drive A (standard configuration). 1.2MB 5.25" 1.44, 1.25MB 3.5" 2.88MB 3.5"...
  • Page 58: Processor Settings Submenu

    Processor Settings Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Processor Retest Clears CPU error information. Processor Speed Setting Indicates the frequency of the CPU. Display only. Processor 1-4 CPUID Indicates the ID of installed processors. Disabled "Disabled" indicates that the processor is defected.
  • Page 59: Primary Ide Master/Primary Ide Slave Submenu

    Primary IDE Master/Primary IDE Slave Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Auto Type Set the IDE device to be the None master. The selection of "Auto" CD-ROM causes the device to be detected IDE Removable automatically during execution of ATAPI Removable POST.
  • Page 60: Advanced Menu

    Enabled (POST) running screen is displayed Screen or not on booting. If this item is set to "Disabled," the "NEC" logo appears during POST. Pressing ESC in the status causes the screen display to be switched to the POST execution screen.
  • Page 61: Memory Configuration Submenu

    Memory Configuration Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting DIMM Group #1 - #3 Status Normal Indicates the current memory Not installed status. "Normal" indicates that Disabled the memory devices operate normally. "Disabled" indicates that one or more memory devices are defected. "Not Installed"...
  • Page 62: Hot-Plug Pci Control Submenu

    Hot-plug PCI Control Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Reserving memory Disabled (None) Determines memory space at space for PHP Minimum 6 (2+4) MB every empty slot for PHP (PCI Middle 48 (16+32) MB Hot-plug). Maximum 96 (32+64) MB Empty Bus Default Refer to Empty Bus Default Speed Speed submenu.
  • Page 63: Pci Slot 1 - Pci Slot 8 Submenu

    PCI Slot 1 – PCI Slot 8 Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Enabled Option ROM Scan Disables/enables the Option Disabled ROM BIOS on the PCI bus. When a graphic accelerator board is installed or a disk array controller or SCSI controller is installed, set this option to "Enabled."...
  • Page 64: I/O Device Configuration Submenu

    I/O Device Configuration Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Serial Port A Disabled Specifies whether serial port A Enabled is enabled or disabled. Auto Base I/O Address Selects the base address and interrupt (IRQ) for serial port A. These menus are displayed if Serial port A is enabled.
  • Page 65: Advanced Chipset Control Submenu

    Advanced Chipset Control Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Wake On LAN Disabled Specifies whether the remote Enabled power-on function through network is enabled or disabled. Disabled Wake On Ring Specifies whether the remote Enabled power-on function through a serial port is enabled or disabled.
  • Page 66: Security Menu

    Security Menu Option Parameter Description Your Setting User Password is Clear Status only, user cannot modify. Once set, this can be disabled by setting it to a null string, or by clearing password jumper on system board (see System Board Jumpers in this Chapter).
  • Page 67: Security Menu (Continued)

    Security Menu (continued) Option Parameter Description Your Setting Normal Fixed disk boot sector Prevents data from being Write Protect written to hard disks. 2 min Secure Mode Timer Specifies the period of time 5 min the keyboard or mouse are 10 min inactive at which the system 20 min...
  • Page 68: Server Menu

    Boot Monitoring 5 Minutes monitoring function is enabled 10 Minutes or disabled on booting. 15 Minutes To use this function, install NEC 20 Minutes ESMPRO Agent. Do not use 25 Minutes this function if the system is 30 Minutes booted from OS without...
  • Page 69: Server Menu (Continued)

    Server Menu (continued) Option Parameter Description Your Setting Disabled Post Error Pause Indicates whether POST is Enabled aborted once at the end of POST if an error occurs during the execution of POST. Stay Off Indicates the AC-LINK function. AC-LINK Last State Shows the state of the power of Power On...
  • Page 70: System Management Submenu

    System Management Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting BIOS Version – Indicates the version of BIOS. (Display only) – Board Part # Indicates the baseboard information. (Display only) Board Serial # – System Part # – Indicates the system information. (Display only) System Serial # –...
  • Page 71: Console Redirection Submenu

    Console Redirection Submenu Option Parameter Description Your Setting Disabled Serial Port Selects the port to be used as On-Board Com A Address the redirection port. The On-Board Com B parameters specified in I/O device configuration submenu is used as address and interrupt.
  • Page 72: Exit Menu

    Exit Menu You can make the following selections on the Exit Menu. Select an option using the up or down arrow keys, then press <Enter> to execute the option. Pressing <Esc> does not exit this menu. You must select one of the items from the menu or menu bar to exit.
  • Page 73: Scsiselect Utility

    SCSISelect Utility The SCSISelect Utility detects the SCSI host adapters on the system I/O board and on option SCSI controller boards. The SCSISelect Utility is used mainly to set the transfer rate of connected SCSI device. Use the SCSISelect Utility to: Change default values Check and/or change SCSI device settings that may conflict with those of other devices in the server...
  • Page 74: Adaptec Scsi Utility Configuration Settings

    Adaptec SCSI Utility Configuration Settings The following keys are active for all Adaptec SCSI Utility screens: Action Arrows Up and down arrows move from one parameter to another within a screen. ENTER Displays options for a configurable parameter. Selects an option. Moves back to previous screen or parameter or EXIT if at the Main menu.
  • Page 75: Exiting Adaptec Scsi Utility

    Extended BIOS Translation for DOS Enabled Drives >1 GByte Verbose/Silent Mode Verbose Host Adapter BIOS (Configuration Utility Enabled Reserves BIOS Space) Domain Validation Enabled 1, 2 Support Removable Disks Disabled Under BIOS as Fixed Disks BIOS Support for Int13 Extensions Enabled No effect if BIOS is disabled.
  • Page 76: Configuring The Raid Controller

    Configuring the RAID Controller The RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Devices) option available for your system is the dual channel SecuRAID 320 (Mylex AcceleRAID 352) RAID controller board, which gives your system the added security of fault tolerance. If you order a system with an Operating System (OS) hot load and a RAID controller, the system is pre-configured at the factory according to Table 3-3.
  • Page 77: Configuring System Jumpers

    Configuring System Jumpers Before You Begin Only a qualified technical person should perform the procedures in this section. ! CAUTION Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage the system board. Modify the system board only at an ESD workstation. Otherwise, wear an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground.
  • Page 78: Moving System Jumpers

    Table 3-4. System Board Jumper Summary Jumper On/Off Jumper Function (default in bold) What it does at system reset. 1 - 2 Spare Off, Not Used Provides a spare jumper storage location. On, Spare 3 - 4 Reserved Off, Not Used Reserved.
  • Page 79: Clearing Cmos

    Figure 3-2 Moving a Jumper (Shorting Plug) 5. Reinstall the rear access cover and processor access cover removed in steps 2 and 3 above. See Installing the Rear Access cover and Processor Access Cover in chapter 4. Clearing CMOS WARNING Before doing the procedures in this section, make sure that your system is powered off and unplug the AC power cords from the back of the chassis.
  • Page 80: Clearing The Password

    7. Reinstall the rear access cover and processor access cover removed in steps 3 and 4 above. See Installing the Rear Access cover and Processor Access Cover in chapter 4. 8. Reinstall ac power cords and power up the system. While waiting for POST to complete, press the F2 key to enter BIOS setup.
  • Page 81 3. Remove the rear access cover following procedures described in Chapter 4 of this guide. 4. Remove the processor access cover following procedures described in Chapter 4 of this guide. 5. Remove the spare jumper from pins 1 and 2 on system function jumper block, see Figure 3-1.
  • Page 83: Upgrading Your System

    Upgrading Your System General Information Precautions Preparing Your System for Upgrade Equipment Log Removing the Front Door Installing the Front Door Access Covers Accessing the System Boards Removing the Access Cover to the System Boards Removing the Memory Board Processors DIMMs Replacing the Real-time Clock Battery Installing PCI Add-In Boards...
  • Page 84 This chapter contains step-by-step instructions for upgrading your system. When you disassemble any part of the server, note the orientation and placement of any cables or shielding that you remove. WARNING The DC push button on/off switch on the front panel does not turn off system AC power.
  • Page 85: Precautions

    Precautions The following warnings and cautions apply throughout this chapter. Only a technically qualified person should integrate and configure the system. The only procedures that can safely be done with the system power on is removing or installing (hot-swapping) an SCA drive/carrier assembly in one of the SCSI hot-swap drive cages, hot-swapping a failed power supply, or hot swapping a hot plug fan module or PCI board.
  • Page 86 ! CAUTION Electrostatic discharge (ESD) and ESD protection. ESD can damage disk drives, boards, and other parts. This system can withstand normal levels of environmental ESD while you are hot-swapping SCSI hard drives or hot- swapping a failed fan module or power supply. However, we recommend that you do all procedures in this chapter only at an ESD workstation.
  • Page 87: Preparing Your System For Upgrade

    Preparing Your System for Upgrade Have the following tools available: Phillips screwdriver (#2 bit) flat-head screwdriver small needle nose pliers pen or pencil utility knife ESD workstation or antistatic wrist strap (recommended). Equipment Log Use the equipment log form located at the end of this guide to record the model and serial number of your system, all installed options, and any other pertinent information specific to your system.
  • Page 88: Installing The Front Door

    4. Remove the front door. Installing the Front Door Note: This procedure is for tower-based systems only. To install the front door of the tower cabinet, perform the following procedure. 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter.
  • Page 89: Installing The Rear Access Cover

    Installing the Rear Access Cover Note: Before installing the rear access cover, check that you have not left tools or loose parts inside the system. To install the rear access cover: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter.
  • Page 90: Installing The Front Access Cover

    Installing the Front Access Cover Note: Before installing the front access cover, check that you have not left tools or loose parts inside the system. To install the front access cover: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter.
  • Page 91: Installing The Access Cover To The System Boards

    Figure 4-4. Removing the Access Cover to the System Boards Installing the Access Cover to the System Boards To install the access cover: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Position the access cover with the captive screws toward the front of the server.
  • Page 92: Installing The Memory Board

    Figure 4-5. Removing the Memory Board Installing the Memory Board To install the memory board: 1. Holding the bracket on the top edge of the memory board, insert the board into the guides at both ends of the electronics bay. 2.
  • Page 93 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Power off the system. Ensure the power cords are unplugged from the AC wall outlet. 3. Remove the rear access cover and system board access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter.
  • Page 94: Installing The Processor Board Air Baffle

    Installing the Processor Board Air Baffle To install the processor board air baffle: 1. Position the baffle so that the two release tabs (A) are toward the rear of the chassis (Figure 4-8). 2. With the rear of the air baffle raised, insert the tab on the front of the air baffle into the slot in the chassis.
  • Page 95: Removing The Processor Board

    Removing the Processor Board To remove the processor board: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Power off the system. Ensure the power cords are unplugged from the AC wall outlet. 3. Remove the rear access cover and system board access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter.
  • Page 96 Figure 4-10. Installing the Processor Board 3. Press inwards and close the handles until the processor board is fully engaged with the sockets on the baseboard. 4. Install the processor board air baffle following procedures previously described in this chapter. 5.
  • Page 97: Processors

    Processors The processor board includes four Intel Xeon processor ZIF sockets. See Figure 4-11. The following sections provide procedures for installing and removing the processors. Figure 4-11. Processor Sockets Note: Your system may have up to four processors on the system board. All installed processors must be matched for speed and cache size.
  • Page 98: Installing Processors

    Installing Processors Note: Your system may have up to four processors on the system board. All installed processors must be matched for speed and cache size. If replacing a processor, the replacement processor must match the speed and cache size of all installed processors. If upgrading a processor, all processors must be upgraded to match.
  • Page 99 9. Aligning the pins of the processor with the socket, insert the processor into the socket. The processor should drop into the socket without requiring any force. Figure 4-13. Installing the Processor 10. Lower the locking bar completely. 11. If the heat sink does not already have thermal interface material applied to it, follow the instructions packaged with the applicator and apply thermal grease to the top of the processor.
  • Page 100: Removing Processors

     Snap one end of the clip down over the corresponding tab on the retention module. Snap the remaining end of the clip down over the corresponding tab. Be sure the clip is adequately engaged with the tab. Repeat this step with the second clip. Removing Processors To remove a processor: 1.
  • Page 101 ! CAUTION When performing the next step, be very careful that the screwdriver does not slip out of the clip, as the system board can be damaged.  Using your thumb, press down on this end of the clip until it clears the bottom edge of the tab on the retention module and rotate the screwdriver as shown in Figure 4-12 until the end of the clip is free of the tab.
  • Page 102: Dimms

    DIMMs The memory board contains twelve DIMM sockets arranged in three groups of 4-way interleaved memory. See Figure 4-14. Each 168-pin socket can hold a single 72-bit DIMM module with 256MB, 512MB, 1GB or 2GB of memory. When all twelve sockets are populated, the memory board supports a maximum of 24GB of memory with 2GB DIMMs.
  • Page 103: Installing Dimms

    Installing DIMMs 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Power off the system. Ensure the power cords are unplugged from the AC wall outlet. 3. Remove the rear access cover and system board access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter.
  • Page 104: Removing Dimms

    10. Install the memory board following procedures previously described in this chapter. 11. Install the system board access cover and rear access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter. 12. Plug in the AC power cords and power on the system. 13.
  • Page 105: Replacing The Real-Time Clock Battery

    6. Install the memory board following procedures previously described in this chapter. 7. Install the system board access cover and rear access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter. 8. Plug in the AC power cords and power on the system. 9.
  • Page 106 Replace the battery as follows. Note: Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage add-in boards and other components; place them on an antistatic surface. Wear an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground. 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter.
  • Page 107: Installing Pci Add-In Boards

    Installing PCI Add-In Boards Your server supports four hot-plug PCI add-in boards (slots 5 through 8) and four non-hot-plug PCI add-in boards (slots 1 through 4). See Figure 4-18. PCI slots are numbered 1 through 8. The 8 slot is located at the top of the system board.
  • Page 108: Identifying Pci Add-In Boards

    Identifying PCI Add-in Boards There are three types of PCI boards: 5V PCI boards, 3.3V PCI boards, and universal PCI boards. See Figure 4-19. 5V PCI Board 3.3V PCI Board Universal PCI Board Figure 4-19. Identifying PCI Add-in Boards A 5V PCI board must be installed into a 5V PCI slot, and a 3.3V PCI board must be installed into a 3.3V or 5V PCI slot.
  • Page 109 Latch, rear retention mechanism Latch, front retention mechanism Figure 4-20. Installing and Removing a Non-Hot-Plug PCI Add-In Board 8. Insert the board into the front and rear retention mechanisms. Carefully push down on the board until it engages and fully seats in the slot connector. 9.
  • Page 110: Removing A Pci Add-In Board From A Non-Hot-Plug Slot

    Removing a PCI Add-In Board from a Non-Hot-Plug Slot To remove a PCI add-in board from a non-hot-plug slot: 1. Disconnect the AC power cords from the power source or wall outlets. 2. Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system. 3.
  • Page 111: Installing A Pci Add-In Board In A Hot-Plug Slot

    Installing a PCI Add-In Board in a Hot-Plug Slot Windows 2000 enables replacing and adding of a hot-plug PCI board while the server is in operation. Only the INTEL 100BASE-TX LAN board and the INTEL 1000BASE-T LAN board support the hot-plug PCI feature. The following sections describe PCI hot-plug functionality and include: Installing a hot-plug PCI board while the server is in operation.
  • Page 112: Checking The Status Indicators For A Hot-Plug Add-In Board

    Table 4-1. BIOS Clock Speed Settings BIOS Clock Speed Setting Description PCI 33MHz PCI boards operating at any clock speed. (With this setting, boards capable of operating at over 66 MHz will operate at 33 MHz.) PCI 66MHz PCI boards operating at either PCI-66MHz or PCI-X 66MHz/100MHz.
  • Page 113: Installing A Hot-Plug Pci Add-In Board

    Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Add-In Board Note: This procedure is only supported with Windows 2000 with the PCI hot-plug driver installed. To install a hot-plug PCI add-in board: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter.
  • Page 114 7. Insert the board into the front and rear retention mechanisms. Carefully push down on the board until it engages and fully seats in the slot connector. 8. Connect the cables to the PCI board while firmly holding the PCI board with your hand.
  • Page 115: Removing A Hot-Plug Pci Add-In Board

    Removing a Hot-Plug PCI Add-In Board To remove a hot-plug PCI add-in board: 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. Note: Before removing a hot-plug PCI board, be sure to terminate the driver of the slot containing the PCI board. Failure to do so may cause the system to fail.
  • Page 116: Hard Disk Drives

    Hard Disk Drives The following sections provide procedures for installing a disk drive, removing a disk drive, or swapping out a faulty disk drive from one of the hot-swap drive bays. The 3 1/2-inch SCSI drives must use the industry standard 80-pin Single Connector Attachment (SCA) connector.
  • Page 117: Checking A Hot-Swap Scsi Drive Status Indicator

    Note: ESD can damage disk drives, boards, and other parts. This system can withstand normal levels of environmental ESD while you are hot-swapping SCSI hard drives. However, we recommend that you do all procedures in this chapter only at an ESD workstation or provide some ESD protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground (any unpainted metal surface) on your system when handling parts.
  • Page 118: Installing A Hot-Swap Drive In A Carrier

    Installing a Hot-Swap Drive in a Carrier Before you can install a drive in the hot-swap drive bay, you must install the drive into a drive carrier. See Figures 4-25 and 4-26. To install a hot-swap drive in a carrier: 1.
  • Page 119: Removing A Hot-Swap Drive From A Carrier

    SCA Connector Plastic Rail Drive Screw Carrier Figure 4-26. Installing a SCSI Hard Disk Drive in a Carrier Removing a Hot-swap Drive from a Carrier To remove a hot-swap drive from a carrier: 1. Remove the carrier and drive from the drive bay. 2.
  • Page 120 Handle Locking slot Latch Figure 4-27. Removing a Drive Carrier 2. Carefully pull on the carrier handle and slide the carrier out of the bay. 3. Install a new drive into the carrier. 4. Hold the carrier handle in the fully open position and slide the carrier into the desired bay.
  • Page 121: Dc Power Supplies

    DC Power Supplies The power supply bay accommodates up to three power supply modules. The bay contains a power distribution board (PDB) that manages the delivery of power from the power supply modules. Checking the Power Status LEDs Figure 4-29 shows the three power supply status LEDs. Power LED Fail LED Predictive Fail LED...
  • Page 122: Removing A Power Supply Module

    Removing a Power Supply Module To remove a power supply module: 1. Disconnect the AC power cord for the supply from both the wall outlet and from the power supply. Screws Latch handle Figure 4-30. Removing a Power Supply Module 2.
  • Page 123: Installing A Power Supply Module

    Installing a Power Supply Module To install a power supply module: 1. If present, remove the filler panel from the vacant slot. 2. Holding the power supply latch handle in the open position, slide the power supply module into the vacant slot until you feel resistance. ! CAUTION The module engaging its connector causes the resistance.
  • Page 124: System Cooling Fans

    System Cooling Fans Your system includes four fan modules that can be easily installed or removed from the side of the system. ! CAUTION Don’t remove a fan module while the server is powered on unless you have a replacement unit available. Once you remove a fan module from the system, replace it within five minutes.
  • Page 125: Replacing A Fan Module

    Replacing a Fan Module 1. Observe the safety and ESD precautions listed at the beginning of this chapter. 2. Remove the front door, rear access cover and front access cover following procedures previously described in this chapter. 3. Grasp the failed fan module and pull it straight out of the foam baffle. See Figure 4-32.
  • Page 126: 5.25-Inch Peripheral Drives

    5.25-Inch Peripheral Drives This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing devices from the 5.25-inch peripheral bay. Preliminary Considerations ! CAUTION You should not install hard drives in the 5.25-inch peripheral drive bays, as the drives cannot be properly cooled in this location.
  • Page 127 Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device Install a 5 1/4-inch device drive as follows. ! CAUTION CD-ROM devices contain a laser system and are classified as CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCTS. In case of any trouble with a CD-ROM, please contact your nearest service representative.
  • Page 128 5. If the drive bay is covered by a metal EMI shield, insert your finger in the large hole in one end of the shield (A) and pull the shield from the chassis. Save the shield. See Figure 4-34. Figure 4-34. Removing the EMI Shield 6.
  • Page 129 9. Install the device into the bay as follows (see Figure 4-36): Move any cables in the bay out of the way. Align the rails on the media device with the supports in the bay. Slide the device into the bay until it locks in place. Connect the power cable (B) and data cable (A) to the device.
  • Page 130: Removing A 5 1/4-Inch Device

    Removing a 5 1/4-Inch Device Remove a 5 1/4-inch device as follows (see Figure 4-37). 1. Perform steps 1 through 4 of the previous subsection Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device. 2. Disconnect the power cable (B) and data cable (A) from the device that you are removing.
  • Page 131 Upgrading Your System 4-49...
  • Page 133: Problem Solving

    Problem Solving Problem Solving Static Precautions Troubleshooting Checklists Diagnostic Procedures Specific Problems and Corrective Actions Problems with the Network Plug and Play Installation Tips Error Messages How to Identify BIOS and BMC Revision Levels...
  • Page 134: Static Precautions

    Problem Solving This chapter helps you identify and solve problems that may occur during system installation or while using your system. The first section of this chapter tells you how to reset your system in the event of problems. The next few sections provide troubleshooting checklists and procedural steps that help you isolate specific system problems.
  • Page 135: Troubleshooting Checklists

    Troubleshooting Checklists The following subsections provide troubleshooting checklists for problems that occur at initial system startup, when you run new application software, and after the system hardware and software have been running correctly. Initial System Startup Incorrect installation or configuration usually causes problems that occur at initial system startup.
  • Page 136: Running New Application Software

    Are the configuration settings in BIOS Setup and the SCSISelect Utility correct? For information about running these utilities, refer to the Configuring Your System chapter 3. If the above items are all correct, but the problem reoccurs, refer to Additional Troubleshooting Procedures in this chapter.
  • Page 137: After System Has Been Running Correctly

    After System Has Been Running Correctly Problems that occur after the system hardware and software have been running correctly often indicate equipment failure. However, many situations that are easy to correct can also cause such problems. If you have problems after the system has been running correctly, check the following: If you are running the software from a diskette or CD-ROM, try a new copy of the software.
  • Page 138: Diagnostic Procedures

    Diagnostic Procedures This section provides a more detailed approach to diagnosing and identifying problems and then locating their sources. Error Checking Each time you turn on the system, POST (Power-On-Self-Test) runs automatically and checks the system board, processors, memory board, keyboard, and mouse. If POST finds an error, it displays an error message.
  • Page 139: Monitoring Post

    Monitoring POST Each time you turn on the system, the Power-On Self-Test (POST) runs automatically and checks the system board, processors, memory board, keyboard, and mouse. During the memory test, POST displays the amount of memory that it is able to access and test.
  • Page 140: Verifying Proper Operation Of Key System Indicators

    Verifying Proper Operation of Key System Indicators As POST determines the system configuration, it tests for the presence of each mass storage device installed in the system. As each device is checked, its activity indicator should turn on briefly. Check for the following: Does the diskette drive activity indicator turn on briefly? If not, refer to “Diskette Drive Activity Indicator Does Not Light”...
  • Page 141: Specific Problems And Corrective Actions

    Specific Problems and Corrective Actions This section provides possible solutions for the following specific problems: Power LED does not light No beep or incorrect beep pattern No characters appear on screen Characters on the screen appear distorted or incorrect System cooling fan does not rotate Diskette drive activity LED does not light Hard disk drive activity LED does not light CD-ROM drive activity LED does not light...
  • Page 142: No Characters Appear On Screen

    No Characters Appear on Screen Check the following: Is the keyboard working? Check to see if the Num Lock light is functioning. Is the video display monitor plugged in and turned on? Are the brightness and contrast controls on the video monitor properly adjusted? Are the video monitor switch settings correct? Is the video monitor signal cable properly installed? Is the onboard video controller enabled?
  • Page 143: Diskette Drive Activity Led Does Not Light

    Is the front panel power on indicator lit? If the switches and connections are correct and the power outlet is functioning, the power supply has probably failed. Contact your service representative for assistance. Diskette Drive Activity LED Does Not Light Check the following: Are the diskette drive's power and signal cables properly installed? Is the diskette drive properly configured?
  • Page 144: Bootable Cd-Rom Is Not Detected

    Bootable CD-ROM Is Not Detected Check the following: Is the BIOS set to allow the CD-ROM to be the first bootable device? Check your BIOS Setup (F2) configuration. Problems with the Network Diagnostics pass, but the connection fails: Make sure the network cable is securely attached. The controller stopped working when an add-in adapter was installed: Make sure the cable is connected to the port from the onboard network controller.
  • Page 145: Error Messages

    Error Messages This section describes the POST error codes and messages. POST Error Codes and Messages Whenever a recoverable error occurs during POST, BIOS displays a message on the video display screen and causes the speaker to beep as the message appears. BIOS also issues a beep code (one long tone followed by two short tones) during POST if the video configuration fails or if an external ROM module does not have the correct checksum.
  • Page 146 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 0231 Shadow RAM Failed Shadow RAM error Contact your service representative. at offset: 0232 Extended RAM Extended RAM error Contact your service representative. Failed at address line: 0250 System Battery is...
  • Page 147 Error Code and Message Description Action 02F5 DMA Test Failure DMA Test Failed Contact your service representative. 02F6 Software NMI failed Software NMI failed Contact your service representative. 02F7 Fail-safe Timer NMI Fail-safe Timer NMI failed Contact your service representative. Error 0611 IDE Configuration...
  • Page 148 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 0B28 Unsupported CPU This server does not support the Contact your service representative for an detected for CPU 1 installed CPU. approved list of CPUs. 0B29 Unsupported CPU detected for CPU 2 0B2A...
  • Page 149 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 0B7C An error occurred An error occurred while redundant Contact your service representative to during the redundant power supply was configured. replace the power unit. power module confirmation 0B7D Normal operation...
  • Page 150 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action All the functions other than the function 0B94 IPMB Error IPMB signal lines do not respond of accessing to SMC through IPMB can be used. This is not a fatal error. Turn off the power once and then on again to restart the server.
  • Page 151 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 0BD0 1st SMBus device No response received from Contact your service representative to address not device on 1st SMBus replace the board indicated in the acknowledged system event log.
  • Page 152 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 0BE8 IPMB device address IPMB device address not Contact your service representative error acknowledged 0BE9 IPMB device error IPMB device error detected 0BEA IPMB timeout IPMB timeout 8100 Memory error DIMM Memory error detected in...
  • Page 153 Table 5-1. POST Error Codes and Messages (continued) Error Code and Message Description Action 8162 Mismatched processor Mismatched processor speed speed detected on detected on processor #3 processor #3 8163 Mismatched processor Mismatched processor speed speed detected on detected on processor #4 processor #4 Table 5-2.
  • Page 154: Post Error Code Hardware References

    POST Error Code Hardware References The following hardware illustrations show the devices associated with the error codes that appear on the screen of the display unit as listed in Table 5-1. Fans Fan 1 Fan 4 Fan 5 Fan 2 Fan 6 Fan 3 Processors (CPUs)
  • Page 155: How To Identify Bios And Bmc Revision Levels

    How to Identify BIOS and BMC Revision Levels To identify your system's current BIOS and BMC revision levels, perform the following procedure: 1. Power-on or reboot the system. “Press <F2> to enter SETUP” displays. 2. Press F2. The BIOS Setup Utility starts and the Main Menu is displayed. The menu bar at the top of the Main Menu lists the following selections: Menu Main...
  • Page 157: A Technical Specifications

    Technical Specifications Server Unit...
  • Page 158: Server Unit

    This appendix provides the technical specifications for your server unit. Server Unit Table A-1 lists the server unit technical specifications. Table A-1. Server Unit Technical Specifications Item Specification Chassis Dimensions Width: 12.2 inches (311 mm) Height: 18.1 inches (460 mm) Depth: 25.0 inches (635 mm) Weight Approximately 96 lbs.
  • Page 159 Table A-1. Server Unit Technical Specifications (Continued) Item Specification Optional Processor Support Upgradeable from one to four processors Chipset Grand Champion HE + CSB5 Graphics ATI RAGE XL (4 MB VRAM) Resolutions: 640x480, 800x600, 1024x768, 1280x1024 Colors: 16 Meg @ 640x480/800x600 64K @ 1024x768 256 @ 1280x1024 Fast Ethernet PCI Bus Controller...
  • Page 161: B Interrupt Request/ Pci Irq Device/ I/O Port Address Assignments

    Interrupt Request/ PCI IRQ Device/ I/O Port Address Assignments Interrupt Request Assignments PCI IRQ Device Assignments I/O Port Address Assignments...
  • Page 162 This appendix provides the Interrupt Requests (IRQs), PCI IRQ device, and I/O port addresses that are factory assigned for this system. Use these values for reference when installing an optional device. Interrupt Request Assignments Table B-1 lists the factory assigned Interrupt Requests (IRQs). Table B-1.
  • Page 163: Pci Irq Device Assignments

    PCI IRQ Device Assignments The PCI devices are assigned IRQs as listed in Table B-2. To change the PCI IRQ device assignment settings use the procedures in subsection BIOS Setup Utility of chapter 3. Table B-2. PCI IRQ Device Assignments Menu Option Interrupt PCI IRQ 0...
  • Page 164: Pci Irq Device Assignments

    Table B-3. PCI IRQ Device Assignments (Continued) Menu Option Interrupt PCI IRQ 30 PCI slot #7 (INT C), PCI slot #8 (INT D) PCI IRQ 31 PCI slot #7 (INT D), PCI slot #8 (INT C) B-4 Interrupt Request/PCI IRQ Device/I/O Port Address Assignments...
  • Page 165: I/O Port Address Assignments

    I/O Port Address Assignments Table B-4 lists the I/O port address assignments. In Table B-4 the addresses are listed in hexadecimal notation and the I/O port address of a PCI device is set according to its type and number. Table B-4. I/O Port Address Assignments Address Item 8-bit DMA control register...
  • Page 166 Table B-3. I/O Port Address Assignments (Continued) Address Item DMA1 extended write mode register Master 8259 ELCR programming Slave 8259 ELCR programming DMA2 extended write mode register SMBus control PHPC1 register PHPC2 register PCI IRQ mapping index register PCI IRQ mapping data register PCI error status register Address/status control Rise time counter control...
  • Page 167 Glossary (Alternating Current) The type of current available in wall outlets. All computers must convert alternating current to direct current to operate. See also DC. address A label, name, or number that identifies a location in computer memory. ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) A standard number assigned to each of the alphanumeric characters and keyboard control code keys to enable the transfer of information between different types of computers and peripherals.
  • Page 168 (Baseboard Management Controller) Contains all of the server management functions. One major function of the BMC is to monitor system management events and log their occurrence in the System Event Log (SEL). boot The process of loading the operating system into memory. (bits per second) The number of bits transferred in one second during serial communication, such as modem transmission.
  • Page 169 (Cathode-Ray Tube) The type of video display used in monitors for desktop computers. (Direct Current) The type of current available in the rechargeable battery packs used in portable computers. See also AC. default The factory setting your computer uses unless you instruct it otherwise. For example, when powering up, the computer will boot from the default drive.
  • Page 170 (Expanded Memory Specification) A method of accessing memory beyond the 640K limit of DOS by exchanging data in and out of main memory at high speeds. Some software requires EMS to operate. EPROM (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) A type of memory device that is usually used to store system BIOS code.
  • Page 171 hot swap A method used to insert or remove SCSI disk drives into or from an operating bus. This method is typically used in RAID subsystems. When used in non-RAID subsystems the operating system must typically be restarted. (Integrated Circuit) An electronic device that contains miniaturized circuitry. (Integrated Drive Electronics) A type of hard disk drive with the control circuitry located inside the disk drive rather than on a drive controller card.
  • Page 172 Super-fast Ultra 2 SCSI Low Voltage Differential (LVD) Parallel SCSI Interface. A new SCSI interface that provides greater I/O bandwidth, device connectivity, data reliability, and longer cable lengths for Ultra2 SCSI hard disk drives. Note that in order to achieve LVD performance all devices including cable, controller, and drive must support LVD.
  • Page 173 partition The process of dividing the storage space on a hard disk into separate areas so that the operating system treats them as separate disk drives. password A security feature that prevents an unauthorized user from operating your computer. See also EEPROM.
  • Page 174 RS-232C port An industry standard serial port. See also serial port. SAF-TE (SCSI Accessed Fault Tolerant Enclosure) A specification for monitoring the state of the drives and enclosure environment (fan, power supply, temperature, etc.) using the SCSI bus to indicate faults. save To store information on a floppy disk, hard disk, magnetic tape, or some other permanent storage device.
  • Page 175 SVGA (Super VGA) A type of video display system that provides very high-resolution text and graphics on analog color monitors. system board The main circuit board in your computer. It contains most of the connectors and ports. tape drive A type of storage device using magnetic tape. (Transistor-Transistor Logic) A type of integrated circuit used in computers.
  • Page 177 Equipment Log Use this equipment log form to record pertinent information about your system. You will need some of this information to run the System Setup Utility. Be sure to update the equipment log when you add options. Record the model and serial numbers of the system components, dates of component removal or replacement, and the name of the vendor from whom the component was purchased.
  • Page 178 Serial Number Component Manufacturer Name & Model (if available) Date Installed Server System Board Processor 1 Processor 2 Processor 3 Processor 4 DIMM Group #1 DIMM Group #2 DIMM Group #3 Diskette Drive A Tape Drive 1 Tape Drive 2 CD-ROM Drive 1 Hard Disk Drive 0 Hard Disk Drive 1...
  • Page 179 Index AC link mode, 1-24 Hot plug PCI, 1-22 ACPI, 1-23 Hot swap Administrative password, 1-25 fan modules, 1-22 Hot swapping, 1-22 Battery, RTC replacing, 4-23 I/O expansion slots, 1-15 BIOS, 1-15, 3-3 I/O port address assignments, B-5 BMC, 1-17 IDE controller, 1-16 Boot menu Indicators, 1-8...
  • Page 180 Precautions powering off, 2-9 upgrading, 4-3 powering on, 2-7 Problems software locking feature, 1-25 application software, 5-11 upgrading, 4-2 beep code, 5-9 System board management (BMC), 1-17 bootable CD-ROM not detected, 5-12 System upgrade CD-ROM drive activity light, 5-11 precautions, 4-3 characters distorted, 5-10 preparing, 4-5 diskette drive activity LED, 5-11...
  • Page 182 456-01592-000...

This manual is also suitable for:

Express5800/140hc