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HP A7500 Series Configuration Manual

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HP A7500 Switch Series
Fundamentals

Configuration Guide

Part number: 5998- 1 864
Software version: Release 6626 and later
Document version: 6W101-201 1 1 130

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  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    HP A7500 Switch Series Fundamentals Configuration Guide Part number: 5998- 1 864 Software version: Release 6626 and later Document version: 6W101-201 1 1 130...
  • Page 2 The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an...
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents CLI configuration ·························································································································································· 1 What is CLI? ······································································································································································1 Entering the CLI ·································································································································································1 Command conventions ·····················································································································································1 Undo form of a command················································································································································2 CLI views ············································································································································································2 CLI view description ·················································································································································2 Entering system view ················································································································································3 Exiting the current view············································································································································4 Returning to user view··············································································································································4 Using the CLI online help ·················································································································································4 Typing commands ·····························································································································································5 Editing command lines·············································································································································5...
  • Page 4 Logging in through Telnet·············································································································································· 36 Introduction ···························································································································································· 36 Telnet login authentication modes ······················································································································· 37 Configuring none authentication for Telnet login ······························································································ 38 Configuring password authentication for Telnet login ······················································································ 39 Configuring scheme authentication for Telnet login ·························································································· 40 Configuring common settings for VTY user interfaces (optional)······································································ 43 Configuring the device to log in to a Telnet server as a Telnet client······························································...
  • Page 5 Configuring authentication and authorization on the FTP server ····································································· 83 FTP server configuration example (for standalone mode)················································································· 84 FTP server configuration example (for IRF mode)······························································································· 86 Displaying and maintaining FTP··································································································································· 88 TFTP configuration······················································································································································89 TFTP overview ································································································································································· 89 Introduction to TFTP ··············································································································································· 89 TFTP operation ·······················································································································································...
  • Page 6 Specifying a startup configuration file ·······················································································································109 Backing up the startup configuration file ···················································································································110 Deleting a startup configuration file ···························································································································110 Restoring a startup configuration file ·························································································································110 Displaying and maintaining a configuration file ······································································································111 Software upgrade configuration ···························································································································· 112 Device software overview ···········································································································································112 Software upgrade methods·········································································································································112 Software upgrade through a system reboot··············································································································113 Upgrading Boot ROM through a system reboot ······························································································113...
  • Page 7 Member switch-based ISSU upgrade configuration example (incompatible)···············································147 Device management ··············································································································································· 149 Enabling MPU brand migration from H3C to HP ·····································································································149 Configuring the device name ·····································································································································149 Changing the system time ···········································································································································150 Configuration guidelines ····································································································································150 Configuration procedure ····································································································································153 Enabling displaying the copyright statement ············································································································153 Configuring banners····················································································································································153...
  • Page 8: Cli Configuration

    CLI configuration What is CLI? The command line interface (CLI) enables you to interact with your device by typing text commands. At the CLI, you can instruct your device to perform a given task by typing a text command and then pressing Enter.
  • Page 9: Undo Form Of A Command

    Convention Description Braces enclose a set of required syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from which { x | y | ... } you select one. Square brackets enclose a set of optional syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from [ x | y | ...
  • Page 10: Entering System View

    CLI views adopt a hierarchical structure. See Figure • After logging in to the switch, you are in user view. The user view prompt is <device name>. In user view, you can perform display, debugging, and file management operations, set the system time, restart your device, and perform FTP and Telnet operations.
  • Page 11: Exiting The Current View

    Exiting the current view The CLI is divided into different command views. Each view has a set of specific commands and defines the effective scope of the commands. The commands available to you at any given time depend on the view you are in.
  • Page 12: Typing Commands

    logging Send log information to terminal monitor Send information output to current terminal trapping Send trap information to terminal If ? is at the argument position, the CLI displays a description about this argument. For example: <Sysname> system-view [Sysname] interface vlan-interface ? <1-4094>...
  • Page 13: Entering A String Type Value For An Argument

    Entering a STRING type value for an argument A STRING type argument value can contain any printable character (ASCII code range from 32 to 126) except for the question mark (?), quotation mark (“), backward slash (\), and space. For example: <Sysname>...
  • Page 14: Configuring Cli Hotkeys

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Disabled by default, which means Enable the command alias function command-alias enable you cannot configure command aliases. Required command-alias mapping cmdkey Configure a command alias alias Not configured by default. Configuring CLI hotkeys Follow these steps to configure CLI hotkeys: To do…...
  • Page 15: Redisplaying Input But Not Submitted Commands

    Hotkey Function Ctrl+V Pastes the content in the clipboard. Ctrl+W Deletes all the characters in a continuous string to the left of the cursor. Ctrl+X Deletes all characters to the left of the cursor. Ctrl+Y Deletes all characters to the right of the cursor. Ctrl+Z Exits to user view.
  • Page 16: Checking Command-Line Errors

    Checking command-line errors If a command contains syntax errors, the CLI reports error information. Table 4 lists some common command line errors. Table 4 Common command line errors Error information Cause % Unrecognized command found at '^' position. The command was not found. % Incomplete command found at '^' position.
  • Page 17: Configuring The History Buffer Size

    more information about the history-command max-size command, see Fundamentals Command Reference. Configuring the history buffer size Follow these steps to configure the history buffer size: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view — system-view user-interface { first-num1 Enter user interface view [ last-num1 ] | { aux | vty } —...
  • Page 18: Filtering Output Information

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required By default, a login user uses the settings of the screen-length command. The default settings of the screen-length command are: multiple-screen display is enabled Disable the multi-screen display screen-length disable and up to 24 lines are displayed on function the next screen.
  • Page 19 Character Meaning Remarks Matches the preceding character or For example, “zo+” matches “zo” and “zoo”, but character group one or multiple not “z”. times Matches the preceding or For example, “def|int” only matches a character succeeding character string string containing “def” or “int”. If it is at the beginning or the end of a regular expression, it equals ^ or $.
  • Page 20 Character Meaning Remarks Matches a string containing For example, “\Bt” matches “t” in “install”, but not \Bcharacter character, and no space is allowed “t” in “big top”. before character. Matches character1character2. For example, “v\w” matches “vlan”, with “v” being character2 must be a number, letter, character1\w character1, and “l”...
  • Page 21: Configuring User Privilege And Command Levels

    Configuring user privilege and command levels Introduction To avoid unauthorized access, the switch defines user privilege levels and command levels. User privilege levels correspond to command levels. When a user at a specific privilege level logs in, the user can only use commands at that level or lower levels.
  • Page 22 To do… Use the command… Remarks user-interface { first-num1 Enter user interface view [ last-num1 ] | { aux | vty } — first-num2 [ last-num2 ] } Required By default, the authentication Specify the scheme authentication authentication-mode scheme mode for VTY users is password, mode and no authentication is needed for AUX login users.
  • Page 23 Follow these steps to configure the user privilege level under a user interface (SSH publickey authentication type): To do… Use the command… Remarks Required if the SSH login mode is adopted, and only username is needed during authentication. Configure the authentication type For more information, see Security After the configuration, the for SSH users as publickey...
  • Page 24: Switching User Privilege Level

    After the user logs back in, the user privilege restores to the original level. To avoid problems, HP recommends that administrators log in to the switch by using a lower • privilege level and view switch operating parameters. To maintain the switch, administrators can temporarily switch to a higher level.
  • Page 25 Authentication Meaning Description mode The switch authenticates a user by using the privilege level switch password input by the user. Local password local authentication When this mode is applied, you need to set the password for privilege level switch with the super password command. The switch sends the username and password for privilege level switch to the HWTACACS or RADIUS server for remote authentication.
  • Page 26 CAUTION: If no user privilege level is specified when you configure the password for switching the user privilege • level with the super password command, the user privilege level defaults to 3. Specifying the simple keyword saves the password in plain text, which is less secure than specifying the •...
  • Page 27: Modifying The Level Of A Command

    CAUTION: HP recommends you to use the default command level or modify the command level under the guidance of professional staff. An improper change of the command level may bring inconvenience to your maintenance and operation, or even potential security problems.
  • Page 28: Displaying And Maintaining Cli

    information, and the reset commands, which clear specified information. One-time commands that are executed are never saved. Displaying and maintaining CLI To do… Use the command… Remarks display command-alias [ | { begin Display defined command aliases | exclude | include } Available in any view and the corresponding commands regular-expression ]...
  • Page 29: Login Methods

    Login methods Login methods You can log in to the switch in the following ways. Table 7 Login methods Login method Default state Logging in By default, you can log in to a device through the console port, the through the authentication mode is None (no username or password required), and the console port user privilege level is 3.
  • Page 30: Users And User Interfaces

    A single user interface corresponds to a single user interface view where you can configure a set of parameters, such as whether to authenticate users at login, and the user privilege level after login. When the user logs in through a user interface, the connection follows these parameter settings, implementing centralized management of various sessions.
  • Page 31: Cli Login

    CLI login Overview The CLI enables you to interact with a device by typing text commands. At the CLI, you can instruct your device to perform a given task by typing a text command and then pressing Enter to submit it to your device.
  • Page 32: Login Procedure

    The port properties of the hyper terminal must be the same as the default settings of the console port shown in the following table. Setting Default Bits per second 9,600 bps Flow control None Parity None Stop bits Data bits Login procedure Use the console cable shipped with the device to connect the PC and the device.
  • Page 33 Figure 5 Connection description Figure 6 Specify the serial port used to establish the connection...
  • Page 34 Figure 7 Set the properties of the serial port Power on the device. Press Enter if the device successfully completes the power-on self test (POST). A Step3 prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 8 Configuration page Execute commands to configure the device or check the running status of the device.
  • Page 35: Console Login Authentication Modes

    Console login authentication modes The following authentication modes are available for console port login: none, password, and scheme. none—Requires no username and password at the next login through the console port. This mode • is insecure. • password—Requires password authentication at the next login through the console port. scheme—Requires username and password authentication at the next login through the console •...
  • Page 36: Configuring None Authentication For Console Login

    (optional).” After the configuration, the next time you log in to the device through the console port, you are prompted to press Enter. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 9 Configuration page...
  • Page 37: Configuring Password Authentication For Console Login

    (optional).” When you log in to the device through the console port after configuration, you are prompted to enter a login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you input the password and press Enter, as shown Figure...
  • Page 38: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Console Login

    Figure 10 Configuration page Configuring scheme authentication for console login Configuration prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, you can log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, “Configuration requirements.”...
  • Page 39 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional • By default, command authorization is not enabled. • By default, the command level depends on the user privilege level. A user is authorized a command level not higher than the user privilege level. With command authorization enabled, the Enable command authorization command authorization...
  • Page 40 After the configuration, when you log in to the device through the console port, you are prompted to enter a login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you input the password and username and press Enter, as shown in...
  • Page 41: Configuring Common Settings For Console Login (Optional)

    Figure 11 Configuration page Configuring common settings for console login (optional) Follow these steps to configure common settings for console port login To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Optional Enable display of copyright copyright-info enable information Enabled by default.
  • Page 42 By default, the terminal display type is ANSI. The device supports two types of terminal display: ANSI and VT100. HP recommends you to set the display type of both the device and the client to VT100. If the device and the client use...
  • Page 43: Logging In Through Telnet

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional The default idle-timeout is 10 minutes. The system automatically terminates the user’s Set the idle-timeout idle-timeout minutes connection if there is no information interaction timer [ seconds ] between the device and the user within the idle-timeout time.
  • Page 44: Telnet Login Authentication Modes

    Telnet login authentication modes • • Configuring none authentication for Telnet login Configuring password authentication for Telnet login • Configuring scheme authentication for Telnet login • • Configuring common settings for VTY user interfaces (optional) Configuring the device to log in to a Telnet server as a Telnet client •...
  • Page 45: Configuring None Authentication For Telnet Login

    Configuring none authentication for Telnet login Configuration prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, you can log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, “Configuration requirements.”...
  • Page 46: Configuring Password Authentication For Telnet Login

    Figure 13 Configuration page Configuring password authentication for Telnet login Configuration prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, you can log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, “Configuration requirements.”...
  • Page 47: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Telnet Login

    (optional).” When you log in to the device through Telnet again, perform the following steps: You are required to enter the login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you enter the • correct password and press Enter, as shown in Figure If “All user interfaces are used, please try later!”...
  • Page 48 To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Enable Telnet telnet server enable By default, the Telnet service is disabled. Enter one or multiple VTY user user-interface vty — interface views first-number [ last-number ] Required Whether local, RADIUS, or HWTACACS Specify the scheme authentication-mode authentication is adopted depends on the...
  • Page 49 For more information about AAA, RADIUS, and HWTACACS, see Security Configuration Guide. When you log in to the device through Telnet again: You are required to enter the login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after •...
  • Page 50: Configuring Common Settings For Vty User Interfaces (Optional)

    Figure 15 Configuration page Configuring common settings for VTY user interfaces (optional) Follow these steps to configure common settings for VTY user interfaces: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Optional Enable display of copyright copyright-info enable information Enabled by default.
  • Page 51: Configuring The Device To Log In To A Telnet Server As A Telnet Client

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the maximum screen-length By default, the next screen displays 24 number of lines on the screen-length lines. next screen A value of 0 disables the function. Optional Set the size of history history-command By default, the buffer saves 10 history command buffer...
  • Page 52: Logging In Through Ssh

    Figure 16 Telnet from one device (Telnet client) to another device (Telnet server) NOTE: If the Telnet client port and the Telnet server port that connect them are not in the same subnet, make sure that the two devices can reach each other. Configuration procedure Follow the step below to configure the device to log in to a Telnet server as a Telnet client: To do…...
  • Page 53: Configuring The Ssh Server

    Object Requirements Configure the authentication mode and other settings. If the host operates as an SSH client, run the SSH client program on the host. SSH client Obtain the IP address of the VLAN interface on the server. By default, the device is enabled with the SSH server and client functions. On a device that serves as the SSH client, you can log in to an SSH server to perform operations on •...
  • Page 54 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional • By default, command authorization is not enabled. • By default, command level for a login user depends on the user privilege level. The user is authorized the command with the default level not higher than the user privilege level.
  • Page 55 To do… Use the command… Remarks authentication default { hwtacacs-scheme Apply the hwtacacs-scheme-name specified AAA [ local ] | local | none | scheme to the radius-scheme domain radius-scheme-name [ local ] } Exit to system quit view Required Create a local user and enter local local-user user-name user view By default, no local user exists.
  • Page 56: Configuring The Ssh Client To Log In To The Ssh Server

    When the AAA scheme is RADIUS or HWTACACS, the user privilege level is configured on the • RADIUS or HWTACACS server. For more information about AAA, RADIUS, and HWTACACS, see Security Configuration Guide. Configuring the SSH client to log in to the SSH server Configuration prerequisites You have logged in to the device.
  • Page 57: Configuration Requirements

    This section includes these topics: • Configuration requirements Login procedure • Modem login authentication modes • • Configuring none authentication for modem login Configuring password authentication for modem login • • Configuring scheme authentication for modem login Configuring common settings for modem login (optional) •...
  • Page 58 CAUTION: Note the following device settings: The bits per second of the console port is lower than the transmission rate of the modem. Otherwise, • packets may be lost. The parity check mode, stop bits, and data bits of the console port adopt the default settings. •...
  • Page 59 Figure 20 Connection description Figure 21 Enter the phone number...
  • Page 60 Figure 22 Dial the number Character string CONNECT9600 is displayed on the terminal. Then a prompt such as <HP> appears Step6 when you press Enter. Figure 23 Configuration page Execute commands to configure the device or check the running status of the device. To get help, type ?.
  • Page 61: Modem Login Authentication Modes

    Modem login authentication modes The following authentication modes are available for modem dial-in login: none, password, and scheme. none—Requires no username and password at the next login through modems. This mode is • insecure. password—Requires password authentication at the next login through the console port. Keep your •...
  • Page 62: Configuring None Authentication For Modem Login

    (optional).” After the configuration, when you log in to the device through modems, you are prompted to press Enter. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you press Enter, as shown in Figure Figure 24 Configuration page...
  • Page 63: Configuring Password Authentication For Modem Login

    (optional).” After the configuration, when you log in to the device through modems, you are prompted to enter a login password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you input the password and press Enter, as shown Figure...
  • Page 64: Configuring Scheme Authentication For Modem Login

    Figure 25 Configuration page Configuring scheme authentication for modem login Configuration prerequisites You have logged in to the device. By default, you can log in to the device through the console port without authentication and have user privilege level 3 after login. For information about logging in to the device with the default configuration, “Configuration requirements.”...
  • Page 65 To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional • By default, command authorization is not enabled. • By default, command level for a login user depends on the user privilege level. The user is authorized the command with the default level not higher than the user privilege level.
  • Page 66 After the configuration, when you log in to the device through modems, you are prompted to enter a login username and password. A prompt such as <HP> appears after you input the password and username and press Enter, as shown in...
  • Page 67: Configuring Common Settings For Modem Login (Optional)

    Figure 26 Configuration page Configuring common settings for modem login (optional) Follow these steps to configure common settings for modem login: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Optional Enable display of copyright copyright-info enable information Enabled by default.
  • Page 68 By default, the terminal display type is ANSI. The device supports two types of terminal display: ANSI and VT100. HP recommends you to set the display type of both the device and the client to VT100. If the device and Configure the type...
  • Page 69: Displaying And Maintaining Cli Login

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Configure the user Optional privilege level for user privilege level level 3 by default. login users Optional Set the maximum By default, the next screen displays number of lines on screen-length screen-length 24 lines at most. the next screen A value of 0 disables the function.
  • Page 70 To do… Use the command… Remarks display users all [ | { begin | Display information about all user exclude | include } Available in any view interfaces that the device supports regular-expression ] display user-interface [ num1 | { aux |vty } num2 ] [ summary ] [ | Display user interface information Available in any view { begin | exclude | include }...
  • Page 71: Nms Login

    NMS login NMS login overview An NMS runs the SNMP client software. It offers a user-friendly interface to facilitate network management. An agent is a program that resides in the device. It receives and handles requests from the NMS. An NMS is a manager in an SNMP enabled network, whereas agents are managed by the NMS. The NMS and agents exchange information through the SNMP protocol.
  • Page 72: Nms Login Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks snmp-agent usm-user v3 user-name group-name [ [ cipher ] Required authentication-mode { md5 | Add a user to the If the cipher keyword is specified, both sha } auth-password SNMP group auth-password and priv-password are cipher [ privacy-mode { 3des | aes128 | text passwords.
  • Page 73 # Enter system view. <Sysname> system-view # Enable the SNMP agent. [Sysname] snmp-agent # Configure an SNMP group. [Sysname] snmp-agent group v3 managev3group # Add a user to the SNMP group. [Sysname] snmp-agent usm-user v3 managev3user managev3group Configuration on the NMS On the PC, start the browser.
  • Page 74 Figure 29 iMC homepage Log in to the iMC and configure SNMP settings for the iMC to find the device. After the device is found, you can manage and maintain the device through the iMC. For example, query device information or configure device parameters.
  • Page 75: User Login Control

    User login control User login control overview The device provides the following login control methods. Login Through Login control methods ACL used Configuring source IP-based login control over Telnet Basic ACL users Configuring source and destination IP-based login Telnet Advanced ACL control over Telnet users Configuring source MAC-based login control over Ethernet frame header ACL...
  • Page 76: Configuring Source And Destination Ip-Based Login Control Over Telnet Users

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required inbound: Filters incoming Telnet Use the ACL to control user login acl [ ipv6 ] acl-number { inbound | packets. by source IP address outbound } outbound: Filters outgoing Telnet packets. Configuring source and destination IP-based login control over Telnet users Advanced ACLs can match both source and destination IP addresses of packets, so you can use advanced ACLs to implement source and destination IP-based login control over Telnet users.
  • Page 77: Source Mac-Based Login Control Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks rule [ rule-id ] { permit | deny } Configure rules for the ACL Required rule-string Exit the advanced ACL view quit — user-interface [ type ] first-number Enter user interface view — [ last-number ] Required Use the ACL to control user login acl acl-number inbound...
  • Page 78: Configuring Source Ip-Based Login Control Over Nms Users

    Configuring source IP-based login control over NMS users You can log in to the NMS to remotely manage the devices. SNMP is used for communication between the NMS and the agent that resides in the device. By using the ACL, you can control SNMP user access to the device.
  • Page 79: Source Ip-Based Login Control Over Nms Users Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks snmp-agent usm-user { v1 | v2c } user-name group-name [ acl acl-number ] snmp-agent usm-user v3 Associate the user with the ACL user-name group-name [ [ cipher ] authentication-mode { md5 | sha } auth-password [ privacy-mode { 3des | aes128 | des56 } priv-password ] ] [ acl acl-number ]...
  • Page 80: Ftp Configuration

    FTP configuration FTP overview Introduction to FTP The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is an application layer protocol used to share files between server and client over a TCP/IP network. FTP uses TCP ports 20 and 21. Port 20 is used to transmit data, and port 21 is used to transmit control commands.
  • Page 81: Configuring The Ftp Client

    Table 8 Configuration when the device serves as the FTP client Device Configuration Remarks If the remote FTP server supports anonymous FTP, the device can log in to it directly; if not, Use the ftp command to establish the Device (FTP client) the device must obtain the FTP username and connection to the remote FTP server password first to log in to the remote FTP...
  • Page 82: Establishing An Ftp Connection

    Establishing an FTP connection Before you can access the FTP server, you must establish a connection from the FTP client to the FTP server. You can either use the ftp command to establish the connection directly or use the open command in FTP client view to establish the connection.
  • Page 83: Managing Directories On The Ftp Server

    To do… Use the command… Remarks view. ftp ipv6 Log in to the remote FTP server open ipv6 server-address indirectly in FTP client view [ service-port ] [ -i interface-type interface-number ] Managing directories on the FTP server After the device serving as the FTP client has established a connection with an FTP server, you can create or delete folders under the authorized directory of the FTP server.
  • Page 84: Using Another Username To Log In To The Ftp Server

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional The ls command displays the name Display detailed information about of a directory or file only, while the a directory or file on the remote FTP dir [ remotefile [ localfile ] ] dir command displays detailed server information such as the file size...
  • Page 85: Maintaining And Debugging The Ftp Connection

    Maintaining and debugging the FTP connection After a device serving as the FTP client has established a connection with the FTP server, you can perform the following operations to locate and diagnose FTP connection problems. For more information about establishing an FTP connection, see “Establishing an FTP connection.”...
  • Page 86 Figure 33 Network diagram for FTPing a system software image file from an FTP server Configuration procedure CAUTION: If the available memory space of the device is not enough, use the fixdisk command to clear the memory file or use the delete/unreserved command to delete the files not in use and then perform the following operations.
  • Page 87: Ftp Client Configuration Example (For Irf Mode)

    Specify newest.app as the main system software image file for next startup of the standby MPU (in • slot 1). <Sysname> boot-loader file slot1#flash:/newest.app slot 1 main This command will set the boot file of the specified board. Continue? [Y/N]:y The specified file will be used as the main boot file at the next reboot on slot 1! # Reboot the device.
  • Page 88 <Sysname> ftp 10.1.1.1 Trying 10.1.1.1 ... Connected to 10.1.1.1. 220 WFTPD 2.0 service (by Texas Imperial Software) ready for new user User(10.1.1.1:(none)):abc 331 Give me your password, please Password: 230 Logged in successfully # Set the file transfer mode to binary. [ftp] binary 200 Type set to I.
  • Page 89: Configuring The Ftp Server

    The specified file will be used as the main boot file at the next reboot on chassis 2 slot 0! <Sysname> boot-loader file chassis2#slot1#flash:/newest.app chassis 2 slot 1 main This command will set the boot file of the specified board. Continue? [Y/N]:y The specified file will be used as the main boot file at the next reboot on chassis 2 slot 1! # Reboot the IRF fabric, and the system software image file is updated at the system reboot.
  • Page 90: Configuring Authentication And Authorization On The Ftp Server

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Manually release the FTP connection established with the free ftp user username Optional specified username Configuring authentication and authorization on the FTP server To allow an FTP user to access certain directories on the FTP server, you must create an account for the user, authorize the user to access the directories, and configure a password for the user.
  • Page 91: Ftp Server Configuration Example (For Standalone Mode)

    FTP server configuration example (for standalone mode) Network requirements • As shown in Figure 35, use the device as an FTP server, and the PC as the FTP client. Their IP addresses are 1.2.1.1/16 and 1.1.1.1/16 respectively. The device and PC can reach each other. The PC keeps the updated system software image file of the device.
  • Page 92 # Log in to the FTP server through FTP. c:\> ftp 1.1.1.1 Connected to 1.1.1.1. 220 FTP service ready. User(1.1.1.1:(none)):abc 331 Password required for abc. Password: 230 User logged in. # Download the configuration file config.cfg of the device to the PC for backup. ftp>...
  • Page 93: Ftp Server Configuration Example (For Irf Mode)

    FTP server configuration example (for IRF mode) Network requirements • As shown in Figure 36, an IRF fabric comprises a master and a slave device. The member ID of the master is 1, and the slot numbers of the active MPU and the standby MPU on the master are 0 and 1 respectively.
  • Page 94 [Sysname] ftp server enable [Sysname] quit Configure the PC (FTP client) # Log in to the FTP server through FTP. c:\> ftp 1.1.1.1 Connected to 1.1.1.1. 220 FTP service ready. User(1.1.1.1:(none)):abc 331 Password required for abc. Password: 230 User logged in. # Download the configuration file config.cfg of the IRF fabric to the PC for backup.
  • Page 95: Displaying And Maintaining Ftp

    <Sysname> boot-loader file chassis2#slot1#flash:/newest.app chassis 2 slot 1 main This command will set the boot file of the specified board. Continue? [Y/N]:y The specified file will be used as the main boot file at the next reboot on chassis 2 slot 1! # Reboot the IRF fabric, and the system software image file is updated at the system reboot.
  • Page 96: Tftp Configuration

    TFTP configuration TFTP overview Introduction to TFTP The Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) provides functions similar to those provided by FTP, but it is less complex than FTP in interactive access interface and authentication. It is more suitable in environments where complex interaction is not needed between client and server.
  • Page 97: Configuring The Tftp Client

    This mode is more secure but consumes more memory. HP recommends that you use the secure mode or, if you use the normal mode, specify a filename that does not exist in the target directory.
  • Page 98: Displaying And Maintaining The Tftp Client

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Use an ACL to control the device’s By default, no ACL is used to tftp-server [ ipv6 ] acl acl-number access to TFTP servers control the device’s access to TFTP servers. Optional tftp client source { interface Specify the source IP address of By default, the source IP address interface-type interface-number | ip...
  • Page 99 Figure 38 Smooth upgrading using the TFTP client function Configuration procedure Configure the PC (TFTP server), the configuration procedure is omitted. On the PC, enable the TFTP server • Configure a TFTP working directory • Configure the device (TFTP client) CAUTION: If the available memory space of the device is not enough, use the fixdisk command to clear the memory file...
  • Page 100: Tftp Client Configuration Example (For Irf Mode)

    TFTP client configuration example (for IRF mode) Network requirements As shown in Figure 39, an IRF fabric comprises a master and a slave device. The member ID of the • master is 1, and the slot numbers of the active MPU and the standby MPU on the master are 0 and 1 respectively.
  • Page 101 This command will set the boot file of the specified board. Continue? [Y/N]:y The specified file will be used as the main boot file at the next reboot on chassis 1 slot 0! <Sysname> boot-loader file chassis1#slot1#flash:/newest.app chassis 1 slot 1 main This command will set the boot file of the specified board.
  • Page 102: File Management

    File management Managing files Files such as host software and configuration files that are necessary for the operation of the device are saved in the storage media of the device. You can manage files on your device through these operations: Performing file operations, Performing directory...
  • Page 103: Performing File Operations

    Format Description Length Example a.cfg indicates a file named a.cfg in the current working directory. If the current working directory is on the active MPU of the IRF fabric (the active MPU of the master), Specifies a file in the current 1 to 91 a.cfg represents file a.cfg on the file-name...
  • Page 104: Displaying The Contents Of A File

    Displaying the contents of a file To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Currently only text files can be Display the contents of a file more file-url displayed. Available in user view Renaming a file To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Rename a file...
  • Page 105: Restoring A File From The Recycle Bin

    Restoring a file from the recycle bin To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Restore a file from the recycle bin undelete file-url Available in user view Emptying the recycle bin To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional If the original directory of the file to Enter the original working be deleted is not the current cd { directory | ..
  • Page 106: Creating A Directory

    Creating a directory To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Create a directory mkdir directory Available in user view Removing a directory To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Remove a directory rmdir directory Available in user view NOTE: Before you remove a directory, you must delete all the files and the subdirectory in this directory. To •...
  • Page 107: Performing Batch Operations

    By default, a storage medium is automatically mounted when connected to the device. However, • when a storage medium is connected to a lower version system, the system cannot recognize the storage medium. To perform read and write operations to the storage medium, you must mount it. •...
  • Page 108: Example For File Operations

    alert: The system warns you about operations that may cause problems such as file corruption and • data loss. To prevent incorrect operations, the alert mode is preferred. • quiet: The system does not prompt confirmation for any operation. Follow these steps to set a prompt mode: To do…...
  • Page 109: Configuration File Management

    Configuration file management The device provides the configuration file management function. You can manage configuration files on the user-friendly command line interface (CLI). Configuration file overview A configuration file saves the device configurations as a set of text commands. You can save the current configuration to a configuration file so that the configuration takes effect after you reboot the device.
  • Page 110: Coexistence Of Multiple Configuration Files

    The commands are listed in sections by views, usually in this order: system view, interface view, • routing protocol view, and user interface view. • Sections are separated with one or more blank lines or comment lines that start with a pound sign A configuration file ends with a return.
  • Page 111: Selecting The Modes For Saving The Configuration File

    In IRF mode • When the configuration file auto-save function is enabled, and you save the current configuration by executing the save [ safely ] [ force ] command or executing the save filename all command and then pressing Enter, each MPU of an IRF fabric automatically saves the current configuration to the specified configuration file, and use this file as the startup configuration file, keeping the consistency of the configuration files on the active MPU and standby MPUs of the IRF fabric.
  • Page 112: Setting Configuration Rollback

    If the configuration file is generated by another device, the file must comply with the format of the configuration file on the current device. HP recommends that you use the configuration file generated by using the backup function. You can apply configuration rollback in these situations: Running configuration error.
  • Page 113: Configuration Task List

    Preserves all commands present in both the replacement configuration file and the running • configuration. • Removes commands from the running configuration that are not present in the replacement configuration file. Applies the commands from the replacement configuration file that are not present in the running •...
  • Page 114: Enabling Automatic Saving Of The Running Configuration

    If the device configuration does not change frequently, manually save the running configuration as • needed HP recommends that you save the running configuration manually, or configure automatic saving • with an interval longer than 1,440 minutes (24 hours).
  • Page 115: Manually Saving The Running Configuration

    If a high-speed storage media (such as a CF card) is used and the device configuration changes • frequently, set a shorter saving interval. Follow these steps to enable automatic saving of the running configuration: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view...
  • Page 116: Specifying A Startup Configuration File

    CAUTION: Do not unplug and plug a card during configuration rollback (that is, the system is executing the configuration replace file command). Configuration rollback may fail if one of the following situations is present (if a command cannot be rolled back, the system skips it and processes the next one): The actual undo form of a command differs from the complete undo form of the command.
  • Page 117: Backing Up The Startup Configuration File

    Backing up the startup configuration file The backup function allows you to copy the startup configuration file from the device to the TFTP server. Follow the step below to back up the startup configuration file: To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Back up the startup configuration...
  • Page 118: Displaying And Maintaining A Configuration File

    The restore function allows you to copy a configuration file from a TFTP server to the root directory of the storage media of each MPU of an IRF fabric and specify the file as the startup configuration file. Follow the step below to restore a startup configuration file: To do…...
  • Page 119: Software Upgrade Configuration

    Software upgrade configuration Device software overview The device software comprises the Boot ROM and the system software images. After the device is powered on, it runs the Boot ROM image, initializes hardware, and displays the hardware information. Then the device runs the system software image, which provides drivers and adaption for hardware and implements service features.
  • Page 120: Software Upgrade Through A System Reboot

    Upgrade method Upgrade object Description • Hotfix is a fast, cost-effective method to repair software defects of a device. • Compared with software version upgrade, hotfix can upgrade the software without interrupting the running services of the device. In other words, it can repair the Software upgrade by System software software defects of the current version without rebooting...
  • Page 121: Upgrading System Software Through A System Reboot

    Upgrading system software through a system reboot In standalone mode Save the system software image to the root directory of the active MPU's storage media by using a method such as FTP or TFTP. Copy the system software image to the root directory of the storage device of the standby MPU. Specify the system software image to be used at the next boot of the active MPU and standby MPU respectively at the CLI.
  • Page 122: Software Upgrade By Installing Hotfixes

    Software upgrade by installing hotfixes Hotfix can repair software defects of the current version without rebooting the switch, protecting the running services of the switch from being interrupted. Basic concepts in hotfix Patch and patch file A patch, also called patch unit, is a package used to fix software defects. Generally, patches are released as patch files.
  • Page 123 Figure 41 Relationship between patch state changes and command actions NOTE: Information about patch states is saved in file patchstate on the Flash. HP recommends that you do not operate this file. IDLE state Patches in the IDLE state are not loaded. You cannot install or run the patches, as shown in Figure 42 this example, the memory patch area can load up to eight patches).
  • Page 124 DEACTIVE state Patches in the DEACTIVE state have been loaded to the memory patch area but have not yet run in the system. Suppose that there are seven patches in the patch file to be loaded. After the seven patches successfully pass the version check and CRC check, they are loaded to the memory patch area and are in the DEACTIVE state.
  • Page 125: Hotfix Configuration Task List

    Figure 45 Patches are running Hotfix configuration task list Task Remarks Installing a patch in one step Use either approach. Install patches The step-by-step patch installation allows you to Installing a patch step-by-step control the patch status. Uninstalling a patch step-by-step Optional Configuration prerequisites Patches are released per switch model or card type.
  • Page 126: Installing A Patch In One Step

    NOTE: In standalone mode, the loading and installation are performed on all cards that are in position and OAM CPU, so before these operations, save the patch files for the active MPU or LPU to the root directory of the active MPU's storage media, and save the patch files for the standby MPU to the root directory of the standby MPU's storage media.
  • Page 127: Installing A Patch Step-By-Step

    Configure the patch file location patch location patch-location flash: by default NOTE: HP recommends that you save the patch file to the root directory of the Flash. patch-location In standalone mode, the directory specified by the argument must exist on both the active MPU and standby MPU.
  • Page 128 Loading a patch file Loading the correct patch files is the basis of other hotfixing operations. • If you install a patch from a patch file, the system loads a patch file from the Flash by default. If you install a patch from a patch package, the system finds the correct patch file in the patch •...
  • Page 129: Uninstalling A Patch Step-By-Step

    Confirming running patches After you confirm that the installed patch is running, the patch state changes to RUNNING, and the patch is in the normal running stage. After the device is reset or rebooted, the patch is still valid. Follow these steps to confirm the running of patches in standalone mode: To do…...
  • Page 130: Displaying And Maintaining Software Upgrade

    [ | { begin | Display the patch information Available in any view exclude | include } regular-expression ] NOTE: In an IRF fabric, HP recommends that you uninstall all patches by using the undo patch install command in one operation.
  • Page 131: Software Upgrade Configuration Examples

    Software upgrade configuration examples Immediate upgrade configuration example (for standalone mode) Network requirements As shown in Figure 46, the current software version is soft-version1, and Boot ROM version is • bootrom-version1 for the device. Immediately upgrade the software version and Boot ROM version of the device to soft-version2 and bootrom-version2 respectively through remote operations.
  • Page 132: Immediate Upgrade Configuration Example (For Irf Mode)

    CAUTION: If the size of the Flash on the device is not large enough, delete the original system software images from the Flash before downloading. # Before upgrade, execute the save command to save the current configuration (configuration procedure is omitted). # Log in to the FTP server (The prompt may vary with servers.) <Device>...
  • Page 133 Configure the TFTP server (configurations may vary with different types of servers) Obtain the system software image and configuration file through legitimate channels, such as the official website of HP, agents, and technical staff. Save these files under the TFTP server’s working path for the access of the TFTP clients.
  • Page 134: Hotfix Configuration Example (For Standalone Mode)

    <IRF> tftp 2.2.2.2 get soft-version2.app chassis2#slot0#flash:/soft-version2.app <IRF> tftp 2.2.2.2 get soft-version2.app chassis2#slot1#flash:/soft-version2.app # Specify file new-config.cfg as the startup configuration file for all member switches of the IRF fabric. <IRF> startup saved-configuration new-config.cfg main Please wait ... Setting the master board ..
  • Page 135 Figure 48 Network diagram of hotfix configuration TFTP server TFTP client 2.2.2.2/24 1.1.1.1/24 Internet Device Configuration procedure Configure FTP Server. The configuration varies depending on server type and the configuration procedure is omitted. • Enable the TFTP server function. Save the patch files patch_mpu.bin, patch_lpu.bin, and patch_lpo.bin to the directory of the TFTP •...
  • Page 136: Issu Overview

    ISSU also provides a version rollback function to enable fast version rollback, and provides relevant display commands to help you understand version compatibility information and verify the state of the upgrade process. ISSU provides more functionality than other upgrade methods. HP recommends that you use ISSU to upgrade your switch.
  • Page 137: Issu States

    ISSU states The ISSU upgrade process is accomplished through the execution of a series of commands, which must be executed in a specific sequence. The display issu state command displays the current ISSU state, upgrade version, old version, version compatibility state, and upgrade method to determine the next operation to be executed.
  • Page 138: Compatible

    Compatible The fundamental modules that support the operation of your switch and the service modules are compatible. The ISSU upgrade between the two versions can successfully proceed. You can select an upgrade method according to the operating mode of your switch: Standalone mode ”ISSU configuration (standalone mode).”...
  • Page 139 Verify the running status and current software version of each card with the display device command. Ensure that your switch has two MPUs and all cards operate normally. Verify the system software image information with the display boot-loader command. Ensure that the active MPU and the standby MPU use the same system software image, which means the two files have the same file path, name, and content.
  • Page 140: Issu Configuration

    ISSU configuration NOTE: For how to upgrade system software by rebooting the whole switch, see the chapter “Software upgrade configuration.” ISSU configuration (standalone mode) ISSU upgrade (compatible) Follow these steps to perform an ISSU upgrade To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view...
  • Page 141: Issu Upgrade (Incompatible)

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional The value of the slot-number argument provided in this command must be the same as that specified in the issu load Accept the ISSU upgrade issu accept slot slot-number command. With this command executed, the system deletes the rollback timer and does not perform the auto-rollback operation in this upgrade process.
  • Page 142: Mpu-Based Issu Upgrade (Compatible)

    NOTE: Avoid modifying the current configuration, rebooting a card, plugging or unplugging cables that connect IRF ports, performing an active and standby switchover, or deleting or modifying the system software image during the ISSU upgrade; otherwise, upgrade failure may occur. MPU-based ISSU upgrade (compatible) Execute the display version comp-matrix file upgrading-filename command, and then view the command output.
  • Page 143: Member Switch-Based Issu Upgrade (Compatible)

    Member switch-based ISSU upgrade (compatible) Execute the display version comp-matrix file upgrading-filename command, and then view the command output. If the compatibility information between the current version and the upgrade version is displayed as Compatible, follow the steps in Table 13 to perform an ISSU upgrade.
  • Page 144: Version Rollback

    Table 14 Member switch-based ISSU upgrade (incompatible) To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required chassis-number is the member ID of a slave switch. issu load file upgrading-filename Upgrade a slave switch Execution of this command reboots a chassis chassis-number force slave switch.
  • Page 145 NOTE: If the versions are compatible, after execution of the issu commit command, the ISSU upgrade is completed and the configuration can neither be automatically nor manually rolled back. To roll back the configuration to the previous version, start a new ISSU upgrade process. If the versions are incompatible, after execution of the issu run switchover command, the ISSU upgrade is completed, the rollback timer is deleted, and the configuration can neither be automatically nor manually rolled back.
  • Page 146: Displaying And Maintaining Issu

    Displaying and maintaining ISSU To do… Use the command… Remarks display issu rollback-timer [ | Display information about the { begin | exclude | include } Available in any view rollback timer regular-expression ] display issu state [ | { begin | Display the ISSU upgrade state exclude | include } Available in any view...
  • Page 147: Issu Configuration Example

    Configure the TFTP server (The configuration varies with server types) Obtain the new system software image through legal channels (such as HP official websites, agents, or technical staff), and then save the file in the working path on the TFTP server to make the file accessible to the TFTP client.
  • Page 148: Issu Configuration Example (Incompatible)

    Running Version:6606L07 Version Compatibility List: 6606L08 (Compatible) chassis 0 slot 2: Hotfix chassis 0 slot 5: Hotfix chassis 0 slot 6: Hotfix The output shows that the current version and the new version are completely compatible, all LPUs can be upgraded by installing hotfixes, and the ISSU upgrade will not interrupt the services on the LPUs.
  • Page 149 Obtain the right system software image for the software version upgrade through legal channels (such as HP official websites, agents, or technical staff), and then save the file to the working path on the TFTP server to make the file accessible to the TFTP client.
  • Page 150: Irf Mode

    Obtain the right system software image for the software version upgrade through legal channels (such as HP official websites, agents, or technical staff), and then save the file to the working path on the TFTP server to make the file accessible to the TFTP client.
  • Page 151 <IRF> copy soft-version2.app chassis2#slot1#flash:/ # Display the compatibility information between soft-version2.app and the current version. <IRF> display version comp-matrix file soft-version2.app Number of Matrices in Table = 1 Matrix for HP A7503 Running Version:6606L07 Version Compatibility List: 6606L08 (Compatible) chassis 1 slot 2: Hotfix...
  • Page 152: Member Switch-Based Issu Upgrade Configuration Example (Compatible)

    Obtain the right system software image for the software version upgrade through legal channels (such as HP official websites, agents, or technical staff), and then save the file to the working path on the TFTP server to make the file accessible to the TFTP client.
  • Page 153 <IRF> copy soft-version2.app chassis2#slot1#flash:/ # Display the compatibility information between soft-version2.app and the current version. <IRF> display version comp-matrix file soft-version2.app Number of Matrices in Table = 1 Matrix for HP A7503 Running Version:6606L07 Version Compatibility List: 6606L08 (Compatible) chassis 1 slot 2: Reboot...
  • Page 154: Member Switch-Based Issu Upgrade Configuration Example (Incompatible)

    Obtain the right system software image for the software version upgrade through legal channels (such as HP official websites, agents, or technical staff), and then save the file to the working path on the TFTP server to make the file accessible to the TFTP client.
  • Page 155 <IRF> copy soft-version2.app chassis2#slot1#flash:/ # Display the compatibility information between soft-version2.app and the current version. <IRF> display version comp-matrix file soft-version2.app Number of matrices = 1 Matrix for HP A7503 Running Version:6606L07 Version Compatibility List: 6606L08 (Incompatible) chassis 1 slot 2: Reboot...
  • Page 156: Device Management

    The configuration tasks in this document are all optional and independent from one another. Enabling MPU brand migration from H3C to HP Perform brand migration immediately after you set up a switch or IRF fabric that has both H3C and HP MPUs. The migration prevents network management software, for example, IMC, from mistakenly...
  • Page 157: Changing The System Time

    Optional Configure the device name sysname sysname The default device name is HP. Changing the system time You must synchronize your device with a trusted time source by using NTP or changing the system time before you run it on the network. Network management depends on an accurate system time setting, because the timestamps of system messages and logs use the system time.
  • Page 158 Command Effective system time Configuration example System time 03:00:00 ss Sat 01/01/2005 NOTE: If the original system time The original system time plus summer-offset is in the daylight saving time clock summer-time ss beyond the daylight saving one-off 00:30 range: time range, the original 2005/1/1 1:00...
  • Page 159 Command Effective system time Configuration example System time Original system clock ± clock timezone zone-offset outside the zone-time add 1 daylight saving time 02:00:00 zone-time Sat clock summer-time ss range: 01/01/2005 one-off 1:00 2007/1/1 1:00 Original system clock ± 2007/8/8 2 zone-offset 2, 3 or 3, 2 Original system clock ±...
  • Page 160: Configuration Procedure

    Configuration procedure Follow these steps to change the system time: To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the system time and date clock datetime time date Available in user view. Enter system view system-view — Optional clock timezone zone-name { add | Set the time zone Universal time coordinated (UTC) minus } zone-offset...
  • Page 161 Banner types You can configure the following banners: • Legal banner appears after the system displays the copyright or license statement for a user attempting to log in. To continue authentication or login, the user must enter Y or press Enter. To quit the process, the user must enter N.
  • Page 162: Configuration Procedure

    <System> system-view [System] header shell AHave a nice day. Please input banner content, and quit with the character 'A'.――System prompt Please input the Password!A Configuration procedure Follow these steps to configure banners: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view —...
  • Page 163: Rebooting A Card Or Switch Immediately At The Cli

    Power off and then re-power on the switch. This method might cause data loss and hardware • damage, and is the least preferred method. Reboot at the CLI enables easy remote device maintenance. CAUTION: A reboot can interrupt network services. •...
  • Page 164: Configuring Jobs

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Schedule a reboot to occur at a Required schedule reboot at hh:mm [ date ] specific time and date Use either command. The scheduled reboot function is disabled by default. Schedule a reboot to occur after a schedule reboot delay { hh:mm | delay mm }...
  • Page 165: Configuration Guidelines

    Configuration guidelines To have a job successfully run a command, check that the specified view and command are valid. • The system does not verify their validity. After job execution, the configuration interface, view, and user status that you have before job •...
  • Page 166: Configuring The Detection Timer

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Configure a command to run at a specific time and date: time time-id at time date command command Configure a command to run at a specific time: Required time time-id { one-off | repeating } Add commands to the job at time [ month-date month-day | Use any of the commands.
  • Page 167: Clearing Unused 16-Bit Interface Indexes

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional For the default temperature thresholds, Table temperature-limit slot slot-number Configure temperature The warning and alarming thresholds hotspot sensor-number lowerlimit thresholds for a card must be higher than the low temperature warninglimit [ alarmlimit ] threshold.
  • Page 168: Enabling Load Sharing Between Mpus

    NOTE: In an IRF fabric, the command applies to all member switches. • A confirmation is required when you execute this command. The command will not run if you enter N to • cancel the operation or fail to make a confirmation within 30 seconds. Enabling load sharing between MPUs By default, the active MPU and the standby MPU are not load shared, and only the active MPU forwards traffic between LPUs.
  • Page 169: Setting The Operating Mode Of A Card

    CAUTION: To avoid loops, enable strict standby mode before you connect the ports on the MPUs to the upstream devices. Setting the operating mode of a card Introduction to card operating modes MPU operating modes Table 17 to set the operating mode of the MPUs on your A7500 switches. Table 17 Working modes and MPU compatibility matrix Recommended MPU model...
  • Page 170: Configuration Procedure

    Table 18 Operating modes and LPU compatibility matrix Recommended EB/SD SC/SRP2XB Operating mode Feature highlights application cards SLAVE scenario Uses the default MAC address normal Common networks Supported Supported table and routing table A large MAC Increases the MAC address bridging address table is Supported...
  • Page 171 To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Optional Set the MPU operating mode (in switch-mode { l2-enhanced | The default operating mode of all standalone mode) standard } MPUs except the LSQ1SRP1CB is standard. Optional Set the MPU operating mode (in switch-mode { l2-enhanced | The default operating mode of all IRF mode)
  • Page 172: Enabling Lpu Forwarding Proxy

    Enabling LPU forwarding proxy Introduction to LPU forwarding proxy LPU forwarding proxy enables the switch to use one high-performance LPU to forward traffic for overloaded LPUs or provide extended services. By default, LPU forwarding proxy is disabled. If the switch has two MPUs, the active MPU can forward or process traffic for LPUs.
  • Page 173: Configuration Procedure

    Configuration procedure Follow these steps to enable LPU forwarding proxy: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — In standalone mode: switch-mode optional-proxy-board Required Enable LPU forwarding proxy In IRF mode: By default, LPU forwarding proxy is disabled. switch-mode optional-proxy-board chassis chassis-number Enabling the port-down function globally...
  • Page 174: Verifying And Diagnosing Transceiver Modules

    Verifying and diagnosing transceiver modules Verifying transceiver modules You can verify the genuineness of a transceiver module in the following ways: Display the key parameters of a transceiver module, including its transceiver type, connector type, • central wavelength of the transmit laser, transfer distance and vendor name. •...
  • Page 175: Displaying And Maintaining Device Management Configuration

    Displaying and maintaining device management configuration For diagnosis or troubleshooting, you can use separate display commands to collect running status data module by module, or use the display diagnostic-information command to bulk collect running data for multiple modules. The display diagnostic-information command equals this set of commands: display clock, display version, display device, and display current-configuration.
  • Page 176 To do… Use the command… Remarks display power [ power-id ] [ | { begin | Display the power state Available in any view exclude | include } regular-expression ] Display the operating modes of all display switch-mode status [ | { begin | Available in any view cards exclude | include } regular-expression ]...
  • Page 177 To do… Use the command… Remarks display device manuinfo [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number ] ] [ | Display electronic label data Available in any view { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] display environment [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number ] ] [ | Display temperature statistics Available in any view...
  • Page 178: Index

    MPUs,161 Checking command-line errors,9 Enabling LPU forwarding proxy,165 Clearing unused 16-bit interface indexes,160 Enabling MPU brand migration from H3C to HP,149 views,2 Enabling strict standby mode for the network ports on Command conventions,1 MPUs,161 Configuration file overview,102 Enabling the port-down function...
  • Page 179 Performing batch operations,100 Standalone mode,140 Performing directory operations,98 Performing file operations,96 TFTP client configuration example (for IRF mode),93 Performing storage medium operations,99 TFTP client configuration example (for standalone mode),91 TFTP overview,89 Rebooting a card or switch,155 Typing commands,5 Restoring a startup configuration file,1 10 Undo form of a command,2...
  • Page 180: Support And Other Resources

    Related information Documents To find related documents, browse to the Manuals page of the HP Business Support Center website: http://www.hp.com/support/manuals For related documentation, navigate to the Networking section, and select a networking category. •...
  • Page 181 Conventions This section describes the conventions used in this documentation set. Command conventions Convention Description Boldface Bold text represents commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown. Italic Italic text represents arguments that you replace with actual values. Square brackets enclose syntax choices (keywords or arguments) that are optional. Braces enclose a set of required syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from which { x | y | ...
  • Page 182 Network topology icons Represents a generic network device, such as a router, switch, or firewall. Represents a routing-capable device, such as a router or Layer 3 switch. Represents a generic switch, such as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 switch, or a router that supports Layer 2 forwarding and other Layer 2 features.