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ASR 5000 Installation Guide
Last updated September 30, 2015
Americas Headquarters
Cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-1706
USA
http://www.cisco.com
Tel: 408 526-4000
800 553-NETS (6387)
Fax: 408 527-0883

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   Summary of Contents for Cisco ASR 5000 Series

  • Page 1

    ASR 5000 Installation Guide Last updated September 30, 2015 Americas Headquarters Cisco Systems, Inc. 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-1706 http://www.cisco.com Tel: 408 526-4000 800 553-NETS (6387) Fax: 408 527-0883...

  • Page 2

    ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. Cisco and the Cisco Logo are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    CONTENTS About this Guide ....................xi Conventions Used ........................... xii Dimensions .............................. xii Related Documentation .......................... xiii Contacting Customer Support ........................ xiii ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ............15 The ASR 5000 Platform .......................... 16 Chassis Configurations ........................... 17 Chassis Description ..........................21 Slot Numbering ...........................

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    ▀ Contents Optical Line Card (OLC2) ........................46 Channelized Line Card (CLC2) ......................48 Card Interlock Switch ..........................51 Card Identifiers ............................52 Installation Procedure Overview ..............55 Chassis Components ..........................56 Installation at a Glance ........................... 58 Required Tools and Equipment ......................59 Hand Tools ............................

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents ▀ Connecting to the Management LAN ....................109 Using the SFP Interfaces ......................... 109 Using the Ethernet RJ-45 Interfaces ....................111 Connecting to the Serial Console Port ....................113 DB-9 to RJ-45 Adapter ........................114 USB to DB-9 Adapter ........................115 Connecting to the Console Port .......................

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    ▀ Contents SPIO Run/Fail LED States ......................168 SPIO Active LED States ....................... 169 SPIO Standby LED States ......................169 SPIO Interface Link LED States ....................170 SPIO Interface Activity LED States ....................170 Checking the LEDs on the Ethernet Line Cards ................171 Ethernet Line Card Run/Fail LED States ..................

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Contents ▀ Replacing a Power Filter Unit ................ 219 Determining that a PFU has Failed ...................... 220 Removing the Failed PFU ........................221 Installing the Replacement PFU ......................224 What to do with the Failed PFU ......................227 Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray ............. 229 Determining Whether a Fan Tray Needs Replacing ................

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    Re-packaging Your RMA ........................306 Shipping Multiple Components ......................306 Sealing the Shipment ........................307 Labeling the Shipment ........................307 Cisco Return Locations ........................307 Packaging ASR 5000 Cards ......................... 308 Application Cards ..........................308 Application Card Types ........................ 308 Packaging an Application Card ....................

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    Contents ▀ Spare Component Recommendations............317 ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 11: About This Guide

    About this Guide This Installation Guide pertains to the features and functionality that run on and/or that are associated with the Cisco® ASR 5000 platform. It describes how to unpack, install and initially configure the system. This guide also includes technical specifications and guidelines for monitoring system operation.

  • Page 12: Conventions Used

    About this Guide ▀ Conventions Used Conventions Used The following tables describe the conventions used throughout this documentation. Icon Notice Type Description Information Note Provides information about important features or instructions. Caution Alerts you of potential damage to a program, device, or system. Warning Alerts you of potential personal injury or fatality.

  • Page 13: Related Documentation, Contacting Customer Support

    Use the information in this section to contact customer support. Refer to the support area of http://www.cisco.com for up-to-date product documentation or to submit a service request. A valid username and password are required to access this site. Please contact your Cisco sales or service representative for additional information.

  • Page 15: Asr 5000 Hardware Platform Overview

    Chapter 1 ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview This chapter describes the hardware components that comprise the ASR 5000. It includes the following sections:  The ASR 5000 Platform  Chassis Configurations  Chassis Description  Power Filter Units  Fan Tray Assemblies ...

  • Page 16: The Asr 5000 Platform

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ The ASR 5000 Platform The ASR 5000 Platform The ASR 5000 multimedia core platform is designed for deployment in multimedia-enabled core networks. It features a distributed architecture that allows all tasks and services to be allocated across the entire platform. This platform allows operators to deploy more efficient mobile networks that support a greater number of concurrent calls, optimize resource usage, and deliver enhanced services, while providing scalability.

  • Page 17: Chassis Configurations

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Chassis Configurations ▀ Chassis Configurations The system is designed to scale from a minimum configuration, as shown in the table below, to a fully-loaded redundant configuration containing a maximum of 48 cards. If session recovery is enabled, the minimum number of packet processing cards per chassis increases from one to four cards.

  • Page 18

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Chassis Configurations Component Supported Redundant HW Redundant HW + SW Maximum per Chassis ASR 5000 Configuration Configuration (Note 2) Product (Note 1) Optical Line Card 2 (OLC2) SGSN only Channelized Line Card 2 (CLC2) SGSN only Notes:...

  • Page 19

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Chassis Configurations ▀ Figure 2. Chassis Components (front and rear views) This diagram shows exploded views of the front and rear chassis components. They are described below. Table 2. Chassis and Sub-component Identification Key Item Description Chassis: Supports 16 front-loading slots for application cards and 32 rear-loading slots for line cards.

  • Page 20

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Chassis Configurations Item Description Lower fan tray cover/EMI shield: Secures the lower fan tray assembly in place and serves as an EMI shield. The cover also provides an air baffle allowing air to enter into the chassis. Lower bezel: Covers the lower fan tray bay.

  • Page 21: Chassis Description

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Chassis Description ▀ Chassis Description Slot Numbering The ASR 5000 chassis features a 48-slot design with 16 front-loading slots for application cards and 32 rear-loading slots (16 upper and 16 lower) for line cards. ASR 5000. Figure 3.

  • Page 22: Rear Slot Numbering For Half-height Line Cards

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Chassis Description Rear Slot Numbering for Half-Height Line Cards Rear-installed line cards must be installed directly behind their respective front-loaded application card. For example, an application card in Slot 1 must have a corresponding line card in Slot 17. The redundant line card for this configuration would be placed in Slot 33.

  • Page 23: Midplane Architecture

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Chassis Description ▀ Midplane Architecture The midplane separates the front and rear chassis slots. The connectors on the midplane provide intra-chassis communications, power connections, and data transport paths between the various installed cards. The midplane also contains two independent -48 VDC busses (not shown) that distribute redundant power to each card within the chassis.

  • Page 24: Gbps Switch Fabric

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Chassis Description The following subsections describe each bus. 320 Gbps Switch Fabric The System Management Card (SMC) is an IP-based (packetized) switch fabric that provides a transport path for user data throughout the system. Its 320 Gbps switch fabric establishes inter-card communication between the SMCs and other application cards within the chassis along with their associated line cards.

  • Page 25: Oc-48 Tdm Bus

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Chassis Description ▀ Figure 5. RCC Logical View Each RCC facilitates 28 links:  One link with each of the 14 packet processing card slots  One link with each of the line card slots ...

  • Page 26: Power Filter Units

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Power Filter Units Power Filter Units Located at the bottom rear of the chassis are slots for two 165-amp Power Filter Unit (PFU) assemblies. Each PFU provides DC power from the site’s power distribution frame (PDF) to the chassis and its associated cards. Each load- sharing PFU operates independently of the other to ensure maximum power feed redundancy.

  • Page 27: Fan Tray Assemblies

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Fan Tray Assemblies ▀ Fan Tray Assemblies There are two fan tray assemblies within the chassis. A lower fan tray intakes ambient air and an upper fan tray exhausts warmed air from the chassis. Each fan tray is connected to both PFUs to ensure power feed redundancy. Both fan tray assemblies are variable speed units that automatically adjust fan speed based on temperature or failover situations.

  • Page 28: Upper Fan Tray

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Fan Tray Assemblies Figure 8. Particulate Air Filter Important: A replacement air filter is shipped with each chassis. A minimum of one replacement air filter for each deployed chassis should be kept on site. This allows qualified service personnel to quickly replace the filter when necessary.

  • Page 29: Application Cards

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Application Cards ▀ Application Cards The following application cards are supported by the system. System Management Card (SMC) The SMC serves as the primary system controller, initializing the entire system and loading the software’s configuration image into other cards in the chassis as applicable.

  • Page 30

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Application Cards Figure 10. System Management Card (SMC) Table 6. SMC Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers —Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch —Sliding this switch downward on an active SMC initiates an immediate switchover to the standby SMC.

  • Page 31: Smc Raid Support

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Application Cards ▀ Item Description PC-Card/PCMCIA Slot—Stores or moves software, diagnostics, and other information. System Alarm Speaker—Sounds an audible alarm when specific system failures occur. Alarm Cut-Off (ACO) —Press and release this recessed toggle switch to reset the system alarm speaker and other audible or visual alarm indicators connected to the CO Alarm interface on the SPIO.

  • Page 32: Packet Processing Cards: Psc2 And Psc3

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Application Cards  Files copied/removed from CDR module to RAID disk The hard disk supports SNMP notifications which are described in the SNMP MIB Reference. Important: When the hard-disk is filled, dynamically created records files in the folder /hd-raid/record will be deleted to free up space.

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    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Application Cards ▀ Figure 11. Packet Processing Card (Generic) Table 7. Packet Processing Card (Generic) Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers —Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch —In its Down position the interlock switch notifies the system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 34: Packet Services Card (psc)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Application Cards Packet Services Card (PSC) The PSC has reached its end of life and is no longer available for purchase. It is not supported in StarOS Release 16.0+. Packet Services Card Type A (PSCA) The PSCA has reached its end of life and is no longer available for purchase.

  • Page 35: Line Cards

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Line Cards The following rear-loaded cards are currently supported by the system. Switch Processor I/O (SPIO) Card The SPIO card provides connectivity for local and remote management, CO alarming, and Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) timing input.

  • Page 36: Management Lan Interfaces

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Item Description 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet Management LAN Interfaces—Two RJ-45 interfaces, supporting 10/100 Mbps or 1 Gbps Ethernet. Console Port—RJ-45 interface used for local connectivity to the command line interface (CLI). BITS Timing Interface (Optional) —Either an analog E1 BNC coaxial connector or T1 (DS-1) 3-pin wire-wrap connector.

  • Page 37: Bits Timing

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ BITS Timing The Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) timing interface is optional and required only when the system is used in support of non-data applications. A BITS module is available on two versions of the SPIO: one supports an analog E1 BNC coaxial interface (for 2048 kHZ clocking), and the other a T1 (DS1) 3-pin wire-wrap interface (for 1544 kHz clocking).

  • Page 38: Redundancy Crossbar Card (rcc)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Redundancy Crossbar Card (RCC) The RCC uses 5 Gbps serial links to ensure connectivity between rear-mounted line cards and every non-SMC front- loaded application card slot in the system. This creates a high availability architecture that minimizes data loss and ensures session integrity.

  • Page 39: Fast Ethernet Line Card (flc2)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Fast Ethernet Line Card (FLC2) The FLC2 installs directly behind its respective packet processing card, providing network connectivity to the RAN interface and the packet data network. Each FLC2 (Ethernet 10/100) has eight RJ-45 interfaces. Each of these IEEE 802.3-compliant interfaces supports auto-sensing 10/100 Mbps Ethernet.

  • Page 40: Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (glc2)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Table 11. FLC2 Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers—Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch—In its Down position the interlock switch notifies the system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 41

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ The GLC2 supports the Star Channel (1 Gbps) for faster FPGA upgrades and is Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) 6/6 compliant. The GLC2s can be installed in chassis slots 17 through 23, 26 through 39, and 42 through 48. These cards are always installed directly behind their respective or packet processing cards, but they are not required behind any redundant packet processing cards (those operating in Standby mode).

  • Page 42: Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (qglc)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC) The QGLC is a 4-port Gigabit Ethernet line card that installs directly behind its associated packet processing card to provide network connectivity to the packet data network. There are several different versions of Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP) modules available for the QGLC.

  • Page 43: Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (xglc)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Figure 16. Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC) Table 15. QGLC Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers—Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch—In its Down position the interlock switch notifies system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 44

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards The XGLC is configured and monitored by the SMC via the system’s control bus. If the firmware needs to be upgraded. the XGLC uses the Star Channel for a faster download. Install XGLCs in chassis slots 17 through 23 and 26 through 32. These cards should always be installed directly behind their respective packet processing cards, but they are not required behind any redundant packet processing cards (those operating in Standby mode).

  • Page 45

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Figure 17. 10 Gigabit Ethernet line Card (XGLC) Table 17. XGLC Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers—Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch—In its Down position the interlock switch notifies system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 46: Optical Line Card (olc2)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Optical Line Card (OLC2) The OLC2 is labeled OLC2 OC-3/STM-1 Multi Mode (or Single Mode depending on SFP type). The OLC2 supports either OC-3 or STM-1 signaling and ATM. The OLC2 support both SDH and SONET. The basic unit of framing in SDH is STM-1 (Synchronous Transport Module level - 1), which operates at 155.52 Mbps.

  • Page 47

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Figure 18. Optical Line Card (OLC2) Table 19. OLC2 (ATM) Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers—Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch—In its Down position, the interlock switch notifies the system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 48: Channelized Line Card (clc2)

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards Channelized Line Card (CLC2) The CLC2 is also referred to as the Frame Relay line card. It provides frame relay over SONET or SDH. The CLC2 supports network connectivity through a gigabit interface to connect to the Packet Control Unit (PCU) of the base station subsystem (BSS) in a mobile network.

  • Page 49

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Line Cards ▀ Figure 19. Channelized Line Card (CLC2) Table 21. CLC2 (Frame Relay) Callouts Item Description Card Ejector Levers—Use to insert/remove card to/from chassis. Interlock Switch—In its Down position the interlock switch notifies the system to safely power down the card prior to its removal.

  • Page 50

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Line Cards  ITU-T - Recommendation G.751 Digital Multiplex Equipment Operating at the Third Order Bit Rate of 34 368 kbps and the Fourth Order Bit Rate of 139 264 kbps and Using Positive Justification, 1993. ...

  • Page 51: Card Interlock Switch

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Card Interlock Switch ▀ Card Interlock Switch Each card has a switch interlock mechanism that is integrated with the upper card ejector lever. The interlock ensures proper notification to the system before a card is removed. You cannot configure or place a card into service until you slide the card interlock switch upward.

  • Page 52: Card Identifiers

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview ▀ Card Identifiers Card Identifiers The table below cross-references ASR 5000 application and line cards by acronym, label, variant, and Cisco part identifier (PID). Table 22. ASR 5000 Component References Descriptor Acronym Label Variant Application Cards...

  • Page 53

    ASR 5000 Hardware Platform Overview Card Identifiers ▀ Descriptor Acronym Label Variant Channelized 4-port Line Card CLC2 CLC2 OC-3/STM-1 with MM SFP with SM SFP Optical 4-port (ATM) Line Card OLC2 OLC2 OC-3/STM-1 with MM SFP with SM SFP ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 55: Installation Procedure Overview

    Chapter 2 Installation Procedure Overview This chapter briefly describes the steps and tools that are required for the physical installation of the chassis. This chapter includes the following sections:  Chassis Components  Installation at a Glance  Required Tools and Equipment ...

  • Page 56: Chassis Components

    Installation Procedure Overview ▀ Chassis Components Chassis Components The following graphic and table illustrate the chassis and describe its subcomponents: Figure 21. ASR 5000 Chassis and Sub-components Table 23. Chassis and Sub-component Identification Key Item Description Chassis: Supports 16 front-loading slots for application cards and 32 rear-loading slots for line cards. The chassis ships with blanking panels over every slot except the following: 1, 8, 17, and 24.

  • Page 57

    Installation Procedure Overview Chassis Components ▀ Item Description Upper bezel: Covers the upper fan tray bay. Lower fan tray cover/EMI shield: Secures the lower fan tray assembly in place and serves as an EMI shield. The cover also provides an air baffle allowing air to enter into the chassis. Lower bezel: Covers the lower fan tray bay.

  • Page 58: Installation At A Glance

    Installation Procedure Overview ▀ Installation at a Glance Installation at a Glance The list below summarizes the installation process for the chassis.  Unpack the chassis and cards  Determine which chassis mounting option to use: standard or mid-mount.  Install the chassis into a standard 19-inch equipment rack or telecommunications cabinet. ...

  • Page 59: Required Tools And Equipment

    Installation Procedure Overview Required Tools and Equipment ▀ Required Tools and Equipment This section lists the tools and equipment needed for installation. Hand Tools The following hand tools are required for installation of the chassis, application and line cards, fan tray assemblies, and power filter units: ...

  • Page 60: Site Prerequisites

    Installation Procedure Overview ▀ Site Prerequisites Site Prerequisites This section summarizes power, grounding, environment, and clearance requirements that must be met prior to installing and operating the ASR 5000. For detailed information, refer to the Technical Specifications chapter. Power and Grounding Each PFU requires a power feed of 160A @ -48VDC (nominal).

  • Page 61: Protecting Against Electro-static Discharge

    Installation Procedure Overview Protecting Against Electro-static Discharge ▀ Protecting Against Electro-static Discharge Electro-Static Discharge (ESD) can cause serious damage to sensitive components on the chassis, its sub-components, and/or the cards installed in the chassis. To prevent damage from ESD, you must take proper grounding precautions before handling the chassis or any of its components.

  • Page 62

    Installation Procedure Overview ▀ Protecting Against Electro-static Discharge Figure 22. Location of Chassis ESD Jacks ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 63: Federal Communications Commission Warning

    Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.

  • Page 65: Chassis Installation

    Chapter 3 Chassis Installation This chapter provides information on rack configurations and instructions for installing and removing the chassis and its sub-components – the upper and lower fan trays and the Power Filter Units (PFUs). This chapter includes the following sections: ...

  • Page 66: Equipment Rack Configuration

    Chassis Installation ▀ Equipment Rack Configuration Equipment Rack Configuration The chassis is designed for installation in a standard 19-inch (48.26 cm) equipment rack. Additional rack hardware, such as extension brackets, may be used to install the chassis in a standard 23-inch (58.42 cm) rack. Each chassis is 24.50 inches (62.23 cm) high.

  • Page 67

    Chassis Installation Equipment Rack Configuration ▀ Figure 23. System Airflow and Ventilation Proper ventilation and cooling must allow the chassis to operate within the temperature and humidity levels described in the following table. Table 24. Operating Temperature and Humidity Recommendations 0 degrees C to +55 degrees C Operating Temperature Operating Humidity...

  • Page 68: Mounting Options

    Chassis Installation ▀ Weight Considerations Mounting Options There are two options for mounting the chassis in a standard equipment rack or telecommunications cabinet:  Flush Mount: In this configuration, the flanges of the mounting brackets are flush with the front of the chassis. This is the default configuration as shipped as is commonly used with 4-post racks and equipment cabinets.

  • Page 69: Unpacking The Asr 5000 Chassis

    Chassis Installation Unpacking the ASR 5000 Chassis ▀ Unpacking the ASR 5000 Chassis Important: Before unpacking the chassis, use a pallet jack to move the container as close to the final installation site as possible. The chassis ships in a wooden container that is 28.25 in. (64.135cm) wide by 36.75 in. (93.35cm) high by 33.75 in. (85.75cm) deep.

  • Page 70

    Chassis Installation ▀ Unpacking the ASR 5000 Chassis Figure 24. ASR 5000 Shipping Container ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 71: Installing The Chassis

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Installing the Chassis Important: If you are installing more than one chassis in an equipment rack, to ensure an easier installation, begin by installing the first chassis near the bottom of the rack. Caution: When handling or moving the chassis, lift the chassis from the bottom only.

  • Page 72

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Step a Remove the plastic bezel from the upper-front of the chassis by placing your fingers in the notches on the sides of the bezel and pulling it toward you. Place it to the side for re-installation later. Step b Loosen the four screws that secure the fan tray in place using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

  • Page 73

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Step a Unsnap the plastic bezel from the lower-front of the chassis by placing your fingers in the notches on the sides of the bezel and pulling it toward you. Place it to the side for re-installation later. Step b Use a Phillips #1 screwdriver to loosen the four captive screws that hold the fan tray cover/EMI shield in place.

  • Page 74: Flush Mount Installation Of The Chassis

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Step d Repeat step b and step c for the PFU located in the bay labeled Power Filter Unit 2 located on the lower-right side of the chassis. Step 4 Proceed to either the Flush Mount Installation of the Chassis Mid-Mount Installation of the Chassis section that...

  • Page 75: Mid-mount Installation Of The Chassis

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Mid-Mount Installation of the Chassis Follow the instructions below to perform the mid-mount installation of the system. Step 1 On the side of the chassis, unfasten the eight Phillips #2 screws that secure the mounting bracket to the chassis. Step 2 Place the mounting bracket over the middle set of mounting holes on the side of the chassis and secure it to the chassis with the screws you removed in step 1.

  • Page 76: Grounding The Chassis

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Step 5 Mount the chassis to the rails of the equipment rack with the hardware that was supplied with the equipment rack. Begin with the two bottom holes and work your way up until all holes on each flange are secured. Step 6 Repeat step 1 through step 5 for any additional chassis you are installing in the equipment rack.

  • Page 77

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Figure 25. Chassis Ground Terminals Table 25. Terminal and Cable specifications Item Description Ground Terminal: 2-hole lug (0.186-inch posts, spaced 0.630-inch on center). The method of connection is: chassis - lug - flat washer - nut (3/8-inch). The nut(s) must be torqued to 50 in-lb (5.65 N-m).

  • Page 78

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Follow the instructions below to connect the chassis to earth ground. Step 1 Locate the chassis ground terminal on the lower-left corner of the rear of the chassis next to Power Filter Unit 1. Step 2 Route the stranded copper ground cable to the chassis ground terminal.

  • Page 79: Re-installing Chassis Sub-components

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Re-Installing Chassis Sub-components If you performed the procedure in the Reducing the Weight of the Chassis Prior to Installation section, complete the procedures described below to re-install the sub-components of the chassis. Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear grounding wrist straps to avoid ESD damage to the components.

  • Page 80

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Step c Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to tighten each of the four screws on the PFU to secure it to the chassis. Step d Re-install the second PFU in the PFU bay labeled Power Filter Unit 2 by repeating step b and step c.

  • Page 81

    Chassis Installation Installing the Chassis ▀ Step d Replace the fan tray bay cover/EMI shield. The perpendicular tabs on the cover should face away from the chassis and be positioned at the bottom. Use a Phillips #1 screwdriver to hand tighten the four captive screws in an alternating pattern –...

  • Page 82

    Chassis Installation ▀ Installing the Chassis Step b Slowly slide the fan tray into the chassis along the guides until its face plate is firmly against the chassis. Step c Use a Phillips #1 screwdriver to tighten the four screws on the face of the fan tray to secure it. Step d Replace the upper plastic bezel: align it over the bezel mounts that protrude from the face of the fan tray and snap it in place.

  • Page 83: Application Card Installation

    Chapter 4 Application Card Installation This chapter provides information on chassis configurations and instructions for installing application cards. Line cards are discussed in the Line Card Installation chapter. This chapter includes the following sections:  Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments ...

  • Page 84: Chassis Slot Numbering And Assignments

    Application Card Installation ▀ Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments The chassis has 16 front-loading slots that host application cards. This allows the installation of redundant components and provides ample room for expanding the system. Chassis slots are labeled 1 through 16 from left to right. Figure 26.

  • Page 85: Packet Processing Card Redundancy

    Application Card Installation Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments ▀ The following table details the specific ASR 5000 chassis slot assignments for each of the above card types. Table 26. Application Card Slot Assignments Application Card Type Chassis Slot Number(s) Description System Management Card (SMC) Primary SMC Redundant SMC...

  • Page 86: Recommended Minimum Chassis Configuration

    Application Card Installation ▀ Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments Recommended Minimum Chassis Configuration The recommended minimum chassis configuration for application cards, including redundancy, is as follows: Slot Number Card Card State Active Standby 2 and 4 (see Note 1) PSC2 or PSC3 Active 2, 3 and 4 (see Note 2) 11 (see Notes 1 and 2)

  • Page 87: Installing Application Cards

    Application Card Installation Installing Application Cards ▀ Installing Application Cards The installation procedure is identical for all application cards. This section provides the instructions for installing application cards in the chassis. Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear grounding wrist and/or heel straps to avoid ESD damage to the components.

  • Page 88

    Application Card Installation ▀ Installing Application Cards Step 5 Properly support the weight of the card and align it with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide the card into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame. Caution: Take extra caution when installing packet processing cards.

  • Page 89

    Application Card Installation Installing Application Cards ▀ Step 7 Slide the interlock switch on the front panel of the application card upward to lock the ejector tab in place. The flange on the left-side of the interlock switch prevents movement of the ejector tab when raised completely. Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail.

  • Page 91: Line Card Installation

    Chapter 5 Line Card Installation This chapter provides information on chassis configurations and instructions for installing line cards. This chapter includes the following sections:  Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments  Line Card Redundancy  Recommended Minimum Chassis Configuration  Installing Half-Height Line Cards ...

  • Page 92

    Line Card Installation ▀ Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments The chassis has 32 rear-loaded slots for line cards. This allows for the installation of redundant components and provides ample space for expanding the system. There are two rows of slots on the rear of the chassis. The upper row of slots is labeled 17 through 32 from right to left. The lower row of slots is labeled 33 through 48 from right to left.

  • Page 93

    Line Card Installation Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments ▀ The following line cards are available for the chassis:  Switch Processor Input/Output (SPIO) Card: SPIOs are installed in chassis slots 24 and 25 behind SMCs. SPIOs provide interfaces for local and remote management, Central Office (CO) alarming, and eventually, Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) timing.

  • Page 94

    Line Card Installation ▀ Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments Table 28. Line Card Slot Assignments Line Card Type Chassis Slot Description Number Switch Processor Resides behind Primary SMC in slot 8. Input/Output (SPIO) Resides behind Redundant SMC in slot 9. Redundancy Crossbar Card Resides behind Primary SMC in slot 8.

  • Page 95: Line Card Redundancy

    Line Card Installation Line Card Redundancy ▀ Line Card Redundancy To optimize network efficiency and minimize down time, the system supports 1:1 redundancy for OLC2s, CLC2s, FLC2s, GLC2s, and QELCs. With the exception of the XGLC, line cards are installed in the half-height slots at the rear of the chassis. This design allows two Ethernet or two Optical (ATM) or two Channelized line cards directly behind (one top, one bottom) every packet processing card that normally operates in active mode.

  • Page 96: Cli Commands For Xglc Redundancy

    Line Card Installation ▀ Line Card Redundancy CLI Commands for XGLC Redundancy Side-by-side 1:1 redundancy only operates on top line card slot numbers: cards 17 through 23 and 26 through 32. Make sure that both packet processing cards in front of the line cards are of the same type, configured as a redundant pair, and active.The CLI configuration to support this redundancy mode is specified at the card level as follows: [local]asr5000# config [local]asr5000(config)# card 17...

  • Page 97

    Line Card Installation Recommended Minimum Chassis Configuration ▀ Recommended Minimum Chassis Configuration An absolute minimum chassis configuration consists of one packet processing card and their respective line cards. However, it is strongly recommended that redundant components be used to minimize the risk of system outage. Therefore, the recommended minimum chassis configuration consists of the following: Table 29.

  • Page 98: Installing Half-height Line Cards

    Line Card Installation ▀ Installing Half-Height Line Cards Installing Half-Height Line Cards This section provides instructions for adding half-height line cards to the chassis. Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear a grounding wrist strap to avoid ESD damage to the components. Failure to do so could result in damage to sensitive electronic components and potentially void your warranty.

  • Page 99

    Line Card Installation Installing Half-Height Line Cards ▀ Step 5 Hold the card by its ejector levers and align the card with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide it into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame. Step 6 Push the ejector levers inward firmly until the card is firmly seated in the chassis midplane and the ejector levers can be pushed in no further.

  • Page 100

    Line Card Installation ▀ Installing Half-Height Line Cards Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail. Step 8 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to tighten the screws at the top and bottom of the line card’s front panel to secure the card to the chassis.

  • Page 101: Installing The 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (xglc)

    Line Card Installation Installing the 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) ▀ Installing the 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) The XGLC is a full-height line card that gets installed in the rear slots of the ASR 5000 chassis. It provides a single Small Form-factor Pluggable+ (SFP+) 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface for network connectivity.

  • Page 102

    Line Card Installation ▀ Installing the 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) Step 3 Properly support the weight of the card and align it with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide the card into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame. Step 4 Push the ejector levers inward firmly until the card is firmly seated in the chassis midplane and the ejector levers can be pushed in no further.

  • Page 103

    Line Card Installation Installing the 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) ▀ Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail. Step 6 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to tighten the screws at the top and bottom of the front panel to secure the card to the chassis.

  • Page 105: Cabling The Switch Processor Input/output Line Card

    Chapter 6 Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card This chapter provides information on the Switch Processor Input/Output (SPIO) line card interfaces and instructions for installing the cables. This chapter includes the following sections:  SPIO Interfaces  Connecting to the Management LAN ...

  • Page 106: Spio Interfaces

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ SPIO Interfaces SPIO Interfaces The SPIO is available with the following types of interfaces:  Two Gigabit Ethernet, fiber optical (SFP)  Two 1000Base-T Ethernet, copper (RJ-45)  One RS-232 interface (RJ-45) ...

  • Page 107: E1 Bnc Bits Interface Version

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card SPIO Interfaces ▀ E1 BNC BITS Interface Version The figure and table that follow provide information on the various interfaces in this version of the SPIO. Figure 28. SPIO BITS BNC Interface Callouts Table 30.

  • Page 108: T1 3-pin Bits Interface Version

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ SPIO Interfaces T1 3-Pin BITS Interface Version The figure and table that follow provide information on the various interfaces in this version of the SPIO. Figure 29. SPIO BITS 3-Pin Interface Callouts Table 31.

  • Page 109: Connecting To The Management Lan

    Minimum Tx Power: -9.5 dBm Rx Sensitivity: -17 dBm Important: The SFP interface is only certified to work with SFP transceiver modules purchased from Cisco for use with the SPIO card. Important: Be sure to label the interface cables with their destination prior to connecting them to the SPIO card.

  • Page 110

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to the Management LAN ARNING Class 1 Laser Device Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture of the port when no cable is connected.

  • Page 111: Using The Ethernet Rj-45 Interfaces

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to the Management LAN ▀ Using the Ethernet RJ-45 Interfaces The two RJ-45 interfaces are auto-sensing 10/100/1000Base-TX Ethernet interfaces. Refer to the figure and table that follow for pinouts for the RJ-45 Ethernet ports. Important: To comply with GR-1089 intra-building, lightning-immunity requirements and ensure compliance with Radiated Emissions Criteria, you must use shielded-twisted pair (STP) copper cable and ensure that it is properly...

  • Page 112

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to the Management LAN Each of these interfaces is equipped with two light emitting diode (LED) status indicators:  Link: This green LED shows whether or not the line card is connected to the network. The LED is illuminated when the card is connected.

  • Page 113: Connecting To The Serial Console Port

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to the Serial Console Port ▀ Connecting to the Serial Console Port The Console port is an RJ-45 RS-232 interface that provides access to the system’s command line interface (CLI). This serial interface communicates at 9600 to 115200 bps (default = 115200 bps). The RJ-45 pinout of tis interface is described in the figure and table that follow.

  • Page 114: Db-9 To Rj-45 Adapter

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to the Serial Console Port DB-9 to RJ-45 Adapter SPIOs are shipped with an RJ-45-to-RJ-45 serial cable and an RJ-45-to-DB-9 adapter. The DB-9S conductor on the adapter is female. If you use the cable and adaptor together, refer to the following figure and table. Important: If the console cable is to be used in a null-modem configuration, the workstation or terminal server must provide a carrier-detect signal.

  • Page 115: Usb To Db-9 Adapter

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to the Serial Console Port ▀ USB to DB-9 Adapter A USB to Serial DB-9 adapter is supplied with each system. The DB-9 connector on the adapter is male and can be used in conjunction with the Console RJ-45 Cable and DB-9 Adapter to connect a laptop or workstation to the R-J45 port on the SPIO.

  • Page 116: Connecting To The Console Port

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to the Serial Console Port This adapter provides a serial port on a laptop or workstation that does not have one. It draws power from the USB port. Figure 35. USB to Console Port Interconnection Connecting to the Console Port Important: The following instructions assume that you are using the RJ-45-to-RJ-45 cable with the RJ-45-to-...

  • Page 117: Connecting To A Bits Timing Source

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to a BITS Timing Source ▀ Connecting to a BITS Timing Source The SPIO can be optionally equipped with a BITS interface that derives a 1544 kHz (SONET T1 framing) or 2048 kHz (SDH E1 framing) clock signal from an external Building Integrated Timing Supply to synchronize line card timing.

  • Page 118: Bits T1 3-pin Interface

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to a BITS Timing Source BITS T1 3-Pin Interface The 3-pin version of the SPIO employs a wire-wrap connector that accepts a T1 (DS1) BITS data signal (all ones). The following figure shows the BITS timing interface wire-wrap pin-out. Figure 37.

  • Page 119: Connecting To The Co Alarm Interface

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to the CO Alarm Interface ▀ Connecting to the CO Alarm Interface The Central Office (CO) Alarm interface utilizes a 10-pin Molex female-connector fro interconnection with the three normally closed dry-contact relays. These relays trigger external audio and/or visual indicators for the following three alarm levels: ...

  • Page 120

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card ▀ Connecting to the CO Alarm Interface The 8-foot (2.4 meter) CO alarm cable shipped with the chassis supports redundant SPIO card installations. This “Y” cable has two Molex connectors on one end that are keyed to fit into the CO Alarm interfaces in one direction only. Each connector mates with one of the side-by-side SPIO cards.

  • Page 121: Electrical Characteristics

    Cabling the Switch Processor Input/Output Line Card Connecting to the CO Alarm Interface ▀ Electrical Characteristics Each of the three dry-contact relay switches is rated to support a maximum switching current of 1A@30VDC. The relay contacts should not directly connected to high current devices such as sirens and flashing lamps. Important: The CO alarm interface of the SPIO is suitable for connection to intra-building or unexposed wiring or cabling only.

  • Page 123: Cabling The Fast Ethernet (10/100) Line Card

    Chapter 7 Cabling the Fast Ethernet (10/100) Line Card This chapter provides information on the Fast Ethernet Line Card (FLC2) interfaces and instructions for installing the cables. This chapter includes the following section:  FLC2 Interfaces ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 124: Flc2 Interfaces

    Cabling the Fast Ethernet (10/100) Line Card ▀ FLC2 Interfaces FLC2 Interfaces The Fast Ethernet Line Card (FLC2, Ethernet 10/100) has eight RJ-45 interfaces, as shown in the figure below. Each of these is an auto-sensing 10Base-T/100Base-TX Ethernet interface that terminates a shielded twisted-pair (STP) copper cable.

  • Page 125

    Cabling the Fast Ethernet (10/100) Line Card FLC2 Interfaces ▀ Refer to the following figure and table for pinouts for the RJ-45 Ethernet ports. Figure 42. 10/100 Ethernet Interface Pinouts Table 39. 10/100 Ethernet Interface Pinouts 100Base-T 100Mbps Cat5 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable...

  • Page 127: Cabling The Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards

    Chapter 8 Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards This chapter provides cabling instructions and information for the interfaces on the Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (GLC2), the four-port Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC), and 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC). These cards support 802.3z-compliant Gigabit Ethernet interface(s) which connect the chassis to other elements in the packet data network.

  • Page 128

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards ▀ Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (GLC2) Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (GLC2) The following figure shows the single-port GLC2. The front panel of this card is labeled “Ethernet 1000”. This card supports a single fiber or copper Small Form-factor Plugin (SFP) transceiver module as described below: Figure 43.

  • Page 129

    Emissions Criteria, you must use shielded-twisted pair cable and ensure that it is properly terminated at both ends. Important: The SFP interface is only certified to work with SFP transceiver modules purchased from Cisco for use with the GLC2. Important: Class 1 Laser Compliance Notice Because of the optical SFP interface, this product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class 1 laser devices for IEC825, EN60825, and 21CFR1040 specifications.

  • Page 130

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards ▀ Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC) Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC) The following figure shows the four-port Quad Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (QGLC). The front panel of this card is labeled “Ethernet 1000”. Important: If you enter the show card table CLI command, the QGLC is listed as a Quad 1000 Ethernet Line Card.

  • Page 131

    Emissions Criteria, you must use shielded-twisted pair cable and ensure that it is properly terminated at both ends. Important: The SFP interface is only certified to work with SFP transceiver modules purchased from Cisco for use with the QGLC. Important: Because of the optical SFP interface, this product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class 1 laser devices for IEC825, EN60825, and 21CFR1040 specifications.

  • Page 132: Rj-45 Sfp Module Detail

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards ▀ RJ-45 SFP Module Detail RJ-45 SFP Module Detail The following describes the RJ-45 (copper) SFP module for the GLC2 and the QGLC with pinouts and definitions. Important: To comply with GR-1089 intra-building, lightning-immunity requirements and ensure compliance with FCC Radiated Emissions Criteria, you must use shielded-twisted pair (STP) cable and assure that it is properly terminated at both ends.

  • Page 133: Cabling The Optical Sfp Interface

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards Cabling the Optical SFP Interface ▀ Cabling the Optical SFP Interface To interconnect the optical SFP interface(s) on the GLC2 and the QGLC, follow the instructions below. Step 1 To ensure full connectivity, use your thumb to firmly press the SFP transceiver module into its socket on the front panel of the card.

  • Page 134

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards ▀ 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) The 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card or XGLC, is a full-height line card. The XGLC uses industry standard SFP+ transceiver modules to support various fiber types as required. The following diagram shows the XGLC’s single SFP+ interface.

  • Page 135

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) ▀ Table 43. SFP+ Modules Supported by the XGLC Module Type Card Identification Interface Type Cable Specifications 10G Base-SR Ethernet 10G SR Fiber, LC duplex Fiber Type: Multi-mode fiber (MMF), 850 nm wavelength female connector Core Size (microns)/Range: ...

  • Page 136: Cabling The Optical Sfp+ Interface

    Cabling the Gigabit Ethernet Line Cards ▀ Cabling the Optical SFP+ Interface Cabling the Optical SFP+ Interface To interconnect the optical SFP+ interface on the XGLC, follow the instructions below. Important: Be sure to label the interface cable with its destination prior to connecting it to the XGLC. This will assure proper reconnection should the card need to be serviced.

  • Page 137: Cabling The Optical (atm) Line Cards

    Chapter 9 Cabling the Optical (ATM) Line Cards This chapter provides information physical interfaces and instructions for installing the cables on the Optical Line Card (OLC2). This chapter includes the following sections:  Optical (ATM) Line Card Interfaces  Cabling the Optical SFP Interface ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 138: Optical (atm) Line Card Interfaces

    Min/Max Tx Power: -19 dBm/-14 dBm Rx Sensitivity: -30 dBm Important: The SFP interface is only certified to work with SFP transceiver modules purchased from Cisco for use with the OLC2. Important: Because of the optical SFP interface, this product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class 1 laser devices for IEC825, EN60825, and 21CFR1040 specifications.

  • Page 139

    Cabling the Optical (ATM) Line Cards Optical (ATM) Line Card Interfaces ▀ Figure 47. OLC-Optical (ATM) Line Card Fiber Interfaces ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 140

    Cabling the Optical (ATM) Line Cards ▀ Cabling the Optical SFP Interface Cabling the Optical SFP Interface To use the optical SFP interfaces on the OLC2 (ATM), follow the instructions below. Important: Be sure to label the interface cables with their destination prior to connecting them to the OLC/OLC2.

  • Page 141: Cabling The Channelized Line Cards

    Chapter 10 Cabling the Channelized Line Cards This chapter provides information about the physical interfaces and instructions for installing the cables on the CLC2 (STM-1/OC-3). This chapter includes the following sections:  Channelized Line Card Interfaces  Cabling the Optical SFP Interface ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 142: Channelized Line Card Interfaces

    Min/Max Tx Power: -19 dBm/-14 dBm Rx Sensitivity: -30 dBm Important: The SFP interface is only certified to work with SFP transceiver modules purchased from Cisco for use with the CLC2. Important: Because of the optical SFP interface, this product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class 1 laser devices for IEC825, EN60825, and 21CFR1040 specifications.

  • Page 143

    Cabling the Channelized Line Cards Channelized Line Card Interfaces ▀ Figure 48. CLC2 Fiber Optic Interfaces ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 144

    Cabling the Channelized Line Cards ▀ Cabling the Optical SFP Interface Cabling the Optical SFP Interface To use the optical SFP interface on the a channelized line card, follow the instructions below. Important: Be sure to label the interface cables with their destination prior to connecting them to the CLC2. This will assure proper reconnection should the card need to be serviced.

  • Page 145: Cabling The Power Filter Units

    Chapter 11 Cabling the Power Filter Units This chapter provides information and instructions for applying the power supply and return cables to the Power Filter Units (PFUs) and the chassis. This chapter includes the following sections:  Power Considerations  Connecting the PFU to the Power Source ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 146: Power Considerations

    Cabling the Power Filter Units ▀ Power Considerations Power Considerations Each chassis supports one or two 165-amp PFUs. The following table describes the power requirements for the chassis. Table 46. Chassis Power Requirements Characteristic Value Input Voltage Maximum range: -40VDC to -60VDC Nominal range: -48VDC to -60 VDC TUV Rated Peak Current Load 165A @ -48 VDC...

  • Page 147: Power Cable Requirements

    Cabling the Power Filter Units Power Considerations ▀ Power Cable Requirements You can install up to three chassis in an equipment rack or telecommunications cabinet. Typically power cabling is run from the office Power Distribution Frame (PDF) to a Power Distribution Panel (PDP) installed in the rack or cabinet and then to each of the chassis.

  • Page 148

    Cabling the Power Filter Units ▀ Power Considerations Figure 49. PFU Wiring Diagram ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 149

    Cabling the Power Filter Units Power Considerations ▀ Table 48. ASR 5000 PFU Wiring Diagram Descriptions Item Description Two 2-hole lugs are required: one for return (RTN) and one for power (-VDC). The PFU 0.3125-inch posts spaced 0.88- inch on center. Method of connection: PFU - Flat Washer - Lug - Lock-Washer - Nut (9/16-inch).

  • Page 150: Connecting The Pfu To The Power Source

    Cabling the Power Filter Units ▀ Connecting the PFU to the Power Source Connecting the PFU to the Power Source Follow the instructions in this section to connect the PFU(s) to the power source. Each of the four power terminals is shipped with nuts and washers. The PFU has one lock-washer and one flat washer. ARNING Verify that the power source from the fuse panel is OFF before attaching power cables to the PFU(s) installed in the chassis.

  • Page 151

    Cabling the Power Filter Units Connecting the PFU to the Power Source ▀ Step 4 Connect the lug attached to the power return cable to the PFU: Step a Insert the lug over the two terminals labeled RTN. These are the two top terminals on the PFU. Step b Secure the lug to the RTN terminals with two of the four washers and two of the four nuts that you removed in step 3.

  • Page 152

    Cabling the Power Filter Units ▀ Connecting the PFU to the Power Source Step 6 Reinstall the plastic terminal cover. Caution: To avoid the risk of potential damage to the system, never operate the chassis without the plastic terminal cover installed. Make sure that the power and return lugs do not protrude past the edge of the plastic terminal covers.

  • Page 153: Applying Power And Verifying The Installation

    Chapter 12 Applying Power and Verifying the Installation This chapter provides information and instructions for understanding the boot process, applying power to the chassis, and verifying that the installation was successful. Important: This chapter assumes that the ASR 5000 chassis, its sub-components, as well as application and line cards have been physically installed.

  • Page 154: Understanding The System Boot Process

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Understanding the System Boot Process Understanding the System Boot Process Before you apply power to the system, it is important that you understand the boot process and how the hardware components are brought on line. The following figure provides a flowchart that explains each step in the startup process.

  • Page 155

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Understanding the System Boot Process ▀ Step 1 When power is first applied to the chassis, or after a reboot, only the SMC in slots 8 and 9 receive power. Therefore, the SMCs are the first cards to boot and their LEDs are the first to light up. Once the system confirms that cards are located in slots 8 and 9, power is quickly applied to the SPIOs in slots 24 and 25.

  • Page 156: Applying Power To The Chassis

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Applying Power to the Chassis After the system successfully boots and the initial configuration is applied, the system is ready to be configured or offer services. Applying Power to the Chassis Once you have properly connected all power and ground cables to the chassis according to the instructions in “Cabling the Power Filter Units”, follow the instructions below to apply power to the system.

  • Page 157

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Applying Power to the Chassis ▀ Step c Optional. If the circuit breaker on your PFU is equipped with a locking clip, lock the circuit breaker in place. Move the breaker’s locking clip to the left until the clip’s inside tang is recessed in the breaker’s actuator opening.

  • Page 158: Verifying The Installation

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation When power is applied to the chassis, power is provided to the upper and lower fan trays, and every installed application and line card. Each PFU, application card, and line card installed in the chassis has light emitting diodes (LEDs) that indicate its status.

  • Page 159: Checking The Leds On The Smc(s)

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Color Description Troubleshooting Verify that the power source is on and is supplying the correct voltage and sufficient current. Check the cables from the power source to the rack for continuity. If a fuse panel is installed between the Power Distribution Frame (PDF) and the chassis, verify that the fuses are intact.

  • Page 160: Smc Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Figure 52. SMC LEDs SMC Run/Fail LED States The SMC’s Run/Fail LED indicates the overall status of the card. This LED is illuminated steady green for normal operation. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the table to diagnose the problem. ▄...

  • Page 161: Smc Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Table 50. SMC Run/Fail LED States Color Description Troubleshooting Green Card powered with no None needed. errors detected Blinking Card is initializing and/or This is normal operation during boot-up. Green loading software Card powered with error(s) Errors were detected during the POSTs.

  • Page 162: Smc Standby Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation SMC Standby LED States The Standby LED on the SMC indicates that software is loaded on the card and it is serving as a redundant component. For the SMC installed in slot 9, this LED is illuminated steady green during normal operation. For the SMC installed in slot 8, this LED is off during normal operation.

  • Page 163: Smc Service Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ SMC Service LED States The Service LEDs on the SMCs indicate that the system requires maintenance or service. Examples are that the system could not locate a a valid software image at boot-up, or that a high temperature condition exists. This LED is off during normal operation.

  • Page 164: Checking The Leds On Packet Processing Cards

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Checking the LEDs on Packet Processing Cards Each packet processing card is equipped with status LEDs as shown in the following figure:  Run/Fail  Active  Standby  Status ...

  • Page 165: Psca, Psc2, Psc3 And Ppc Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Figure 53. Packet Processing Card LEDs PSCA, PSC2, PSC3 and PPC Run/Fail LED States The packet processing card’s Run/Fail LED indicates the overall status of the card. This LED is illuminated steady green during normal operation.

  • Page 166: Psca, Psc2, Psc3 And Ppc Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Table 56. Packet Processing Card Run/Fail LED States Color Description Troubleshooting Green Card powered with no errors None needed. detected Blinking Green Card is initializing and/or None needed. loading software Card powered with error(s) Errors were detected during the POSTs.

  • Page 167: Psca, Psc2, Psc3 And Ppc Card Standby Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ PSCA, PSC2, PSC3 and PPC Card Standby LED States The Standby LED on the packet processing card indicates that software is loaded on the card and the card is serving as a redundant component.

  • Page 168: Spio Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Figure 54. SPIO LEDs SPIO Run/Fail LED States The SPIO’s Run/ Fail LED indicates the overall status of the card. This LED is illuminated steady green for normal operation. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the table to diagnose the problem. Table 59.

  • Page 169: Spio Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ SPIO Active LED States The Active LED on the SPIO indicates that the software is loaded on the card and that the card is ready for operation. For the SPIO installed in chassis slot 24, this LED is steady green during normal operation. For the SPIO installed in slot 25, this LED is off during normal operation.

  • Page 170: Spio Interface Link Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation SPIO Interface Link LED States The Link LED, associated with a particular SPIO interface indicates the status of the network link. This LED is illuminated steady green during normal operation. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the table to diagnose the problem.

  • Page 171: Checking The Leds On The Ethernet Line Cards

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Checking the LEDs on the Ethernet Line Cards This section describes the LEDs for the following Ethernet cards:  Fast Ethernet 10/100 Line Card (FLC2)  Gigabit Ethernet 1000 (GLC2) ...

  • Page 172: Ethernet Line Card Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Ethernet Line Card Active LED States The Active LEDs on the Ethernet Line Cards indicate that the operating software is loaded on the card and that the card is ready for operation. The line cards installed remain in ready mode until their corresponding packet processing card is activated during configuration.

  • Page 173: Ethernet Line Card Interface Link Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Table 66. Ethernet Line Card Standby LED States Color Description Troubleshooting Green Card is in redundant mode None needed for line cards installed in slots 33 through 39 and 42 through 48 after configuration.

  • Page 174: Ethernet Line Card Activity Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Ethernet Line Card Activity LED States The Activity LEDs are associated with a particular network interface on the Ethernet line cards. The LEDs are illuminated steady green when data is being transmitted or received on the network link. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the following table to diagnose the problem.

  • Page 175: Optical (atm) Line Card Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Figure 55. Card-Level Status LEDs for the Optical (ATM) Line Card Optical (ATM) Line Card Run/Fail LED States The Run/Fail LED on the ATM line card indicates the overall status of the card. These LEDs are illuminated steady green for normal operation.

  • Page 176: Optical Atm Line Card Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Optical ATM Line Card Active LED States The Active LED on the Optical (ATM) line card indicates that the operating software is loaded on the card and that the card is ready for operation. The line cards installed will remain in a ready mode until their corresponding packet processing card is made active via configuration.

  • Page 177: Checking The Alarm And Link Leds On The Optical (atm/pos Oc-3) Line Card

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Table 71. Optical (ATM) Line Card Standby LED States Color Description Troubleshooting Green Card is in Redundant mode None needed for line cards installed in slots 33 through 39 and 42 through 48 after configuration.

  • Page 178: Card-level Leds On The Channelized (stm-1/oc-3) Line Card

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Table 72. Alarm/Link States for Optical (ATM) Line Card LED Color Description Red Alarm Red (ON) Illuminates when the port is in a fault condition, such as LOS or LOF. Off when there is no alarm for this port.

  • Page 179: Channelized Line Card Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Figure 57. Card-Level Status LEDs for the Channelized Line Card Channelized Line Card Run/Fail LED States The Run/Fail LED on the Channelized line card indicates the overall status of the card. These LEDs are illuminated steady green during normal operation.

  • Page 180: Channelized Line Card Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Channelized Line Card Active LED States The Active LED on the channelized line card indicates that the operating software is loaded on the card and that the card is ready for operation. Installed line cards remain in ready mode until their corresponding packet processing card is activated during configuration.

  • Page 181: Checking The Alarm And Link Leds On The Channelized Line Card 2

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Table 75. Channelized Line Card Standby LED States Color Description Troubleshooting Green Card is in redundant mode None needed for line cards installed in slots 33 through 39 and 42 through 48 after configuration.

  • Page 182: Checking The Leds On The Rcc(s)

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation Table 76. Alarm/Link States for Channelized Line Card LED Color Description Red Alarm Red (ON) Illuminates when the port is in a fault condition, such as LOS or LOF. Off when there is no alarm for this port. Yellow Alarm Yellow (ON) Illuminates when the port is receiving a signal experiences a problem at the remote end,...

  • Page 183: Rcc Run/fail Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Verifying the Installation ▀ Figure 59. RCC LEDs RCC Run/Fail LED States The RCC Run/Fail LED indicates the overall status of the card. This LED is illuminated steady green during normal operation. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the table to diagnose the problem. Table 77.

  • Page 184: Rcc Active Led States

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation ▀ Verifying the Installation RCC Active LED States The Active LED on the RCC indicates that the card is being used. During normal operation, this LED is off on both RCCs. If the LED is not green, use the troubleshooting information in the table to diagnose the problem. Table 78.

  • Page 185: Completing Initial System Configuration

    Applying Power and Verifying the Installation Completing Initial System Configuration ▀ Completing Initial System Configuration After power is applied to the chassis and the ASR 5000 has successfully booted, the command line interface (CLI) appears on a terminal connected to the Console port of the SPIO. The initial configuration requires completing the following tasks via the CLI: ...

  • Page 187: System Monitoring

    Chapter 13 System Monitoring This chapter describes how to use the command line interface (CLI) show commands to monitor system status and performance. These commands allow an operator to obtain information on all aspects of the system, from current software configuration to call activity and status. The selection of commands described in this chapter provides useful and in-depth information for monitoring the hardware.

  • Page 188: Monitoring

    System Monitoring ▀ Monitoring Monitoring This section contains commands used to monitor system performance and the status of tasks, managers, applications, and various other software components. Most of the procedure commands are useful for both maintenance and diagnostics. There is no limit to the frequency that any of the individual commands or procedures can be implemented. Important: All of the commands listed below can be run from the Exec mode prompt of the Command Line Interface (CLI).

  • Page 189

    System Monitoring Monitoring ▀ To do this: Enter this command: show port table all View the number and status of physical ports on each line card. Output indicates Link and Operation state for all interfaces – Up or Down. show cpu table Verify CPU usage and memory.

  • Page 190: Periodic Status Checks

    System Monitoring ▀ Monitoring Periodic Status Checks Depending upon system usage and performance, you may want to perform these tasks more frequently than recommended. Table 81. Periodic Status Checks To do this: Enter this command: Monthly dir /flash Check for unused or unneeded file on the CompactFlash. delete /flash/<filename>...

  • Page 191: Counters And Bulkstats

    System Monitoring Counters and Bulkstats ▀ Counters and Bulkstats The ASR 5000 maintains many counters for gathering statistics and troubleshooting. In general you should not regularly clear the counters, just let them increment over time. Counters track events since the chassis booted (unless cleared), unlike show commands that give the current state (for example, the current number of calls).

  • Page 192: Summary Of Maintenance Tasks

    System Monitoring ▀ Summary of Maintenance Tasks Summary of Maintenance Tasks This section contains a quick reference for when to perform various maintenance operations on the ASR 5000 chassis. These operations include, but are not limited to:  Load on the chassis ...

  • Page 193: No Specific Time Frame

    System Monitoring Summary of Maintenance Tasks ▀ No Specific Time Frame  If you make a config change that you want to be permanent, synchronize filesystems between SMCs and save the configuraiton to /flash.  For an expired password, re-enable the operator as soon as possible. ...

  • Page 195: Adding Application And Line Cards To An Existing Installation

    Chapter 14 Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation This chapter provides instructions for installing additional application and line cards in an installed chassis that is processing calls (a production system). This chapter includes the following sections:  Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments ...

  • Page 196

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation ▀ Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments Chassis Slot Numbering and Assignments The following figure shows the front and rear chassis slots. Figure 60. Chassis Slot Numbers Important: You must install the System Management Cards (SMCs) in slots 8 and 9. Their associated line cards are the Switch Processor Input Output card (SPIO) and the Redundant Crossbar Card (RCC).

  • Page 197: Adding Application Cards

    You can add single packet processing cards to a production system. However, you must reboot the system to ensure optimal operation and capacity. For this reason Cisco Systems suggests that you perform the installation during a maintenance window when a reboot will have minimal impact.

  • Page 198

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation ▀ Adding Application Cards Step 5 Properly support the weight of the card and align it with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide the card into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame. Caution: Take extra care when you install packet processing cards.

  • Page 199

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation Adding Application Cards ▀ Step 7 Slide the interlock switch on the front panel of the application card upward to lock the ejector tab in place. The flange on the left-side of the interlock switch prevents movement of the ejector tab when raised completely. Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail.

  • Page 200: Adding Half-height Line Cards

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation ▀ Adding Half-Height Line Cards Adding Half-Height Line Cards This section provides instructions for adding half-height line cards to the chassis. Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear a grounding wrist strap to avoid ESD damage to the components.

  • Page 201

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation Adding Half-Height Line Cards ▀ Step 5 Hold the card by its ejector levers and align the card with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide it into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame. Step 6 Push the ejector levers inward firmly until the card is firmly seated in the chassis midplane and the ejector levers can be pushed in no further.

  • Page 202

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation ▀ Adding Half-Height Line Cards Step 9 Repeat step 1 through step 7 for every other line card that to be installed. Step 10 Install blanking panels over any unused chassis slots. ARNING To reduce the risk of electric shock and to ensure proper ventilation, blanking panels must be used to cover any chassis slot that is not occupied by an application card.

  • Page 203: Adding A 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation Adding a 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card ▀ Adding a 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card The 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) is a full-height line card that occupies two half-height slots in the rear of the ASR 5000 chassis.

  • Page 204

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation ▀ Adding a 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card Step 3 Properly support the weight of the card and align it with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide the card into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame.

  • Page 205

    Adding Application and Line Cards to an Existing Installation Adding a 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card ▀ Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail. Step 6 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to tighten the screws at the top and bottom of the front panel to secure the card to the chassis.

  • Page 207: Removing And Installing Smc Pc Cards

    Chapter 15 Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards The ASR 5000 supports the use of PC Cards, also known as PCMCIA cards. These cards store software images, configuration files, and other data. Each SMC incorporates a single PCMCIA slot on its front panel. PC Cards are optional components.

  • Page 208: Installing Pc Cards

    Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards ▀ Installing PC Cards Installing PC Cards This section provides instructions for installing a PC Card in the SMC. If you are performing an initial installation of a PC Card, begin with step 1. If you are replacing a PC Card that you have removed according to the procedures in Removing PC Cards , begin with step 4.

  • Page 209

    Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards Installing PC Cards ▀ Step 5 Align the PC Card slot cover over the open slot. Step 6 Use the two screws that you removed in step 2 and a Phillips #1 screwdriver to secure the PC Card slot cover. ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 210: Removing Pc Cards

    Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards ▀ Removing PC Cards Removing PC Cards Follow these instructions to remove a PC Card from the SMC. Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear a grounding wrist strap to avoid ESD damage to the components. Failure to do so could result in damage to sensitive electronic components and potentially void your warranty.

  • Page 211

    Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards Removing PC Cards ▀ Step 4 Eject the PC Card from the slot. Step a Press and release the PC Card ejector button once to release and fully extend it. Step b Firmly press the PC Card ejector button a second time to eject the card. Step 5 Grasp the PC Card and pull it out of the slot.

  • Page 212

    Removing and Installing SMC PC Cards ▀ Removing PC Cards Step 6 Align the PC Card slot cover over the open slot. Step 7 Use the two screws that you removed in step 2 of this procedure and a Phillips #1 screwdriver to fasten the PC Card slot cover.

  • Page 213: Replacing The Chassis Air Filter

    Chapter 16 Replacing the Chassis Air Filter The lower fan tray draws air into the chassis. It is equipped with a particulate air filter to prevent dust and debris from entering the system. The air filter must be changed periodically to ensure proper ventilation and air flow through the chassis.

  • Page 214: Determining When An Air Filter Needs Replacing

    Replacing the Chassis Air Filter ▀ Determining When an Air Filter Needs Replacing Determining When an Air Filter Needs Replacing If the air filter is replaced at least every six months as preventive maintenance, there should be no need for out-of-cycle replacement.

  • Page 215: Removing The Air Filter

    Replacing the Chassis Air Filter Removing the Air Filter ▀ Removing the Air Filter Follow the instructions below to remove the air filter. Step 1 Access the chassis’ lower fan tray assembly. Step a Remove the plastic bezel from the lower-front of the chassis by placing your fingers in the notches on its sides and pulling it toward you.

  • Page 216

    Replacing the Chassis Air Filter ▀ Removing the Air Filter Step 2 Raise the plastic tab above the face of the fan tray assembly and gently pull it toward you until the air filter is free from the fan tray assembly. Caution: Do not operate the chassis without the air filter installed for extended periods of time.

  • Page 217: Installing The Air Filter

    Replacing the Chassis Air Filter Installing the Air Filter ▀ Installing the Air Filter Follow the instructions below to install an air filter. Step 1 Verify that the arrows located on the sides of the air filter point upwards. The arrows indicate the direction of the airflow into the chassis through the filter.

  • Page 218

    Replacing the Chassis Air Filter ▀ Installing the Air Filter Step 4 Remove any dust build-up that may have accumulated on the chassis front air intake. This should be done as part of routine maintenance to continue optimum airflow into the chassis. The front air intake is located on the lower fan tray cover.

  • Page 219: Replacing A Power Filter Unit

    Chapter 17 Replacing a Power Filter Unit Up to two -48 VDC Power Filter Unit (PFU) assemblies can be installed in the ASR 5000 chassis. Two PFUs provide load-balancing and redundancy. The PFUs are located in the lower-rear of the chassis. This chapter provides instructions for replacing a PFU in the event of failure.

  • Page 220: Determining That A Pfu Has Failed

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit ▀ Determining that a PFU has Failed Determining that a PFU has Failed The chassis can use one of several mechanisms to indicate a PFU failure. The first indicator is when the POWER LED on the PFU is off. If the LED is off and a starPowerState SNMP trap is generated with a value of Failed (2), the PFU must be replaced.

  • Page 221: Removing The Failed Pfu

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit Removing the Failed PFU ▀ Removing the Failed PFU In the event of a PFU failure, follow these instructions to safely remove the PFU from the chassis. Step 1 Power down the PFU by flipping the circuit breaker on the PFU to the OFF position. If the circuit breaker on your PFU is equipped with a locking clip, move the clip to the right to unlock the circuit breaker’s actuator.

  • Page 222

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit ▀ Removing the Failed PFU Step 4 Remove the cable from the -VDC terminals as described below. The -VDC terminals are the two terminals located at the bottom of the PFU. Step a Use a 9/16-inch nut driver or socket wrench to remove the nuts and washers that secure the cable to the PFU.

  • Page 223

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit Removing the Failed PFU ▀ Step 7 Grasp the handle on the PFU and gently pull it toward you. The PFU should easily slide out of the chassis. Step 8 Proceed to Installing the Replacement PFU.

  • Page 224: Installing The Replacement Pfu

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit ▀ Installing the Replacement PFU Installing the Replacement PFU Follow the instructions below to install the replacement PFU in the chassis. Step 1 Flip the circuit breaker actuator on the replacement PFU to the OFF position. If the circuit breaker on your PFU is equipped with a locking clip, lock the circuit breaker in place.

  • Page 225

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit Installing the Replacement PFU ▀ Step 3 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to tighten each of the four screws on the PFU to secure it to the chassis. Step 4 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to remove the plastic cover from the power terminals. Each of the four power terminals is shipped with one nut and two washers.

  • Page 226

    Replacing a Power Filter Unit ▀ Installing the Replacement PFU Step 8 Fasten the lug attached to the power feed cable to the PFU: Step a Insert the lug over the two terminals labeled -VDC. These are the two bottom terminals on the PFU.

  • Page 227: What To Do With The Failed Pfu

    If the failed PFU is still under warranty, return it to the vendor for repair. If the failed PFU is out of warranty, contact Cisco to determine if it can be sent in for repair at an additional cost. Important: Disposal of this product should be performed in accordance with all national laws and regulations.

  • Page 229: Replacing Upper Or Lower Fan Tray

    Chapter 18 Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray The upper fan tray draws air up through the chassis for cooling and ventilation. It then exhausts the heated air through the vents at the upper-rear of the chassis. The lower fan tray draws air from the front and sides and pushes it through the chassis for cooling and ventilation. This chapter includes the following sections: ...

  • Page 230: Determining Whether A Fan Tray Needs Replacing

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray ▀ Determining Whether a Fan Tray Needs Replacing Determining Whether a Fan Tray Needs Replacing The system has several ways to indicate a fan tray failure. The first indicator is that the Status LED on the System Resource Card (SRC) turns red to indicate the failure of a chassis component.

  • Page 231

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray Determining Whether a Fan Tray Needs Replacing ▀ SNMP Trap Description starFanSpeed The speed of the fans controlled by this fan controller. The value normal(1) represents the normal operating speed of the fans. The value high(2) represents that the fans are running at a higher rate of speed.

  • Page 232: Removing An Upper Fan Tray

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray ▀ Removing an Upper Fan Tray Removing an Upper Fan Tray Follow the instructions below to remove an upper fan tray from the chassis. Step 1 Remove the plastic bezel from the upper-front of the chassis by placing your fingers in the notches on the sides of the bezel and pulling it toward you.

  • Page 233

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray Removing an Upper Fan Tray ▀ ARNING Die obere Lüfter Schublade enthaelt mehrere Lüfter. Verletzungsgefahr bei Beruehrung der Lüfter.Hohe Umdrehungszahl der Lüfter unter Stromanschluss.Vorsicht nicht beruehren. Um persoenliche Verletzungen und Geraeteschaden zu verhueten bitte Anleitungen beachten. Schublade ca.

  • Page 234: Installing An Upper Fan Tray

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray ▀ Installing an Upper Fan Tray Installing an Upper Fan Tray Follow the instructions below to install an upper fan tray. Step 1 Hold the front of the fan tray by its sides and align it with the upper fan tray bay of the chassis. Step 2 Slowly slide the fan tray into the chassis along the guides until its face plate is flush against the chassis.

  • Page 235: Removing A Lower Fan Tray Assembly

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray Removing a Lower Fan Tray Assembly ▀ Removing a Lower Fan Tray Assembly Follow the instructions below to remove a lower fan tray assembly from the chassis. Step 1 Unsnap the plastic bezel from the lower-front of the chassis by placing your fingers in the notches on its sides and pulling it toward you.

  • Page 236

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray ▀ Removing a Lower Fan Tray Assembly ARNING The upper fan tray assembly contains multiple fans that are spinning at a high rate of speed when the system is powered on. If system is powered on, do not touch moving fans. To minimize the risk of personal injury and potential damage to equipment, follow these instructions.

  • Page 237: Installing A Lower Fan Tray Assembly

    Replacing Upper or Lower Fan Tray Installing a Lower Fan Tray Assembly ▀ Installing a Lower Fan Tray Assembly Follow the instructions below to install a lower fan tray. Step 1 Hold the front of the fan tray by its handle with one hand and use your other hand to align it with the lower fan tray bay of the chassis.

  • Page 238: What To Do With The Failed Fan Tray

    If the failed fan tray is still under warranty, return it to the vendor for repair. If the failed fan tray is out of warranty, contact Cisco to determine if it can be sent in for repair at an additional cost.

  • Page 239: Replacing Application Cards

    Chapter 19 Replacing Application Cards This chapter provides information on replacing a failed application card. This chapter includes the following sections:  Determining Whether an Application Card has Failed  Removing the Application Card  Installing the Application Card  Replacing the CompactFlash Memory Card on SMCs ...

  • Page 240: Determining Whether An Application Card Has Failed

    Replacing Application Cards ▀ Determining Whether an Application Card has Failed Determining Whether an Application Card has Failed The system has several ways to indicate an application card failure. The first indicator is that the Status LED on the System Management Card (SMC) turns red to indicate the failure of a chassis component. Another indicator is the Run/Fail LED on an application card is red or turns off if that card has a problem.

  • Page 241: Using Snmp Traps

    Replacing Application Cards Determining Whether an Application Card has Failed ▀ Using SNMP Traps The system supports SNMP traps that are triggered when conditions indicate the need to replace an application card. The system provides the traps listed in the table below. Table 83.

  • Page 242: Removing The Application Card

    Replacing Application Cards ▀ Removing the Application Card Removing the Application Card This section describes how to remove an application card. Important: Before you remove and replace an application card on an active system, refer to the System Administration Guide for instructions on how to migrate or switch processes and services to a redundant (standby) card. Step 1 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to loosen the screws at the top and bottom of the failed application card’s front panel.

  • Page 243

    Replacing Application Cards Removing the Application Card ▀ Step 4 Holding the card by its ejector levers, gently slide the card out of the chassis by pulling the card toward you. Caution: Do not leave chassis slots uncovered for extended periods of time. This reduces airflow through the chassis and could cause it to overheat.

  • Page 244: Installing The Application Card

    Replacing Application Cards ▀ Installing the Application Card Installing the Application Card This section describes how to install an application card. Step 1 Slide the interlock switch on the card fully downward. Flip the ejector levers outward and away from the card’s faceplate.

  • Page 245

    Replacing Application Cards Installing the Application Card ▀ Step 4 Slide the interlock switch on the front panel of the application card upward to lock the ejector tab in place. The flange on the left-side of the interlock switch prevents movement of the ejector tab when raised completely. Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail.

  • Page 246: Replacing The Cf Memory Card On Smcs

    Replacing Application Cards ▀ Replacing the CF Memory Card on SMCs Replacing the CF Memory Card on SMCs SMC cards ship with a CompactFlash (CF) memory card that stores configuration files, software images, and session capacity/feature licensing keys for the system. The following figure displays the location of the CompactFlash memory card on the SMC.

  • Page 247: Replacing The Compactflash On An Smc

    Replacing Application Cards Replacing the CF Memory Card on SMCs ▀ Replacing the CompactFlash on an SMC This section provides instructions for the removal of the CompactFlash card from the failed SMC and its safe insertion in the replacement SMC. Step 1 On the failed SMC, remove the card retainer clip that secures the CompactFlash module in the socket by pulling the ends of the card retainer clips out and away from the socket.

  • Page 248: What To Do With The Failed Application Card

    If the failed application card is still under warranty, return it to the vendor for repair. If the failed application card is out of warranty, contact Cisco to determine if it can be sent in for repair at an additional cost.

  • Page 249: Replacing Line Cards

    Chapter 20 Replacing Line Cards This chapter provides information on replacing a failed line card. This chapter includes the following sections:  Determining Whether a Line Card has Failed  Removing the Line Card  Installing the Line Card  What to do with the Failed Line Card Caution: During installation, maintenance, and/or removal, wear a grounding wrist strap to avoid ESD damage...

  • Page 250: Determining Whether A Line Card Has Failed

    Replacing Line Cards ▀ Determining Whether a Line Card has Failed Determining Whether a Line Card has Failed There are several ways the chassis indicates a line card failure. The first indicator is that the Status LED on the System Management Card (SMC) turns red to indicate the failure of a chassis component.

  • Page 251

    Replacing Line Cards Determining Whether a Line Card has Failed ▀ Using SNMP Traps The system supports SNMP traps that are triggered for conditions that may indicate the need to replace a line card. The system provides the traps listed in the table below. Table 84.

  • Page 252: Removing The Line Card

    Replacing Line Cards ▀ Removing the Line Card Removing the Line Card This section describes how to remove a line card. Important: Before removing and replacing a line card on an active system, refer to the System Administration Guide for instructions on how to switch services to a redundant (standby) card. Step 1 Detach any cables that are attached to the line card.

  • Page 253

    Replacing Line Cards Removing the Line Card ▀ Step 5 Holding the card by its ejector levers, gently slide the card out of the chassis. Caution: Do not leave chassis slots uncovered for an extended period of time. This reduces airflow through the chassis and could cause it to overheat.

  • Page 254: Installing The Line Card

    Replacing Line Cards ▀ Installing the Line Card Installing the Line Card Step 1 Slide the interlock switch on the card fully downward. Flip the ejector levers outward and away from the card’s faceplate. Step 2 Hold the card by its ejector levers and align it with the upper and lower card guides of the chassis slot. Gently slide the card into the slot until the levers touch the chassis frame.

  • Page 255

    Replacing Line Cards Installing the Line Card ▀ Step 4 Slide the interlock switch on the front panel of the line card upward to lock the ejector tab in place. The flange on the left-side of the interlock switch prevents movement of the ejector tab when raised completely. Important: You must slide the interlock switch upward before securing the card’s top screw to the mounting rail.

  • Page 256: What To Do With The Failed Line Card

    If the failed line card is still under warranty, return it to the vendor for repair. If the failed line card is out of warranty, contact Cisco to determine if you can send it in for repair at an additional cost.

  • Page 257: Technical Specifications

    Chapter 21 Technical Specifications This chapter lists physical dimensions, power specifications, mounting requirements and interface specifications for ASR 5000 system components. It includes the following sections:  Physical Dimensions  Weights  Power Specifications  Mounting Requirements  Interface Specifications ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 258: Physical Dimensions

    Technical Specifications ▀ Physical Dimensions Physical Dimensions The ASR 5000 can be mounted in any standard (EIA-310-D, IEC 60297) 19-inch (482.6 mm) equipment cabinet or telecommunications rack. The table below lists the dimensions for the chassis and each component that can be placed within the chassis.

  • Page 259: Weights

    Technical Specifications Weights ▀ Weights The following table identifies the maximum weights for fully-loaded systems—cards installed in all slots and all other components installed. Table 86. ASR 5000 Component Weights Component Weight Chassis Empty 65 lbs. (29.48 kg) As Shipped (empty chassis with PFUs, fan trays, bezels and blanking panels) 160 lbs.

  • Page 260: Power Specifications

    Technical Specifications ▀ Power Specifications Power Specifications The following table provides essential power specifications for the chassis and all associated cards within the system. Table 87. Chassis Power Requirements Characteristic Value Input Voltage Maximum range: -40VDC to -60VDC Nominal range: -48VDC to -60 VDC TUV Rated Peak Current Load 165A @ -48 VDC Maximum Peak Power Load...

  • Page 261: Mounting Requirements

    Technical Specifications Mounting Requirements ▀ Mounting Requirements Each 24.5 in. (62.23 cm.) height chassis requires 14 Rack Units (RUs) of space. You can mount the system into any 19- inch (482.6 mm) equipment rack or telco cabinet with the mounting brackets supplied with the chassis. Additional hardware (not supplied), such as extension brackets, may be used to install the chassis in a standard 23-inch (584.2 mm) cabinet or rack.

  • Page 262

    Technical Specifications ▀ Mounting Requirements Figure 62. Three ASR 5000 Chassis in a 42 RU Rack ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 263: Interface Specifications

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications The table below lists the line card interfaces for use within the chassis. Table 88. Line Card Interfaces Card Type Port Quantity Connector Type Notes SPIO Console RJ-45, RS-232 serial — Console Cable Assembly RJ-45 to DB-9 —...

  • Page 264: Spio Card Interfaces

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications SPIO Card Interfaces Each interface on the SPIO card is described below. In each accompanying figure, the interface is shown in the same orientation as the way it appears on the card. Console Port The Console port is an RJ-45 RS-232 interface used to access the command line interface. The interface communicates at a baud rate of 9600 to 115,200 bps (115.2 Kbps).

  • Page 265

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Figure 63. SPIO Console Cable Assembly Table 90. RJ-45 to DB-9 Cable Signal Description Signal Type RJ-45 Pin DB-9 Pin Signal Clear to Send (CTS) Input Data set Ready (DSR) Input Receive Data (RxD) Input Signal Ground (SGND) SGND Ready to Send (RTS)

  • Page 266: Fiber Sfp Interface

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications Fiber SFP Interface The fiber Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP) interface has two host connectors that receive SFP transceivers. Table 92. Fiber SFP Interface Transmit and Receive Levels Signal Level Max TX: 0 dBm Min TX: -9.5 dBm Max RX: 0 dBm (saturation average power)

  • Page 267: Central Office Alarm Interface

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Central Office Alarm Interface The Central Office (CO) alarm interface is a 10-pin Molex connector supporting three dry-contact relay switches. The three normally closed (NC) relays can support normally open (NO) or NC devices. The following two figures show the pin-out details for this interface and the next figure shows an example CO alarm configuration.

  • Page 268

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications Figure 64. SPIO CO Alarms Cable Assembly Table 95. CO Alarms Cable Pinout CO Alarms IF Pin No. Cable Wire Color Cable Terminal Block Position No. Signal Black Major Alarm - Normally closed Orange Major Alarm - Common Major Alarm - Normally open Brown Minor Alarm - Normally closed...

  • Page 269

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Central Office Alarm Wiring Example The following figure depicts how the dry-contact relays can each control up to two external alarm indicators. In this example, the CO alarm interface is connected to a CO Alarm Panel, where green LEDs are wired to indicate normal operation, and red LEDs are wired to indicate an alarm condition.

  • Page 270: Bits Timing Interface

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications BITS Timing Interface Important: External Building Interface Timing Supply (BITS) timing is an alternative to using clock signals derived from an ATM port on an OLC/OLC2, or an ANSI SONET STS-3/SDH STM-1 port on a CLC/CLC2 to synchronize line card timing.

  • Page 271: Fast Ethernet Line Card (flc2) Interfaces

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Fast Ethernet Line Card (FLC2) Interfaces Each of the eight RJ-45 interfaces available on the FLC2 supports auto-sensing 10Base-Tx or 100Base-Tx Ethernet interfaces. 10/100 Mbps RJ-45 Interface The RJ-45 interfaces on the Fast Ethernet line card support the following cable types and transfer rates. The following figure shows the pin-outs for the RJ-45 Ethernet ports.

  • Page 272: Base-lx Interface

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications 1000Base-LX Interface The 1000Base-LX fiber SFP interface on the Ethernet 1000 LX line card has one pair of host connectors. The QGLC has four pairs. Table 98. 1000Base-LX Fiber Transmit and Receive Levels Signal Level Max TX: 0 dBm Min TX:...

  • Page 273: Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (xglc) Sfp

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) SFP+ 10GBase-SR The 10GBase-SR fiber SFP+ interface on the XGLC has one pair of fiber connectors. Table 100. 10GBase-SR Fiber Transmit and Receive Levels Signal Level Max TX: -1.0 dBm Min TX: -7.3 dBm Max RX:...

  • Page 274: Fiber Atm/pos Oc-3 (olc2) Multi-mode Interface

    Technical Specifications ▀ Interface Specifications Fiber ATM/POS OC-3 (OLC2) Multi-Mode Interface Fiber ATM/POS OC-3 SM IR-1 Interface The fiber-optic SFP interface on OLC2 Optical ATM Line Cards with the SM IR-1 interface has one pair of host connectors. Table 102. OC-3 SM IR-1 Fiber Transmit and Receive Levels Signal Level Max TX:...

  • Page 275: Channelized Line Cards

    Technical Specifications Interface Specifications ▀ Channelized Line Cards Channelized Line Card (CLC2) with Single-Mode Interface The optical SFP interface on the 4-port CLC2 with the single-mode interface has four pairs of connectors that accept SFP transceivers. Table 104. Single-Mode Fiber Transmit and Receive Levels Signal Level Max TX:...

  • Page 277: Safety, Electrical And Emc Certifications

    Chapter 22 Safety, Electrical and EMC Certifications This chapter lists FCC warnings, as well as safety, electrical and environmental certifications for the ASR 5000 system. This chapter includes the following sections:  Federal Communications Commission Warning  Safety Certifications  Electrical Certifications ...

  • Page 278

    Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case your organization is responsible for the expenses incurred to correct the interference. Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.

  • Page 279: Electrical Certifications

    Safety, Electrical and EMC Certifications Electrical Certifications ▀ Electrical Certifications The ASR 5000 complies with all electrical certifications listed below.  Telcordia GR-1089-Core, Network Equipment-Building System (NEBS) Requirements: Electromagnetic Compatibility and Electrical Safety Criteria for Network Telecommunication Equipment  FCC, Part 15 B, Class A Requirements for Non-residential Equipment ...

  • Page 280: Electromagnetic Compatibility (emc) Compliance

    Safety, Electrical and EMC Certifications ▀ Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Compliance Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Compliance Electromagnetic compatibility is the ability of electronic devices to operate as intended in proximity to other electronic devices or in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Unintentional radio frequency emissions from an electronic device and immunity of the device to radio frequency interference from other electromagnetic sources are included within electromagnetic compatibility.

  • Page 281: Environmental Specifications

    Chapter 23 Environmental Specifications This chapter provides information related to environmental considerations and storage characteristics associated with the ASR 5000. This chapter includes the following sections:  Operating and Storage Parameters  Supported Environmental Standards  Chassis Air Flow ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 282: Operating And Storage Parameters

    Environmental Specifications ▀ Operating and Storage Parameters Operating and Storage Parameters Use the following information to plan your network installation for the ASR 5000 platform. Table 106. Temperature, Humidity and Altitude Recommendations Temperature Operating 0 degrees C to +55 degrees C Storage -40 degrees C to +70 degrees C Humidity...

  • Page 283: Chassis Air Flow

    Environmental Specifications Chassis Air Flow ▀ Chassis Air Flow Airflow within the ASR 5000 is designed per Telcordia recommendations to ensure the proper vertical convection cooling of the system. As shown in the figure below, the lower fan tray pulls ambient air into the chassis from the front and side intake vents located at the bottom of the chassis.

  • Page 285: Hardware Product Support Matrix

    Appendix A Hardware Product Support Matrix This appendix identifies the embedded services supported by the various types of ASR 5000 packet processing cards and line cards. This appendix includes the following sections:  Packet Processing Cards  Line Cards ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 286: Packet Processing Cards

    Hardware Product Support Matrix ▀ Packet Processing Cards Packet Processing Cards The table below cross-references embedded services with the types of packet processing cards that are capable of running the service in this StarOS release. Packet processing cards included in this matrix are: ...

  • Page 287

    Hardware Product Support Matrix Packet Processing Cards ▀ Table 107. Packet Processing Card – Product Support Matrix Embedded Service PSCA PSC2 PSC3 CDMA PDSN/HA HSGW Not Qualified PMIPv6 Not Qualified Femtocell CDMA Not Qualified Not Qualified UMTS Not Qualified Security Gateway ePDG Not Qualified PDIF...

  • Page 288

    Hardware Product Support Matrix ▀ Line Cards Line Cards The table below cross-references embedded services with the types of lines cards that interoperate with the service in this StarOS release. Line cards included in this matrix are:  SPIO = Switch Processor I/O ...

  • Page 289

    Hardware Product Support Matrix Line Cards ▀ Embedded Service SPIO FLC2 GLC2 QGLC XGLC CLC2 OLC2 Other GGSN IMS-MMD IPCF IPSG SGSN Note 1. Home NodeB Gateway (HNB-GW) applications. ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 291: Preparing A Full-height Line Card Slot

    Appendix B Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot This appendix describes how to modify two vertical half-height line card slots to accept full-height line cards, such as the XGLC. It includes the following sections:  Introduction  Remove Blanking Panels ...

  • Page 292: Introduction

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot ▀ Introduction Introduction The ASR 5000 chassis ships with all rear line card slots configured for half-height line cards. If you are installing a full- height line card, such as the XGLC, you must prepare a full-height slot to receive it. Full-height line cards occupy two half-height slots: an upper chassis slot and the lower chassis slot directly beneath it.

  • Page 293: Remove Blanking Panels

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot Remove Blanking Panels ▀ Remove Blanking Panels You must remove the half-height blanking panels covering the upper and lower chassis slots, if installed. Step 1 Identify the chassis slots in which the full-height line card will be installed. Step 2 Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to loosen the screws at the top and bottom of the blanking panel.

  • Page 294: Remove The Half-height Card Guide

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot ▀ Remove the Half-Height Card Guide Remove the Half-Height Card Guide You must next remove the half-height card guide separating the exposed upper and lower chassis slots. Figure 69. Half-height Card Guide Important: Save all of the items you remove in this step in the event that you wish to re-populate these slots with half-height cards at a later time.

  • Page 295

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot Remove the Half-Height Card Guide ▀ Step 1 Remove the two gasket strips to allow access to the screws beneath. Save the gasket strips. Step 2 Using a Phillips #1 screwdriver, loosen the two screws that secure the half-height card guide ejector rail/cap. Save the screws for later use.

  • Page 296

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot ▀ Remove the Half-Height Card Guide Step 3 Remove the half-height card guide ejector rail/cap. ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 297

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot Remove the Half-Height Card Guide ▀ Step 4 Use the screwdriver provided with the full-height line card to loosen the screw that secures the half-height card guide to the chassis mid-plane. ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 298

    Preparing a Full-Height Line Card Slot ▀ Remove the Half-Height Card Guide Step 5 Gently pull the half-height card guide out of the chassis. Important: You may need to slightly angle the guide when you slide it out of the chassis to unlatch it. ▄...

  • Page 299: Rohs Compliance Statement

    Appendix C RoHS Compliance Statement This appendix contains RoHS compliance statements for ASR 5000 components. The Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive restricts the use of six hazardous materials in the manufacture of various types of electronic and electrical equipment: Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Cadmium (Cd), Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+), Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB), and Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE).

  • Page 300: Chassis

    RoHS Compliance Statement ▀ Chassis Chassis ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 301: Fan Assembly

    RoHS Compliance Statement Fan Assembly ▀ Fan Assembly ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 302: Power Filter Unit (pfu)

    RoHS Compliance Statement ▀ Power Filter Unit (PFU) Power Filter Unit (PFU) ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 303: Full Product

    RoHS Compliance Statement Full Product ▀ Full Product ASR 5000 Installation Guide ▄...

  • Page 304

    RoHS Compliance Statement ▀ Full Product ▄ ASR 5000 Installation Guide...

  • Page 305: Rma Shipping Procedures

    Appendix D RMA Shipping Procedures This appendix describes the procedures for packaging and returning ASR 5000 chassis components via the Cisco Return Material Authorization (RMA) process. For detailed information on Cisco RMA policies (including detailed shipping instructions), go to the Product Online Web Returns (POWR) link on www.cisco.com.

  • Page 306: Rma Overview

    The following general guidelines apply when packaging components:  It is best to use the original Cisco box and packaging in which your equipment was sent and received. You can use a shipping carton saved when the system and its components were installed. You can also use the packaging for a replacement component to repackage the original component.

  • Page 307: Sealing The Shipment

    All returned items must include the RMA number (and Quote Number for Trade-In Returns) on every box being returned. The RMA number can be obtained from the POWR link on www.cisco.com or your Cisco TAC advisor. For Trade-In Returns, a POWR tool label must be placed on the outside of each box.

  • Page 308: Packaging Asr 5000 Cards

    RMA Shipping Procedures ▀ Packaging ASR 5000 Cards Packaging ASR 5000 Cards This section provides detailed instructions for packaging ASR 5000 cards using Cisco shipping cartons. Three types of cartons are used based on the card type being returned: ...

  • Page 309: Packaging An Application Card

    RMA Shipping Procedures Packaging ASR 5000 Cards ▀ Packaging an Application Card The packaging sequence is as follows: Step 1 Place the card inside the ESD bag; fold over and seal the bag with an ESD Label or tape as shown in the photos. Step 2 If packing an SMC, a foam block must be removed from the bottom foam near the connector cut outs.

  • Page 310

    RMA Shipping Procedures ▀ Packaging ASR 5000 Cards Step 3 Place the card in the carton as shown in the photos. Step 4 Place the top piece of foam over the card. Step 5 Close the carton and seal it with packaging tape. See Sealing the Shipment for additional information.

  • Page 311: Line Cards (except Xglc)

    RMA Shipping Procedures Packaging ASR 5000 Cards ▀ Line Cards (except XGLC) Half-Height Line Card Types The packing instructions in this section apply to the following half-height card types:  ASR5K-C4OC3-MM-K9 – Channelized Line Card 2 (CLC2) [MM SFP]  ASR5K-C4OC3-SM-K9 – Channelized Line Card 2 (CLC2) [SM SFP] ...

  • Page 312: Packaging A Half-height Line Card

    RMA Shipping Procedures ▀ Packaging ASR 5000 Cards Packaging a Half-height Line Card The packaging sequence is as follows: Step 1 Place the card inside the ESD bag; fold over and seal the bag with an ESD Label or tape as shown in the photos. ▄...

  • Page 313

    RMA Shipping Procedures Packaging ASR 5000 Cards ▀ Step 2 Place the card within the bottom piece of foam as shown in the photos. If packing an RCC or SPIO, a foam block must be removed from the bottom foam near the connector cut outs. Step 3 Place the top piece of foam over the card.

  • Page 314

    RMA Shipping Procedures ▀ Packaging ASR 5000 Cards Step 4 If you are returning the cable assembly with a SPIO, remove the round insert from the top piece of foam and place the cable assembly in the cutout. Step 5 Close the carton and seal it with packaging tape.

  • Page 315: Gigabit Ethernet Card (xgl)

    RMA Shipping Procedures Packaging ASR 5000 Cards ▀ 10 Gigabit Ethernet Card (XGL) XGLC Card Types The packing instructions in this section applying to the following full-height XGLCs:  ASR5K-0110G-MM-K9 – 1-Port 10 Gigabit Ethernet Line Card (XGLC) [MM SFP+] ...

  • Page 316

    RMA Shipping Procedures ▀ Packaging ASR 5000 Cards Step 2 The XGLC shipping carton includes a bottom foam piece and two top foam pieces. Insert the XGLC in the bottom foam piece and place the two top pieces in the slots at either ends of the card as shown in the photos: Step 3 Close the carton and seal it with packaging tape.

  • Page 317

    Only fully-trained personnel, on-site or field engineering resources should exchange the Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) listed below. Based on industry-leading redundancy and failover features incorporated within the system, Cisco recommends that the following minimum spare parts levels for any ASR 5000 deployment.

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