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Establishing A Setup Or Power-on Password; Resetting The Setup And Power-on Password - HP EliteOne 800 G1 Maintenance & Service Manual

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Establishing a setup or power-on password

To establish the power-on or setup password features, complete the following steps:
1.
Turn on or restart the computer.
2.
As soon as the computer turns on, press the
message is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
3.
Press the
4.
To establish Setup password, select Security > Setup Password and follow the instructions.
– or –
To establish a Power-On password, select Security > Power-On Password and follow the
instructions on the screen
5.
Before exiting, click File > Save Changes and Exit.

Resetting the setup and power-on password

To disable the power-on or setup password features, or to clear the power-on or setup passwords,
complete the following steps:
1.
Shut down the operating system properly, then turn off the computer and any external devices,
and disconnect the power cord from the power outlet.
2.
With the power cord disconnected, press the power button again to drain the system of any
residual power.
WARNING!
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet, and allow the internal system components
to cool before touching.
CAUTION:
the system board even when the unit is turned off. Failure to disconnect the power cord can result
in damage to the system.
Static electricity can damage the electronic components of the computer or optional equipment.
Before beginning these procedures, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity by briefly
touching a grounded metal object. See the Regulatory, Safety and Environmental Notices guide
for more information.
3.
Remove the access panel.
4.
Locate the header and jumper labeled PSWD.
NOTE:
the password jumper and other system board components, see the Illustrated Parts & Service Map
(IPSM). The IPSM can be downloaded from http://www.hp.com/support.
5.
Remove the jumper.
192
Chapter 11 Password security and resetting CMOS
F10
key to enter Computer Setup.
To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
When the computer is plugged in, the power supply always has voltage applied to
The password jumper is blue so that it can be easily identified. For assistance locating
Esc
key while "Press the ESC key for Startup Menu"

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  • Simon Jun 21, 2015 07:39:
    Almost always the people giving these answers have not actually completed such a repair themselves and it is quite common diagnostic comes down to something else other than the power supply. For example while the 4 beep error code might be to confirm power failure on some model of HP computers, ie if you use a wrong type of external AC adapter or one that is faulty, it is not the case with another, ie internal PSU on a desktop. If the PSU fail to provide the correct power source due to a fault the initial power input arriving at the system board regulator would have failed it enough so it will not be enough even to power the base unit or would just indicate a quick power on light and switch itself off immediatel​y. If their is enough power to allow an error code then there must be enough source of power from the PSU for the regulator to accept and allow the system board to register the beep code that a faulty PSU cannot do.
  • Simon Jun 20, 2015 04:29:
    Actually most beep codes are only a fair guests and should not be taken as gospel. Manufactur​er's info does not necessary reflect real life field use and failure and it is often the customers feedback that can give a proper insight on reliabilit​y. For example 4 beeps with flashing red light does not necessary mean there is a problem with the power supply but can well be something else that is causing the power to overload. I have come across it being a motherboar​d, the CPU and both causing the 4 beeps. If you think about it if the power supply is faulty most of the time it won't even power the base unit so no chance of starting a beep. Chances of power supply overloadin​g in a desktop is rare unless a piece hardware has develop a fault or producing too much of a draw.