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VideoBloX
Matrix Switcher
User Manual
800-04465 – April 2008 – Rev. A

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   Summary of Contents for Honeywell VideoBloX

  • Page 1

    VideoBloX Matrix Switcher User Manual 800-04465 – April 2008 – Rev. A...

  • Page 2

    Revision History ISSUES DATE REVISIONS Apr 2009 Initial Release...

  • Page 3

    Honeywell Video Systems shall not be held responsible for the use of this product in violation of current laws and statutes.

  • Page 4: Important Safeguards

    WARNINGS WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT EXPOSE THIS PRODUCT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. WARNING: THE VIDEOBLOX MAXTRIX SWITCHER AND ITS ACCESSORIES ARE TO BE INSTALLED BY QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL ONLY. WARNING: DO NOT INSERT ANY METALLIC OBJECT THROUGH VENTILATION GRILLS.

  • Page 5

    Honeywell A product and cart combination should be moved with care. Quick stops, excessive force, and uneven surfaces may cause the product and cart combination to overturn. VENTILATION - Slots and openings in the cabinet and the back or bottom are provided for ventilation and to ensure reliable operation of the equipment and to protect it from overheating.

  • Page 6: Explanation Of Graphical Symbols

    Honeywell REPLACEMENT PARTS – When replacement parts are required, be sure the service technician has used replacement parts specified by the manufacturer or have the same characteristics as the original part. Unauthorized substitutions may result in fire, electric shock or other hazards.

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    INTRODUCTION ............................ 1 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION ........................1 SYSTEM OVERVIEW..........................2 RACK MOUNT SYSTEM CHASSIS ......................2 VIDEOBLOX MODULES ........................4 VB CHASSISS CONNECTIONS ....................... 4 Main Input Power Connection........................ 4 Low Voltage Input Connection....................... 5 Chassis Sync In ............................. 5 Control Expansion Connector........................

  • Page 8

    Honeywell OVERVIEW ............................. 40 PLANNING YOUR SYSTEM ........................40 NETCPU SYSTEM CONFIGURATION BUTTONS................. 41 ..............................42 YSTEM Utilities Button Definitions ........................43 License..............................43 Sizing ..............................44 Date/Time ............................46 Communications ..........................48 Installer..............................48 INPUTS (A ) ......................49 DDING A VIDEO INPUT Inputs Detail ............................

  • Page 9

    INTERFACING HVBNETCPU WITH SATELLITE SYSTEMS ON A NETWORK ........134 Video on Fiber............................ 134 Video on IP ............................135 Integrating Enterprise DVR and Satellite VideoBloX ................. 136 System Benefits ..........................137 APPENDIX A: VIDEOBLOX CHASSIS INTERLINK EXPANSION ..........138 ............................138 NTRODUCTION ....................

  • Page 10

    Figure 1-1 Front view of VB Chassis ......................1 Figure 1-2 Rear View of VB Chassis ......................3 Figure 2-1 Rear View of VideoBloX Chassis’ Main Power ................4 Figure 2-2 DIP Switches of Power Supply Module ..................6 Figure 2-3 Front and Rear Views of CPU Module ..................8 Figure 2-4 Jumpers Settings –...

  • Page 11

    Honeywell Figure 2-25 Start Upgrade ..........................23 Figure 2-26 Software Version ......................... 24 Figure 2-27Video Input Modules (2 front panel options)................. 25 Figure 2-28 Video Input Module (Standard – 16 BNC Inputs) ................ 25 Figure 2-29 Video Input Module (Looping BNC Inputs).................. 25 Figure 2-30 Type A, B and C Cross-Connect Looping Input Terminal Modules ..........

  • Page 12

    Honeywell Figure 2-53 Back Plane Video Channels Selection for interlink input module..........37 Figure 2-54 DIP SW Settings for interlink input module ................. 37 Figure 2-55 SW1 and SW2 settings for interlink input module ............... 37 Figure 2-56 SW 3 and SW 4 settings for interlink input module ..............39 Figure 3-1 Initial Configuration Screen ......................

  • Page 13

    Figure 3-42 Device Control Mode ........................100 Figure 3-43 Sanyo VCR Control ........................100 Figure 3-44 VST DVR Control......................... 101 Figure 3-45 Honeywell Ademco MUX Control ....................102 Figure 3-46 Tods Configuration ........................103 Figure 3-47 Message Configuration........................ 105 Figure 3-48 Sequences – Editor Configuration....................107 Figure 3-49 Sequences –...

  • Page 14

    Figure 4-3 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with Satellite System with Video on Fiber ..........134 Figure 4-4 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with Satellite System with Video on IP ..........135 Figure 4-5 Integrating Enterprise DVR and Satellite VideoBloX..............136 Figure 5-1 HVBLKI Module ..........................138...

  • Page 15

    Honeywell Figure 5-2 HVBLKO Module ........................... 139 Figure 5-3 Backplane Control and Communications of VB Chassis............... 140 Figure 5-4 Dip Switch of VB chassis....................... 140 Figure 5-5 784 Input X 64 Output System Configuration................141 Figure 5-6 HVB32LKO Jumper Setting......................142 Figure 5-7 HVB32LKI Jumper and Dip Switch Setting ...................

  • Page 17: Introduction

    Honeywell 1 INTRODUCTION PRODUCT DESCRIPTION VideoBloX is a range of compatible building blocks for use in video surveillance and monitoring systems. An entire system would consist of a suitable mix of the following components / modules: Figure 1-1 Front view of VB Chassis •...

  • Page 18: System Overview

    Each system must contain at least one VideoBloX chassis. It is possible to connect more than one chassis either at the same location or at different locations with suitable data and video interlinks between the various racks.

  • Page 19: Figure 1-2 Rear View Of Vb Chassis

    Honeywell VideoBloX modules are mounted from the front of the chassis. The modules are fitted horizontally to allow for vertical system expansion. All modules (except the power supply module) are position independent. Modules are "hot-swappable" and may be removed and reinserted with the power on.

  • Page 20: Videoblox Modules

    Ideally, the main input power supply should have low noise levels, minimum voltage fluctuation and be protected against over voltages such as those induced by lightning. Figure 2-1 Rear View of VideoBloX Chassis’ Main Power...

  • Page 21: Low Voltage Input Connection

    / diagnostics relating to the sync input. Control Expansion Connector This connector allows for connection of control signals between multiple VideoBloX chassis. The pin-out of this connector is automatically modified depending on configuration for the chassis being a master or slave.

  • Page 22: Power Supply Module

    AC input ranging from 115 V to 240 V 50 / 60 Hz. It is additionally possible to power a VideoBloX chassis from an 18 to 24 VAC or 18 to 24 VDC supply. Power indications are visible from the front of the chassis. The power supply is equipped with the necessary protection and filtering to ensure regulatory compliance.

  • Page 23: Reset Push Button

    Switch 3 is used to determine whether the chassis generates or receives system synchronization signal. Switch 4 is used to set the chassis to be the master or slave when multiple VideoBloX chassis are connected. Refer to the following table for detailed information.

  • Page 24: Netcpu & Netosd Module

    8. Fasten the power supply module using the 2X fixing screws. NETCPU & NETOSD MODULE A VideoBloX system is controlled by a single master CPU module. For an expanded system, with multiple chassis, it is possible to interconnect the chassis and have a single...

  • Page 25: Jumper Settings

    Honeywell • Recoverable over current protection • Interface protection compliance with FCC, CE requirements • Built-in real-time clock The front panel indications provide basic information relating to the systems overall running condition and communication activity. Five communication ports provide the following functions:...

  • Page 26: Dip Switch Settings

    VideoBloX MODULES Figure 2-4 Jumpers Settings – Enable the NETCPU Figure 2-5 Jumpers Settings – Enable the NETOSD DIP Switch Settings The NETCPU & NETOSD has four DIP switches to set the system. These switches are accessed by removal the front panel of the CPU.

  • Page 27: Figure 2-6 Dip Switches Of Hvbnet16cpu

    Honeywell Figure 2-6 DIP Switches of HVBNET16CPU DIP switch 1 is used to set communication parameters for the three serial ports. Position Description SW 1 Com 1 port baud rate setting SW 2 BAUD SW2/SW4/SW6 SW1/SW3/SW5 RATE SW 3 9600...

  • Page 28: Output Group Address

    VideoBloX MODULES 0= Don’t detect video source SW 6 Video source detection 1= Detect video source on input car 0= Include channel on video loss SW 7 Loss video skip 1= Skip Channel on video loss 1 = Reset to default NETCPU web password...

  • Page 29: Push Buttons

    Honeywell Note: Each group has 64 output channel addresses, 0 is 1-64; 1 is 65-128 etc. This output group of output board and input board should be same in one chassis, otherwise the switch function can’t work. Push Buttons Push buttons on the front panel (see...

  • Page 30: Fuse

    The NETCPU module and NETOSD module have 1 PCB mounted fuse separately, rated at 0.75A. The fuse should only blow in the event of a fault on the board. In such an event, the NETCPU & NETOSD module should be returned to a Honeywell distributor for repair. Connections...

  • Page 31: Figure 2-9 Login Page

    Honeywell Figure 2-9 Login Page 2. Enter user name and password in User Name and Password field. Default user name is “administrator” while default password is “1234”. Click Login, then the HVBNETCPU homepage (Figure 2-10 ) is displayed. Figure 2-10 HVBNETCPU Homepage 3.

  • Page 32: Figure 2-11 Configuring Network Connections

    VideoBloX MODULES Figure 2-11 Configuring Network Connections 4. To change the network settings, edit the text in relative textboxes and click Apply. For example, you change the IP Address to from 159.99.251.233 to 159.99.251.249 and click Apply. Figure 2-12 is displayed.

  • Page 33: Figure 2-13 Confirming Network Connections

    Honeywell 5. To upgrade the NETCPU firmware, click UPGRADE tab. Figure 2-13 is displayed, prompting you to make sure that the network is connected during file upgrade. Figure 2-13 Confirming Network Connections 6. Click OK. Select folder to be upgraded from the Select Folder drop -down list, see Figure 2-14.

  • Page 34: Figure 2-15 Selecting Netcpu Upgrade File

    VideoBloX MODULES Figure 2-15 Selecting NETCPU Upgrade File If Application is selected from the Select Folder drop-down list, select file “HVBNETCPU_App.img” and click open. If FPGA, select file “HVBNETCPU_FPGA.img” and click open. And if Kernel, select file “HVBNETCPU_Kernel.img” and click open.

  • Page 35: Figure 2-17 Upgrade Completed

    Honeywell Figure 2-17 Upgrade Completed NOTE: IP address of NETCPU will be reset to default values after rebooting when upgrading the Application folder. Default IP address is 192.168.1.9. Therefore, you need to change your IP address so that it is in the same network segment with the NETCPU if necessary.

  • Page 36: Figure 2-19 Changing Password Success

    VideoBloX MODULES 11. Enter the old password in Old Password textbox and new password in New Password and Confirm New Password textboxes. Then click Apply. Figure 2-19 will be displayed if password has been changed successfully. Figure 2-19 Changing Password Success NOTE: Characters in password of NETCPU and NETOSD can be numbers, letters or symbols.

  • Page 37: Figure 2-21 Hvbnetosd Homepage

    Honeywell 2. Enter user name and password in User Name and Password field. Default user name is “administrator” while default password is “1234”. Click Login, then HVBNETOSD homepage (Figure 2-21 ) is displayed. Figure 2-21 HVBNETOSD Homepage 3. Click CONFIGURATION tab, then Figure 2-22 is displayed.

  • Page 38: Figure 2-23 Selecting Language

    VideoBloX MODULES 5. To upgrade the input title font (see Input Title on page ), short name of outputs font (see Outputs Detail on page 59) and message text font (see MESSAGE on page 104), click Language file tab on...

  • Page 39: Figure 2-25 Start Upgrade

    Honeywell If Chinese is selected from the Select language drop-down list, select file “HVBNETOSD_chinese.lang” and click open. If English, select file “HVBNETOSD_English.lang” and click open. And if Korean, select file “HVBNETOSD_Korean.lang” and click open. 7. Click Send to start upgrade. Then Figure 2-25 is displayed.

  • Page 40: Video Input Modules

    VIDEO INPUT MODULES The video input module brings 16 video signals into the VideoBloX chassis. Each of the inputs may be routed to 1 or more of the 64 backplane channels. All input modules have 16 video inputs, but can be switched to 16, 32, or 64 (maximum) outputs. They have internal terminal switches.

  • Page 41: Dip Switch Settings

    8 video inputs from each of the style ‘A’ and ‘C’ modules. When connected using coaxial ribbon cables, each chassis receives all 16 video inputs. The ‘B’ style cross-connection module allows for interconnection of up to 4 VideoBloX chassis. Figure 2-30 Type A, B and C Cross-Connect Looping Input Terminal Modules VideoBloX input module has following features: •...

  • Page 42: Figure 2-31 Hvbm64 Dip Sw Settings

    VideoBloX MODULES SW1.8 SW1.7 SW1.6 SW1.5 SW1.4 SW1.3 SW1.2 SW1.1 Unit Address 0-not allowed DIP Switch Settings of HVBM64 Figure 2-31 shows the DIP switch settings for the HVBM64 module. • DIP Switches S1 (1-8) and S2 (1-3) define the card’s address in a binary format and is set to represent the camera range.

  • Page 43: Led Indications

    The standard video input is connected by a BNC connector. VIDEO OUTPUT MODULES The video output module provides 16 video signals from the VideoBloX chassis. Each of the outputs is associated with one of the 64 backplane channels. Figure 2-32 16 Channel Video Output Modules - Front View Figure 2-33 16 Channel Video Output –...

  • Page 44: Dip Switch Settings

    VideoBloX MODULES Figure 2-34 the Titled Video Output Module – Front View Figure 2-35 the Titled Video Output Module – Rear View The titled output module has following features: • 40 characters by 16 lines text (PAL) or 40 characters by 13 lines text (NTSC) generation capability.

  • Page 45: Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 1-64

    Honeywell Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 1-64 Figure 2-37 Select Different 16 Outputs Group Through Plug-in Board Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 1-16 Figure 2-38 Select Video Output 1-16 (Position A and B)

  • Page 46: Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 17-32

    VideoBloX MODULES Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 17-32 Figure 2-39 Select Video Output 17-32 (Position E and F) Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 33-48 Figure 2-40 Select Video Output 33-48 (Position C and D)

  • Page 47: Module Board Setting, Video Outputs 49-64

    Figure 2-41 Select Video Output 49-64 (Position G and H) AUDIO INPUT MODULE The audio input module brings 16 balanced audio signals into the VideoBloX chassis. Each of the inputs may be routed to 1 or more of the 64 backplane channels.

  • Page 48: Pin Out Of Rj45 Termination

    VideoBloX MODULES • Phantom powering option • 20 dB pad to cater for a wide range of input signal levels. • High pass and low pass filter options PIN OUT of RJ45 termination Each RJ45 port can accommodate four audio inputs. The detailed pin out is as below.

  • Page 49: Jumpers Settings

    Honeywell Figure 2-45 DIP SW Setting of Audio Input Module Jumpers Settings Phantom Power and 20dB Pad Jumpers Fit the two phantom power jumpers as per the legend shown alongside to provide phantom powering for external microphones. In all other cases, these jumpers should not be fitted.

  • Page 50: Adjustments

    VideoBloX MODULES Place the jumper in the position shown as “Low Filter On” to enable the low pass filter function. This reduces the level of signals above 6000 Hz Figure 2-47 Jumper Setting for Low Pass or High Pass Filter...

  • Page 51: Audio Output Module

    Figure 2-49 Diagram of Connecting a Microphone AUDIO OUTPUT MODULE The audio output module provides 16 audio output signals from the VideoBloX chassis. Each of the outputs is associated with one of the 64 backplane channels. Figure 2-50 Front and Rear Views of 8 and 16 Channel Audio Output Modules VideoBloX audio output module has following features: •...

  • Page 52: Chassis Interlink Input And Output Module

    VideoBloX MODULES • Balanced (differential) signal output. • Limited protection against over-voltages, such as those induced by a nearby lightning strike. The output module has a range of jumpers which are populated to determine which group of 16 audio outputs the module receives from the backplane.

  • Page 53: Dip Switch Settings

    Honeywell Figure 2-53 Back Plane Video Channels Selection for interlink input module DIP Switch Settings Figure 2-54 DIP SW Settings for interlink input module Set the Interlink Input DIP switches as follows: • Set the “Start Address” SW1 (1-8) and SW2 (1-3) to match the address of the first input card within the connected sub-chassis.

  • Page 54

    VideoBloX MODULES • Set the “End Address” SW3 (1-8) and SW4 (1-3) to match the address of the last input card within the connected sub-chassis. • SW4 (4-5) are reserved for future use to select protocols. • SW4 (6) is used for testing to switch inputs to the outputs, camera 1 to monitor 1, camera 2 to monitor 2, camera 15 to monitor 15, etc.

  • Page 55: Figure 2-56 Sw 3 And Sw 4 Settings For Interlink Input Module

    Honeywell Figure 2-56 SW 3 and SW 4 settings for interlink input module...

  • Page 56: System Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 3 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW This chapter guide you configuring the VideoBloX Matrix Switching System in detail. All the configurations are based on the following assumptions: All steps assume that the VideoBloX NetCPU Configuration program is running. Inputs = cameras or standby VCR outputs Output = monitors, DVRs, VCRs, or similar devices Linking and Devices will not be addressed in this reference.

  • Page 57: Netcpu System Configuration Buttons

    Type Regular VCR = Type 1. Mux = Type 2. NETCPU SYSTEM CONFIGURATION BUTTONS When the VideoBloX NERCPU Configuration program is run, the following is the initial screen for configuration. Figure 3-1 Initial Configuration Screen The following buttons are consistent among each screen and are used as follows:...

  • Page 58: System

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Download all data for the current pages. (Overwrites NetCPU Configuration.) Use after extensive editing. Upload all data for the current page. (Overwrites PC Configuration.) Create default database for selected page. This also erases all existing data. Indicates when the configuration program has made a connection to the NetCPU.

  • Page 59: Utilities Button Definitions

    Honeywell Utilities Button Definitions Reset the hole system. Synchronizes the time on all devices in the system. Opens the Diagnostics window for selecting the various system diagnostic screens that can be viewed. This button emulates the various diagnostic buttons on the front of the CPU.

  • Page 60: Sizing

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-3 System-License Configuration Field Description Enter an appropriate name that defines the system Installation Name installation. This field is not used. License Number This field is not used. Licensed User This field is not used. Licensed Company The OSD language of this system.

  • Page 61: Figure 3-4 System-sizing Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-4 System-Sizing Configuration Field Definitions Field Description Video Matrix Max Inputs Defines the maximum number of video inputs in the system. The max value is 10000. Max Outputs Defines the maximum number of video outputs in the system. The max value is 2048...

  • Page 62: Date/time

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Max Message Defines the maximum number of messages the user can program. The max value is 1024. Max Device Type Defines the maximum number of device types (VCRs/DVRs, Multiplexers) in the system. The maximum number of different device types is 32. Max Sequence Defines the maximum number of sequences that can be programmed in the system.

  • Page 63

    Honeywell Field Definitions Field Description Time Format Defines the time format displayed in the matrix system. %H:%M:%S %d/%m/%y %I = Hours: Minutes: Seconds Day/Month/Year %I : 12 hour. with century. %d/%m/%Y : DDMMYYYY; %Y/%m/%d : YYYYMMDD; %Y/%d/%m : YYYYDDMM; %m/%d/%Y : MMDDYYYY;...

  • Page 64: Communications

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Communications Click on the Communications Tab to define the system communication parameters. Figure 3-6 System-Communications Configuration Field Descriptions Field Description IPAddress Enter the IP address of the matrix. Contact your system administrator for assistance. WARNING: Entering an incorrect IP address can cause severe disruption or degradation of your network.

  • Page 65: Inputs (adding A Video Input)

    Honeywell Figure 3-7 System-Installer Configuration INPUTS (Adding a video input) Inputs Detail The fields necessary to add a video input are on the Inputs tab. The Inputs Detail tab is used to enter all physical characteristics for a video input.

  • Page 66: Figure 3-8 Inputs - Detail Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-8 Inputs – Detail Configuration Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Input Number Number assigned to the video input being configured. Camera Name Camera title associated with this video input. (see Input Title Camera Short Name Abbreviated camera title associated with this video input. (see Input Title).

  • Page 67

    Honeywell video input. Physical I/P Physical audio input connection (jack number). VIDEO LOSS Enabled Enables automatic video loss detection for this input. Priority Sets the priority level for video loss sequence on this input. (Active only when Video Loss is enabled.) Priority can be set to a number between 0 and 255 with 0 being the highest priority.

  • Page 68: Input Title

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION DEDICATED VCR Type Type of device as determined by the device configuration tab. Standard VCR = Type 1. Mux = Type 2. Address Control address for the VCR/Device associated with this input. Steps for Configuring Video Input Details 1.

  • Page 69: Figure 3-9 Inputs - Titles Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-9 Inputs – Titles Configuration Heading Titles Tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Input Number Number assigned to the video input being configured. Carries over from Inputs Details window. Camera Name Camera title associated with this video input as edited in the Titles section of this window.

  • Page 70

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION display origin. Y Pos The Title’s vertical offset relative to the Y position of the display origin. Style Specifies the Title’s on-screen appearance (Text / Keyline / Background). DISPLAY ORIGIN X Pos The horizontal position from the left side of the screen for all text display.

  • Page 71: Input Access

    Honeywell 6. Select the defined Brightness option for the Title and time display. 7. Enter an X Position and Y Position for the Display Origin. Display Origin is the starting point for the text block. These values move the entire block of text to a new location on the monitor.

  • Page 72: Input Group Names

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Input Number Number assigned to the video input being configured. Carries over from Inputs Detail window. Camera Name Camera title associated with this video input as edited in the Inputs Title tab. Camera Short Name Abbreviated camera title associated with this video input as edited in the Inputs Title tab.

  • Page 73: Figure 3-11 Inputs - Group Names Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-11 Inputs – Group Names Configuration Heading Group names tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Input Number Number assigned to the video input being configured. Carries over from Inputs Detail window. Camera Name Camera title associated with this video input as edited in the Inputs Title tab.

  • Page 74: Links (setting Satellite)

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Links (Setting satellite) Figure 3-12 Inputs – Group Names Configuration Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Address Number assigned to the Satellite being configured. IP address Set the satellite VedioBloX IP which connects to this VB, if the IP is equal to the Machine you are setting, the address you are setting will be set as this VB’s satellite address.

  • Page 75: Outputs (adding A Video Output)

    192.168.1.11 Same with Main VB’s IP. the Main VB’s satellite address is 1. Ethernet 192.168.1.12 Address 2 is a Net VideoBloX. Local NULL Address 3 is an original VB. Connect Main VB via Com2. The Link setting of sub-VB whose IP is 192.168.1.12 is described in the following table.

  • Page 76: Figure 3-13 Outputs - Detail Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-13 Outputs – Detail Configuration Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Output Number Number assigned to the video output being configured. OUTPUT DETAIL Physical O/P Actual output/monitor connection number (provided by the installer). Type Type of function for this output. Available options are Unused, Monitor, Untitled Out (for future development), Interlink Out (for future development), VCR (for future development), and Frame Grabber (for future development).

  • Page 77: Output Access

    Honeywell OUTPUT NOTES Free-form field. i.e., “17-in Monitor – Top Left in Surveillance Bay 2” LOCATION Enable Enable output title. X pos X position of the output title Y pos Y position of the output title Steps for Configuring Video Output Detail 1.

  • Page 78: Figure 3-14 Outputs - Access Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-14 Outputs – Access Configuration Access tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Output Number Number assigned to the video output being configured. Carries over from Outputs Detail window. GROUP NAME Available groups (up to 128, as defined on the Outputs (COLUMN) Group Name tab) are displayed in columns.

  • Page 79: Output Group Names

    Honeywell Outputs can be in more than one group at a time. Select to save/download all information from the current page. Output Group Names The Outputs Group Names tab is used to set up meaningful groupings/names for outputs. Figure 3-15 Outputs – Group Names Configuration...

  • Page 80: Scenes

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION For example, default values are shown as 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. If “2” is revised to be “23”, the list will display as 1, 23, 3, 4, etc. and the original row 23 remains the same. We recommend that the Group Number field NOT be revised.

  • Page 81: Groups

    Honeywell Field Definitions Field Description Scene Number Number assigned to the scene being defined. Scene Name Name associated with this scene. The Scene Name can be up to 50 characters. The Scene Name is used for reference and reporting. The scene name is not outputted on the PVT channel.

  • Page 82: Figure 3-17 Groups Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A Group is a collection of scenes and is called by one of the User Defined Keys (see Steps for Configuring Keyboard Detail on Page 87). Groups are assigned logical and descriptive names such as "Black Jack Tables" or "Elevator Lobbies.” Figure 3-17 Groups Configuration Field Definitions Field...

  • Page 83: Alarms

    Status Monitor switches, Motion Detectors, and Duress Alarms. These devices would be connected to alarm inputs on the VideoBloX system. Such Alarm Inputs would be on the Alarm Terminal Module provided with every system (32 Alarm Inputs) and on the optional I2C Alarm Input Modules (16 Alarm Inputs) connected either locally to the VideoBloX CPU or remotely through data concentrators.

  • Page 84: Figure 3-18 Alarms - General Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Alarms can be used in simple applications to start a Sequence thus switching a camera to a monitor, displaying text on a screen, activating a control output, sounding a keyboard alarm, and "flashing" an Icon on an associated GUI (Graphical User interface). Alarms can also be assigned to an Alarm Queue.

  • Page 85

    Honeywell Priority Sets the priority for the alarm generated by the contact opening. Sequence Name Drop down box used to select (by name) the sequence to run when the contact opens. Sequence name correlates with sequence number. Sequence Number Drop down box used to select (by number) the sequence to run when the contact opens.

  • Page 86: Alarms Access

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION ALARM NOTES Free-form field for adding information about the alarm. (i.e., “Door Status Monitor on Main Lobby Entry doors” OR “Normally Closed contact activates Sequence 4 on opening.”) Steps for configuring an Alarm 1. From the Alarms screen, select General. 2.

  • Page 87: Figure 3-19 Alarms - Access Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-19 Alarms – Access Configuration Heading Access tab Access Button Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Alarm Number Physical address of the Alarm Input as determined by the device it is connected to (ATM or I2C module). This field carries over from the Alarms General screen.

  • Page 88: Alarm Group Names

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Alarms can be in more than one group at a time. 3. Select to save/download all information from the current page. Alarm Group Names The Alarms Group Names tab is used to set up meaningful groupings/names for alarms. Figure 3-20 Alarms –...

  • Page 89: Alarmq (alarm Queues)

    Alarm Q (ALARM QUEUES) Alarm Queue Configuration VideoBloX has an Alarm Queue system for prioritizing and displaying Alarms. There are 32 Queues, each of which is associated with a Keyboard and up to four Monitors. The system will display the highest priority alarm on the first available monitor.

  • Page 90: Figure 3-21 Alarms Queues Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-21 Alarms Queues Configuration Heading Field Definitions Field Description HEADER Alarm Q Number The Alarm Q number to be configured. DESCRIPTION The name assigned to this alarm queue. MONITOR 1 Enabled When this box is checked, the specified monitor is enabled for this alarm queue.

  • Page 91

    Honeywell Monitor Number displayed. MONITOR 3 Enabled When this box is checked, the specified monitor is enabled for this alarm queue. Monitor Number Drop down box used to select (by number) the monitor number associated with this queue. Monitor Number corresponds to Monitor Name displayed.

  • Page 92

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Steps for Configuring Defining an Alarm Queue 1. From the Alarm Qs screen, select the Alarm Number to configure. 2. Enter the Alarm Q Description. 3. Check the Enabled box to enable Monitor 1for the alarm queue. Then select the monitor using either the monitor number or monitor name drop down box.

  • Page 93: Users

    Honeywell USERS Users Detail The fields necessary to define users are on the Users tab.The Users Detail tab is used to enter all basic information for a user. At least one user must be defined. Figure 3-22 Users – Detail Configuration...

  • Page 94

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION This feature is not available - the only language available is English. Priority The priority assigned to this user. Priority can be set to a number between 0 and 255 with 0 being the highest priority. Set Password Use this button to set a password (up to 8 characters).

  • Page 95: User Keys

    Honeywell 3. Enter/edit the User Name. 4. Enter/edit a Short Name for the user. 5. Set the user Priority with 0 indicating the highest priority. 6. Select the Set Password button to set a password for this user (up to 12 characters).

  • Page 96: Figure 3-23 Users - Keys Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-23 Users – Keys Configuration Heading Keys tab Note: The user key configuration will override the default key configuration set up for the keyboard on which the user logs on. Field Definitions Field Description HEADING User Number Number assigned to the user being configured.

  • Page 97: Users Access

    Honeywell Steps for Configuring User Keys 1. On the User screen, select the Keys tab on the right side of the window. Choose either User Keys, F1-F8, or F9-F16 to continue configuration. 2. Select the User Key to be configured.

  • Page 98: Figure 3-24 Users - Access Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-24 Users – Access Configuration Heading Access tab Access Button ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: • Sample Device types are VCRs, DVRs, etc. • Functions are features that users can perform using the keyboard (assuming it is capable and has permission). Access for functions using this tab allows/prohibits the capabilities of the user.

  • Page 99: Users Notes

    Honeywell Steps for Configuring User Access 1. From the User screen, select the Access tab. Choose from the sub-levels available: Cameras, Monitors, Keyboards, Sequences, Functions, or Devices. 2. Set access for each user using the following methods: • Click on the Access button to include this user in / exclude this user from ALL groups.

  • Page 100: Keyboards

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Field Definitions Field Description HEADING User Number Number assigned to the user being defined. This field carries over from the Detail screen. User Name Name associated with this user. This field carries over from the Detail screen. NOTES Free-text field.

  • Page 101

    Honeywell Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Keyboard Number Number assigned to the keyboard being configured. Keyboard Name Name associated with this keyboard. This name is retrieved from the NAME section on this tab. NAME Name associated with this keyboard. The Keyboard Name can be up to 24 characters.

  • Page 102

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Edit Used to edit the sequence selected for logout. CONNECT SEQUENCE Enabled When enabled, triggers a sequence to run when communication is established to this keyboard. Priority Sets the priority level for the keyboard connection sequence. Priority can be set to a number between 0 and 255 with 0 being the highest priority.

  • Page 103

    Honeywell PTZ CONTROL TIMEOUT Enabled When enabled, sets a timeout for PTZ control after a period of inactivity. Timeout Used to set the period of inactivity (in seconds) after which PTZ control will be lost. GENERAL <NO HEADING – FIELDS AT BOTTOM OF WINDOW>...

  • Page 104: Keyboard Keys

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 18. Users should log out then log back in to see keyboard configuration changes. Keyboard Keys The Keyboards Keys tab is used to configure user-definable keys for the keyboard. NOTE: Keyboard capabilities are also related to user permissions/functions. The Keyboards Key tab is used to configure the functionality of the keyboard.

  • Page 105: Keyboard Access

    Honeywell USER KEY FUNCTION Run Sequence Enable this option to use the specific user key to run a sequence when pressed. Once enabled, use the dropdown box to select the sequence (by name or number) to run. Edit the sequence as needed.

  • Page 106: Figure 3-28 Keyboards - Access Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-28 Keyboards – Access Configuration Heading Access tab Access Button ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: • The Keyboards Access Keyboards sub-level is not needed for setup. • Sample Device types are VCRs, DVRs, etc. • Functions are features that users can perform using the keyboard. Access for functions using this tab allows/prohibits the capabilities of the keyboard itself.

  • Page 107: Keyboard Notes

    Honeywell KEYBOARD Indicates the groups in which the keyboard is included / ACCESS (ROW) excluded. (Groups shown depend on sub-level selected.) Steps for Configuring Keyboard Access 1. From the Keyboards screen, select the Access tab. Choose from the sub-levels available: Cameras, Monitors, Keyboards, Sequences, Functions, or Devices.

  • Page 108: Keyboard Group Names

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-29 Keyboards – Notes Configuration Heading Notes tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Keyboard Number Number assigned to the keyboard being configured. This field carries over from the Detail screen. Keyboard Name Name associated with this keyboard. This field carries over from the Detail screen.

  • Page 109: Figure 3-30 Keyboards - Group Names Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-30 Keyboards – Group Names Configuration Heading Group tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Keyboard Number Number assigned to the keyboard being configured. Carries over from Keyboard Detail tab. Keyboard Name Keyboard name as edited in the Keyboards Detail tab.

  • Page 110: Keyboard Functionality

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 3. Select to save/download all information from the current page. 4. Users should log out then log back in to see keyboard configuration changes. Note: The relationship between the user and keyboard priorities, the user and keyboard access, the user and keyboard function keys definition are described as follows: The lower priority of keyboard and user will take effect when user login a keyboard.

  • Page 111: Figure 3-32 Login Mode

    Honeywell Login Mode Figure 3-32 Login Mode • The Login / Logout key is illuminated. Enter the user ID on the numeric keypad, and then press Enter. Enter the password on the numeric keypad, and then press Enter. Correct mistakes using the Clear Key or key ‘<-’.

  • Page 112: Figure 3-34 Camera Mode

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION When there is no number entered, press “Clear” switch to the alternate view and switch back when release. Pressing “Enter” will switch to the alternate view. • Go-Back! Press ← repeatedly (4 times) to undo previous camera selection. •...

  • Page 113: Figure 3-36 High Speed Dome Mode

    Honeywell Select the required monitor using the numeric keys, followed by Enter. The Next / Prev keys will step through the next / previous monitors to which the user / keyboard have access. The ↑ / ↓ select the next / previous camera to the selected monitor.

  • Page 114: Figure 3-38 Preset Recall

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION This prevents the dome “seeking” if an object (players head) is brought into the field of view when focusing on an object (table) • Maintenance Adjustment When domes are installed or re-installed after maintenance, side-to-side movement may be noticed as a result of fluctuating power at the UPS. Select the dome and press Group 13 Key to correct this.

  • Page 115: Figure 3-40 High Speed Dome (auxiliaries)

    Honeywell • Store a Preset Position Restricted Access - for keyboards / users allowed access to this function. Press Store, enter preset number smaller than 99. Then press Enter. Note: If the number you entered is lager then 100, system will perform Preshot function.

  • Page 116: Figure 3-42 Device Control Mode

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION • Valuable tool for selecting cameras • Switches a view to the currently selected monitor User-Defined Keys (UDK) are defined as Groups. Press the button corresponding to the required Group. Select the number within that group to view, and then press Enter. Select next / previous Scene within the group using the Next / Prev keys.

  • Page 117: Figure 3-44 Vst Dvr Control

    The VST number to control corresponds to the monitor number. Keyboard Function buttons (Record, Pause, Rewind, Forward, Play, Stop) will control VST recorder A VST recorder has no standby recorder and it continues to record while a review is in progress. Honeywell Ademco MUX Control...

  • Page 118: Tods (time Of Day Events)

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-45 Honeywell Ademco MUX Control Record Camera Full Screen Numbers 2 x 2 1-16 3 x 3 4 x 4 • To select a MUX Press Device Key (VCR) until Mux is displayed. Select Mux number using numeric keypad.

  • Page 119: Figure 3-46 Tods Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-46 Tods Configuration Field Definitions Field Description HEADER TOD Number Number assigned to the Time of Day Event being defined. DESCRIPTION Name/description given to the Time of Day Event being defined. The name/description can be up to 24 characters. The description is used for referencing and reporting.

  • Page 120: Message

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Priority Set the priority for the alarm generated by the time/day event. Priority can be set to a number between 0 and 255 with 0 being the highest priority. The sequences are activated based on priority. For example, if a sequence with priority 3 has a camera switch to a monitor, and the sequence has locked the monitor, a sequence with a lower priority (greater than 3) will not be able to switch a camera to that same monitor.

  • Page 121: Message Configuration

    Honeywell Typical messages include: • Forced Door Alarm • Duress Alarm • Door Secured • Duress Reset • Video Loss Alarm • TOD Schedule – Door Unlocked (Video Loss %d) • TOD Schedule – Door Locked • Video Restored Alarm •...

  • Page 122: Sequence

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 2. Enter the text to be displayed for the message. 3. Select to save/download all information from the current page. SEQUENCE Sequences Overview Sequences are used to perform Actions in response to Events. The Event can be triggered automatically by, for instance: •...

  • Page 123: Sequences Editor

    Honeywell Sequences Editor The fields necessary to define/edit a sequence are on the Sequences tab. Use the Editor tab to define/edit sequences. Figure 3-48 Sequences – Editor Configuration Heading Editor tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Sequence Number Number assigned to the sequence being defined/edited.

  • Page 124

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Parm1 Used to enter an applicable parameters value for this command (as needed). More detailed information for this parameter is displayed in the Parameter 1 field below the sequence table. Parm2 Used to enter an applicable parameters value for this command (as needed).

  • Page 125: Sequences Notes

    Honeywell 6. Repeat steps 3-5 to continue entering commands for this sequence. 7. Click to remove a record from the sequence. 8. When the sequence definition is complete, select to save the sequence to the flash memory. 9. Repeat step 2-6 to define additional sequences.

  • Page 126: Sequences Access

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-49 Sequences – Notes Configuration Heading Notes tab Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Sequence Number Number assigned to the sequence being defined/edited. This field carries over from the Editor screen. Sequence Name Name associated with this sequence. This field carries over from the Editor screen.

  • Page 127: Figure 3-50 Sequences - Access Configuration

    Honeywell Figure 3-50 Sequences – Access Configuration Heading Access tab Access Button Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Sequence Number Number assigned to the keyboard being configured. This field carries over from the Detail screen. Sequence Name Name associated with this keyboard.

  • Page 128: Sequences Group Names

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION (Include = Exclude = ). Click on the Group again to toggle between include/exclude settings. Sequences can be in more than one group at a time. 3. Select to save/download all information from the current page. Sequences Group Names The Sequences Group Names tab is used to set up meaningful groupings/names for sequences.

  • Page 129: Sequence Examples

    Honeywell Steps for Configuring Sequence Group Names 1. Select a group number to use. NOTE: Group number is an editable text field capable of accepting numeric values. In the database, the group number is still defined as originally set. For example, default values are shown as 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. If “2” is revised to be “23”, the list will display as 1, 23, 3, 4, etc.

  • Page 130: Figure 3-52 Sequences Configuration Example - Camera Switching Sequence

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-52 Sequences Configuration Example – Camera Switching Sequence VideoBloX Matrix Switcher NetCPU Configuration Camera Preset Sequence The following sequence is based on the following commands: PTZRCL Parm1 – The camera or input number. Parm2 – The Preset number. Presets must be set previously using the PCK and the STORE and RECALL buttons.

  • Page 131: Sequence Engine Commands

    Honeywell Figure 3-53 Sequences Configuration Example – Camera Preset Sequence Sequence Engine Commands The following table shows commands available for use in sequence editing: PARAMETER PARAMETER PARAMETER PARAMETER COMMAND DESCRIPTION NUMBER1 NUMBER2 NUMBER3 NUMBER4 Terminates this Sequence Restart Sequence from...

  • Page 132

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Sequence Sequence Suspend/Pause another SUSPEND Number status Sequence Number of Repeat a portion of the LOOP Repeats Sequence until ENDLOOP ENDLOOP End of repeated portion Output Line Number Message TEXTOP Channel (or 0 to erase Number (or 0 Display text on output titler Number all line)

  • Page 133: Devices

    Honeywell State (0,1 or 2 Set/Clear/Toggle a system SETFLAG Flag Number to toggle) flag State to cause Halt Sequence on Flag HALTFLAG Flag Number halt Set or Flag Cleared Conditional Repeat State for WHILE Flag Number conditional to End of Conditional Repeat...

  • Page 134: Figure 3-54 Device - General Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-54 Device – General Configuration Field Definitions Field Description Device Type Defines the type of device you are controlling. There are a maximum of 32 device types. Definition File Enter the database file name that defines the device type. Click on to browse the system to locate the desired file.

  • Page 135: Device Access

    Honeywell 3. Enter the Device Definition File. This database file is created using the software application NETCPU Device Config, and defines the parameters for the device. 4. Enter a meaningful name (e.g. VCR, DVR, Multiplexer, etc.) for the device type 5.

  • Page 136: Device Group Names

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION GROUP NAME Available groups are displayed in columns. (COLUMN) ACCESS (ROW) Indicates the groups in which the device is included / excluded. Steps for Configuring Device Access 1. From the Devices screen, click on the Access Tab. 2. Set access for each device using the following methods: •...

  • Page 137: Device Control Configuration

    Honeywell Field Definitions Field Description HEADING Device Type The device Physical address of the Alarm Input as determined by the device it is connected to (ATM or I2C module). This field carries over from the Alarms General screen. GROUP NUMBER Number assigned to each device group.

  • Page 138: Figure 3-58 Videoblox Device Control Configuration

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-57 displayed the keyboard used to control the VideoBlox System. You need to configure each button’s function by VideoBlox Device Control Configuration software before using it. Double-click the ‘NetCPUDeviceConfig.exe’ in the installation fold. Then the interface of...

  • Page 139: Figure 3-61 Extended Function Keys On Software And Keyboard

    Honeywell Figure 3-61 Extended Function Keys on software and keyboard Figure 3-62 Arrow keys on software and keyboard Perform the following steps to configure the key’s function when pressing it on the keyboard. 1. Select the text you would like to be displayed on the buttons to be configured from...

  • Page 140: Figure 3-63 The Display Textbox

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-63 the Display textbox 2. Click on the button you would like to configure on the software’s interface, see Figure 3-64. Figure 3-64 Clicking on the button to be configured 3. Enter the text to be displayed on the keyboard when key is pressed in the PCK Display textbox, for example “Up”, see Figure...

  • Page 141: Figure 3-66 Key Configuration Result

    Honeywell Figure 3-66 Key Configuration Result Note: Clicking on the button will delete the configuration. Control Configuration Figure 3-67 Control Configuration The command format is different in different protocols. There are two command types: ASCII Code and Control Code. You can select a proper control type from the Control...

  • Page 142

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION For example, when using the HRHD’s protocol to control DVR, the command format is: @!Ad!DRFP00:N!Sd! Where the red characters “!Ad!” and “!Sd!” are replaced corresponding variable value when commands are sent. “!Ad!” means address and “!Sd!” means checksum. Refer to the following table for detailed information.

  • Page 143: Database

    Honeywell Where the red characters “!A” and “!S” are replaced by corresponding variable value when commands are sent. “!A” means address and “!S” means checksum. Refer to the following table for detailed information. Character Meaning Example Replace Address Sum check XOR check Therefore, when the command “DISPLAY”...

  • Page 144: Figure 3-69 Choose Base

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Data base choosing and setting interface User can Create New, Open New, Save as, Rename, Delete and Switch. Figure 3-69 Choose base As the list of database, there is a defaultDB in there, it is the original database when the CFG was installed, please do not delete this database, when the database fold in using has been deleted, CFG will switch database path to this one, and delete the link of the deleted database from the database list.

  • Page 145: Figure 3-70 Create New Data Base

    Honeywell Figure 3-70 Create new data base And then this database will be display in the database list and user can find a fold with the same name in the path where CFG had been installed. Figure 3-71 Position of new data base Than user can choose the database ‘UserTemp’, and press Switch button to choose this...

  • Page 146: Figure 3-72 Switch Data Base

    SYSTEM CONFIGURATION Figure 3-72 Switch data base Press ‘Yes’, and the CFG will do the database switch function. After switch, user can find out that the current user database switch to UserTemp. Figure 3-73 Data base prompt Save as and Delete function If you want to backup the database, you can press Save as, to make a backup of the database you choose.

  • Page 147: Figure 3-74 Open Other Data Base

    Honeywell and Rename Open other If there is a database from other user, and you want to use it in you computer, you can copy it to the CFG installation path, use Open New to add this database to the database list.

  • Page 148: Videoblox Applications

    VideoBloX APPLICATIONS 4 VideoBloX APPLICATIONS INTERFACING HVBNETCPU WITH PERIPHERAL DEVICES The following diagram illustrates the connections between the HVBNETCPU and two GUI work-stations across a TCP/IP network. Figure 4-1 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with Peripheral Devices...

  • Page 149: Interfacing Hvbnetcpu With Gui Work-stations On Anetwork

    Honeywell INTERFACING HVBNETCPU WITH GUI WORK-STATIONS ON A NETWORK The following diagram illustrates the connections between the HVBNETCPU and the two GUI work-stations across a TCP/IP network. Figure 4-2 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with GUI Work-Station...

  • Page 150: Interfacing Hvbnetcpu With Satellite Systems On Anetwork

    VideoBloX APPLICATIONS INTERFACING HVBNETCPU WITH SATELLITE SYSTEMS ON A NETWORK Video on Fiber The following diagram illustrates the connections between HVBNETCPU and a satellite system with the video transmitted on fiber. Figure 4-3 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with Satellite System with Video on Fiber...

  • Page 151: Video On Ip

    Honeywell Video on IP The following diagram illustrates the connections between the HVBNETCPU and a satellite system with the video transmitted on IP. Figure 4-4 Interfacing HVBNETCPU with Satellite System with Video on IP...

  • Page 152: Integrating Enterprise Dvr And Satellite Videoblox

    VideoBloX APPLICATIONS Integrating Enterprise DVR and Satellite VideoBloX The following diagram illustrates the connections between the Enterprise DVR and the HVBNETCPU in a satellite system. Figure 4-5 Integrating Enterprise DVR and Satellite VideoBloX...

  • Page 153: System Benefits

    Honeywell System Benefits • Enhances Enterprise DVR Adds familiarity – conventional surveillance configuration Conventional Keyboard and Monitor PTZ in near real-time No workstation training required • DVR is used for: Long-term video storage Remote Retrieval of Incident Live view and control from any workstation...

  • Page 154: Appendix A: Videoblox Chassis Interlink Expansion

    APPENDIX A: VideoBloX Chassis Interlink Expansion 5 APPENDIX A: VideoBloX Chassis Interlink Expansion Introduction This chapter describes how to use chassis interlink input and output modules. Use the chassis interlink input and output modules to allow multiple chassis to be connected together, increasing the number of inputs of a matrix switching system.

  • Page 155: Chassis Expansion Connection And Dip Switch Setting

    Honeywell HVB32LKI-- Video Interlink Output Module 32 interlinks for interconnecting chassis. Figure 5-2 HVBLKO Module Input and Output Interlink modules have the following features: • 32 input /output channels, allowing for high density interconnects. • Balanced video driver and receivers allow high quality twisted pair connections for video.

  • Page 156: Figure 5-3 Backplane Control And Communications Of Vb Chassis

    APPENDIX A: VideoBloX Chassis Interlink Expansion Figure 5-3 Backplane Control and Communications of VB Chassis The pin-out of CONTROL and COMMS connectors are automatically modified depending on configuration for the chassis being a Master or Slave. Set the backplane dip switch in the front of chassis. If both chassis Control and Communications are connected, Slave chassis “TX Data”,”...

  • Page 157: Example : 784 Inputx 64 Output System Configuration

    Honeywell Example: 784 Input X 64 Output System Configuration. Figure 5-5 784 Input X 64 Output System Configuration HVB32LKO Jumper Setting 1. There are two options, channel 1 to 32 and channel 33 to 64 jumper setting for HVB32LKO. Place the jumper in position A and position B to configure channel 1 to...

  • Page 158: Hvb32lki Jumper And Dip Switch Setting

    APPENDIX A: VideoBloX Chassis Interlink Expansion Figure 5-6 HVB32LKO Jumper Setting 2. Install 1 x HVB32LKO for channel 1 32; 1 x HVB32LKO for channel 33 - 64 into 1 – Slave chassis. 3. Install 1 x HVB32LKO for channel 1 32;...

  • Page 159: Figure 5-8 Inter-link Start And End Address Of 1

    Honeywell 2. In the 1 Slave chassis, two 1 x HVB16M64 input cards will be installed from address 7 to address 27. Therefore, set 1 x HVB32LKI for channel 1 32 and 1 x ¡ª HVB32LKI for channel 33 64 address dip switch as below picture. Install those 2 ¡ª...

  • Page 160: Rj45 Cable Connection

    APPENDIX A: VideoBloX Chassis Interlink Expansion HVB32LKI for channel 33 - 64 address dip switch as below picture. Install those two HVB32LKI into Master chassis. Figure 5-9 Inter-Link Start and End Address of 2 Slave Chassis RJ45 Cable Connection Connect standard RJ45 cable from HVB32LKO to HVB32LKI.

  • Page 161: Appendix B: Backward Compatible Application

    The new modules Honeywell offers to our users provide good backward compatible ability. The old users can interface their old VideoBloX system with new modules seamlessly. In this way, users are able to expend their system capacity with new modules.

  • Page 162: Interface New Output And Titled Output Module With Old System

    APPENDIX B: Backward Compatible Application Interface new output and titled output module with old system Honeywell’s VideoBloX output and titled output module provides changeable plug-in board to do backward compatibility. Figure 6-2 Buffer board of HVBNET16TO There are two kinds of buff board for HVBNET16TO, SA16INBX and SA16INBXB, if the system has the original VB input board, the SA16INBXB should be plugged.

  • Page 163

    Honeywell...

  • Page 164: Appendix C: Aux Command List

    APPENDIX C: AUX Command List 7. APPENDIX C: AUX Command List When SW 1(8) on the NETCPU & NETOSD module is set to 1, COM1 is used for third- party integration. Refer to the following table for detailed information about the command. Command Instruction Example...

  • Page 165

    Honeywell KBALARM Keyboard alarm KBALARM 1,1 Address, status. Address, led number, status. Led number: Led_LogInOut Led_Cam Led_Mon Led_Seq Led_VCR Led_CamWink Led_Menu Led_AlarmAck Led_Non Led_User1 Led_User2 Led_User3 Led_User4 Led_ExtFunc1 Led_ExtFunc2 KBLED Keyboard Led KBLED 1, 32,1 Led_ExtFunc3 Led_ExtFunc4 Led_ExtFunc5 Led_ExtFunc6 Led_ExtFunc7...

  • Page 166

    APPENDIX C: AUX Command List OUTPUT Relay out OUTPUT 1,1,1 Board number, relay number, status Type, address, key value key value : Press down: KEY_USER_1 KEY_USER_2 KEY_USER_3 KEY_USER_4 KEY_F1 KEY_F2 KEY_F3 KEY_F4 KEY_F5 KEY_F6 KEY_F7 KEY_F8 KEY_F9 KEY_F10 KEY_F11 KEY_F12 KEY_F13 DEVICE Device control...

  • Page 167

    Honeywell MATRIX? Get matrix status MATRIX? 1 Output number ALARMS? All alarms status ALARMS? VIDEOS? All inputs status VIDEOS? SIZING? Size SIZING? NOREPLY No reply NOREPLY REPLY reply REPLY HELP HELP Command list LOCALIP Return Local ip Status ALMRPT Alarm state report...

  • Page 168: Appendix D: Sequence Command Examples

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. 8. APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. Terminates this sequence Parm1 Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 Restart this sequence RESTART Parm1 Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 No operation. Parm1 Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 Switch video input to output SWITCH Parm1 Input channel Parm2 Output channel Parm3...

  • Page 169

    Honeywell SCENE Select scene Parm1 Group number Parm2 Scene number Parm3 View number Parm4 Monitor number NEXTCAM Select next camera Parm1 Output Channel Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 Copy one monitor’s camera to another monitor COPYMON Parm1 Source Monitor Parm2 Destination monitor...

  • Page 170

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. SUSPEND Call another sequence as a sub-routine. Parm1 Pause another sequence Parm2 Sequence status. 0, suspend; 1, unsuspended. Parm3 Parm4 LOOP Repeat a portion of the sequence Parm1 Number of repeats Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 ENDLOOP End of repeated portion Parm1 Parm2...

  • Page 171

    Honeywell Parm4 BEEP Generate sound on keyboard Parm1 Keyboard number Parm2 Duration Parm3 Parm4 Note: Duration’s unit is 300ms, if Duration larger then 12 the keyboard will sound continually. ALARM Generate alarm on keyboard Parm1 Keyboard number Parm2 Alarm state...

  • Page 172

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. Note: This command is only for old PCK. LED number: Name Num. Name Num. User1 Func7 User2 Func8 User3 Func9 User4 Func10 Func1 Func11 Func2 Func12 Func3 Func13 Func4 Func14 Func5 Func15 Func6 Func16 LED state: Dark Light Wink...

  • Page 173

    Honeywell Parm1 PTZ input channel number Parm2 Auxiliary number Parm3 Auxiliary state Parm4 DEVICE Operate RS232 device Parm1 Device number / address Parm2 Device Type / definition # Parm3 Device function Parm4 Note: Device function: Key press and release list:...

  • Page 174

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. Parm1 TOD event number Parm2 Required state Parm3 Parm4 PRIORITY Set priority of this sequence Parm1 Priority level Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 LOCKOP Lock output Parm1 Board address Parm2 Output number Parm3 Lock state: 1, lock; 0, unlock. Parm4 SHOWINFO Select diagnostic information screen...

  • Page 175

    Honeywell Note: All the diagnostic information are displayed on monitor 1. Diagnostic information screen number list: 1 Start. 2 System Overview 3 Communications 4 Video Status 5 Matrix Routing 6 Alarm Status 7 Alarm Queue 8 Keyboard Status 9 Input Settings...

  • Page 176

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. Note: Flag number is between 1 and 16 Conditional repeat Parm1 Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 WHILE End of conditional repeat Parm1 Flag number Parm2 State for conditional to execute Parm3 Parm4 Note: DO and WHILE can’t be nested. Conditional Parm1 Flag number...

  • Page 177

    Honeywell Note: IF, ELSE and ENDIF can’t be nested. WHILEBSY Wait while PTZ is in use Parm1 Camera number Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 Conditional IF PTZ is in use IFBUSY Parm1 Camera number Parm2 Parm3 Parm4 SETMODE Set PCK mode Parm1...

  • Page 178

    APPENDIX D: Sequence Command Examples. Note: Required Mode list. LogInOut CamPTZ Menu AlarmAck STARTNET Stop Remote (Net) sequence Parm1 Net node / satellite Parm2 Remote sequence number Parm3 Parm4 STOPNET Start Remote (Net) sequence Parm1 Net node / satellite Parm2 Remote sequence number Parm3 Sequence parameter...

  • Page 179

    Honeywell Note: Device key codes please refer to command DEVICE.

  • Page 180

    All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without written permission from Honeywell Video Systems. The information in this publication is believed to be accurate in all respects. However, Honeywell Video Systems cannot assume responsibility for any consequences resulting from the use thereof. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.

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