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HP Visualize b160L Supplementary Manual

Hp visualize b160l: supplementary guide
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Title_Page.doc i Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996

Service Handbook

B Class
Model B132L/B160L
HP Part No. A4190-90039
Edition E0796
Printed in U.S.A.

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  • Page 1: Service Handbook

    Title_Page.doc i Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Service Handbook B Class Model B132L/B160L HP Part No. A4190-90039 Edition E0796 Printed in U.S.A.
  • Page 2 Title_Page.doc ii Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Hewlett-Packard Co. 1996 Printing History First Printing: July 1996 UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Lim- ited. NOTICE The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
  • Page 3: Safety And Regulatory Statements

    Title_Page.doc iii Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Safety and Regulatory Statements This section contains safety and regulatory statements pertaining to your B132L/B160L workstation. It pro- vides information on the following topics: • • • • • • • • • Safety and Regulatory Statements Special video configuration statements Emissions regulations...
  • Page 4 Title_Page.doc iv Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Special Video Configuration Statements Special Video Configuration Statements The following statements apply only to those applica- tions which include a cable connected to the S-Video connector on the A4248A card. No modification to the regulatory statements is necessary for applications which include cables connected to other connectors on the card but not to the S-Video connector.
  • Page 5: Emissions Regulations

    • • • Hewlett-Packard’s system certification tests were con- ducted with HP-supported peripheral devices and HP shielded cables, such as those you receive with your computer. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Hewlett-Packard could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
  • Page 6: Vcci Class 2 Ite

    Title_Page.doc vi Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Emissions Regulations Operation of this device is subject to the following conditions: • This device may not cause harmful interference. • This device must accept interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. •...
  • Page 7: Emissions Regulations Compliance

    Title_Page.doc vii Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Emissions Regulations Compliance Any third-party I/O device installed in HP system(s) must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the preceding Emissions Regulations statements. In the event that a third-party noncompliant I/O device is installed, the customer assumes all responsibility and liability arising therefrom.
  • Page 8: Safety Statement

    Title_Page.doc viii Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions Electrostatic charges can damage the integrated cir- cuits on printed circuit boards. To prevent such dam- age from occurring, observe the following precautions during board unpacking and installation: •...
  • Page 9 Title_Page.doc ix Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Laser Safety Statement (U.S.A. Only) Laser Safety Statement (U.S.A. Only) The CD ROM mass-storage system is certified as a Class-1 laser product under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Radiation Per- formance Standard according to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.
  • Page 10: Warnings And Cautions

    Title_Page.doc x Thu Jul 25 10:20:14 1996 Warnings and Cautions Warnings and Cautions...
  • Page 11: Table Of Contents

    ServiceLOT.doc xx Thu Jul 25 10:21:34 1996 Contents Tables Audio Electrical Specifications 12 Serial I/O Pins 14 Sample LANSCAN COMMAND TABLE 19 Environmental Specifications 25 Storage Configurations 33 Default SCSI IDs 34 Allowable Memory Configurations 43 LED Error Codes 61 PIM_INFO Action Table 69 Multi-Bit Memory Parity Error 70 Memory Address Ranges 72...
  • Page 12 ServiceLOT.doc xxi Thu Jul 25 10:21:34 1996 Contents Tables Backplane EISA Slot Connector (Rows F, B, E, and A) Backplane EISA Slot Connector (Rows H, D, G, and C) Backplane PCI Slot Connector (3.3V Environment) 136 Backplane GSC Slot Connector 137 Backplane Fan Connector 139 Backplane Speaker Connector 140 System Board DRAMM DIMM Connector 140...
  • Page 13 ServiceLOT.doc xxii Thu Jul 25 10:21:34 1996 Contents Tables AUI Connector Pinouts 154 Serial Port Connector Pinouts 154 PS/2 Connector 155 System Paths 171 Mnemonic Style Notation 172 xxii...
  • Page 14 Removable Storage Devices 8 Security Loop 10 Audio Connectors 10 Keyboard Connectors 13 PS/2 Keyboard and Mouse Connectors 13 HP Parallel I/O Connector 13 802.3 Network Connectors 13 Serial I/O Connectors 14 SCSI Connectors 15 TOC Button 15 Power Cord Connector 15...
  • Page 15 ServiceTOC.doc xii Thu Jul 25 10:20:33 1996 Contents Networking Overview 20 Mail 20 telnet 20 rlogin 21 ftp 21 rcp 22 NFS 22 2 Environmental/Installation/PM Environmental Specifications 25 Installation 27 Preventive Maintenance 27 3 Configuration Workstation Configurations 31 FRU Configurations 32 Internal Storage Configurations 32 Allowable Memory Configurations 41 Monitor-Type Selection 44...
  • Page 16 ServiceTOC.doc xiii Thu Jul 25 10:20:33 1996 Contents 4 Troubleshooting Getting Ready to Troubleshoot 51 Dealing with a Boot Failure 56 Selftest Failures 61 Running System Verification Tests 64 Running ODE-Based Diagnostics 66 Dealing with HPMC Parity Error 70 5 Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers 81 FRU Removal and Replacement 87 Searching for Bootable Media 58...
  • Page 17 ServiceTOC.doc xiv Thu Jul 25 10:20:33 1996 Contents Second Level Cache Boards 97 Storage Tray Assembly 99 Storage Tray Cover 102 Disk Filler Panel 103 CD-ROM Drive or DDS Tape Drive 104 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive 106 Hard Disk Drive 109 Removing EISA, GSC, and PCI Option Boards 111 CPU Board Assembly 113 Determining LAN ID 114...
  • Page 18 ServiceTOC.doc xv Thu Jul 25 10:20:33 1996 Contents 8 Service Notes 9 Boot Console Interface Accessing the Boot Console Interface 165 Booting Your Workstation 167 Searching for Bootable Media 169 Resetting Your Workstation 170 Displaying and Setting Paths 171 Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type 174 Displaying the Current Memory Configuration 182 Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags 184 Displaying and Setting the Fastboot Mode 186...
  • Page 19 ServiceTOC.doc xvi Thu Jul 25 10:20:33 1996 Contents ISL Environment 191 Invoking ISL from the Boot Console Interface 191 ISL User Commands 192 Updating System Firmware with ODE 194...
  • Page 20 DDS Drive Switch Settings for Data Compression Oper- ation Mode 40 Memory Connectors 42 Power On Troubleshooting 52 Selftests Troubleshooting 53 HP-UX Compatible Mode Troubleshooting 54 HP-UX Compatible Mode Troubleshooting (Continued) 55 B132L/B160L Major Components 81 Main Tray FRUs 82...
  • Page 21 ServiceLOF.doc xviii Thu Jul 25 10:21:05 1996 Contents Figures Storage Tray FRUs 83 Removing the Floor Stand 88 Removing the Main Tray Assembly 90 Memory Module Location 91 Removing the Memory Retainer 92 Removing a Memory Module 93 Memory Module Location 94 Removing the Memory Retainer 95 Installing Memory Modules 96 Cache Boards Location 97...
  • Page 22 ServiceLOF.doc xix Thu Jul 25 10:21:05 1996 Contents Figures Removing the Floppy Disk Drive 108 Removing a Hard Disk Drive 110 Removing an EISA, GSC, or PCI Option Board 111 Installing an Option Slot Blank Plate 112 Removing the CPU Board 115 Removing the Optional EGRAM Module 116 Disconnecting the Fan and Speaker Connectors 118 Removing the System Fans and Speaker 119...
  • Page 23: Product Information

    Chap1.doc 1 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information...
  • Page 24 Chap1.doc 2 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information This chapter introduces the HP 9000 B132L/B160L workstation. Its purpose is to familiarize you with your workstation and its controls and indicators. The information is presented in the following sections: •...
  • Page 25: Product Description

    • Processor Performance Model B132L - 132 Mhz (33 Mhz GSC) Model B160L - 160 Mhz (40 Mhz GSC) Operating System Native HP-UX (version 10.20 or greater) User Interface HP VUE graphical user interface HP CDE graphical user interface Compatibility...
  • Page 26 Chap1.doc 4 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information Product Description • Internal Storage Devices Fast, Wide SCSI Hard Disk Drives (requires optional FW SCSI adapter) Single-Ended SCSI Hard Disks (up to two) Single-Ended SCSI CD-ROM Drive Single-Ended SCSI 2.0/4.0/8.0 GB, 4-mm DDS-Format Tape Drive 3.5-inch Slimline Floppy Disk Drive (not a SCSI Device)
  • Page 27: System Unit Front Panel Controls And Leds

    Chap1.doc 5 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Front Panel Controls and LEDs System Unit Front Panel Controls and LEDs Before powering on your system, you should become familiar with the system unit controls. Figure 1 shows the system unit front panel controls. Removable Storage Devices Power Switch...
  • Page 28: System Power Switch

    Use the Power switch to power the system unit on and off. NOTICE: There is no need to manually shut down the HP- UX operating system on your workstation before powering it off. When you turn off the power switch, your workstation automatically shuts down the operating system before terminating the power.
  • Page 29: Audio Controls

    Chap1.doc 7 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Audio Controls Next to the system LEDs are the following audio con- trols: Headset Jack Volume Control Mic Jack Mute Button NOTICE: The Volume Control, Headphone Jack, and Mic (microphone) Jack features of the CD-ROM are supported through software applications only.
  • Page 30: Removable Storage Devices

    Chap1.doc 8 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Front Panel Controls and LEDs Removable Storage Devices The Models B132L/B160L support the following removable storage devices: • CD-ROM Disc Drive • DDS-Format Tape Drive • Floppy Diskette Drive NOTICE: Due to space limitations, a DDS-format tape drive and a CD-ROM drive cannot both be mounted in...
  • Page 31: System Unit Rear Panel Connectors

    Single-Ended SCSI Security Loop Pullout Card Audio Audio Line Out Line In HP Parallel Figure 2 System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Fast, Wide SCSI PS/2 Mouse PS/2 Keyboard Monitor LAN-TP LAN-AUI Serial 1 Serial 2 System Unit Rear Panel Connectors...
  • Page 32: Security Loop

    Chap1.doc 10 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Security Loop The security loop provides a means of locking the storage tray, with a padlock or other locking device, to prevent unauthorized removal from the system. Audio Connectors Your workstation has audio input and output capability through external input and output connectors on the...
  • Page 33 Chap1.doc 11 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 • • • The audio electrical specification for this workstation are summarized in Table 1 System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Audio Input Line In Mono microphone (on the front panel) compati- ble with 1.5V phantom supply (bias voltage supplied by the system).
  • Page 34: Audio Electrical Specifications

    Chap1.doc 12 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Table 1 Audio Electrical Specifications Frequency Response Input Sensitivity/Impedance Line In Microphone Max Output Level/Impedance Line Out Headphone Speaker (internal) Output Impedance Line Out Headphone Signal to Noise* Line Out Headphone Speaker...
  • Page 35: Keyboard Connectors

    HP Parallel I/O Connector The 25-pin HP Parallel I/O interface uses Centronics interface protocols to support peripheral devices such as printers and plotters. Consult the documentation that accompanies each peripheral device for specific information concerning its use.
  • Page 36: Serial I/O Pins

    Chap1.doc 14 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Serial I/O Connectors You can attach a variety of pointing devices (such as a mouse or trackball), or peripheral devices to the Serial Input/Output (SIO) ports on the B132L/B160L work- station.
  • Page 37: Scsi Connectors

    Chap1.doc 15 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information System Unit Rear Panel Connectors SCSI Connectors Use the single-ended and fast, wide connectors to con- nect external SCSI devices such as DDS-format tape drives and CD-ROM drives. Consult the documenta- tion that accompanies each SCSI device for specific information concerning its use.
  • Page 38: Monitors

    Chap1.doc 16 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 Product Information Monitors Monitors You can use one of the following HP monitors with your workstation: • 17-inch, 1280x1024 color monitor (A4330) • 20-inch, 1280x1024 color monitor (A4331) Before using your monitor you should become famil- iar with its controls, connectors, and indicators.
  • Page 39: Operating System Overview

    Your workstation uses the HP-UX operating system, version 10.20 or greater. Instant Ignition systems, (systems with preloaded software), have X-windows and either the HP VUE or the HP CDE graphical user interface installed and configured. Please refer to the “Instant Ignition System Configura- tion Information”...
  • Page 40: Important Information You Need To Note

    • Internet Protocol (IP) address • Subnetwork mask NOTICE: For help with these, refer to Using your HP Workstation. LANIC ID Locate the contents label that comes with the worksta- tion shipping carton. Find the LANIC ID listed there and write it down in the space provided:...
  • Page 41: Sample Lanscan Command Table

    Chap1.doc 19 Thu Jul 25 10:22:00 1996 2 In a terminal window, enter the following at the prompt: You will see a table similar to Table 3. Table 3 Sample LANSCAN COMMAND TABLE Hardware Station Path Address 2.0.2 0x0800091595EE The LANIC ID in this example is 0800091595EE. At alternative method for listing the system’s LANIC ID is to enter the following command at the informa- tion menu of the Boot Console Handler:...
  • Page 42: Networking Overview

    For information on set- ting up and using electronic mail on your workstation, contact your system administrator and also see the Using Your HP Workstation manual that came with your workstation. telnet The telnet application uses the TELNET protocol to communicate with another computer system on the network.
  • Page 43: Rlogin

    Protocol. Use ftp to copy files between your work- station and another computer system on the network. For more information, see the Using Your HP Work- station manual that came with your workstation and read the online man page by entering the following at...
  • Page 44: Rcp

    For more information, see the Using Your HP Workstation manual that came with your worksta- tion and read the online man page by entering the fol- lowing at a command-line prompt:...
  • Page 45: Environmental/Installation/Pm

    Chap2.doc 23 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental/Installation/...
  • Page 46 Chap2.doc 24 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental/Installation/PM This chapter lists the environmental specifications and regulatory requirements for the system. Installation and preventive maintenance information, if applicable, is also provided.
  • Page 47: Environmental Specifications

    Chap2.doc 25 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental Specifications Table 4 lists the environmental specifications for this workstation. Table 4 Environmental Specifications Type Altitude Operating Non-operating DC magnetic field Operating Non-operating Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Emissions Susceptibility Electrostatic Discharge Air discharge Contact discharge Humidity (Non-condensing) Operating...
  • Page 48: Environmental Specifications

    Chap2.doc 26 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental/Installation/PM Environmental Specifications Table 4 Environmental Specifications Type Operating random Swept sine survival Random survival Acoustics Specifications 0.21 G rms, 5-50 Hz 0.5 G peak, 5-500 Hz 2.09 G rms, 5-500 Hz <5 bels 5-30˚ C <6 bels 30-40˚...
  • Page 49: Installation

    Chap2.doc 27 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental/Installation/PM Installation Installation Refer to the Hardware Install Card Model B132L/B160L, (Part Number A4190-90010) for sys- tem installation information. Preventive Maintenance The system unit requires no preventive maintenance. Some removable media storage devices require opera- tor preventive maintenance.
  • Page 50 Chap2.doc 28 Thu Jul 25 10:22:49 1996 Environmental/Installation/PM Preventive Maintenance...
  • Page 51: Configuration

    Chap3.doc 29 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration...
  • Page 52 Chap3.doc 30 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration This chapter provides details about setting up and changing the system configuration.
  • Page 53: Workstation Configurations

    Chap3.doc 31 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration Workstation Configurations Workstation Configurations Refer to the HP 9000 B Class Configuration Guide for a complete list of supported accessories, peripherals, and operating systems for this workstation.
  • Page 54: Fru Configurations

    Chap3.doc 32 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations FRU Configurations This section provides information for setting up or changing the configuration of the system Field Replaceable Units (FRUs). Internal Storage Configurations Each storage device is restricted as to where in the storage tray it may be installed.
  • Page 55: Storage Configurations

    Chap3.doc 33 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Table 5 Storage Configurations Disk Tray Position * Fast Wide SCSI devices are supported only with the optional Fast Wide SCSI controller. Supported Devices Conditions Floppy Drive The floppy drive is not a SCSI device.
  • Page 56: Default Scsi Ids

    Chap3.doc 34 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Table 6 lists the recommended SCSI IDs for internal storage devices. NOTE: There are no jumper settings to change for the floppy drive. These SCSI IDs are the default IDs for each storage device.
  • Page 57: Early Model Cd-Rom Drive Scsi Address/Jumper Settings

    Chap3.doc 35 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 NOTE: Remove or disable the terminators on all drives (disk, CD- ROM, and DDS). SCSI ID Figure 4 Early Model CD-ROM Drive SCSI Address/Jumper Settings FRU Configurations SCSI Jumpers SCSI ID Configuration...
  • Page 58: Later Model Cd-Rom Drive Scsi Address/Jumper Settings

    Chap3.doc 36 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Figure 5 Later Model CD-ROM Drive SCSI Address/Jumper Settings...
  • Page 59: Early Model Dds-Dc Tape Drive Scsi Address/Jumper Settings

    Chap3.doc 37 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 SCSI ID Figure 6 Early Model DDS-DC Tape Drive SCSI Address/Jumper Settings Configuration FRU Configurations SCSI ID...
  • Page 60: Later Model Dds-Dc Tape Drive Scsi Address/Jumper Settings

    Chap3.doc 38 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Figure 7 Later Model DDS-DC Tape Drive SCSI Address/Jumper Settings...
  • Page 61: Dds-2 Tape Drive Scsi Address/Jumper Settings

    Chap3.doc 39 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Figure 8 DDS-2 Tape Drive SCSI Address/Jumper Settings...
  • Page 62: Dds Drive Switch Settings For Data Compression Operation Mode

    Chap3.doc 40 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Figure 9 DDS Drive Switch Settings for Data Compression Operation Mode...
  • Page 63: Allowable Memory Configurations

    Chap3.doc 41 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Allowable Memory Configurations This workstation has 6 memory slots, labeled 0A, 0B, 1A, 1B, and 2A, 2B. The memory configuration is 32 MB to 384 MB installed in pairs of 16 MB, 32MB, or 64 MB memory modules.
  • Page 64: Memory Connectors

    Chap3.doc 42 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations Memory Module Connectors Figure 10 Memory Connectors White Ejector Tabs...
  • Page 65: Allowable Memory Configurations

    Chap3.doc 43 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Table 7 shows the allowable memory configurations for the Model B132L/B160L workstation. Table 7 Allowable Memory Configurations Configuration Number FRU Configurations Pair 0 Pair 1 Pair 2 Configuration Total...
  • Page 66: Monitor-Type Selection

    Chap3.doc 44 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration FRU Configurations See chapter 5 of this manual for details on installing memory modules. Monitor-Type Selection The built-in graphics in the Model B132L/B160L workstation supports the following two monitors: • 17-inch, 1280x1024 color monitor (A4330) •...
  • Page 67: Graphics Configuration Consideration

    Chap3.doc 45 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Graphics Configuration Consideration If you are installing a graphics option, read the infor- mation in this section first. Special Video Configuration Statements The following statements apply only to those applica- tions which include a cable connected to the S-Video connector on the A4248A card.
  • Page 68: Graphics Paths

    Chap3.doc 46 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration Graphics Configuration Consideration Graphics Paths graphics(0) is the built-in 8-plane graphics adapter. graphics(1) and graphics(2) are graphics adapters installed in option slots 1 and 2. When a dual display graphics adapter (an adapter which has two video output connectors) is installed, the video connector on the left (when looking at the system from the rear) is graphics(NA) and the video...
  • Page 69: Graphics Configuration Restrictions

    Chap3.doc 47 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration Graphics Configuration Consideration Graphics Configuration Restrictions The system supports only four graphics displays at a time. A “display” is a video output port or connector. For example, the Dual Visualize Enhanced Graphics Card (A4451A) is a dual display card.
  • Page 70 Chap3.doc 48 Thu Jul 25 10:23:22 1996 Configuration Graphics Configuration Consideration...
  • Page 71: Troubleshooting

    Chap4.doc 49 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting...
  • Page 72 Chap4.doc 50 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting This chapter provides information about isolating a failing component, known as a Field Replaceable Unit (FRU), in a Model B132L/B160L workstation.
  • Page 73: Getting Ready To Troubleshoot

    Getting Ready to Troubleshoot Getting Ready to Troubleshoot To troubleshoot a B132L/B160L workstation, you must be familiar with the HP-UX operating system and be able to start and stop processes. You should also be familiar with the boot ROM diagnostics, ISL diagnostics, and the Support Tools Manager online tests, which we describe in this chapter.
  • Page 74: Power On Troubleshooting

    Chap4.doc 52 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Getting Ready to Troubleshoot Start Turn on system Power LED Lights? Fans on? Power LED Lights? Replace power supply Power LED Lights? Figure 11 Power On Troubleshooting Flowchart 1 Next Chart Replace CPU board Replace the following FRUs one at a time until LED lights:...
  • Page 75: Selftests Troubleshooting

    Start Figure 12 Selftests Troubleshooting Getting Ready to Troubleshoot Selftests Power LED pass? Lights? Replace CPU board Replace indicated or backplane Powerup Check monitor display appears Configuration normal? Troubleshoot the error messages indicated part displayed? Go to HP-UX flowchart Troubleshooting...
  • Page 76: Hp-Ux Compatible Mode Troubleshooting

    Check the following: 1. Interface cables 2. Mass storage devices and their files 3. System unit interfaces Figure 13 HP-UX Compatible Mode Troubleshooting Flowchart 3 Does Boot List Select OS to boot appear? System Do other with LAN system units cable &...
  • Page 77: Hp-Ux Compatible Mode Troubleshooting (Continued)

    Can you log in? all peripherals work? programs load and run? Figure 14 HP-UX Compatible Mode Troubleshooting (Continued) Getting Ready to Troubleshoot Flowchart 4 Run offline ISL Diagnostics Refer to Chapter 5 of System Administrator’s Tasks Run offline and online diagnostics...
  • Page 78: Dealing With A Boot Failure

    Chap4.doc 56 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with a Boot Failure Dealing with a Boot Failure To start this workstation from an operating system stored on a device different from the usual boot device, to boot from a different disk, or to boot from another type of device (such as a DDS tape drive), see the following situations and examples that use the Boot Console Interface.
  • Page 79 ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX oper- ating system. For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on the root disk (fwscsi.6.0) has become corrupted, boot the...
  • Page 80: Searching For Bootable Media

    Chap4.doc 58 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with a Boot Failure Searching for Bootable Media To list all devices that may contain bootable media, go to the Main Menu of the Boot Console Interface and then type the following at the prompt: The search may turn up more devices than there are lines on the display.
  • Page 81: Stable Storage

    Chap4.doc 59 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Stable Storage Stable Storage is non-volatile memory associated with each PA-RISC processor module. Stable storage is used by the processor (CPU) to store device path information, the state of the boot flags, HPMC error information, and operating system initialization data.
  • Page 82: Isl Environment

    • Run offline diagnostic programs (TDIAG, IOMAP). • Provide automatic booting of the HP-UX O/S after power-on or reset. The ISL program provides a standalone environment for loading offline diagnostic and utility programs from the LIF directory.
  • Page 83: Selftest Failures

    Chap4.doc 61 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Selftest Failures Chassis codes are the key to debugging selftest errors. If a failure is found during selftest, chassis codes are displayed in the diagnostic LEDs. the LED error code To get additional information about failures from the boot console interface, use the Service menu pim, pdt, and Chassis Code commands.
  • Page 84: Led Error Codes

    Chap4.doc 62 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Selftest Failures Table 8 LED Error Codes RS-232 LED Value Chassis Code Range 5000 - 500F 8000 - 8FFF CD00 - CDff* 8500, 8501 CD1E CDEF CDD0 INIT/TEST code Any fault not in this table including 1000-101C...
  • Page 85 Chap4.doc 63 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Table 8 LED Error Codes LED Value Chassis Code Any call to early_update_c hassis_display RS-232 Description Range Power on value (processor board fault when this value remains for more than one second) Troubleshooting Selftest Failures...
  • Page 86: Running System Verification Tests

    Chap4.doc 64 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Running System Verification Tests Running System Verification Tests HP-UX uses an online diagnostics product called the Support Tools Manager that allows system operation verification. Three interfaces are available with the Support Tools...
  • Page 87 Chap4.doc 65 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 To access the Support Tools Manager, perform the fol- lowing steps: 1 In a terminal window, type the following at the # prompt 2 The following message appears: 3 To verify the system operation, type the following at the 4 Press Enter to return to the CTSM>...
  • Page 88: Running Ode-Based Diagnostics

    Chap4.doc 66 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Running ODE-Based Diagnostics Running ODE-Based Diagnostics The Offline Diagnostic Environment (ODE) consists of diagnostic modules for testing and verifying system operation. ODE provides all the necessary functions for the user to load specified tests and interact with those tests.
  • Page 89 Chap4.doc 67 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 • For further information on the various ODE com- mands and a complete listing of the command set, type help at the ODE> prompt or at the prompt of one of the test modules. Running ODE-Based Diagnostics mapper - identifies the configuration of HPPA systems.
  • Page 90: Dealing With Hpmc (Uncorrectable Error)

    The power-on sequence follows this path: Power-on -> Selftest -> Console Path -> Boot Admin Mode -> Boot Path -> ISL Mode -> HP-UX Mode When the hardware detects an unrecoverable (HPMC) error in the HP-UX environment, an error message, referred to as an HP-UX Kernal Tombstone is dis- played on the monitor.
  • Page 91: Pim_Info Action Table

    Chap4.doc 69 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Table 9 PIM_INFO Action Table Cache Check Check Type Word Word 0x80000000 0x40000000 0x20000000 0x20000000 0x20000000 0x20000000 0x20000000 0x20000000 Note 1 When more than one failed FRU is identified, run the appropriate diagnostics to isolate the failed FRU.
  • Page 92: Multi-Bit Memory Parity Error

    Chap4.doc 70 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) HPMC Caused by a Multi-Bit Memory Parity Error An HPMC interruption is forced when a multi-bit memory parity error is detected during a “DMA read” operation of fetching an I/D cache line (32 bytes). Table 10 shows an example of the HPMC error infor- mation retrieved from Stable Storage by the PIM_INFO command during the Boot Administration...
  • Page 93: Interpreting The Table

    Chap4.doc 71 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Interpreting the Table The values in the Bus Check and System Responder Address words indicate that a multi-bit memory parity error was detected by logic in the memory module. Ignore the value in the System Controller Status word. The System Responder contains the SPA of the faulty SIMM pair.
  • Page 94: Memory Address Ranges

    Chap4.doc 72 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) Determining the Faulty SIMM Pair The address given by the System Responder Address is contiguous, even though empty slots are permitted. Memory boards are installed in pairs of the same memory capacity.
  • Page 95 Chap4.doc 73 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Table 11 Memory Address Ranges Pair (3 thru 0) _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ Pair 3: Pair 2: Pair 1: Pair 0: Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) Memory Address Range Size (MB)
  • Page 96: Example Table

    Chap4.doc 74 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) The SIMM address ranges are: Pair 3: Pair 2: Pair 1: Pair 0: Table 12 Example Table Pair (3 thru 0) ____3____ ____3____ ____3____ Pair 3 ____3____ (32 MB SIMMs) ____3____...
  • Page 97 Chap4.doc 75 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Table 12 Example Table (3 thru 0) ____1____ ____1____ ____1____ Pair 1 ____1____ (32 MB ____1____ SIMMs) ____1____ ____1____ ____1____ Pair 0 ____0____ (8 MB ____0____ SIMMs) _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ 2 Determine the SIMM pair that contains the System Re- Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) Memor...
  • Page 98 Chap4.doc 76 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) NOTICE: Addressing starts at Pair 3, not Pair 0. A If the System Responder Address (as shown using the PIM_INFO command) is between 0x000000 and 0x03FFFFFF: Error in Pair 3 B If the System Responder Address (as shown using the PIM_INFO command) is between 0x04000000 and 0x05FFFFFF:...
  • Page 99: Processor Module Error (Data Cache Parity)

    Chap4.doc 77 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 HPMC Caused by a Data Cache Parity Error An HPMC interruption is forced when a data parity error is detected during a Load instruction to the mem- ory address space or during a data cache flush opera- tion.
  • Page 100 Chap4.doc 78 Thu Jul 25 10:23:57 1996 Troubleshooting Dealing with HPMC (Uncorrectable Error) The value in the CPU State word indicates that register values and addresses stored in Stable Storage at the time of the HPMC were saved. The value on the Cache Check word identifies that logic in the processor module detected a (data) cache parity error.
  • Page 101: Field Replaceable Units

    Chap5.doc 79 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units...
  • Page 102 NOTICES: There is no need to manually shutdown the HP-UX operating system on the workstation before switching it off. When the power switch is turned off, the workstation automatically shuts down the operating system before terminating the power.
  • Page 103: Exchange And Nonexchange Part Numbers

    Chap5.doc 81 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers In this chapter we refer to exchange and nonexchange part numbers. You must return FRUs with exchange part numbers in exchange for a replacement FRU. Do not return FRUs with nonexchange part numbers.
  • Page 104: Main Tray Frus

    Chap5.doc 82 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers Figure 16 shows the Main Tray FRUs for the B132L/ B160L workstation. The numbers correspond to item numbers in Table 14 and Table 15. Figure 16 Main Tray FRUs...
  • Page 105: Storage Tray Frus

    Chap5.doc 83 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers Figure 17 shows the Storage Tray FRUs for the B132L/B160L workstation. The numbers correspond to item numbers in Table 14 and Table 15. Figure 17 Storage Tray FRUs Table 14 lists the exchange parts, and Table 15 lists the nonexchange parts in the B132L/B160L workstation.
  • Page 106: Exchange Parts Fru List

    Chap5.doc 84 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers Table 14 Exchange Parts FRU List Figure Number Part Number Description A4190-69013 132 MHz CPU Assy A4190-69016 160 MHz CPU Assy A1658-69009 2 GB SE SCSI Disk A2084-69016 2 GB FW SCSI Disk A4190-69012...
  • Page 107: Nonexchange Parts Fru List

    Chap5.doc 85 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Table 15 Nonexchange Parts FRU List Figure Number Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Not Shown Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers Part Number Description A4190-66500 PCI Backplane...
  • Page 108 Chap5.doc 86 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers Table 15 Nonexchange Parts FRU List Figure Number A4190-84009 A4190-84010 Not Shown A4190-61603 A4081-62021 A4190-60010 A4190-62024 Not Shown 8120-6861 Not Shown A4452-66501 A4190-40016 Not Shown 0624-0727 Not Shown 5180-1344...
  • Page 109: Fru Removal And Replacement

    1 Power off the system, the monitor, and any peripheral NOTICE: There is no need to manually shut down the HP- UX operating system on the workstation before powering it off with the power switch. When the...
  • Page 110: Removing The Floor Stand

    Chap5.doc 88 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Figure 18 Removing the Floor Stand CAUTION: Follow normal ESD, anti-static precautions when handling the workstation or any of its components. Failure to do so can cause component degradation or failure.
  • Page 111 Chap5.doc 89 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 7 Lay the workstation on a flat stable surface, such as a 8 If installed, remove any locking device from the storage FRU Removal and Replacement table top or floor. tray security tab on the rear of the system unit. Field Replaceable Units...
  • Page 112: Main Tray Assembly

    Chap5.doc 90 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Main Tray Assembly Perform the following steps to remove the main tray assembly from the system unit: 1 Completely loosen the four thumb screws on the rear of the system unit, as shown in Figure 19.
  • Page 113: Removing Memory Modules

    Chap5.doc 91 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Removing Memory Modules Before removing memory modules, remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system unit. Refer to Chapter 3 for information about memory con- figurations. Perform the following steps to remove memory mod- ules: 1 Locate the memory modules on the CPU board, as shown Figure 20...
  • Page 114: Removing The Memory Retainer

    Chap5.doc 92 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Pull the tab on the memory retainer and slide it toward the front of the main tray to remove it, as shown in Figure 21 Figure 21 Removing the Memory Retainer...
  • Page 115: Removing A Memory Module

    Chap5.doc 93 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 3 To remove a memory module, push the ejector tabs on each side of the module. Lift the memory module up and out of the connector and place it on a static-free surface. Figure 22 shows how to remove a memory module.
  • Page 116: Installing Memory Modules

    Chap5.doc 94 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Installing Memory Modules Before installing memory modules, remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system unit. Refer to Chapter 3 for information about memory configurations. Perform the following steps to install memory modules: 1 Locate the memory connectors on the CPU board, as shown in Figure 23.
  • Page 117: Removing The Memory Retainer

    Chap5.doc 95 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 2 Pull the tab on the memory retainer and slide it toward Figure 24 Removing the Memory Retainer 3 Close the ejector tabs on each side of the memory con- Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement the front of the main tray to remove it, as shown in Figure 21...
  • Page 118: Installing Memory Modules

    Chap5.doc 96 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 4 Line up the memory module with the guides making sure that the notched end of the memory module is toward the white ejector tabs (front of the main tray), as shown in Figure 25.
  • Page 119: Second Level Cache Boards

    Chap5.doc 97 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Second Level Cache Boards Before removing second level cache boards, remove the main tray assembly. 1 Locate the cache board connectors on the CPU board, as shown in Figure 26.
  • Page 120: Removing Second Level Cache Boards

    Chap5.doc 98 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 To remove a second level cache board, swing the ejector tabs on each side of the board out and away from the board, as shown in Figure 27. Lift the board up and out of the connector and place it on a static-free surface.
  • Page 121: Storage Tray Assembly

    Chap5.doc 99 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Storage Tray Assembly Before removing the Storage Tray Assembly, remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system unit. The Storage Tray Assembly does not have to NOTICE: be removed from the system unit to access a hard disk drive or the 3.5-inch floppy drive.
  • Page 122: Disconnecting The Storage Tray Assembly

    Chap5.doc 100 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Remove the storage tray retaining screw, as shown in Figure 29. 3 Disconnect the cables from the system board and the backplane, as shown in Figure 29. FWSCSI Storage Tray Power...
  • Page 123: Removing The Storage Tray Assembly

    Chap5.doc 101 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 4 Hold the storage tray with both hands and slide it toward Figure 30 Removing the Storage Tray Assembly NOTICE: When replacing the storage tray, use the following procedure: a Align the pins on the backpanel of the main tray with the b Lower the front of the storage tray and move it slightly d Replace and tighten the storage tray retaining screw.
  • Page 124: Storage Tray Cover

    Chap5.doc 102 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Storage Tray Cover To remove the storage tray cover press in the two cover locking tabs then lift the front end of the cover and slide it forward off of the pins in the rear, as shown in Figure 31.
  • Page 125: Disk Filler Panel

    Chap5.doc 103 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Disk Filler Panel NOTICE: If you remove a disk filler panel, you must replace it or install a removable media storage device in its place. Before removing a disk filler panel, remove the Stor- age Tray Assembly.
  • Page 126: Cd-Rom Drive Or Dds Tape Drive

    Chap5.doc 104 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement CD-ROM Drive or DDS Tape Drive Before removing the CD-ROM drive or DDS Tape drive, perform the following procedures: Remove the Main Tray Assembly. • Remove the Storage Tray Assembly. •...
  • Page 127 Chap5.doc 105 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Disconnect the power and data cables from the device. 3 Slide the device completely out of the storage tray and place it on a static-free surface.
  • Page 128: 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive

    Chap5.doc 106 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Perform the following procedures before removing a floppy disk drive: Remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system • unit. Remove the Storage Tray Cover. •...
  • Page 129: Removing The Floppy Disk Carrier

    Chap5.doc 107 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Lift the rear of the floppy disk carrier, push the carrier to- ward the rear of the disk tray, then lift the front of the floppy disk carrier from the Storage Tray, as shown in Figure 35.
  • Page 130: Removing The Floppy Disk Drive

    Chap5.doc 108 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 3 Lift the floppy drive straight up to remove it from the floppy carrier, as shown in Figure 36. Figure 36 Removing the Floppy Disk Drive NOTICE: When replacing the floppy drive in the carrier, make sure to align the pin in the carrier with the...
  • Page 131: Hard Disk Drive

    Chap5.doc 109 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Hard Disk Drive Perform the following procedures before removing a hard disk drive. • • • NOTICE: The Storage Tray Assembly does not have to be removed from the Main Tray to access a hard disk drive in the rear position or the 3.5-inch floppy drive.
  • Page 132: Removing A Hard Disk Drive

    Chap5.doc 110 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Push the locking tab toward the drive and hold it there while simultaneously sliding the drive toward the front of the storage tray, as shown in Figure 37. Figure 37 Removing a Hard Disk Drive 3 Lift the drive straight up to remove it from the Storage...
  • Page 133: Removing Eisa, Gsc, And Pci Option Boards

    Chap5.doc 111 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Removing EISA, GSC, and PCI Option Boards Before removing EISA, GSC, or PCI option boards from the system unit, remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system unit. NOTE: Slot 1 supports GSC or PCI option boards; slot 2 supports EISA, GSC, or PCI option boards.
  • Page 134: Installing An Option Slot Blank Plate

    Chap5.doc 112 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement NOTICE: If you are not replacing the board, perform the following procedure: a Install a blank plate in the rear panel, as shown in Figure 39 b Perform Steps 2 through 1 in reverse order.
  • Page 135: Cpu Board Assembly

    Chap5.doc 113 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 CPU Board Assembly Before removing the CPU board assembly perform the following procedures: • • If you are replacing the original CPU board with a new one, refer to the section, “Determining LAN ID” below before removing the board.
  • Page 136: Determining Lan Id

    Chap5.doc 114 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Determining LAN ID Enter the following at the prompt: The output is similar to the following: Hardware Station Path Address 2.0.2 0x08000970ECC0 0 An alternative way to find the system’s LAN ID is to use the following command at the information menu of the Boot Console Handler: lanaddress...
  • Page 137: Removing The Cpu Board

    Chap5.doc 115 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Removing the CPU Board Perform the following steps to remove the CPU board from the main tray: 1 Pull the two ejector handles at the same time, as shown Figure 40 Removing the CPU Board 2 Slide the CPU board out of the main tray.
  • Page 138: Optional Egram Module

    Chap5.doc 116 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Optional EGRAM Module Before removing the optional EGRAM (System Graphics RAM) module, perform the following proce- dures: Remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system • unit.
  • Page 139 Chap5.doc 117 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 NOTICE: When replacing the EGRAM module make sure that its connector is correctly aligned with the connector on the CPU board and press down firmly to make sure that it is fully connected. Press down on the corners of the module to make sure that the standoffs are fully engaged.
  • Page 140: System Fans And Speaker

    Chap5.doc 118 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement System Fans and Speaker Before removing the fans, remove the Main Tray Assembly from the system unit. Perform the following steps to remove the system fans: 1 Locate the desired fan or speaker connector on the back- plane, push in the tab on the connector and disconnect it from the backplane, as shown in Figure 42.
  • Page 141: Removing The System Fans And Speaker

    Chap5.doc 119 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 3 Lift the fan out of the top of the fan shroud, or pull the speaker out of the front of the fan shroud, as shown in Figure 43.
  • Page 142: Battery

    Chap5.doc 120 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Battery Before removing the battery, perform the following procedures: • Remove the Main Tray • Remove the Storage Tray Lift the clip and slip the battery out of its holder, as shown in Figure 44.
  • Page 143: Power Supply

    Chap5.doc 121 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Power Supply Before removing the power supply, remove the Main Tray Assembly. 1 Remove the option board support bracket by pushing in Figure 45 Removing the Option Board Support Bracket FRU Removal and Replacement on the locking tab and sliding it toward the rear of the main tray, as shown in Figure 45.
  • Page 144: Removing The Power Supply

    Chap5.doc 122 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 2 Remove the two power supply retaining screws, as shown in Figure 46. Power Supply Retaining Screws Figure 46 Removing the Power Supply 3 Pull the power supply out of the side of the main tray, as shown in Figure 46.
  • Page 145: Fast Wide Scsi Controller

    Chap5.doc 123 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Fast Wide SCSI Controller Before removing the FW SCSI controller, remove the main tray assembly. To remove the FW SCSI controller, use a pair of nee- dle-nose pliers to squeeze the tabs on the standoffs so that they will pass through the board and pull the board straight out from the backplane to disconnect it.
  • Page 146: Backplane

    Chap5.doc 124 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement Backplane Before removing the backplane, perform the following procedures: • Remove the Main Tray Assembly • Remove the Mass Storage Tray • Remove the CPU Board •...
  • Page 147: Disconnecting The Speaker And Fan Connectors

    Chap5.doc 125 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Perform the following steps to remove the backplane: 1 Disconnect the two fan connectors and the speaker con- Figure 48 Disconnecting the Speaker and Fan Connectors 2 Pull the fan and speaker cables out of the slots in the FRU Removal and Replacement nector by pushing in on the connectors locking tab and pulling the connector, as shown in Figure 48.
  • Page 148: Removing The Backplane

    Chap5.doc 126 Thu Jul 25 10:24:29 1996 Field Replaceable Units FRU Removal and Replacement 3 Lift the backplane on its standoffs and swing the right end out away from the backplane support, as shown in Figure 49. Figure 49 Removing the Backplane...
  • Page 149: Diagrams And Pinouts

    Chap6.doc 127 Thu Jul 25 10:26:08 1996 Diagrams and Pinouts...
  • Page 150: Reference

    Service.book : Chap7.doc 157 Thu Jul 25 11:00:35 1996 Reference...
  • Page 151 Service.book : Chap7.doc 158 Thu Jul 25 11:00:35 1996 Reference This chapter provides part numbers and titles to refer- ence documents.
  • Page 152: Installation Manual

    Hardware Install Card Model B132L/B160L A4190-90010 Service Manuals Service Handbook B132L/B160L Workstations (this handbook) A4190-90039 Precision Architecture RISC HP 9000 Series 700 Diagnostics Manual 92453-90010 System Administration Tasks Manual HP Apollo 9000 Series 700 B2355-90040 Reference Manuals B132L/B160L Owner’s Guide A4190-90014...
  • Page 153 Service.book : Chap7.doc 160 Thu Jul 25 11:00:35 1996 Reference Reference Manuals...
  • Page 154: Service Notes

    Service.book : Chap8.doc 161 Thu Jul 25 11:00:53 1996 Service Notes...
  • Page 155 Service.book : Chap8.doc 162 Thu Jul 25 11:00:53 1996 Service Notes...
  • Page 156: Boot Console Interface

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 163 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface...
  • Page 157 Service.book : Chap9.doc 164 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface The Boot Console Interface provides an “interactive” environment after the power-on sequence.
  • Page 158: Accessing The Boot Console Interface

    1 Close any files and applications on your workstation. 2 Press the power switch on the front panel of the system NOTICES: There is no need to manually shut down the HP- UX operating system on your workstation before powering it off. When you turn off the power switch, your workstation automatically shuts down the operating system before terminating the power.
  • Page 159 Service.book : Chap9.doc 166 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Accessing the Boot Console Interface 3 When the system has completely shut down, power on your workstation. If Autoboot is turned off, the boot sequence automati- cally stops at the boot console Main Menu.
  • Page 160: Booting Your Workstation

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 167 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Booting Your Workstation Usually, you start your workstation by turning it on and waiting for HP-UX to boot automatically. How- ever, you may not always want the usual sequence to occur.
  • Page 161 ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX oper- ating system. If you do not want ISL to be loaded, you must enter no.
  • Page 162: Searching For Bootable Media

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 169 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Searching for Bootable Media To list devices that contain bootable media, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this appendix, and then type the following at the prompt: The search command searches all buses.
  • Page 163: Resetting Your Workstation

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 170 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Resetting Your Workstation Resetting Your Workstation To reset your workstation, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this appendix, and then type the following at the prompt: Main Menu: Enter command >...
  • Page 164: Displaying And Setting Paths

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 171 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Displaying and Setting Paths A path is the hardware address of a device that is attached to the I/O system of your workstation. The path command sets the system paths shown in Table 39.
  • Page 165 Service.book : Chap9.doc 172 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting Paths The paths are displayed in Mnemonic Style Notation, as shown in Table 40. Table 40 Mnemonic Style Notation I/O Type Built-in FWSCSI Built-in SCSI Optional Built-in LAN To display the current setting for a particular system...
  • Page 166 Service.book : Chap9.doc 173 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 To set a system path to a new value, follow the direc- tions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” ear- lier in this chapter, and then type the following at the prompt: where path_type is one of the path types listed in Table 39 and path is the specification of the path in Mne-...
  • Page 167: Displaying And Setting The Monitor Type

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 174 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Your system ships from the factory preset to use a monitor with a specific resolution and frequency. If you replace your workstation’s monitor with a differ- ent type of monitor, you must reconfigure your work- station to support the new monitor.
  • Page 168 Service.book : Chap9.doc 175 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 The correct usage for setting the graphics configura- tion is: where valid graphics_path parameters are: and type is the numerical monitor type as shown with the monitor list command. Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type monitor graphics_path type graphics(0) - The built-in 8-plane graphics adapter.
  • Page 169: Displaying The Current Monitor Configuration

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 176 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type When a dual display graphics adapter (an adapter which has two video output connectors) is installed, the video connector on the left (when looking at the system from the rear) is graphics(NA) and the video connector on the right is graphics(NB).
  • Page 170 Service.book : Chap9.doc 177 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 The screen displays a list of the current graphics adapters and there monitor types configured for your workstation. MONITOR INFORMATION Path ----------- GRAPHICS(0) Configuration Menu: Enter command > In this example, only the built-in graphic adapter graphics(0) is configured.
  • Page 171: Setting The Monitor Type

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 178 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Setting the Monitor Type You can set the monitor type for a graphics adapter by typing the following: Config Menu:Enter command> Where n is the number of the graphics adapter and tt is the monitor type.
  • Page 172 Service.book : Chap9.doc 179 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 To set the monitor type for graphics(0) to monitor type 2 you would enter the following; The boot console displays a message that tells you that your new monitor selection will take affect the next time you reboot your system.
  • Page 173: Setting The Monitor Type At Power On

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 180 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Setting the Monitor Type at Power On If you replace your workstation’s monitor with a dif- ferent monitor type, and do not set the workstation’s graphics parameters by using the monitor command before doing so, you need to perform the following: Wait 2 seconds after the Num Lock light flashes near...
  • Page 174 Service.book : Chap9.doc 181 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Next, the following message is displayed: To restart the monitor selection process, press TAB. Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type To select a new Graphics Monitor Type press the <TAB> key now, otherwise EXIT by enter- ing any other key (or will time out in 15 seconds)...
  • Page 175: Displaying The Current Memory Configuration

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 182 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying the Current Memory Configuration Displaying the Current Memory Configuration The following sample screen output using the memory command shows a sample memory configu- ration table. To display the current memory configuration for your system, from the Information Menu of the boot con- sole interface, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface”...
  • Page 176 Service.book : Chap9.doc 183 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 The screen displays status and configuration informa- tion for the memory DIMMs installed in your worksta- tion. The following sample shows the memory information when memory modules are properly installed and con- figured MEMORY INFORMATION MEMORY STATUS TABLE...
  • Page 177: Setting The Auto Boot And Auto Search Flags

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 184 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags auto boot and auto search are variables stored in your workstation’s nonvolatile memory. If you reset these flags to a new value, the change takes effect the next time you reboot the workstation.
  • Page 178 Service.book : Chap9.doc 185 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Autosearch searches for devices in the following order: NOTICE: Fast Wide SCSI adapter option cards installed in the option slots are not searched unless they are referenced by the primary or alternate boot paths. EISA cards are not searched.
  • Page 179: Displaying And Setting The Fastboot Mode

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 186 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Fastboot Mode Displaying and Setting the Fastboot Mode When fastboot is enabled (set to on), your worksta- tion does a quick check of the memory and skips I/O interface testing during its power-on self tests.
  • Page 180: Displaying The Lan Station Address

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 187 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Displaying the LAN Station Address It is sometimes necessary to supply a LAN station address of your workstation to other users. For exam- ple, if your workstation is to become a member of a cluster, the cluster administrator needs to know your LAN station address in order to add your workstation to the cluster.
  • Page 181: Displaying System Information

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 188 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Displaying System Information Displaying System Information The all command allows you to display the system’s processor revision and speed, cache size, memory size, flag settings, and the boot and console paths. To display system information from the Information Menu, type the following at the prompt: Information Menu: Enter command >...
  • Page 182: Displaying Pim Information

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 189 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Displaying PIM Information The pim command allows you to display the most recent PIM information for the specified fault type. To display PIM information for a specific fault, from the Service Menu, type the following at the prompt: ServiceMenu:Entercommand>...
  • Page 183: Stable Storage

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 190 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Stable Storage Stable Storage Stable storage is nonvolatile memory associated with the PA-RISC processor module. Stable storage is used by the processor (CPU) to store • Device path information •...
  • Page 184: Isl Environment

    Execute user-entered commands to modify boot device paths and boot options in stable storage Run offline diagnostic programs and utilities Provide automatic booting of the HP-UX O/S after power-on or reset terface” earlier in this chapter, and then type the follow-...
  • Page 185 ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX oper- ating system. For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on your root disk (fwscsi.6.0) has become corrupted, and...
  • Page 186 127. The entry for the keyboard and mouse devices begins at byte address 160 and ends at 191. listautofl or lsautofl - lists the contents of the (HP-UX) autoboot file. support - boots the Support Tape from the boot device.
  • Page 187: Updating System Firmware With Ode

    Service.book : Chap9.doc 194 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Updating System Firmware with ODE Updating System Firmware with ODE The Offline Diagnostic Environment (ODE) consists of diagnostic modules for testing and verifying system operation. The update utility of ODE provides the capability of updating the PDC/IODC firmware from the LIF directory onto the EEPROM.
  • Page 188 Service.book : Chap9.doc 195 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Updating System Firmware with ODE and displays the PDC version of the currently running PDC as well as that of the images that were loaded. If you wish to continue, type y. When the update process has completed, the machine reboots automatically.
  • Page 189 Service.book : Chap9.doc 196 Thu Jul 25 11:01:09 1996 Boot Console Interface Updating System Firmware with ODE...
  • Page 190 131 enhanced video pinouts, 153 fans fan pinouts, 150 pinouts, 150 hard disk drive pinouts, 146 removing, 118 HP parallel I/O, 13 fastboot keyboard, 13 disabling,, 186 mouse, 13 displaying status,, 186 network, 13 enabling,, 186...
  • Page 191 Service.book : ServiceIX.doc 198 Thu Jul 25 11:01:33 1996 Index configurations, 32 GSC boards exchange part numbers, 81, removing, 111 GSC option boards, 4 installing memory modules, main tray, 82 hard disk drive nonexchange part numbers, pinouts, 146 81, 84 removing, 109 procedures, 87 removing backplane, 124...
  • Page 192: Fwscsi Board Backplane Connector

    154 TOC button, 15 tools needed for FRUs, 80 rcp, 22 trackball, 16 rlogin, 21 troubleshooting HP-UX compatible mode, 55 power on, 52 SCSI devices selftests, 53 connector pinouts, 152 connectors, 15 IDs, 34 user interface, 3, 4 security loop, 10...
  • Page 193 Service.book : ServiceIX.doc 200 Thu Jul 25 11:01:33 1996 Index...

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