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Sharp JW-20FL5 User Manual

Fl-net module (board).
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Sharp Programmable Controller
F L - n e t
User's Manual
Version 1.0
Produced in June 2002
Module name
JW-20FL5
JW-20FLT
JW-50FL
Z-336J

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   Summary of Contents for Sharp JW-20FL5

  • Page 1 Version 1.0 Produced in June 2002 Sharp Programmable Controller Module name JW-20FL5 JW-20FLT JW-50FL F L - n e t Z-336J User's Manual...
  • Page 2 Thank you for purchasing the FL-net module (board) for use with the sharp programmable controller. JW-20FL5 (Installed PC) JW20H/30H FL-net module JW-20FLT JW-50FL JW50H/70H/100H FL-net board Z-336J J-board Please familiarize yourself with the module by reading this user's manual thoroughly.
  • Page 3: Safety Precautions

    Safety Precautions Read this manual and attached documents carefully before installation, operation, maintenance and check- ing in order to use the machine correctly. Understand all of the machine knowledge, safety information, and cautions before starting to use. In this instruction manual, safety precautions are ranked into "danger" and "caution"...
  • Page 4 Danger - Don't touch the terminal while the power is being supplied or you may have an electric shock. - Assemble the emergency stop circuit and interlock circuit outside of the programmable controller. Otherwise breakdown or accident damage of the machine may be caused by the trouble of the programmable controller.
  • Page 5 User's Manual Chapter 1: Outline Chapter 2: Handling Precautions Chapter 3: System Configuration Chapter 4: Name and Function of Each Part Chapter 5: Installation Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring Chapter 7: Use Guide Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer Chapter 9: Message Transfers Chapter 10: Communication Control Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE Function Chapter 12: Parameters Chapter 13: Troubleshooting...
  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    4-3 Z-336J ............................4-3 4-4 JW-50FL ............................4-4 Chapter 5: Installation ..................5-1 to 8 5-1 Installation of JW-20FL5/20FLT ....................5-1 5-2 Installation of Z-336J ........................5-2 [1] Maximum number of boards to mount ..................5-3 [2] Address allocation of I/O relay ....................5-4 (1) When mounted on Z-311J/312J ..................
  • Page 7 (1) Cyclic transfer ........................7-10 (2) Message transfer ........................ 7-11 [5] Transfer cycle ..........................7-11 [6] Data area and memory ......................7-12 [7] Communication management table ..................7-13 (1) Local node management table ..................7-13 (2) Participating node management table ................7-14 (3) Network management table ....................
  • Page 8 (1) Enable/disable the use of the transmission buffer (Setting parameter address 37(8)) ..12-2 12-3 How to set parameters ......................12-3 [1] When the JW-20FL5/20FLT or Z-366J is used ................. 12-3 [2] When the JW-50FL is used ...................... 12-4 Chapter 13: Troubleshooting ................13-1 to 6 13-1 Before you conclude that the machine is faulty ................
  • Page 9 [1] General specifications ......................14-3 [2] Communication specifications ....................14-3 [3] External dimension drawings ....................14-3 14-3 JW-50FL ........................... 14-4 [1] General specifications ......................14-4 [2] Communication specifications ....................14-4 [3] External dimension drawings ....................14-5 Chapter 15: Appendix ..................15-1 to 63 15-1 System configuration guide ......................
  • Page 10 [6] Status management of the FL-net ..................15-28 [7] Control message sequence number of the FL-net ..............15-28 15-5 Parts needed to build a network ..................... 15-29 [1] Parts needed to configure an Ethernet ................... 15-29 [2] Parts related to 10BASE5 ...................... 15-30 (1) Transceiver ........................
  • Page 11: Chapter 1: Outline

    Chapter 1: Outline An FL-net module (JW-20FL5/20FLT, JW-50FL, FL-net board (Z-336J)) is an interface module use to connect a programmable controller (JW20H/30H, JW50H/70H/100H), J-board to an FL-net. FL-net is an open network that connects production equipment and controllers from multiple FA (factory automation) venders, to create a unified production process.
  • Page 12: Chapter 2: Handling Precautions

    Chapter 2: Handling Precautions Make sure to follow the precautions bellow who using the JW-20FL5/20FLT, JW-50FL (hereafter referred to as this module) and Z-336J (hereafter referred to as this board). (1) Installation - Do not install or store this unit in the following conditions.
  • Page 13: Chapter 3: System Configuration

    Transceiver FL-net Terminator J-board JW20H/30H JW50H/70H/100H Transceiver cable 10BASE-T (max. 50 m) twisted pair cable Other JW-20FL5 (max. 100 m) Z-336J maker’s JW-50FL J-board JW50H/70H JW20H/30H /100H JW-20FLT Z-336J JW-50FL - A basic system (segment) configuration consists of a 10BASE5 coaxial cable between 10m and 500 m long with nodes connected to this cable.
  • Page 14: Chapter 4: Name And Function Of Each Part

    12VDC ±5% and 0.5 A or more. Specify a module number from 0 to 6. 6 Module No. switch - Be careful do not use the same number for another option module. 7 Reset switch Only used by SHARP engineers. Users should not press this switch.
  • Page 15: Jw-20flt

    The shield on the twisted pair cable is not shorted to the base. Specify a module number from 0 to 6. 5 Module No. switch - Be careful do not use the same number for another option module. 6 Reset switch Only used by SHARP engineers. Users should not press this switch.
  • Page 16: Z-336j

    7 Module No. switch - Be careful do not use the same number for another option board. 8 Reset switch Only used by SHARP engineers. Users should not press this switch. Number of communication Specify the number of communication boards actually installed (including the Z-336J).
  • Page 17: Jw-50fl

    12VDC 5% and 0.5 A or more. 6 Reset switch Only used by SHARP engineers. Users should not press this switch. Turn ON when the shields on the 10BASE-T connectors or 10BASE5 connectors are connected to the FG (base) of the JW-50FL.
  • Page 18: Chapter 5: Installation

    Chapter 5: Installation Chapter 5: Installation 5-1 Installation of JW-20FL5/20FLT This section describes the installation procedures for the JW-20FL5/20FLT (hereafter referred to as the module) on the JW20H/30H basic rack panel. Turn off the power to the JW20H/30H. Set the module No. switch on the back of the module.
  • Page 19: Installation Of Z-336j

    Chapter 5: Installation 5-2 Installation of Z-336J Board dimensions and assembled dimensions of the Z-336J are shown below. Board dimensions [Unit: mm] Boss hole: 4- 4 The dimensions on the left do not include metal fittings. Assembled dimensions [Unit: mm] 25.0 * CPU board (when Z-311J/312J is mounted) 21.6...
  • Page 20: Maximum Number Of Boards To Mount

    Chapter 5: Installation This paragraph describes the maximum number of Z-336J boards to install on the J-board and allocation of I/O relays. Allocation of I/O relays When mounted on the Z-311J/312J See the next page. When mounted on the Z-313J See page 5-5.
  • Page 21: Address Allocation Of I/o Relay

    Chapter 5: Installation [2] Address allocation of I/O relay This section describes I/O relay addresses allocated to the Z-336J. (1) When mounted on Z-311J/312J The total number of Z-336J boards able to be mounted including other communication boards is two at maximum.
  • Page 22: When Mounted On Z-313j

    Chapter 5: Installation (2) When mounted on Z-313J The number of boards available mounted on the Z-336J including other communication boards is one at maximum. Below shows the switch setting of the Z-313J and Z-336J as well as I/O relay allocation of the Z- 336J.
  • Page 23: When Mounted On Z-511j

    Chapter 5: Installation (3) When mounted on Z-511J The number of boards available mounted on the Z-336J including other communication boards is two at maximum. Below shows the switch setting of the Z-511J and Z-336J as well as I/O relay allocation of the Z- 336J.
  • Page 24 Chapter 5: Installation When using two communication boards (Z-336J) Switch setting The set switches SW1 and SWA on the Z-551J and the number of communication boards setting switch SWA on the Z-336J are as follows. - Z-336J - Z-511J Use Z-336J Use Z-336J Switch SW1 Switch SWA...
  • Page 25: Installation Of Jw-50fl

    Chapter 5: Installation 5-3 JW-50FL (1) Installation of cable for option module Install the optional cable on the basic rack panel that installed JW-50FL. Cable type for option module Maximum number of JW-50FL Cable for option module that can be installed ZW-2CC ZW-4CC ZW-6CC...
  • Page 26: Chapter 6: Connection/wiring

    (JIS X5252). We recommend that you contact a specialist for perform any installation or hook up. (Sharp Document Systems Co., Ltd. is providing the Ethernet installation work service, and supplying network products from Allied System Co., Ltd.)
  • Page 27: Connection

    [1] Connection of JW-20FL5 This paragraph describes how to connect 10BASE5 cable to the JW-20FL5. (1) Connecting the transceiver cable 1 Slide the lock on the 10BASE5 connector (on the JW-20FL5) up. Slide lock JW-20FL5 2 Insert the connector so that the two locking posts on the cable connector match the holes on the slide lock.
  • Page 28: Wiring The Power Source

    (Accessory: Connector, cable length 1.5 m) Remarks - Use a power supply that is dedicated for use by the JW-20FL5. - Do not reverse the positive and negative connections to the power terminals. Reversing the polarity may damage the JW-20FL5.
  • Page 29: When Connecting To A Jw-20flt

    Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring [2] When connecting to a JW-20FLT Connect a 10BASE-T twisted pair cable to the 10BASE-T connector on the JW-20FLT. 10BASE-T twisted pair cable 10BASE-T connector...
  • Page 30: Connection Of Z-336j

    Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring [3] Connection of Z-336J (1) When connecting to a 10BASE5 This paragraph describes how to connect 10BASE5 cable to the Z-336J. Connecting the transceiver cable Slide lock 10BASE5 connector Z-336J Cable connector Transceiver cable Locking post 1 Slide the lock on the 10BASE5 connector (on the Z-336J) up. 2 Insert the connector so that the two locking posts on the cable connector match the holes on the slide lock.
  • Page 31 Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring Wiring the power source When a 10BASE5 is used, 12 VDC power should be supplied to the transceiver. Supply power to the 12 VDC power supply input terminal of the Z-336J using a commercial constant voltage power supply unit. Item Specifications 12 VDC –5%...
  • Page 32: When Connecting To A 10base-t

    Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring (2) When connecting to a 10BASE-T Connect a 10BASE-T twisted pair cable to the 10BASE-T connector on the Z-336J. 10BASE-T connector 10BASE-T twisted pair cable Z-336J...
  • Page 33: Connection Of Jw-50fl

    Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring [4] Connection of JW-50FL (1) Connection of 10BASE5 This paragraph describes how to connect 10BASE5 cable to the JW-50FL. Connecting the transceiver cable Slide lock Locking post 10BASE5 connector Locking post Transceiver cable 1 Slide the lock on the 10BASE5 connector (on the JW-50FL) up. 2 Insert the connector so that the two locking posts on the cable connector match the holes on the slide lock.
  • Page 34: When Connecting To A 10base-t

    Chapter 6: Connection/Wiring (2) When connecting to a 10BASE-T Connect a 10BASE-T twisted pair cable to the 10BASE-T connector on the JW-50FL. 10BASE-T twisted pair cable 10BASE-T connector...
  • Page 35: Chapter 7: Use Guide

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function Chapter 7: Use Guide 7-1 Ethernet [1] 10BASE5 system The basic configuration of a10BASE5 system consists of one coaxial cable, with a maximum length of 500 m, and nodes connected to this cable as shown below. Each node is connected to the coaxial cable using a transceiver and a transceiver cable (AUI cable).
  • Page 36 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function If the distance between nodes is greater than 500 m, connect a repeater as shown below, or to increase the number of segments by branching. The figure below is an example of a system with a maximum of 1500 m of cable.
  • Page 37 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function The example shown below allows up to 2,500m between nodes. In order to extend communication distance, link cables are used (with repeaters at both ends). The maximum length of one link is 500 m. These cables are referred to as "link segments." The link segments must not connect nodes directly.
  • Page 38: 10base-t System

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function Parameters related to the system configuration are summed up below. General specifications for configuring an Ethernet system Item Specifications Maximum length of a segment 500 m Maximum number of transceivers that can be installed within one segment Maximum distance between nodes 2500 m or less (except for the transceiver cables) Maximum number of nodes in a system...
  • Page 39: Ip Addresses On An Ethernet

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [3] IP addresses on an Ethernet In general, the UDP/IP uses a 32-bit logical address called the "IP address." The IP address consists of a network address and a host address. Normally, a class C configuration is used in the FA industry.
  • Page 40: Fl-net

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 7-2 FL-net [1] Description of the FL-net (1) The FL-net concept FL-net is an FA control network that uses an Ethernet protocol. FL-net has a cyclic transfer function and a message transfer function. The basic concepts of the FL-net are as follows. 1 Ethernet protocols are used for communication (physically and as conceptual data links) between FA controllers.
  • Page 41 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) FL-net protocol The FL-net consists of the following 6 protocol layers. Application layer Controller interface Service function Cyclic transfer Message transfer FA link protocol layer FL-net Token function protocol Transport layer Network layer Data link layer Ethernet (Compatible with IEEE802.3) Physical layer...
  • Page 42: The Number Of Modules And Their Node Numbers

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (4) FL-net's IP address scheme Each node in the FL-net should be set independently using class C addresses. An "IP address" is an address used to identify a specific node (station) when sending data and using an Internet Protocol (IP).
  • Page 43: Data Communication Type

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [3] Data communication type FL-net data communication supports both "cyclic transfer" and "message transfer." Message Cyclic data data with Token Cyclic transfer Cyclic transfer + Message transfer Type of data communication on the FL-net (1) Cyclic transfer With cyclic transfer, the JW-50FL sends data at certain intervals.
  • Page 44: Cyclic Transfer

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) Message transfer In the message transfer operation, the JW-50FL sends data non-cyclically. Normally, when a request to send occurs, the FL-net will communicate with a certain node. Transfer message from node 1 to 3 Transfer message from node 6 to 4 Example of a message transfer [4] Transfer data volume...
  • Page 45: Message Transfer

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) Message transfer The maximum amount of data that can be transferred in one message frame is 1024 bytes (exclud- ing the header section). Message frame 1024 byes Message transfer data limit [5] Transfer cycle In the cyclic transfer operation, the JW-50FL refreshes the common memory almost constantly.
  • Page 46: Data Area And Memory

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [6] Data area and memory FL-net communication module CPU module Cyclic transfer Common memory area 1 Common memory area 2 Message transfer buffer area FL-net management table area Physical memory FL-net parameter area Data area and memory 7-12...
  • Page 47: Communication Management Table

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [7] Communication management table The status of each node is controlled using an individual node management table (maintained by the node itself), a participating node management table, and a network management table. (1) Local node management table The settings in each local node management table are controlled by the node itself.
  • Page 48: Participating Node Management Table

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) Participating node management table The participating node management table contains data related to the nodes currently participating in the network. Participating node management table Number Item Description of bytes Node number 1 byte 1 to 254 Upper layer status 2 bytes RUN/STOP/ALARM/WARNING/NORMAL Area 1 of common memory: Data top...
  • Page 49: Cyclic Transfer And Data Area

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [8] Cyclic transfer and data area (1) Outline of the cyclic transfer process The cyclic transfer process is a function that supports cyclic data exchanges that occur between nodes. 1 Establishes the common memory function. 2 Transmits when a node receives the token.
  • Page 50: Common Memory

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) Common memory The description of the common memory is as follows. 1 The common memory allows the memory to be shared between nodes performing a cyclic transfer. 2 Two types of areas (area 1 and area 2) are allocated for each node. 3 If an area needed by a node to send its data exceeds the transfer size allowed for one frame, namely, more than 1024 bytes, the node should use multiple frames to send the data.
  • Page 51: Area 1 And Area 2

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function The common memory can also be used exclusively as a receiving area. Node 01 common memory Node 02 Node 05 (Receive) (Receive) (Send) (Receive) (Send) (Receive) Example 2: Common memory during a cyclic transfer (3) Area 1 and area 2 One node can be allocated two data areas (area 1 and area 2) for common memory.
  • Page 52: Guarantee Of Simultaneity

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (4) Guarantee of simultaneity The cyclic transfer divides data into frames, depending on the amount of data being sent. The FL-net guarantees the simultaneity on common memory of each node using the following proce- dures. Note: When area 2 exceeds 3084 bytes, the JW-50FL cannot guarantee the simultaneity of the data for hardware reasons.
  • Page 53: Message Transfers

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function [9] Message transfers (1) Outline of the message transfer process The message transfer process is a function that allows asynchronous data to be exchanged be- tween nodes. The basic operation of the message transfer process is shown below. 1 When a node receives a token, it will send a maximum of one frame of message data before the cyclic frame data sending.
  • Page 54: Table Of Support Messages

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (2) Table of support messages Table of support messages Message Request Response Pages to refer 1 Read byte-block data 7-21 2 Write byte-block data 7-22 3 Read word-block data 7-23 4 Write word-block data 7-24 5 Read network parameters 7-25 6 Write network parameters...
  • Page 55: Details Of The Support Messages

    Chapter 7: Computer Link Function (3) Details of the support messages 1 Read byte-block data This is a message function used to read a virtual address space (32-bit address space) in a target node on the network, in units of one byte at a time (each address = 8-bits). Be careful because the internal address map varies with the FL-net module you are using.
  • Page 56 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 2 Write byte-block data This is a message function used to write to a virtual address space (32-bit address space) in a target node on the network, in units of one byte at a time (each address = 8-bits). Be careful because the internal address map varies with the FL-net module you are using.
  • Page 57 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 3 Read word-block data This is a message function used to read a virtual address space (32-bit address space) in a target node on the network in units of one word at a time (one address = 16-bits). Be careful because the internal address map varies with the FL-net module you are using.
  • Page 58 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 4 Write word-block data This is a message function used to write to a virtual address space (32-bit address space) in a target node on the network in units of one word at a time (one address = 16-bits). Be careful because the internal address map varies with the FL-net module you are using.
  • Page 59 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 5 Read network parameters This is a function used to read the network parameter data for a target node through the network. It reads the following data. Network parameter data - Node number - Vender name - Manufacturer model name - Node name (facility name) - Address and size of common memory...
  • Page 60 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 6 Write network parameters This is a function used to change the network parameter data of a receiving node through the network. The following data can be changed. - Node name (facility name) - Address and size of common memory When the address and size of the common memory is changed, the receiving node leaves the network and re-enters it again.
  • Page 61 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 7 Start, stop commands This is a function used to remotely start and stop the operation of equipment that is connected to the FL-net. Request message Response message Operation Operation instruction Request message Response message Stop Stop instruction 7-27...
  • Page 62 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 8 Read profile This is a function used to remotely set the system parameters of a device profile that is the data for the receiving node. The following parameters are included in the system parameters. - Common parameters (essential) - Parameters peculiar to each device (optional) Request message...
  • Page 63 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function 9 Read log data This is a function used to read the log data of the receiving node. Request message Response message Communication log data 0 Clear log data This is a function used to clear log data of the receiving node. Request message Response message Clear...
  • Page 64 Chapter 7: Computer Link Function q Return message This is a function used to send back a message that has been received. The FL-net automatically returns messages. Request message Response message w Transfer transmission message This is a function used to provide a transmission service to the FL-net upper layer. This function informs received message to the FL-net upper layer.
  • Page 65: Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer To execute a cyclic transfer using the FL-net module (JW-20FL5/20FLT and JW-50FL) and FL-net board (Z-336J), the parameters in the common memory areas (area 1 and 2) must be set. Token Data...
  • Page 66 Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer Notes on the common memory areas The common memory areas (area 1 and 2) can also be set using the following procedures. 1. There is no need to allocate sequential node numbers. [Example] Node Node Node Node 2 Node 2 Node 2...
  • Page 67: Setting Procedures

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer 8-1 Setting procedures This section describes all of the FL-net module setting procedures. For details about message transfers, the communication management area, and the SEND/RECEIVE function, see the respective chapters. 1 Specify a parameter area See Chapter 12. A parameter area is allocated within the control module.
  • Page 68: Areas That Can Be Allocated As The Common Memory Area

    The data memory area that can be allocated as the common memory areas (area 1 and 2) vary with the model of the module used. FL-net module Host PC Control module Details JW20H JW-21CU/22CU See below JW-31CUH1 JW-20FL5 JW-20FLT JW30H JW-32CUH1 Next page JW-33CUH1/2/3 FL-net board Host J-board CPU board Details...
  • Page 69: For The Jw30h Or J-board (z-500 Series)

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer (2) For the JW30H or J-board (Z-500 series) Address of the data memory that can be allocated to common memory Bit address Byte address File address Relay 00000 to 15777 0000 to 1577 000000 to 001577 TMR/CNT contact point T-C0000 to T-C0777 001600 to 001777...
  • Page 70: For The Jw50h/70h/100h

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer (3) For the JW50H/70H/100H Address of the data memory that can be allocated to common memory Bit address Byte address File address Relay 00000 to 15777 0000 to 1577 000000 to 001577 T-C0000 to 0777 001600 to 001777 1600 to 1777 TMR/CNT contact point T-C1000 to 1777...
  • Page 71: Parameter Settings For Cyclic Transfers

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer 8-3 Parameter settings for cyclic transfers The parameters related to cyclic transfers are as follows. Parameter Description address Top address (word address) of the data sending areas of own node area 1 * - Address 10 is for the lower digit and 11 is for the upper digit. Sending data length (word) of own node area 1 - Address 12 is for the lower digit and 13 is for the upper digit.
  • Page 72: Word Addresses Used For The Top Address

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer [1] Word addresses used for the top address The top address entered in the parameters for cyclic transfers on the FL-net are word addresses. Variations among the PLC models that can be installed are shown below. (1) For the JW20H or J-board (Z-300 series) JW20H/J-board (Z-300series) address Top address set in FL-net cyclic transfer Byte address...
  • Page 73: For The Jw30h Or J-board (z-500 Series)

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer (2) For the JW30H or J-board (Z-500 series) JW30H/J-board (Z-500 series) Top address set in FL-net cyclic address transfer Byte address File address Word unit: Octal Word unit: Hex. 0000, 0001 000000, 000001 000000 0000 0002, 0003 000002, 000003 000001 0001 Relay...
  • Page 74 Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer From the previous page JW30H/J-board (Z-500 series) Top address set in FL-net cyclic address transfer Byte address File address Word unit: Octal Word unit: Hex. E6000, E6001 024000, 024001 012000 1400 Register (Possible to register error history) E7776, E7777 025776, 025777 012777 15FF...
  • Page 75: For The Jw50h/70h/100h

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer (3) For the JW50H/70H/100H JW30H/J-board (Z-500 series) Top address set in FL-net cyclic address transfer Byte address File address Word unit: Octal Word unit: Hex. 0000, 0001 000000, 000001 000000 0000 0002, 0003 000002, 000003 000001 0001 Relay 1576, 1577 001576, 001577...
  • Page 76 Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer From the previous page JW50H/70H/100H address Top address set in FL-net cyclic transfer Byte address File address Word unit: Octal Word unit: Hex. 000000, 000001 000000 0000 File 1 037776, 037777 017777 1FFF 177776, 177777 077777 7FFF 000000, 000001 000000...
  • Page 77: Communication Time

    Chapter 8: Cyclic Transfer 8-4 Communication time [1] Token round time The token round time can be obtained as follows. Node N 1 Node N Spacing between data of this node and the previous node Token round time = ∑ (Total of the space (time) between data from this node and all previous nodes.) "Tn"...
  • Page 78: Chapter 9: Message Transfers

    Chapter 9: Message Transfers The message transfer method used with the module classifies messages as "client function," "transmission type message," or "remote function" (SHARP's proprietary function). These classifications can be assigned by setting each type to "Used" or "Not used," as shown below.
  • Page 79: Message Sending Procedures And Data Reception Details

    37 Parameter Details address Enable/disable use of a transmission type buffer Setting value Message Message other than transmission Messages other than SHARP's proprietary message format Transmission Computer link function message SHARP's proprietary format Remote function O: Used X: Not used...
  • Page 80 Chapter 9: Message transfers From the previous page 2 Setting transmission buffer (set the sending details) Specify the [information section] and [data section] to be used for sending messages to the transmission buffer (addresses +2000 to 3777 , +4040 to 4055 Transmission Details buffer address...
  • Page 81: Transmission Buffer

    Chapter 9: Message transfers 9-2 Transmission buffer This section describes the transmission buffer that is used for sending and receiving data for the message transfer. The transmission buffer area (+0000 to 4055 ) is determined by entering top address to parameter (address 34 to 36 ).
  • Page 82: Allocation Of Available Areas For The Transmission Buffer

    The allocation of available areas for the transmission buffer varies with the module on which the FL-net is installed. FL-net module Host PC Control module Details JW20H JW-21CU/22CU See below JW-31CUH1 JW-20FL5 JW-20FLT JW30H JW-32CUH1 Next page JW-33CUH1/2/3 FL-net board Host J-board CPU board Details...
  • Page 83: For The Jw30h Or J-board (z-500 Series)

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (2) For the JW30H or J-board (Z-500 series) Allocation available data memory address for the transmission buffer Bit address Byte address File address Relay 00000 to 15777 000000 to 001577 0000 to 1577 TMR/CNT contact point T-C0000 to T-C0777 1600 to 1777 001600 to 001777...
  • Page 84: For The Jw50h/70h/100h

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (3) For the JW50H/70H/100H Allocation available data memory address for common memory area Bit address Byte address File address Relay 00000 to 15777 000000 to 001577 0000 to 1577 TMR/CNT T-C0000 to 0777 001600 to 001777 1600 to 1777 contact T-C1000 to 1777...
  • Page 85: Message Transaction Codes And Execution Conditions

    1001 (request remote function: SHARP's proprietary function) Transmission 1002 to 1199 messages 1200 (response of computer link function: SHARP's proprietary function) 1201 (response of remote function: SHARP's proprietary function) 1202 to 59999 (Transmission buffer --- O: Used, X: Not used)
  • Page 86: Use Of Virtual Address Space And Pc Memory Space

    This section describes the addresses used in the host PC by the FL-net. FL-net module Host PC Control module Details JW20H JW-21CU/22CU Next page JW-31CUH1 JW-20FL5 JW-20FLT JW30H JW-32CUH1 Page 9-11 to 9-13 JW-33CUH1/2/3 FL-net board Host J-board CPU board...
  • Page 87: For The Jw20h Or J-board (z-300 Series)

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (1) For the JW20H or J-board (Z-300 series) Virtual address space PC memory space Low word High word Byte block Word block 0x0000 to 0x003F 0x0000 to 0x001F 0000 to 0077 0x0040 to 0x007F 0x0020 to 0x003F 0100 to 0177 0x0080 to 0x00FF 0x0040 to 0x007F...
  • Page 88: For The Jw30h Or J-board (z-500 Series)

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (2) For the JW30H or J-board (Z-500 series) Files 0 Virtual address space PC memory space Low word High word Byte block Word block 0x0000 to 0x003F 0x0000 to 0x001F 0000 to 0077 0x0040 to 0x007F 0x0020 to 0x003F 0100 to 0177 0200 to 0377...
  • Page 89 Chapter 9: Message transfers From the previous page Virtual address space PC memory space Low word High word Byte block Word block T00-000 to 177 0x0000 to 0x007F 0x0000 to 0x003F T01-000 to 177 0x0080 to 0x00FF 0x0040 to 0x007F T02-000 to 177 0x0100 to 0x017F 0x0080 to 0x00BF...
  • Page 90 Chapter 9: Message transfers Files 1 to 3 and 10 to 2C Virtual address space PC memory space Low word High word File number File address Byte block Word block 000000 to 037777 0x0001 0x0000 to 0x3FFF 0x0000 to 0x1FFF 000000 to 177777 0x0002 0x0000 to 0xFFFF...
  • Page 91 Chapter 9: Message transfers (3) For the JW50H/70H/100H Files 0 Virtual address space PC memory address Low word High word Byte block Word block 0x0000 to 0x003F 00x0000 to 0x001F 0000 to 0077 0x0040 to 0x007F 00x0020 to 0x003F 0100 to 0177 0x0080 to 0x00FF 00x0040 to 0x007F 0200 to 0377...
  • Page 92 Chapter 9: Message transfers Files 1 to 7 Virtual address space PC memory address Low word High word File No. File address Byte block Word block 000000 to 177777 0x0001 0x0000 to 0xFFFF 00x0000 to 0x7FFF 000000 to 177777 0x0002 0x0000 to 0xFFFF 00x0000 to 0x7FFF 000000 to 177777...
  • Page 93: Computer Link Function

    (Compatible with Satellite net: SHARP's proprietary message format) The computer link function is SHARP's proprietary transmission message format (request TCD1000, response TCD12000, and can be used between PCs equipped with a SHARP FL-net module (board). 1 Send (request) 2 Receive (response)
  • Page 94: Setting The Computer Link To Send And Receive Data

    Chapter 9: Message transfers [1] Setting the computer link to send and receive data When a computer link message format is used, the sending and receiving details of the transmission buffer are set as follows. 1 Setting the sending details (command) Put the address of the [information section] and [data section] containing the data to be sent in the transmission buffer (base address +2000 to 3777 , and base address +4040 to 4055...
  • Page 95 Chapter 9: Message transfers From the previous page 3 Receive (response details) The details of the data received (response) from the node to communicate is stored in the transmis- sion buffer (base address +0000 to 1777 , and base address +4000 to 4015 Transmission Details buffer address...
  • Page 96: Basic Format Of Computer Link Commands

    Chapter 9: Message transfers [2] Basic format of computer link commands (1) Communication format When a computer link is used, data sent from this node to a target node is referred to as a [com- mand], and data received from the target node by this node is referred to as a [response]. The communication format for commands and responses is as follows.
  • Page 97: Memory Address Expression Format

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (2) Memory address expression format The format expressing memory address contained in the command (command text/response text) is as shown below. ( For more details, refer to "[3] Descriptions of each command.") PSEG : Program segment (corresponds to the file number.) JW20H JW30H JW50H/70H/100H...
  • Page 98: Execution Condition

    Chapter 9: Message transfers BLOC : Bit location on the data memory The register (file register) is to be designated using DSEG and DADR. [Example] Register 09000 : DSEG = 00 , DADR = 0800 030000 of the file 1 : DSEG = 01 , DADR = 3000 The relay address is to be designated using DSEG, DADR, and BLOC.
  • Page 99: Table Of Commands

    Chapter 9: Message transfers (4) Table of commands Command code Contents See page Reading program 9-34 Write program 9-35 Monitoring relay 9-25 The current value monitor of the timers/counters 9-28 Monitoring register 9-29 Set/reset relay 9-26 Set/reset timer/counter 9-27 Write in register 9-30 Write same data to register 9-31...
  • Page 100: Descriptions Of Each Command

    Chapter 9: Message transfers [3] Descriptions of each command This section describes the "COM" settings and the items thereafter of the communication formats (page 9-19). Read out write enable mode (COM=E9 [Format] Ë Command Ë Response RSLT WMOD = E9 WMOD = 00 : Mode 0 (All memory write-disabled)
  • Page 101 Chapter 9: Message transfers Selecting the write enable mode COM = F9 [Format] Ë Command WMOD Ë Response RSLT = F9 WMOD = 00 : Mode 0 (All memory write-disabled) : Mode 1 (Only the data memory write-enabled) : Mode 2 (All memory write-enabled) [Function] - Selecting the write enable mode.
  • Page 102 Chapter 9: Message transfers Monitoring relay (COM = 20 [Format] Ë Command COM DSEG DADR DADR BLOC Ë Response RSLT DSEG DADR DADR BLOC DATA = 20 DSED = Segment (00 to 07, 10 to 2C See page 9-20. DADR = Byte address (0000 to FFFF See page 9-20.
  • Page 103 Chapter 9: Message transfers Set/reset relay (COM = 30 [Format] Ë Command COM DSEG DADR DADR BLOC DATA Ë Response RSLT DSEG DADR DADR BLOC = 30 DSED = Segment (00 to 07, 10 to 2C See page 9-20. DADR = Byte address (0000 to FFFF See page 9-20.
  • Page 104 Chapter 9: Message transfers Set/reset timer/counter (COM = 32 [Format] Ë Command COM TADR TADR DATA Ë Response RSLT TADR TADR = 32 TADR = Timer-counter number (0000 to 03FF See page 9-21. L, H DATA = Set/reset data (00 : reset, 01 : set) [Function]...
  • Page 105 Chapter 9: Message transfers The current value monitor of the timers/counters (COM = 23 [Format] Ë Command COM TADR TADR Ë Response ..RSLT TADR TADR DATA ..DATA ATTR ATTR = 23 TADR = Timer and counter number (0000 to 03FF See page 9-21.
  • Page 106 Chapter 9: Message transfers Monitoring register COM = 24 [Format] Ë Command COM DSEG DADR DADR Ë Response ..RSLT DSEG DADR DADR DATA DATA = 24 DSEG = Segment (00 to 07, 10 to 2C See page 9-20. DADR = Byte address (0000 to FFFF See page 9-20.
  • Page 107 Chapter 9: Message transfers Write in register (COM = 34 [Format] Ë Command ..COM DSEG DADR DADR DATA DATA Ë Response COM RSLT DSEG DADR DADR = 34 DSEG = Segment (00 to 07, 10 to 2C See page 9-20. DADR = Byte address (0000 to FFFF...
  • Page 108 Chapter 9: Message transfers Write same data to register (COM = 35 [Format] Ë Command COM DSEG DADR DADR DATA Ë Response COM RSLT DSEG DADR DADR = 35 DSEG = Segment (00 to 07, 10 to 2C See page 9-20. DADR = Byte address (0000 to FFFF...
  • Page 109 Chapter 9: Message transfers Read out the system memory (COM = 44 [Format] Ë Command SEG SADR SADR Ë Response ..RSLT SEG SADR SADR DATA DATA = 44 = Segment (08 SADRL,H = System memory address (0000 to 047F See page 9-21.
  • Page 110 Chapter 9: Message transfers Write to the system memory (COM = 54 [Format] Ë Command ..SEG SADR SADR DATA DATA Ë Response COM RSLT SEG SADR SADR = 54 = Segment (08 SADR = System memory address (0000 to 047F See page 9-21.
  • Page 111 Chapter 9: Message transfers Reading program (COM = 04 [Format] Ë Command PSEG PADR PADR Ë Response ..COM RSLT PSEG PADR PADR DATA DATA = 04 PSEG = Program segment (08 , 09 See page 9-20. PADR = Program address (0000 to 7DFF See page 9-20.
  • Page 112 Chapter 9: Message transfers Write program (COM = 14 [Format] Ë Command COM PSEG PADR PADR DATA DATA Ë Response COM RSLT PSEG PADR PADR = 14 PSEG = Program segment (08 , 09 See page 9-20. PADR = Program address (0000 to 7DFF See page 9-20.
  • Page 113 Chapter 9: Message transfers Read date (COM = A2 [Format] Ë Command Ë Response RSLT = A2 = Year (express lower two digits of Western year, 00 to 99 = Month (01 to 12 = Date (01 to 31 = Day of week (00 : Sunday, 01 : Monday, 02 : Tuesday, 03...
  • Page 114 Chapter 9: Message transfers Set date (COM = B2 [Format] Ë Command Ë Response RSLT = B2 = Year (express lower two digits of Western year in BCD. 00 to 99 = Month (01 to 12 = Date (01 to 31 = Day of week (00 : Sunday, 01 : Monday, 02...
  • Page 115 Chapter 9: Message transfers Read time (COM = A3 [Format] Ë Command Ë Response RSLT = A3 = Hour to 23 : BCD) = Minute to 59 : BCD) = Second to 59 : BCD) [Function] - Read time data. [Execution condition] - Write enable mode : Mode 0, mode 1 and mode 2...
  • Page 116 Chapter 9: Message transfers Set time (COM = B3 [Format] Ë Command CTRL Ë Response = Hour to 23 : BCD) = Minute to 59 : BCD) = Second to 59 : BCD) CTRL = Control data : Run clock : Stop clock [Function] - Write time data...
  • Page 117 Chapter 9: Message transfers Monitor PC operation status (COM = E8 [Format] Ë Command COM MODE Ë Response RSLT MODE = E8 MODE = 00 : Operating : Stopped operation by an instruction from other module. : Stopped operation by an instruction from this module. [Function] - Monitor PC run/stop status.
  • Page 118 Chapter 9: Message transfers Halt and release halting of PC(COM = F8 [Format] Ë Command COM MODE Ë Response RSLT MODE = F8 MODE = 00 : Release halt : Halt [Function] - Halt/release halting of PC operation. [Execution condition] - Write enable mode : Mode 0, mode 1 and mode 2 - PC operation status...
  • Page 119: Computer Link Error Code Table

    Chapter 9: Message transfers [4] Computer link error code table RSLT Details (Hexadecimal) Normally end Format error PC does not stop operation Verify error of write command. Time out while accessing memory. Tried to set/reset TMR/CNT while PC stops operation. Miss match write enable mode.
  • Page 120: Two-layer Communication With The Ethernet

    FL-net Command line (JW-20FL5/20FLT) [An example of using the JW-20FL5/20FLT] - When making a two-layer communication with the FL-net, the frame needs to contain the information including the source, transit stations, and destination, and slot number (i.e. designating the communi- cation path).
  • Page 121 Chapter 9: Message transfers Note The two-layer communication is possible only with the computer link to the module on the FL-net from the host computer on the Ethernet via transit stations. Communication in the reverse direction, or the computer link from the host computer on the FL-net to this module, is not possible. Example: In the following example as shown in the diagram, the expansion header needs to be as follows.
  • Page 122: Remote Programming And Remote Monitor Functions

    FL-net FL-net * The JW20H (JW-20FL5/20FLT) cannot be used as a junction station ("n+2" station or "m "station). Use a JW30H (JW-20FL5/20FLT) or a JW50H/70H/100H (JW-50FL). Using a support tool that is connected to node "n," you can do the following.
  • Page 123: Example Operation

    (JW-100SP) Connection cable RESET (JW-22KC/24KC) (JW-20FL5) [For connection with the JW- 50FL, use the ZW-3KC.] 2 Communication settings Set the JW-100SP communication settings to "network" and enable remote programming and remote monitoring. Start the JW-100SP Click [Setting] on the menu bar.
  • Page 124 Chapter 9: Message transfers 3 Network settings Select whether a node (target station) that will be used to execute remote programming and remote monitoring is on a standard network connection or an extended connection. In the figure below, nodes numbered 10 to 12 are standard connections. Nodes numbered 1 to 3 are extended network connections.
  • Page 125: Chapter 10: Communication Control

    Chapter 10: Communication Control Chapter 10: Communication Control A participating node list flag, an operation status flag, error status flag, local node management table, participating nodes management table, and network management table are set up in the communica- tion control area of the JW-50FL. (Complete setting procedure for the JW-50FL =>...
  • Page 126: Participating Nodes List Flag

    Chapter 10: Communication Control [1] Participating nodes list flag Shows the participation status of each node in the network Node number (correspond to bit number of each address) *2 Address +000 +001 +002 +003 +004 +005 +006 +007 +010 +011 +012 +013 +014...
  • Page 127: Operation Status Flag

    Chapter 10: Communication Control [2] Operation status flag Shows the operation information for each node Node number (correspond to bit number of each address) *2 Address +040 +041 +042 +043 +044 +045 +046 +047 +050 +051 +052 +053 +054 +055 +056 +057 +060...
  • Page 128: Error Status Flag

    Chapter 10: Communication Control [3] Error status flag Shows the error information for each node Node number (correspond to bit number of each address) *2 Address +100 +101 +102 +103 +104 +105 +106 +107 +110 +111 +112 +113 +114 +115 +116 +117 +120...
  • Page 129: Local Node Management Table

    Chapter 10: Communication Control [4] Local node management table This section shows the information about the local node as part of the network control information. Corresponding Address Details header information +140 Node number +141 Reserved area +142 to 153 Node name (facility name) +154 to 165 Vendor name +166 to 177...
  • Page 130: Participating Node Management Table

    Chapter 10: Communication Control [5] Participating node management table Shows the information for the node numbers at address offset +300 for each table. Corresponding Address Details header information +224 to 225 Common memory (area 1) storage address C_AD1 +226 to 227 Common memory (area 1) storage size C_SZ1 +230 to 231...
  • Page 131: Chapter 11: Send/receive Function

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function The SEND/RECEIVE functions are exclusive SHARP functions. These can only be used between PCs equipped with FL-net modules (board). Note: The SEND/RECEIVE functions can be used only when a JW30H, JW50H/70H/100H, or a J- board (Z-500 series) is used as the host PC.
  • Page 132: Operation Of Send/receive Instruction

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function 11-1 Operation of SEND/RECEIVE instruction [1] SEND This function operates by the combination of F-203 (OPCH) and F-204 (SEND). (1) When the module is used (host PC: JW30H, J-board (Z-500 series)) F-203 CH-ST fileN OPCH F-204 SEND : Module No.
  • Page 133: When The Module Is Used (host Pc: Jw50h/70h/100h)

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function (2) When the module is used (host PC: JW50H/70H/100H) F-203 PORT- CH-ST fileN OPCH F-204 SEND PORT : Port number on which the JW-50FL is installed (0 to 7) : Channel number within the specified port number (0 to 3) In the PC program, the same port number can be called 4 0000 to 1577 b0000 to b1777...
  • Page 134 Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function Sample of program (for the JW30H) When transferring 8 bytes of data from source station register 1000 to the register 09000 of the target station number 3 : Local node JW-20FL Module No. Switch : 2 Channel used 00000 F-44...
  • Page 135: Receive

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function [2] RECEIVE This function operates by the combination of F-203 (OPCH) and F-205 (RCV). (1) When the module is used (host PC: JW30H, J-board (Z-500 series)) F-203 CH-ST fileN OPCH F-204 SEND 0000 to 1577 : Module No. switch set value (0 to 6) of the communication 2000 to 7577 module b0000 to b1777...
  • Page 136: When The Module Is Used (host Pc: Jw50h/70h/100h)

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function (2) When the module is used (host PC: JW50H/70H/100H) F-203 PORT- CH-ST fileN OPCH F-204 SEND PORT : Port number on which the JW-50FL is installed (0 to 7) : Channel number within the specified port number (0 to 3) In the PC program, the same port number can be called 4 times, once for each channel (CH0, CH1, CH2, and CH3).
  • Page 137 Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function Sample of program (for the JW30H) When transferring 8 bytes of data from source station register 1000 to the register 09000 of the target station number 3 : Local node JW-20FL Module No. Switch : 2 Channel used 00000 F-44...
  • Page 138: Timeout Time For Send/receive Instructions

    Chapter 11: SEND/RECEIVE function 11-2 Timeout time for SEND/RECEIVE instructions Enter a timeout time for the SEND/RECEIVE functions in the parameter at address 60 Timeout time parameter Address Detail Timeout time for SEND/RECEIVE instructions (0.1 to 25.5 sec.) - The specified timeout time will be effective for all target nodes. - The allowable range is 0.01 (0.1 sec.) to 255 (25.5 sec.), in decimal notation.
  • Page 139: Chapter 12: Parameters

    Chapter 12: Parameters Chapter 12: Parameters This chapter describes the parameters that can be set in the module. The parameter area is set in the control module (CPU board). "12-3 How to set parameters." 12-1 Table of parameters Reference Address Details page IP address...
  • Page 140: Details Of Each Of The Parameters

    1000 (request computer link function: SHARP's proprietary function) 1001 (request remote function: SHARP's proprietary function) Transmission 1002 to 1199 messages 1200 (response of computer link function: SHARP's proprietary function) 1201 (response of remote function: SHARP's proprietary function) 1202 to 59999 (Transmission buffer... : Used,...
  • Page 141: How To Set Parameters

    12-3 How to set parameters [1] When the JW-20FL5/20FLT or Z-366J is used Set parameters of JW-20FL5/20FLT and Z-336J as optional parameters of the control module (CPU board). Determine the area of the optional parameters using the module No. switch set value of JW- 20FL5/20FLT and Z-336J.
  • Page 142: When The Jw-50fl Is Used

    Chapter 12: Parameters [2] When the JW-50FL is used Set the parameters for the JW-50FL in the system memory of the control module. Select the parameter (system memory) area using the SW3 switch on the JW-50FL. (Details See the next page. Switch SW3 See page 4-4.) Switch SW3 setting Parameter address...
  • Page 143 Chapter 12: Parameters - Parameter addresses on the JW-50FL Depending on the setting of switch SW3 on the JW-50FL, the addresses of the parameters (in system memory) will vary, as shown below. In this manual, the parameter addresses in the left column of the tables are expressed in their common form.
  • Page 144: Chapter 13: Troubleshooting

    Chapter 13: Troubleshooting Chapter 13: Troubleshooting 13-1 Before you conclude that the machine is faulty Check item Description Check whether the modules and boards are installed properly. Are the switches on the module and boards set properly? Check whether the network IP addresses are set properly. Are the common memory areas set properly? Check for loose connections on modules and boards.
  • Page 145: General Network Problems And Countermeasures

    Chapter 13: Troubleshooting 13-2 General network problems and countermeasures [1] Problems concerning the network and appropriate countermeasures (when unable to communicate) Symptom Check points Check details Countermeasure Is the indicator on the power supply lit? Whether main power lamps of communication modules are lit? Is the main power lamp on the AUI power Check and reconnect...
  • Page 146: Problems Concerning The Network And Appropriate Countermeasures (when Communications Are Unstable)

    Chapter 13: Troubleshooting [2] Problems concerning the network and appropriate countermeasures (when communications are unstable) Symptom Check points Check details Countermeasures Make sure the external conductive Ground properly, according shields of all the coaxial cables are to section 15-6. connected to ground at one point Are the shield wires of the AUI Ground according to the cables properly connected to...
  • Page 147: How To Check An Ip Address Using The Ping Function On A Personal Computer

    Chapter 13: Troubleshooting [3] How to check an IP address using the Ping function on a personal computer Even without specialized tools, such as the FL-net network analyzer, you can check the connections and IP addresses of FL-net equipment using an ordinary personal computer running Windows95 etc. The method for using the Ping function is described below.
  • Page 148: General Precautions Related To The Fl-net

    Chapter 13: Troubleshooting 13-3 General precautions related to the FL-net For details about the FL-net transfer route standards, see the previous section and IEEE802.3. In addi- tion, the following limitations and precautions should be noted. Description Do not place communication data from other Ethernet devices on the FL-net communication cables.
  • Page 149: Error Indicators On The Display Panel

    (LED display) of the module. Find the cause of the error by looking up the error code that is displayed. Then take the appropriate countermeasures (resetting the param- eters, etc.) JW-50FL JW-20FL5 DC12V TEST (JW-20FL5)
  • Page 150: Chapter 14: Specifications

    Chapter 14: Specifications Chapter 14: Specifications 14-1 JW-20FL5/20FLT [1] General specifications Specifications Item JW-20FL5 JW-20FLT PC models to use JW20H/30H Storage temperature -20 to +70˚ C Ambient operating 0 to +55˚ C temperature Ambient humidity 35 to 90% RH (without condensing) Equivalent to JIS C 0911: Vibration test: width 0.15 mm (10 to 58 Hz),...
  • Page 151: External Dimension Drawings

    Chapter 14: Specifications [3] External dimension drawings JW-20FL5 JW - 20FL5 LN TX RX 12V T PE HE S7 S6 S5 S4 S3 S2 S1 S0 Basic rack panel (Unit: mm) RESET JW-20FLT JW - 20FLT Basic rack panel (Unit: mm)
  • Page 152: Z-336j

    Chapter 14: Specifications 14-2 Z-336J [1] General specifications Item Specifications PC models to use J-board Storage temperature -20 to +70˚ C Ambient operating 0 to +55˚ C temperature Ambient humidity 35 to 90% RH (without condensing) Equivalent to JIS C 0911: Vibration test: width 0.15 mm (10 to 58 Vibration resistance Hz), 9.8 m/s (58 to 150 Hz), (2 hours each on the X, Y, Z axes)
  • Page 153: Jw-50fl

    Chapter 14: Specifications 14-3 JW-50FL [1] General specifications Item Specifications Host PC Install in optional slots on the JW50/70H/100H (max. 5 units) *1 Storage temperature -20 to +70˚ C Ambient operating 0 to +55˚ C temperature Ambient humidity 35 to 90% RH (without condensing) Equivalent to JIS C 0911: Vibration test: width 0.15 mm (10 to 58 Vibration resistance Hz), 9.8 m/s...
  • Page 154: External Dimension Drawings

    Chapter 14: Specifications (2) FL-net specifications Item Specifications Communication control method Master-less token method Number of stations supported Maximum 254 Cyclic transfer (n: n, 8K bits + 8K words) Communication function Message transfer (1: 1, 1: n) Maximum data length of one frame is 1K bytes [3] External dimension drawings JW-50FL DC12V...
  • Page 155: Chapter 15: Appendix

    Chapter 15: Appendix Chapter 15: Appendix 15-1 System configuration guide [1] Brief description of the Ethernet Ethernet is a standardized LAN (Local Area Network) arrangement used to communicate between personal computers and printers. It prescribes the communication data format, cables and connectors to use.
  • Page 156: 10base5 Specifications

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] 10BASE5 Specifications 10BASE5 is a connection method for creating an Ethernet network using a coaxial cable approximately 10 mm thick (The thick cable is also called the "yellow cable"). The "10" in "10BASE5" refers to a data transfer speed of 10Mbps.
  • Page 157: 10base-t Specifications

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] 10BASE-T Specifications 10BASE-T is a connection method for creating an Ethernet network using twisted pair cables. The "10" in "10BASE-T" refers to the data transfer speed of 10Mbps. The word "BASE" means that the data transfer system is a "base band system." The "-T" refers to the twisted pair cable that is used to carry the data.
  • Page 158: Other Ethernet Specifications

    Chapter 15: Appendix [4] Other Ethernet Specifications (1) 10BASE2 10BASE2 is a connection method for creating an Ethernet network using a coaxial cable approxi- mately 5 mm thick (This cable is also called a "Thin cable"). The "10" in "10BASE2" refers to a data transfer speed of 10Mbps.
  • Page 159: Examples Of System Configurations

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-2 Examples of system configurations [1] Small scale configuration Using a single, multi-port transceiver or hub, you can construct a network system connecting a few devices. Multi-port transceiver AUI cable (Maximum cable length: 50 m) (a) Using a multi-port transceiver Twisted pair cable [UTP: Category 5] (Maximum cable length: 100 m) (b) Using a hub...
  • Page 160: Basic Configuration

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] Basic configuration Connect several multi-port transceivers and hubs to a single coaxial cable, and construct a network of dozens of devices. Coaxial cable (Maximum cable length: 500 m) Termination Ground resistor terminal Single port transceiver AUI cable (maximum cable length: 50 m) Multi-port transceiver Twisted pair cable...
  • Page 161: Configuration Of A Large-scale Network

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] Configuration of a large-scale network By connecting several 10BASE5 network segments using repeaters, you can construct a network con- sisting of several hundred devices. Coaxial cable (Maximum cable length: 500 m) AUI cable Multi-port (maximum cable length: 50 m) transceiver Repeater - A maximum of 50m total cable...
  • Page 162: Configuration Of A Long Distance Distribution System

    Chapter 15: Appendix [4] Configuration of a long distance distribution system When constructing a large-scale network, if the distance between network segments exceeds the limit of the 10BASE5 cable (500 m), you can construct a network up to 2 km long by connecting optical repeaters between network segments.
  • Page 163: Configuration Of Local Concentrations

    Chapter 15: Appendix [5] Configuration of local concentrations In a location where several dozen devices are concentrated in close proximity, a network system can be constructed using a star coupling hub. Star coupling hub Twisted pair cable [UTP: Category 5] (Maximum cable length 100 m) An example of a configuration for a local concentration of devices...
  • Page 164: Configuration Combining Local And Long Distance Distribution

    Chapter 15: Appendix [6] Configuration combining local and long distance distribution In the basic configuration, if a specific controller is located a long distance away, or if there is a high voltage power source or noise generating source near the network, divide the network into two seg- ments and connect an optical cable between the two segments.
  • Page 165: Principles Of The Fl-net System

    Chapter 15: Appendix [7] Principles of the FL-net system The goal of an FL-net is real-time communication between controllers, such as programmable control- lers, robot controllers, and numeric control devices, in production systems. The FL-net constructs a token passing mechanism using an instantaneous information transfer based on Ethernet UDP/IP protocols to execute cyclic and message communications.
  • Page 166: Definition Of Network Systems

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-3 Definition of network systems [1] Communication protocol standards The term "Communication protocol" refers to the rules for exchanging information between systems on a particular communication circuit. The communication protocols used by FL-net conform to the follow- ing standards.
  • Page 167: Physical Implementations Of An Fl-net

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] Physical implementations of an FL-net There are five physical implementations of an Ethernet network that support a 10M bps data transfer speed. They are 10BASE5, 10BASE2, 10BASE-T, 10BASE-F, and 10BROAD36 (this is not common/). In addition to these implementations, a 100M bps Ethernet transmission speed is also available. The FL-net supports 10BASE5 (recommended), 10BASE2, and 10BASE-T hardware.
  • Page 168: Fl-net Sub Net Mask

    Chapter 15: Appendix [5] FL-net sub net mask The sub net mask on an FL-net is always "255.255.255.0." The user does not need to set this sub net value. This value is identical to the original network address section and the device address section of the class C.
  • Page 169: Fl-net Data Format

    Chapter 15: Appendix [8] FL-net data format (1) Outline of the FL-net data format Data that are sent and received over the FL-net are packed in each layer of the communication protocol as follows. Less than 1024 bytes User data FL-net header User data UDP header...
  • Page 170 Chapter 15: Appendix One frame of FL-net data that can be monitored in a communication circuit is shown below. In the example below, 128 bytes of cyclic data is being transferred. Ethernet header IP header UDP header FL-net header User data Sample frame of FL-net data 15-16...
  • Page 171: Fl-net Header Format

    Chapter 15: Appendix (2) FL-net header format The FL-net header is 64 to 96 bytes long. 64 to 96 byes Less than 1024 bytes FL-net header Cyclic/message data Lower layer FA link data header Less than 1500 byes FL-net header An FL-net header is added to every frame, to comply with the FL-net protocol.
  • Page 172 Chapter 15: Appendix Each message has a transaction code for requesting or responding in its header. It is used to identify the message frame. Table of transaction codes Transaction code Application 0 to 5999 Transmission message 60000 to 64999 Reserved 65000 Cyclic header (with token) 65001...
  • Page 173: Network Control Of The Fl-net

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-4 Network control of the FL-net [1] Token control of the FL-net (1) Token Basically, a node can send data whenever it holds a token. A node can send data without holding a token when it reissues a token due to a time out of the token monitor time, or when it issues a participation request frame so that it can begin participating in the network.
  • Page 174: Flow Of The Token

    Chapter 15: Appendix (2) Flow of the token Basically, only one token exists on the same network. If there are two or more tokens on the same network, the token from the node with the smaller node number takes priority, and the other tokens are discarded. A frame with a token (a token frame) consists of a destination node number and the node number of the node sending the token.
  • Page 175: Token And Data

    Chapter 15: Appendix (3) Token and data There are six data patterns that can be attached to and sent with a token, as follows. Token and data Details Item No data to attach Only sends the token Token Cyclic data only Only attaches cyclic data to the token Token + Cyclic data Sends only cyclic data.
  • Page 176: Interval Between Frames (minimum Allowable Interval Between Frames)

    Chapter 15: Appendix (4) Interval between frames (minimum allowable interval between frames) The time interval after a node receives a token until it sends a frame is referred to as the "frame interval." The minimum interval that each node must wait for, before sending a frame, is referred to as the "minimum allowable frame interval."...
  • Page 177: Joining And Leaving An Fl-net Network

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] Joining and leaving an FL-net network (1) Participation in the FL-net Each node monitors the circuit while the FL-net starts up, to determine the interval of a participating token detection time. When that time has elapsed, if it does not receive a token, the node concludes that the network is just starting and tries to join the network as it starts.
  • Page 178 Chapter 15: Appendix Participation in an existing network When the JW-50FL receives a token within the participating token detection time, it concludes that it is linked to a network that is already established, and waits for a participation request frame up to three token cycles.
  • Page 179: Leaving An Fl-net Network

    Chapter 15: Appendix (2) Leaving an FL-net network Each node checks the node numbers each time it receives a token frame. If the JW-50FL does not receive a token frame from a certain node three times in a row, the node is regarded as having left the network.
  • Page 180: Node Status Control

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] Node status control The status control of nodes consists of a local node management table, a participating nodes manage- ment table, and a network management table. An outline of each is shown below. Outline of each table used for node status control Name Details Local node management table...
  • Page 181: Fl-net Participating Node Management Table

    Chapter 15: Appendix [5] FL-net Participating node management table (1) Basic functions The status of each node is monitored by the management table which each node keeps for itself. This table handles the data used to control each node participating in the network. The operation is outlined below.
  • Page 182: Status Management Of The Fl-net

    Chapter 15: Appendix [6] Status management of the FL-net (1) Basic functions Control parameters related to the network. (2) Management data Network management table Number Item Description of bytes Token latch node number 1 byte Currently token staying node. Minimum frame interval 1 byte In units of 100 µsec.
  • Page 183: Parts Needed To Build A Network

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-5 Parts needed to build a network [1] Parts needed to configure an Ethernet The parts needed to configure an Ethernet are shown below. For details about these parts, see section [2] and [3]. Transceiver cable Coaxial cable Ground Multi-port (AUI cable)
  • Page 184: Parts Related To 10base5

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] Parts related to 10BASE5 (1) Transceiver A transceiver converts signals flowing through coaxial cables (yellow cables) into signals that the nodes can use, and vise-versa. When you want to connect a transceiver, it should be installed at a distance of 2.5 m (or a multiple of 2.5 m) from any other transceiver.
  • Page 185: Coaxial Cable

    Chapter 15: Appendix Tap connector M6 bolts 141 LAN transceiver Installation of a tap in the main case of a transceiver Transceiver (tap type) To connect a tap type transceiver to a coaxial cable, make a hole in the coaxial cable insulation and insert a probe that will make contact with center conductor in the coaxial cable.
  • Page 186 Chapter 15: Appendix Transceiver (connector type) Install the transceiver connector on a coaxial cable. Then, connect the transceiver to the connector. No special tools are needed for this connection, and it is easy to install and remove. The transceiver must be supplied with power from a node through a transceiver cable. Coaxial cable Transceiver Transceiver cable...
  • Page 187 Chapter 15: Appendix Multi-port transceiver The tap type transceiver and connector type transceiver can only be used to connect one terminal. A multi-port transceiver can connect a number of nodes. In practice, 4- and 8-port type transceivers are available. Coaxial cable Transceiver cable (AUI cable) Transceiver cable...
  • Page 188 Chapter 15: Appendix Repeater A repeater is used to relay or transfer signals. It is used for communication between segments using different media, to extend the length of a segment, to increase the number terminals that can be connected, or to convert from one cable type to another. A repeater reads the electronic signals from one segment, amplifies the signal as required, and sends it to all the segments connected to the repeater.
  • Page 189: Coaxial Connectors

    Chapter 15: Appendix (2) Coaxial cable Coaxial cable consists of a center conductor and an external conductive layer that functions as a shield. Coaxial cables used for Ethernet connections must have 50 ohms of impedance. An RG58A/ U cable can be used with 10BASE2 and a yellow cable can be used with 10BASE5. The maximum length of a single 10BASE2 cable is 185 m and the maximum length of a 10BASE5 cable is 500 m.
  • Page 190: Relay Connector

    Chapter 15: Appendix (4) Relay connector This connector is used to make a connection between coaxial cables. Although the repeater is used to extend a segment, a relay connector is used to extend a cable in the same segment. Be careful because the use of multiple relay connectors on the same line may change the electrical resistance of the coaxial cable.
  • Page 191: Ground Terminal Of A Coaxial Cable

    Chapter 15: Appendix (6) Ground terminal of a coaxial cable This device is used to prevent communication data errors that may be caused by electrical noise on a coaxial cable. There should only be one ground point on any single piece of coaxial cable. Provide class D grounding to connect this device.
  • Page 192: 10base5/10base-t Converter

    Chapter 15: Appendix (8) 10BASE5/10BASE-T converter This converter is used to connect a 10BASE5 cable to a 10BASE-T cable. 10BASE-T connector 10BASE5 connector (female) (male) 10BASE5/10BASE-T converter for Ethernet use Coaxial cable Transceiver cable Transceiver (AUI cable) 10BASE-T Installation of a 10BASE5/10BASE-T converter for Ethernet use. 15-38...
  • Page 193: Coaxial/optical Converter, Repeater

    Chapter 15: Appendix (9) Coaxial/optical converter, repeater This device converts electrical signals on a coaxial cable (10BASE5/10BASE2) into optical signals, and from optical signals to electrical signals. A FOIRL (Fiber Optic Inter Repeater Link) is used to connect repeaters in a 10BASE-FL network. The device is used to prevent noise and extend the length of a cable.
  • Page 194: 10base-t Related Items

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] 10BASE-T related items (1) Hub A hub connects a number of twisted pair cables in a10BASE-T installation and it has a repeater function. Some types of hubs have a 10BASE2 interface or a cascade interface. When you need to cascade hubs, you can use up to 4 layers.
  • Page 195: 10base-t Cable

    Chapter 15: Appendix (2) 10BASE-T cable This cable is also called "twisted pair cable" or "twisted couple cable." Two copper wires are twisted around each other as a pair. These pairs are bundled together in sets and covered with external insulating cover.
  • Page 196: Installation Of An Fl-net Network

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-6 Installation of an FL-net network [1] Wiring 10BASE5 coaxial cable (1) Laying and connecting cables Various installation methods can be used, depending on local conditions. The major wiring methods are shown below. Exposed wiring on a wall. Free access, wiring beneath the floor.
  • Page 197 Chapter 15: Appendix (3) Major coaxial cable installation specifications The primary coaxial cable installation requirements are as follows: Coaxial cable installation information Item Specifications and details When routing a cable Minimum 100 mm radius in corners When securing a cable Minimum 100 mm radius in corners Cable tension Max.
  • Page 198 Chapter 15: Appendix Remove the aluminum braided screen around the cable 1. Remove aluminum screen around the cable * Remove all the aluminum tape on this part. 2. Remove the aluminum tape on the cable * Remove the aluminum tape at the two positions shown above. Strip the insulation material around the conductor.
  • Page 199 Chapter 15: Appendix Assemble the coaxial cable connector Note: The gap between the center pin and the insulator should not be larger than 1 mm. The insula- tion material must be intact. (5) Transceiver Installing and securing a tap type transceiver The method and location for installing a transceiver depends on the local conditions.
  • Page 200 Chapter 15: Appendix Handling and installation procedures 1. Names of the parts in the transceiver Markers every 2.5 m on the coaxial cable cover. Install a probe at this position. Coaxial cable Shield crimping pin Securing screw Tap case Coaxial probe Frame Main case of the HLT-200TC Tap screw...
  • Page 201 Chapter 15: Appendix 2. Insert a shield crimping pin into the tap case. 3. Tighten the case screw so that it will not loosen. 4. Place the tap case at one of the markers located every 2.5 m on the coaxial cable. Insert a frame into the slide and secure the case using the screw.
  • Page 202 Chapter 15: Appendix Insert into the transceiver tap frame and coaxial cable Note: When inserting a frame, make sure that the cable is at the center of the crimping pin. Tighten the screw a little and see if the clamping part is tilted very much. If so, loosen the screw and reposition the cable so that frame is at the center of the tap.
  • Page 203 Chapter 15: Appendix 6. Tighten the core probe using a special spanner. Note: That completes the installation of a tap connector. The test method for a proper installation is shown below. - The shield-crimping pin shall be shorted. - When a terminator is installed at both ends of a coaxial cable, the resistance between the core probe and the shield crimping pin] should be 25 ohms.
  • Page 204 Chapter 15: Appendix 8. If you think the shield-crimping pin or the core probe may be bent, pull them out. If they are inserted improperly, you may be able to see that they are bent. In this case, realign them. Insert the tap screw in the hole in the top of the case, and tighten it.
  • Page 205 Chapter 15: Appendix (6) Installation of terminators (terminating resistors) Insulation on connectors and terminators Shown below is a method for insulating a relay connector and an "L" type connector. Coaxial connector Straight sleeve (type N) Insulation sleeve cut away Insulation tape Insulation sleeve Coaxial cable Insulating a relay connector...
  • Page 206 Chapter 15: Appendix (7) Installation of a transceiver cable An example of how to install a transceiver and transceiver cable is shown below. An example of how to install parts on a wall An example of how to install parts in the ceiling and below the floor An example of how to install a transceiver and transceiver cable Example of an installation on a wall (1) Coaxial cable...
  • Page 207 Chapter 15: Appendix An example of an installation on a wall (2) Wooden board (1600 x 180 x 1.0) An example of an installation on a wall (3) Wooden board (180 x 180 x 1.0) An example of an installation on a wall (4) Installation example of a transceiver and transceiver cable: 1 15-53...
  • Page 208 Chapter 15: Appendix An example of an installation in a ceiling An example of an installation below a floor Installation example of a transceiver and transceiver cable: 2 15-54...
  • Page 209 Chapter 15: Appendix (8) Installation of a ground terminal for a coaxial cable A method for installing a grounding terminal for a coaxial cable is shown below. Set up a single ground point (class 3 or better grounding) using a ground terminal (G-TM). Ground a coaxial cable at any one point.
  • Page 210: 10base-t (utp)

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] 10BASE-T (UTP) (1) How to create a 10BASE-T (UTP) cable Strip the sheath on a 10BASE-T (UTP) cable Terminal arrangement Cut the sheath 40 mm away from the end and untwist the cables. Lay them out in the same T568B T568A order as the terminals.
  • Page 211 Chapter 15: Appendix Insert the UTP cable signal lines into the connector Install the signal lines in the correct order, and check to make sure the wires reach all the way into the connector. Look at the connector from the front, top and bottom. Assembling a UTP cable connector After making sure the signal lines are fully inserted, crimp the connector using a special tool.
  • Page 212: Grounding The Fl-net System

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-7 Grounding the FL-net system [1] Outline of the grounding procedures for the FL-net system This section uses an example of how to ground an FL-net controller control panel when attaching the control panel to the steel frame of a building. In order to ground the control panel to a building frame, the following conditions need to be satisfied.
  • Page 213: Wiring Power Lines And Grounding Equipment

    Chapter 15: Appendix [2] Wiring power lines and grounding equipment This section describes how to wire power lines and ground lines in a distribution panel, or controller panel for the FL-net system. When wiring power lines and making grounds, observe the precautions below. 1.
  • Page 214: Wiring The Power Lines And Grounding The Network Equipment In An Fl-net

    Chapter 15: Appendix [3] Wiring the power lines and grounding the network equipment in an FL-net This section describes how to wire the power lines and ground lines for the network equipment in an FL- net system. When wiring power lines and making ground connections, observe the precautions below. 1.
  • Page 215: Installation Of Network Equipment In An Fl-net

    Chapter 15: Appendix [4] Installation of network equipment in an FL-net Shown below is an example installation of network equipment in an FL-net system. 1. Install a transceiver in a metal box using a wooden board for insulation. The box must have a class D ground.
  • Page 216: Wiring And Grounding Through Wiring Ducts And Conduits

    Chapter 15: Appendix [5] Wiring and grounding through wiring ducts and conduits Shown below are methods for wiring and grounding through wiring ducts and conduits used on an FL- net. Observe the precautions below when wiring 1. When wiring using wiring ducts, separate the power lines and signal lines using a physical separator. The wiring duct itself (including the lid and separator) must be grounded with a class D ground.
  • Page 217: Fl-net Installation Check Sheet

    Chapter 15: Appendix 15-8 FL-net installation check sheet FL-net installation check sheet Communication line name: Station number: Date checked: Item to check Checked by: Are all the connectors securely locked? Are the cable curve radiuses within the specified value? Are the connectors protected by jackets, etc.? Are the wiring DI numbers (line numbers) attached to the lines? Are they correct? Is any communication cable lying under a heavy object?
  • Page 218: Alphabetical Index

    Configuration of local concentrations ................... 15-9 Connection of 10BASE2 ........................ 6-3 Connecting to standard network ....................9-45 Connection of 10BASE5 ........................ 6-8 Connecting the transceiver cable ....................6-2 Connection of JW-20FL5 ....................... 6-2 Connection of JW-50FL ......................... 6-8 Connection of Z-336J ........................6-5...
  • Page 219 Connection/Wiring .......................... 6-1 Control data ..........................15-28 Control message sequence number of the FL-net ..............15-28 Current value monitor of the timers/counters (COM = 23 ) ............9-28 Cyclic transfer and data area ....................... 7-15 Cyclic transfer process ......................... 7-15 Cyclic transfer ......................
  • Page 220 Installation of a transceiver cable ....................15-52 Installation of an FL-net network ....................15-42 Installation of coaxial connectors ....................15-43 Installation of JW-20FL5/20FLT ..................... 5-1 Installation of JW-50FL ........................5-8 Installation of network equipment in an FL-net ................15-61 Installation of terminators (terminating resistors) ............... 15-51 Installation of Z-336J ........................
  • Page 221 Memory address expression format ..................... 9-20 Message other than transmission ....................12-2 Message sending procedures and data reception details .............. 9-2 Message transaction codes and execution conditions ..............9-8 Message transfer ....................7-10, 7-11, 7-19, 9-1 Message transfer process ......................7-19 Monitor PC operation status (COM = E8 ) ................
  • Page 222 Precautions for laying and hooking up ..................15-42 Principles of the FL-net system ....................15-11 Problems and countermeasures (when unable to communicate) ..........13-2 Problems and countermeasures (when communications are unstable) ........13-3 Read byte-block data ........................7-21 Read data (COM = A2 ) ......................
  • Page 223 Specifications ..........................14-1 - JW-20FL5/20FLT ........................14-1 Z-336J ............................14-3 - JW-50FL ............................ 14-4 Start switch ............................ 8-3 Start, stop commands ........................7-27 Status management of the FL-net ..................... 15-28 Sub net mask ..........................15-14 Support messages ........................7-20 System configuration guide ......................15-1 System configuration ........................
  • Page 224 Upper layer status ........................10-5 Use guide ............................7-1 Use of virtual address space and PC memory space ..............9-9 Wiring 10BASE5 coaxial cable ....................15-42 Wiring and grounding through wiring ducts and conduits ............15-62 Wiring power lines and grounding equipment ................15-59 Wiring precautions .........................

This manual also for:

Jw-20fltJw-50flZ-336j

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