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Cisco GRP= Installation And Configuration Note

Gigabit route processor
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Gigabit Route Processor
Installation and Configuration Note
Product Numbers: GRP-B=, GRP=
Document Order Number: DOC-784339=
This hardware installation and configuration note describes the Gigabit Route Processor (GRP), the
route processor for use in Cisco 12000 Series Routers.
Document Contents
Following are the sections in this document:
Corporate Headquarters:
Cisco Systems, Inc., 170 West Tasman Drive, San Jose, CA 95134-1706 USA
Copyright © 1997-2002. Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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  Summary of Contents for Cisco GRP=

  • Page 1: Table Of Contents

    Installation and Configuration Note Product Numbers: GRP-B=, GRP= Document Order Number: DOC-784339= This hardware installation and configuration note describes the Gigabit Route Processor (GRP), the route processor for use in Cisco 12000 Series Routers. Document Contents Following are the sections in this document: Important Information, page 2 •...
  • Page 2: Important Information

    GRP Redundancy When two GRPs are installed in a Cisco 12000 Series Router, one GRP is the active GRP, and the other is the backup, or standby GRP. If the active GRP fails or is removed from the system, the standby GRP detects the failure and initiates a switchover.
  • Page 3: Product Overview

    Cisco IOS Release. Also refer to the Cisco IOS software release notes for additional information. The GRP line card is supported in Cisco IOS Release 11.2(9)GS and later. GRP configurations with 512 MB of route memory are only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=. Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or 12.0(19)ST or later and ROMMON Release 11.2 (181) or later are also required.
  • Page 4 The Cisco IOS software images that run the Cisco 12000 Series Router system reside in Flash memory, which is located on the GRP in the form of a single in-line memory module (SIMM), and on up to two Flash cards (called Flash memory cards or Flash disks), which insert into the two slots (slot 0 and slot 1) on the front of the GRP.
  • Page 5 Storing the Cisco IOS images in Flash memory enables you to download and boot from upgraded Cisco IOS software images remotely or from software images that reside in GRP Flash memory. The Cisco 12000 Series Router system supports downloadable system software for most Cisco IOS software upgrades, which enables you to remotely download, store, and boot from a new Cisco IOS software image.
  • Page 6: Memory Components

    512 KB 1. 64 MB of DRAM serves as a replacement for any DRAM DIMM slot on a minimum configuration of 128 MB (both slots populated) for the GRP. 2. GRP route memory configurations of 512 MB are only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=. Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or 12.0(19)ST or later and ROMMON Release 11.2 (181) or later are also required.
  • Page 7 These kits are available only for Product Number GRP-B=. They are not compatible with any other Cisco product. See MEM-GRP/LC-64= can be used to replace bank 1 or bank 2 in the 128-MB default configuration on Note the GRP line card. Cisco does not recommend using a 64-MB configuration on this card.
  • Page 8: System Status Leds

    Soft Reset Switch A soft reset switch provides a reset to the R5000 software on the GRP. You access the soft reset switch through a small opening in the GRP faceplate. To depress the switch, insert a pape rclip or a similar object into the opening.
  • Page 9: Asynchronous Serial Ports

    Flash Card Slots The GRP includes two Flash card slots. Either slot can support an ATA Flash disk or a linear Flash memory card. Note The GRP only supports +5VDC Flash card devices. It does not support +3.3VDC Flash card devices.
  • Page 10: Preparing For Installation

    • replacement you will perform and that you have all the parts and tools you need. If you plan to replace a GRP, back up your current configuration file to a remote server or to Flash • memory before you remove the GRP. This prevents you from having to reenter all your current configuration information manually.
  • Page 11 Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements FCC Class A Compliance This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment.
  • Page 12 Preparing for Installation Class A Notice for Hungary Warning This equipment is a class A product and should be used and installed properly according to the Hungarian EMC Class A requirements (MSZEN55022). Class A equipment is designed for typical commercial establishments for which special conditions of installation and protection distance are used.
  • Page 13: Preventing Electrostatic Discharge

    • touching board components or connector pins. Place a removed GRP board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding bag. If you plan • to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag.
  • Page 14: Replacing A Grp

    Removing a GRP When you remove a GRP from a slot, be sure to use the ejector levers, which help to ensure that the GRP is fully dislodged from the backplane connector. (See Required Tools and Parts “Removing a GRP”...
  • Page 15 Caution Caution Before you replace the GRP, back up the running configuration to a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) file server or an installed Flash memory card or Flash disk so that you can retrieve it later. If the configuration is not saved, the entire configuration will be lost inside the NVRAM on the removed GRP, and you will have to reenter the entire configuration manually.
  • Page 16 Turn off system power. Step 1 If you are replacing the GRP in a system with one GRP, copy the currently running configuration file to Step 2 a TFTP server or Flash memory so that you can retrieve it later. (See the Memory”...
  • Page 17 ESD damage. Installing a GRP When you install a GRP, be sure to use the ejector levers, which help to ensure that the GRP is fully inserted in the backplane connector. (See inward (toward the center of the GRP), the ejector levers push the GRP into the slot and ensure that the GRP backplane connector is fully seated in the backplane.
  • Page 18: Connecting To The Console Port

    Replacing a GRP Connecting to the Console Port The system console port on the GRP is a DCE DB-25 receptacle for connecting a data terminal, which you must configure. The console port is labeled Console, as shown in console port, check your terminal’s documentation to determine the baud rate of the terminal you plan to use.
  • Page 19 Connecting to the Auxiliary Port The auxiliary port on the GRP is an EIA/TIA-232 DTE, DB-25 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router. The port is labeled Auxiliary. An example of a modem connection is shown in hardware flow control and modem control.
  • Page 20 Replacing a GRP Figure 6 RJ-45 Receptacle and Plug (Horizontal Orientation) 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 RJ-45 receptacle The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage Warning (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the basic rate interface (BRI) circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.
  • Page 21 The MII connection requires an external physical sublayer (PHY) and an external transceiver. Depending on the type of media you use between the MII connection on the GRP and your switch or hub, the network side of your 100BASE-T transceiver should be appropriately equipped—with SC-type or ST-type connectors (for optical fiber), BNC connectors, and so forth.
  • Page 22 Network length (max 1. EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36-compliant. 2. Cisco Systems does not supply Category 5 UTP RJ-45 or 150-ohm STP MII cables or MII transceivers; these items are available commercially. 3. AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.
  • Page 23 Ethernet port. In this example, you cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 via the Ethernet port (E0) on the GRP in Router A; you can only access the hosts and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0. (See dotted arrows in To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of your line cards (in...
  • Page 24: Grp Boot Process Overview

    The GRP, line cards, and CSCs are then powered up. GRP power-on-reset logic delay, which allows power and both local and CSC clocks to stabilize. After the power-on reset is released, the GRP begins to execute the ROM monitor software.
  • Page 25 In a noisy environment, place your hand in front of the exhaust vents to verify that the blower modules are operating. During the GRP boot process, observe the GRP alphanumeric display LEDs, which are located at one Step 3 end of the GRP, near the ejector lever.
  • Page 26 (The physical location of the alphanumeric display LEDs on the line cards is the same as on the GRP, which is shown in Refer to the appropriate line card installation and configuration note for complete details on line card display LED sequences.
  • Page 27: Verifying Interface Status

    The status LEDs on the GRP indicate system and GRP status, which Flash memory card or Flash disk slot is active, which Ethernet connection is in use, and what is occurring on the Ethernet interface. (A successful boot is indicated by the alphanumeric display LEDs as shown in not necessarily mean that the system has reached normal operation.)
  • Page 28: Configuring The Ethernet Interface

    The Ethernet interface does not provide external routing functions; it is primarily designed as a Telnet port into the GRP, and for booting and/or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which the Ethernet interface is directly connected.
  • Page 29 Using Configuration Mode to Configure the Ethernet Interface, page 29 • Using the setup Command Facility to Configure the Ethernet Interface, page 29 • Using Configuration Mode to Configure the Ethernet Interface Use the following procedure to perform a basic configuration of the Ethernet interface in configuration mode: At the privileged-level prompt, enter configuration mode and specify that the console terminal is the Step 1...
  • Page 30: Implementing Additional Configuration And Maintenance Tasks

    Implementing Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks This section contains information on the following additional configuration, troubleshooting, and maintenance tasks: Configuring the Software Configuration Register • Flash Disks and Flash Memory Cards in the GRP • Recovering Lost Password • Upgrading GRP Memory •...
  • Page 31 Boot Field Settings and the boot Command Bits 0 through 3 of the software configuration register form the boot field, specified as a binary number. The factory default configuration register setting for systems and GRP spares is 0x2102. Note Boot field—When the boot field is set to either 0 or 1 (0-0-0-0 or 0-0-0-1), the system ignores any boot...
  • Page 32 International Association (PCMCIA) Flash memory cards or Flash disks located in PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1 on the GRP. If you set the boot field to any bit pattern other than 0 or 1, the system uses the resulting number to form a filename for booting over the network.
  • Page 33 The server creates a default boot filename as part of the automatic configuration process. To form the boot filename, the server starts with the name cisco and adds the octal equivalent of the boot field number, a hyphen, and the processor-type name (GRP). Table 11 lists the default boot filenames.
  • Page 34 Implementing Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks Table 11 Default Boot Filenames (continued) Action/File Name cisco4-GRP cisco5-GRP cisco6-GRP cisco7-GRP cisco10-GRP cisco11-GRP cisco12-GRP cisco13-GRP cisco14-GRP cisco15-GRP cisco16-GRP cisco17-GRP Bit 8 controls the console Break key. Setting bit 8 (the factory default) causes the system to ignore the console Break key.
  • Page 35 Installing and Removing Flash Memory Card or Flash Disk in GRP The GRP has two Flash Card slots (slot 0 and slot 1), into which you can install a linear Flash memory card or an ATA Flash disk. The slots are positioned with slot 0 on the left and slot 1 on the right. (See Figure 14.)
  • Page 36 Both slots can be used at the same time. Use the following procedure to install a Flash memory card or Flash disk: Facing the GRP front panel, hold the Flash memory card or Flash disk with the connector end of the Step 1 card toward the slot and the label facing right.
  • Page 37 The Flash memory card or Flash disk does not insert all the way inside the GRP; a portion of the card Caution remains outside of the slot. Do not attempt to force the card past this point. Use the following procedure to remove a Flash memory card or Flash disk: To eject the card, press the ejector button until the card is free of the connector at the back of the slot.
  • Page 38 After booting your router, insert the Flash memory card or Flash disk into slot 0. (Use the procedure in Step 1 “Installing and Removing Flash Memory Card or Flash Disk in GRP” section on page is not available, use slot 1.
  • Page 39 Cisco IOS software image. Software Commands Associated with Flash Memory Following are software commands related to the onboard Flash memory on the GRP and the Flash memory cards and Flash disks. If using an ATA Flash disk, replace any commands that include a slot0: or slot1: command argument Note with a disk0: or disk1: command argument.
  • Page 40 To enter configuration mode while in the system software image and specify a Flash filename from which to boot, enter the configure terminal command at the enable prompt as follows: Router#configure terminal Flash Disks and Flash Memory Cards in the GRP May 10 1997 09:42:19 myfile1 May 10 1997 05:43:56 todays–config...
  • Page 41 In the preceding example, the exclamation points (!!!) appear as the file is downloaded, and the C characters signify calculation of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC) value, which is a verification that the file has been correctly downloaded to the Flash memory card or Flash disk. Flash Disks and Flash Memory Cards in the GRP 78-4339-09...
  • Page 42 Before you copy a Cisco IOS software image, you must do the following: • Install a formatted Flash memory card or Flash disk in your GRP. Have a bootable Cisco IOS software image in the onboard Flash memory so you can start the router.
  • Page 43 You can also enter the previous command as copy slot1:image.new slot0:. 78-4339-09 Implementing Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks “Software Commands Associated with Flash Memory” section on page in the following procedure and use the command boot system flash Flash Disks and Flash Memory Cards in the GRP 39.)
  • Page 44 Note with a disk0: or disk1: command argument. Use the following procedure to copy a configuration file from GRP NVRAM to a Flash memory card or Flash disk: Use the show boot command to display the current setting for the environmental variable...
  • Page 45 Copying Configuration File from GRP DRAM to Flash Memory Card or Flash Disk Following is an example of copying your running configuration file from GRP DRAM to a Flash memory card or Flash disk in PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1.
  • Page 46 1186 9197156 bytes available (11381148 bytes used) Copying Configuration File from Flash Memory Card or Flash Disk to GRP NVRAM Following is an example of copying your startup configuration file from a Flash memory card or Flash disk in PCMCIA slot 0 or slot 1 back to NVRAM.
  • Page 47 EXEC command. (See Step 11.) Attach an ASCII terminal to the GRP console port. Step 1 Configure the terminal to operate at 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (or to whatever settings Step 2 the console port is set).
  • Page 48 9600 boot: image specified by the boot system command or default to: cisco2-GRP do you wish to change the configuration? y/n [n]: y enable “diagnostic mode”? y/n [n]: enable “use net in IP bcast address”? y/n [n]: enable “load rom after netbootfails”? y/n [n]:...
  • Page 49 This section provides the procedure for increasing the amount of extended data output (EDO) DRAM on a GRP by replacing up to two dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs). The system DRAM resides on up to two DIMMs on the GRP. The DRAM DIMM sockets are U39 (bank 1) and U42 (bank 2). (See Figure 15 The default DRAM configuration is 128 MB (one 128-MB DIMM in U39).
  • Page 50 Implementing Additional Configuration and Maintenance Tasks Each GRP DIMM socket has one plastic lever on one end, which you use to remove the DIMM from Note its socket. (See Figure Before proceeding, ensure that you have the proper tools and ESD-prevention equipment available. To upgrade DRAM, you will install DIMMs in one or two banks (U39 and U42).
  • Page 51: Removing Dimms

    Remove the GRP. (Follow the steps in the Step 3 Place the GRP on an antistatic mat or pad. Step 4 Position the GRP so that the faceplate is toward you, and the backplane connector is away from you. Step 5 (See Figure 15.)
  • Page 52 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to yourself following the instructions that came with the strap. Step 1 Step 2 Place the GRP on an antistatic mat or pad. Step 3 Position the GRP so that the faceplate is toward you and the backplane connector is away from you. (See Figure 15.) Step 4 Remove a new DIMM from the antistatic bag.
  • Page 53: Obtaining Documentation

    Step 9 Checking the DIMM Installation After you install the new DIMMs and replace the GRP, turn on system power and allow the system to reboot. The time required for the system to initialize might vary with different router configurations and Note DRAM configurations.
  • Page 54: Documentation Feedback

    Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by • calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387). Documentation Feedback You can submit e-mail comments about technical documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.
  • Page 55: Obtaining Additional Publications And Information

    Accessing all the tools on the Cisco TAC website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, register at this URL: http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do Opening a TAC Case Using the online TAC Case Open Tool is the fastest way to open P3 and P4 cases.
  • Page 56 This document is to be used in conjunction with the installation and configuration guide for your Cisco 12000 Series Router. CCVP, the Cisco logo, and the Cisco Square Bridge logo are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn is a service mark of Cisco Systems, Inc.;...

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