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USER'S MANUAL
FT//ex
BENUTZERHANDBUCH
apricot
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC

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Table of Contents

   Summary of Contents for Mitsubishi Electric APRICOT FT//EX

  • Page 1 USER'S MANUAL FT//ex BENUTZERHANDBUCH apricot MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC...
  • Page 2 Apricot FT//ex Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 3 It is against the law to copy any disk supplied for any other purpose than the purchaser’s personal use. All rights reserved; no use or disclosure without written consent. Copyright © 1993 Published by Apricot Computers Limited 3500 Parkside Birmingham Business Park B37 7YS MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC Printed in the United Kingdom Part no. 15220231...
  • Page 4: Important Safety Instructions

    IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS Read these instructions carefully. Save these instructions for fu- ture reference. Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the product. Unplug this product from the wall outlet before cleaning. Do not use liquid cleaners or aerosol cleaners. Use a damp cloth for cleaning.
  • Page 5 Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where persons will walk on the cord. 10. If an extension cord is used with this product, make sure that the total ampere rating of the equipment plugged into the extension cord does not exceed the extension cord ampere rating.
  • Page 6 14. Replace battery with the same type as the product’s battery we recommend. Use of another battery may present a risk of fire or explosion. Refer battery replacement to a qualified serviceman. 15. Warning! Battery may explode if not handled properly. Do not recharge, disassemble or dispose of in fire.
  • Page 7 FCC Class B Radio Frequency Interference Statement Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation.
  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    T a b l e C o n t e n t s About This Manual System Housing Getting Started............... 1-1 1.1.1 Selecting a Site ..........1-1 1.1.2 Unpacking the System ........1-2 1.1.3 Positioning the System ........1-3 1.1.4 Moving the System ..........
  • Page 9 SCSI Feature ..............2-9 2.4.1 Using SCSI ............2-9 Jumper Settings ............2-10 Error Messages ............2-12 2.6.1 Software Error Messages ........ 2-12 2.6.2 System Error Messages ........2-12 2.6.3 Correcting Error Conditions ......2-15 Address Maps and Interrupt Table ......2-16 2.7.1 System Memory Map ........
  • Page 10 5.1.4 System Memory ..........5-6 5.1.5 Math Coprocessor ..........5-6 5.1.6 Video Display ............. 5-6 5.1.7 Communication Settings........5-7 5.1.8 Memory Test ............5-7 Basic System Configuration (Pentium CPU) ....5-8 Advanced System Configuration (486 CPU) ....5-9 5.3.1 Shadow RAM ........... 5-11 5.3.2 Internal Cache ..........
  • Page 11 Advanced Configuration ..........6-7 6.4.1 Advanced Configuration Menu Selections ..6-9 6.4.2 Using the Advanced Configuration Menus ..6-14 6.4.3 Configuring an ISA Option Without a CFG file 6-18 Solving Resource Conflicts ......... 6-18 Options in using the ECU ..........6-19 6.6.1 Starting the ECU From a Fixed Disk ....
  • Page 12 L i s t F i g u r e s Standing the System Alone ..........1-3 Standing the System Against a Wall ........1-4 Moving the System .............. 1-5 Front Panel ................1-6 Rear Panel ................1-8 Connecting the Keyboard ..........1-10 Connecting a Mouse ............
  • Page 13 System Board Layout ............2-3 Installing a SIMM ..............2-6 System Board Jumper Settings ......... 2-10 486 CPU Board Layout ............3-2 486 CPU Board Jumper Locations ........3-6 Pentium CPU Board Layout ..........4-2 Pentium CPU Board Jumper Locations ....... 4-6 Advanced Configuration (System—Open Selected) ...........
  • Page 14 L i s t T a b l e s Features and Functions of the Front Panel ......1-7 Features and Functions of the Rear Panel ......1-9 Memory Configurations with 486 CPU board ...... 2-4 System Board Jumper Settings ......... 2-11 System Error Messages ............
  • Page 16: About This Manual

    About This Manual Audience This User's Manual is intended for three types of reader: Users of application software in a business or personal-computing environment Business and technical buyers who want to develop software and hardware packages to customize the system for a specific environment System designers and programmers who intend to modify the system hardware and configure the system Purpose and Scope...
  • Page 17 Organization This manual consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, System Housing, describes the different parts of the system unit such as switches, status indicators, connectors, and hardware components. It explains how to set up and start the system. It also shows how to install optional hardware devices.
  • Page 18: System Housing

    C h a p t e r System Housing This chapter describes the system housing features and the additional components that can be installed. It also has instructions on installing and removing these components. Getting Started The preinstallation process involves the following: Selecting a site Unpacking the components Positioning the system...
  • Page 19: Unpacking The System

    The system box contains the system with one 3.5-inch diskette drive, a SCSI CD-ROM drive and at at least one fixed disk drive installed. The accessory box contains the following: Apricot FT//ex Owner's Handbook Power Connection Guide Graphics Accelerator Card User's Guide...
  • Page 20: Positioning The System

    1.1.3 Positioning the System Arrange the feet of the system in such a way that the system is standing stably. Figure 1-1 shows the correct position of the feet when standing the system alone. Figure 1-1 Standing the System Alone System Housing 1-3...
  • Page 21: Standing The System Against A Wall

    When standing the system with the fan facing the wall, leave 5 - 10 cm space from the wall for normal air circulation, then position the feet as in Figure 1- When standing the system with the fan facing out, you can put the unit close to the wall and position the feet as in Figure 1-2B.
  • Page 22: Moving The System

    1.1.4 Moving the System The system housing has a handle on top and two wheels at the base for easy moving. Figure 1-3 shows how to move the system. Figure 1-3 Moving the System NOTE: Be sure to close the feet of the system before moving it.
  • Page 23: Features

    Features 1.2.1 Front Panel Keylock 3.5-inch Diskette Drive Fixed Disk Drive LED 3.5-inch Fixed Disk Drive Bays Power LED Power Button 5.25-inch Drive Bays Figure 1-4 Front Panel 1-6 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 24: Features And Functions Of The Front Panel

    Table 1-1 Features and Functions of the Front Panel Feature Function Keylock Locks the system housing Fixed Disk Drive LED Indicates fixed disk drive activity Power LED Indicates that power is applied to the system 3.5-inch Diskette Drive Accommodates a 3.5-inch diskette Drive Bays Holds the diskette drives and fixed disk drives...
  • Page 25: Rear Panel

    1.2.2 Rear Panel Power Socket Serial Port 1 Parallel Port Video Port Serial Port 2 Expansion Slots SCSI Port (optional) Keyboard Connector Mouse Connector Figure 1-5 Rear Panel 1-8 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 26: Features And Functions Of The Rear Panel

    Table 1-2 Features and Functions of the Rear Panel Feature Function Power Socket Connects the power cable Parallel Port Connects a parallel printer Serial Ports Connects serial peripherals SCSI Port (optional) Connects peripheral devices for high-speed, parallel data transfer Expansion Slots For additional expansion boards Keyboard Connector Connects a PS/2-compatible...
  • Page 27: Connecting The Components

    Connecting the Components CAUTION: Make sure that the system is turned off before connecting the system components. Follow these steps to connect the components: Plug the keyboard into the keyboard socket. Figure 1-6 Connecting the Keyboard 1-10 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 28: Connecting A Mouse

    Connect the mouse into the mouse connector. Figure 1-7 Connecting a Mouse Connect the monitor cable into the video socket. Figure 1-8 Connecting a Monitor System Housing 1-11...
  • Page 29: Connecting A Printer

    If you have a parallel printer, connect it to the parallel port. If you have a serial printer or other serial peripherals, connect it to a serial port (Serial 1 or Serial 2). Figure 1-9 Connecting a Printer 1-12 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 30: Connecting The Power Cables

    Plug the female end of the power connector into the system power socket and the other end into a grounded electrical outlet. Plug the monitor power cable into a grounded electrical outlet. Figure 1-10 Connecting the Power Cables System Housing 1-13...
  • Page 31: Installing Options

    Installing Options This section tells you how to open the system housing and install additional components in the system. 1.4.1 ESD Precautions Integrated circuits (ICs) on expansion boards are sensitive to static electricity. To avoid damaging the chips with electrostatic discharge (ESD), observe the following precautions: Do not remove a board from its packaging until you are ready to install Wear a wrist grounding strap before handling electronic components.
  • Page 32: Opening The Upper Front Panel Cover

    Follow these steps to open the system: Turn off the system and unplug the power cable from the wall socket. Open the upper front panel cover. Figure 1-11 Opening the Upper Front Panel Cover NOTE: The front panel covers are reversible. You can also open them from the right side following the same procedure.
  • Page 33: Opening The Lower Front Panel Cover

    Unlock the system housing using the key and open the lower front panel cover by pressing the button and pulling the cover. NOTE: You cannot open the lower front panel if the system is locked. Figure 1-12 Opening the Lower Front Panel Cover NOTE: You cannot remove the key after you have unlocked the housing.
  • Page 34: Removing The Front Panel Cover And Frame

    When installing drives in the 5.25-inch drive bays, you have to remove both the upper front panel cover and its frame. To remove the front panel cover, hold it on both sides and pull. To remove the upper front panel frame, press the latch under it and pull. Figure 1-13 Removing the Front Panel Cover and Frame System Housing 1-17...
  • Page 35: Opening The System Housing

    Pull on the key to swing the left side of the housing open. NOTE: If necessary, you may use a screwdriver to gently pry the side of the housing open. Figure 1-14 Opening the System Housing 1-18 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 36: Inside Components

    Figure 1-15 shows the inside components. Switching Power Supply Metal Plate (for cable clamp) System Board 5.25-inch Drive Frame 3.5-inch Fixed Disk Drive Frame Figure 1-15 Inside Components System Housing 1-19...
  • Page 37: Installing And Removing Expansion Boards

    1.4.3 Installing and Removing Expansion Boards Installing a Board Study the expansion board's installation guide and configure any jumpers as directed. Remove a bracket from any empty expansion slot. Save the screw to secure the new board. Keep the bracket for future use. Figure 1-16 Removing a Bracket 1-20 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 38: Installing A Board

    Gently insert the board into the expansion slot. Make sure that the board is properly inserted. Figure 1-17 Installing a Board Secure the board with the screw. NOTE: Do not neglect this step. The board uses the screw for grounding. Removing a Board Unplug all cables connected to the board.
  • Page 39: Installing Drives

    1.4.4 Installing Drives You can install up to three 5.25-inch drives and one 3.5-inch drive on the upper frame, and eight externally accessible fixed disk drives on the lower frame of the system. Installing a 5.25-inch Diskette Drive Screw the drive guides on the sides of the diskette drive. Figure 1-18 Attaching the Drive Guides 1-22 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 40: Installing A 5.25-inch Diskette Drive

    Insert the drive into a 5.25-inch drive bay. Figure 1-19 Installing a 5.25-inch Diskette Drive Connect the diskette drive cables. System Housing 1-23...
  • Page 41: Removing A 5.25-inch Diskette Drive

    Removing a 5.25-inch Diskette Drive Follow these steps to remove a 5.25-inch diskette drive: Disconnect all the drive cables. Press the metal tabs on the sides of the drive and pull the drive out. Figure 1-20 Removing a 5.25-inch Diskette Drive 1-24 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 42: Pulling Out A Fixed Disk Drive Drawer

    Installing a Fixed Disk NOTE: When you purchase a fixed disk, make sure that you have all the cables necessary to install the drive. Don’t forget to get the bad sector information from your dealer. Follow these steps to install a fixed disk: Pull out a drive drawer.
  • Page 43: Installing A Fixed Disk Drive

    Put the fixed disk drive in the drawer and secure it with four screws under. Figure 1-22 Installing a Fixed Disk Drive 1-26 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 44: Inserting The Drive Drawer

    Insert the drive drawer back to the housing. Figure 1-23 Inserting the Drive Drawer Connect the fixed disk drive cables. System Housing 1-27...
  • Page 45: Arranging The Cables

    1.4.5 Arranging the Cables After installing drives and connecting all the cables, clip the cables using the cable clamp attached to the metal plate between the power supply and the drive bays. Figure 1-24 Clipping the Cables with the Cable Clamp 1-28 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 46: System Board

    C h a p t e r System Board The system is a high-performance EISA machine designed with a 32/64-bit auto-detect and auto-switch architecture. It supports both the 486-series microprocessors and the new Pentium microprocessor, making it a long-range performance machine. The system features the single-chip upgrade technology that makes CPU upgrades easy and economical, and the multiple CPU upgrade technology that can turn it into a multiprocessor system.
  • Page 47: Major Components

    Major Components The system board has the following major components: Four 72-pin SIMM sockets labeled Bank 0 ~ Bank 3 DRAM controller with page/faster page mode and burst read capability One CPU board slot Eight 32-bit EISA expansion slots supporting master/slave add-on cards Two VESA local bus slots supporting master/slave add-on cards Real-time clock and battery that lasts for approximately 5-7 years 128-KB Flash memory...
  • Page 48: System Board Layout

    Serial 2 CPU Board Slot Serial 1 VESA Local Bus Slots Diskette Drive Connector BIOS Fixed Disk Drive Connector EISA Slots Power Connector 1 Keyboard Controller SIMM Sockets PS/2 Mouse Connector Power Connector 2 PS/2 Keyboard Connector SCSI Connectors Parallel Port Figure 2-1 System Board Layout System Board 2-3...
  • Page 49: Upgrading The Memory

    Upgrading the Memory The system comes with a standard 8-MB memory. You can upgrade the system memory by adding memory modules (SIMMs) into the SIMM sockets or by changing the SIMMs for higher memory configuration. The system supports three types of single-density SIMMs: 4-MB, 16-MB, and 64-MB. NOTE: On models using the Pentium CPU board, you can use only another four 72-pin SIMM sockets.
  • Page 50 Table 2-1 Memory Configurations (continued) Bank0 Bank1 Bank2 Bank3 Total 16 MB 64 MB 4 MB 84 MB 4 MB 4 MB 16 MB 64 MB 88 MB 16 MB 64 MB 4 MB 4 MB 88 MB 16 MB 16 MB 64 MB 96 MB...
  • Page 51: Installing Simms

    Be careful when inserting or removing SIMMs. Forcing a SIMM in or out of a socket can damage the socket. 2.2.1 Installing SIMMs Slip a SIMM at a 45 angle into a socket with the component side facing down. NOTE: Always install SIMMs from Bank 0.
  • Page 52: Removing Simms

    2.2.2 Removing SIMMs Follow these steps when removing SIMMs: Press the holding clips on both sides of the SIMM outward to release it. Press the SIMM downwards at about 45 angle. Pull the SIMM out of the socket. NOTE: Always remove the SIMM from the highest bank first. 2.2.3 Reconfiguring the System Reconfigure the system after installing or removing SIMMs.
  • Page 53: Upgrading The Cpu

    Upgrading the CPU The system has a separate board that contains the CPU and the second-level cache. The single-chip upgrade technology gives you the flexibility to upgrade the CPU by just plugging in a higher 486 CPU chip, and changing a few jumper settings on the system board and on the CPU board.
  • Page 54: Scsi Feature

    SCSI Feature The system board features a single-chip Fast SCSI-2 host adapter that adds SCSI I/O capability to the system. The device consists of all the components found on the state-of-the-art SCSI host adapters such as an onboard microcontroller, bus master interface controller, and SCSI controllers. In EISA mode, this device can transfer at a full 33 MB/second burst transfer rate.
  • Page 55: Jumper Settings

    Jumper Settings You have to change jumper settings on the system board when you upgrade the CPU or when you want to reconfigure the system. Follow these steps to change a jumper setting: Pull out the jumper cap from the jumper. Position the jumper cap over the two pins for the desired setting.
  • Page 56: System Board Jumper Settings

    Table 2-2 lists the system board jumpers and their corresponding settings. Table 2-2 System Board Jumper Settings Jumper Settings Function High Speed Write for Local Bus 0 min. wait 1 min. wait CPU Speed Select for VESA Local Bus <=33 MHz >...
  • Page 57: Error Messages

    Error Messages Whenever you receive an error message of any type, do not continue using the computer. Note the message and take corrective action. This section describes the different types of error messages and corresponding corrective measures. There are two general types of error messages: Software System 2.6.1...
  • Page 58: Error Message

    Table 2-3 System Error Messages (continued) Error Message Corrective Action Diskette Drive Error Diskette may be bad. If not, replace the diskette drive. Diskette Drive Controller Error Check and connect the control cable to the diskette drive or controller. DRAM Configuration Error Modify DRAM configuration to agree with one of the options in Table 2-1.
  • Page 59 Table 2-3 System Error Messages (continued) Error Message Corrective Action Memory Error Check SIMMs on the system board. Contact your dealer. Memory Size Mismatch Rerun Setup. Pointing Device Error Check and connect pointing device. Pointing Device Interface Error Contact your dealer. Press F1 key to continue or Press F1 or Ctrl-Alt-Esc.
  • Page 60: Correcting Error Conditions

    2.6.3 Correcting Error Conditions As a general rule, if an error message says “Press F1 to continue,” it is caused by a configuration problem, which can be easily corrected. An equipment malfunction is more likely to cause a so-called fatal error, i.e., an error that causes complete system failure.
  • Page 61: Address Maps And Interrupt Table

    Address Maps and Interrupt Table 2.7.1 System Memory Map Table 2-4 System Memory Map Address Name Function 00000000 ~ 640 KB Onboard DRAM 0009FFFF System Memory 000A0000 ~ 128 KB Reserved for Graphics 000BFFFF Video RAM Display Buffer (non-cacheable) 000C0000 ~ 64-KB Reserved for ROM on 000CFFFF...
  • Page 62 Table 2-4 System Memory Map (continued) Address Name Function 00F0000 ~ 64 KB BIOS System ROM BIOS (ROM) 00FFFFF System RAM BIOS 0100000 ~ System Memory Onboard DRAM 0F9FFFFF 0FA0000 ~ 384 KB Reserved for Memory Map 0FFFFFF I/O Card Memory I/O Card (Non-cacheable) 1000000 ~ System Memory...
  • Page 63: I/o Address Map

    2.7.2 I/O Address Map Table 2-5 System I/O Address Map Address Range (hex) Device 000 ~ 01F DMA Controller-1, 8273 020 ~ 027 Interrupt Controller-1, 8259 030 ~ 037 Interrupt Controller-1, 8259 040 ~ 047 System Timer (8254-1) 050 ~ 057 System Timer (8254-1) 060 ~ 06F Keyboard Controller 8742...
  • Page 64 Table 2-5 System I/O Address Map (continued) Address Range (hex) Device C80 ~ C83 EISA Product System ID NV RAM Page Address (New Mode) SCSI Address, CPU and Memory Type Select 8K or 9K SRAM (in separate mode) Flash ROM Programming IRQ12 Enable, 3.5"...
  • Page 65: Interrupt Levels

    2.7.3 Interrupt Levels Table 2-6 Interrupt Requests Used Interrupt Interrupt Source IRQ0 Timer Output 1 IRQ1 Keyboard IRQ3 Serial Port 2 IRQ4 Serial Port 1 IRQ6 Floppy Disk IRQ7 Printer Port IRQ8 Real-Time Clock IRQ12 PS/2 Mouse IRQ13 Numeric Processor IRQ14 Embedded Hard Disk 2-20 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 66: 486 Cpu Board

    C h a p t e r 486 CPU Board The 486 CPU board supports several 486 CPU types such as: 486SX/33 486DX/33 486DX/50 486DX2/50 486DX2/66 P24T (Pentium Upgrade) You can easily upgrade the CPU using single-chip upgrade technology. This means you only have to remove the old CPU, plug in the new one, and change a few jumper settings.
  • Page 67: Cpu Board Layout

    486 CPU Socket Second-level Cache Figure 3-1 486 CPU Board Layout 3-2 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 68: Upgrading The Cpu

    Upgrading the CPU This section gives instructions for upgrading the CPU. NOTE: Read the electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions in Chapter 1 before unpacking and installing the upgrade CPU. 3.1.1 Installing the Upgrade CPU Follow these steps to install the upgrade CPU: Turn off the system and unplug the power cable from the wall socket.
  • Page 69: Upgrading The Second-level Cache

    Change the appropriate jumper settings on the 486 CPU board. Refer to section 3.3 for the jumper settings. Re-attach the heat sink to the board with the four screws and the clip. Change the appropriate jumper settings on the system board. Refer to section 2.5 for the jumper settings.
  • Page 70: Second-level Cache Upgrade (486 Cpu Board)

    Follow these steps to upgrade the second-level cache: Turn off the system and unplug the power cable from the wall socket. Detach the CPU board from the system board. Detach the heat sink by removing the clip and the four screws securing it to the CPU board.
  • Page 71: Jumper Settings

    Jumper Settings You have to change some jumper settings on the CPU board when you upgrade the CPU. Figure 3-2 shows the jumper locations on the 486 CPU board. Figure 3-2 486 CPU Board Jumper Locations 3-6 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 72: Cpu Board Jumper Settings

    Table 3-2 lists the jumpers on the 486 CPU board and their corresponding settings. Table 3-2 486 CPU Board Jumper Settings Jumper Settings Function CPU Clock Frequency Setting Open 25 MHz (DX2-50) 33 MHz (DX2-66) Closed 40 MHz 50 MHz Open 25 MHz (DX2-50) 40 MHz...
  • Page 73 Table 3-2 486 CPU Board Jumper Settings (continued) Jumper Settings Function SRAM (Cache) Size JP11, JP19 Open 64 KB Closed 128 KB, 256 KB, 1 MB JP12, JP20 Open 64 KB, 128 KB Closed 256 KB, 1 MB JP13, JP14, JP18 Open 64 KB, 128 KB, 256 KB Closed...
  • Page 74: Pentium Cpu Board

    C h a p t e r Pentium CPU Board The Pentium CPU board contains the Pentium CPU, 512-KB second-level cache expandable to 1 MB, four 72-pin SIMM sockets, and another socket for a second Pentium CPU. A system with a Pentium CPU Board can easily be upgraded to a multiprocessor system.
  • Page 75: Pentium Cpu Board Layout

    SIMM Sockets Second Pentium CPU Socket Pentium CPU Upgrade SRAM Sockets SRAM Figure 4-1 Pentium CPU Board Layout 4-2 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 76: Upgrading To Dual Cpus

    Upgrading to Dual CPUs You can increase the system computing power by installing a second Pentium CPU into the upgrade socket on the Pentium CPU board. NOTE: Read the electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions in Chapter 1 before unpacking and installing the upgrade CPU.
  • Page 77: Upgrading The Second-level Cache

    Upgrading the Second-Level Cache The Pentium CPU board has a standard 512 KB of cache memory expandable to 1 MB. NOTE: Read the electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions in Chapter 1 before handling chips. Follow these steps to upgrade the second-level cache: Turn off the system and unplug the power cable from the wall socket.
  • Page 78: Upgrading The Memory

    Upgrading the Memory The Pentium CPU board has four 72-pin SIMM sockets that support up to 256-MB RAM using 4-MB, 8-MB, 16-MB, and 32-MB SIMMs. With the additional four SIMM sockets, the system has a total of eight sockets for a maximum memory upgrade of 256 MB in 256 combinations. NOTE: You have to use the same type of SIMMs in each bank.
  • Page 79: Jumper Settings

    You can upgrade the system memory using any combination of the SIMMs supported by the system. Table 4-2 lists some examples of available memory configurations. Table 4-2 Memory Configurations System Board Pentium CPU Board Bank0 Bank1 Bank2 Bank3 Total 24MB 16MB 16MB 56MB 16MB 16MB...
  • Page 80: Pentium Cpu Board Jumper Settings

    Table 4-3 lists the jumpers on the Pentium CPU board and their corresponding settings. Table 4-3 Pentium CPU Board Jumper Settings Jumper Settings Function Local Bus Enable Disable SRAM (Cache) Type When using a single bank When using double banks When using a single bank When using double banks SRAM (Cache) Size...
  • Page 81: Configuring The System

    C h a p t e r Configuring the System Most systems are already configured by the manufacturer or dealer. There is no need to run Setup when starting the computer unless you get a "Run Setup" message. The Setup program loads configuration values into the battery-backed, nonvolatile memory called CMOS RAM.
  • Page 82 The values in the System Configuration are the basic hardware settings of your system. You have to change some of them if you add or remove any system component. CAUTION: Close all open files and leave your application program before entering Setup. You cannot exit back into an application.
  • Page 83: Basic System Configuration (486 Cpu)

    Basic System Configuration (486 CPU) The following screen appears when you select System Configuration from the main menu: System Configuration Page 1 Basic System Configuration Advanced System Configuration WARNING The following parameters in the Advanced System Configuration depend on CPU in use. Press F9 to set the default value for the best system performance.
  • Page 84 Basic System Configuration Page 1 Date -------------------------------------- [MM/DD/YY] Time ------------------------------------- [HH:MM:SS] Diskette Drive A ---------------------- [xx-MB xx-inch] Diskette Drive B ---------------------- [xx-MB xx-inch] -------------------------------------------- Cylinder Head Sector Landing Pre_Comp Fixed Disk 0 ---------------------- [ xx] None Fixed Disk 1 ---------------------- [ xx] None Base Memory ------------------------- [ xxx] KB...
  • Page 85: The Real-time Clock

    5.1.1 The Real-Time Clock The real-time clock keeps the system date and time. After setting the date and time, you need not enter them every time you turn on the system unit. As long as the internal battery remains good (approximately seven years) and connected, the clock continues to keep the date and time accurately even when the power is off.
  • Page 86: System Memory

    Move the highlight bar to the Fixed Disk 0 parameter to configure the fixed disk drive (drive C). Use the arrow keys to select the value that corresponds to your fixed disk type. Follow the same steps to set the value for Fixed Disk 1 parameter. Select None if you don’t have a second fixed disk.
  • Page 87: Communication Settings

    5.1.7 Communication Settings The Communication Settings parameters let you set the baud rate, parity, stop bit and data length for the first 9-pin serial port (COM 1). : 110 to 9600 bits per second (BPS) Baud rate : Odd, Even, or None Parity : 1 or 2 stop bits Stop bits...
  • Page 88: Basic System Configuration (pentium Cpu)

    Basic System Configuration (Pentium CPU) In the Pentium version, the following screen appears when you select System Configuration from the main menu: System Configuration Page 1 Basic System Configuration Advanced System Configuration WARNING The following parameters in the Advanced System Configuration depend on CPU in use.
  • Page 89: Advanced System Configuration (486 Cpu)

    Advanced System Configuration (486 CPU) The Advanced Configuration parameters let you adjust the other system features for better performance. When you select Advanced System Configuration from the main menu, the following screens appear: Advanced System Configuration Page 1 Shadow RAM F0000H-FFFFFH (System BIOS) ----------------------- [Enabled ] C0000H-C7FFFH (Video BIOS) -------------------------...
  • Page 90 Advanced System Configuration Page 2 Hidden Refresh ------------------------------------------------------ [Enabled ] CPU-DRAM Read Cycle Insert Wait --------------------------- [Disabled] CPU-DRAM Write Cycle Insert Wait --------------------------- [Disabled] SCSI I/O ROM Mapping ------------------------------------------- [0D0000H] = Move Highlight Bar, = Change Setting, PgDn/PgUp = Move Screen F9 = Default Setting, F10 = Bootable Setting, F1 = Help, Esc = Exit The parameter values on the screens may not be the same as the ones on your machine.
  • Page 91: Shadow Ram

    5.2.1 Shadow RAM The system reserves 384 KB of random access memory (RAM) for shadow RAM. This parameter has seven range addresses. When you set these addresses to Enable, the video BIOS, I/O ROM, and system BIOS functions run directly from the shadow RAM.
  • Page 92: Scsi I/o Rom Mapping

    Cache Burst Read Wait-State This parameter sets cache read cycle for proper system operation. When it is set Enabled, the cache read delay is longer and the system is more stable. Cache Write Cycle Insert Wait This parameter sets cache write cycle for proper system operation. When it is set Enabled, the cache write delay is longer and the system is more stable.
  • Page 93: Advanced System Configuration (pentium Cpu)

    Advanced System Configuration (Pentium CPU) In the Pentium BIOS version, when you select Advanced System Configuration from the main menu, the following screens appear: Advanced System Configuration Page 1 Shadow RAM F0000H-FFFFFH (System BIOS) ----------------------- [Enabled ] C0000H-C7FFFH (Video BIOS) ------------------------- [Enabled ] C8000H-CFFFFH ------------------------------------------- [Enabled]...
  • Page 94 Advanced System Configuration Page 2 SCSI I/O ROM Mapping --------------------------------------- [0D0000H] Memory Block Configuration Block Size --------------------------------------------------- [64 KB] Starting Address (A31-A16) ----------------------------- [0000000000000000] Reserved For ----------------------------------------------- [Noncacheable] = Move Highlight Bar, = Change Setting, PgDn/PgUp = Move Screen F9 = Default Setting, F10 = Bootable Setting, F1 = Help, Esc = Exit Most of the parameters on the preceding screens are the same as those in the 486 version, but some of them have different settings.
  • Page 95: System Security

    System Security The System Security option allows you to write protect the disk drives, set the boot drive, and set a system password. System Security Page 1 Disk Drive Control Diskette Drive ------------------------------------------------ [ Normal ] Fixed Disk Drive --------------------------------------------- [ Normal ] System Boot Drive ------------------------------------------ [Auto]...
  • Page 96: Setup Password

    Parallel Port The default setting of the parallel port refers to LPT1. The value in parenthesis is the base address expressed in hexadecimal. The other options are: [Parallel 2 (378h)] for LPT 2 [Parallel 3 (278h)] for LPT 3 5.5.3 Setup Password The Setup Password prevents unauthorized access to the BIOS Utility.
  • Page 97: Power On Password

    NOTE: After setting a password, you have to set jumper JP6 to pins 1-2 to enable the security feature. If You Forget Your Password If you forget your password, you have to reset the configuration values stored in CMOS to their default values. When this happens, call your dealer for assistance.
  • Page 98 Fixed Disk Types Write Landing Sectors Type Cylinders Heads Precomp Zone Per Track (indicates SCSI or no fixed disk) 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH (reserved) 0FFFFH 1024 1023 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 1023 0FFFFH 1023 35~36 (reserved) 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 5-1 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 99 Write Landing Sectors Type Cylinders Heads Precomp Zone Per Track 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 1001 0FFFFH 1001 1024 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 1013 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 1024 0FFFFH 1023 1224 0FFFFH 1223...
  • Page 100 Write Landing Sectors Type Cylinders Heads Precomp Zone Per Track 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 0FFFFH 1366 0FFFFH 1366 0FFFFH 93~100 (reserved) user defined 5-1 Owner's Handbook...
  • Page 101: Eisa Configuration Utility

    C h a p t e r EISA Configuration Utility Your system comes with an EISA configuration utility. Functions The EISA configuration utility (ECU) configures your computer and the boards or options added to the system. The ECU does the following: Resolves conflicts between DMA channels, interrupt (IRQ) lines, I/O port addresses, and memory requirements Presents the option settings that specify those parameters...
  • Page 102: Program Menu Organization

    Program Menu Organization The ECU is a menu-driven program organized into a main menu and various submenus, with help screens for all options. Here is a summary of the program menu organization: LEARN ABOUT CONFIGURING YOUR COMPUTER CONFIGURE COMPUTER Copy Configuration (CFG) Files Configure Computer Basic Method Configure Computer Advanced Method Return to the Main Menu...
  • Page 103: Main Menu

    If you are starting the ECU from a fixed disk, refer to Options in Using the ECU. The following sections describe how to use the main menu and the menu selections. 6.3.1 Main Menu The main menu includes a help box at the lower right-hand side of the screen. Main Menu Learn about configuring your computer Configure computer...
  • Page 104: Configuring The Computer

    CONFIGURE COMPUTER This selection contains the following submenu: Configure Computer Copy configuration (CFG) files Configure computer - basic method Configure computer - advanced method Return to the main menu The options in this submenu are discussed in the following sections. SET DATE AND TIME This selection allows you to set your computer date and time.
  • Page 105: Eisa Board Configuration Files

    Select Copy configuration (CFG) files to copy the CFG file for the board/option. (If you are configuring your computer with an ISA board that has no CFG file, refer to Configuring an ISA Option Without a CFG file. Choose a configuration method Basic or Advanced from the CONFIGURE COMPUTER submenu.
  • Page 106: Configure Computer Basic Method

    6.3.5 Configure Computer Basic Method This selection guides you through the procedure for adding boards and options to your computer. When you choose this selection, the screen displays a graphical overview of the boards and options installed in your computer. (See sample screen below.) When there are no resource conflicts, the ECU saves this configuration information in a system configuration information (SCI) file.
  • Page 107: Advanced Configuration

    Advanced Configuration The advanced configuration method includes such functions as: Changing resources or functions especially when resource conflicts occur. Printing configuration data about an installed board or the entire system. The Print function is under the System menu. Locking a configuration with the current settings; i.e., the resources of the boards locked in the system, do not change when you add new boards to the system.
  • Page 108 Use the pull-down menus to enter configuration data about your computer. As you enter information, the entries are verified (when Auto Verify is turned on). If the utility finds any resource conflicts, you must correct the errors by changing function and resource choices. When there are no resource conflicts, the configuration information is saved in an SCI file.
  • Page 109: Advanced Configuration Menu Selections

    6.4.1 Advanced Configuration Menu Selections Table 6-1 explains the selections available in the pull-down menus. Table 6-1 Advanced Configuration Menu Bar Selections Menu Bar Pull-Down Selection Selection Function System Creates a new configuration and system configuration information (SCI) file for a computer.
  • Page 110 Table 6-1 Advanced Configuration; Menu Bar Selections (continued) Menu Bar Pull-Down Selection Selection Function Edit Adds a selected board or option to the current configuration. Move Selects the current board and moves it to a selected available slot. Remove Selects the current board and removes it from the current configuration.
  • Page 111 Table 6-1 Advanced Configuration; Menu Bar Selections (continued) Menu Bar Pull-Down Selection Selection Function Edit Lock Secures all choices for the current board or the entire configuration to the current selections. Unlock Unlocks all choices for the current board or the entire configuration.
  • Page 112 Table 6-1 Advanced Configuration; Menu Bar Selections (continued) Menu Bar Pull-Down Selection Selection Function View Connections Selects the current board or option and displays information about its external cable connections. Board Selects the current board or Specifications option and displays information about identification and physical characteristics.
  • Page 113 Table 6-1 Advanced Configuration; Menu Bar Selections (continued) Menu Bar Pull-Down Selection Selection Function Help Help Topics Displays an index of help topics which can be displayed on your screen. Help Displays help information about the currently selected board, option or function. This menu item does the same function as pressing the F1 key.
  • Page 114: Using The Advanced Configuration Menus

    6.4.2 Using the Advanced Configuration Menus Getting Help The bottom of the screen shows a line that contains a list of the keys you can use. You can get help information about a selection on a menu or any object on a screen by pressing F1 while your cursor is on the selection or object.
  • Page 115 Using the Keyboard To make menu selections using the keyboard, follow these steps: Press F10 to place the cursor on the menu bar. Use the left and right arrow keys to position the cursor on the desired pull-down menu name. Press Enter to display the pull-down menu.
  • Page 116 Place the mouse cursor over the desired pull-down menu item and click the left button on the mouse to execute the menu item. If the menu item ends in an ellipsis (...), a dialog box appears to prompt you for further information; otherwise, the menu item executes directly. Using Dialog Boxes When you select a menu item that ends in an ellipsis (...), a dialog box appears to prompt you for further information.
  • Page 117 Using Screens When your configuration appears in an overview or a detailed view, use the following steps for moving the cursor: Using the Keyboard To move the cursor on the screen using the keyboard, follow these guidelines: Press Tab to move to the next option. Press Shift-Tab to move to the previous option.
  • Page 118: Configuring An Isa Option Without A Cfg File

    6.4.3 Configuring an ISA Option Without a CFG File Select CONFIGURE COMPUTER ADVANCED METHOD. If a printer is attached to your system, print the resources used by the entire system with this selection: System —> Print Without a printer, select View—>...
  • Page 119: Options In Using The Ecu

    Select the option to unlock either the entire system or the current board only. The highlight appears on the current board. Select to unlock the configuration. Select System —> Verify Options in Using the ECU 6.6.1 Starting the ECU From a Fixed Disk Although we recommend that you start this utility from the System Configuration diskette, you can start the utility from your fixed disk if you have MS-DOS installed on it.
  • Page 120 Starting the Utility To run the utility, type the following command followed by Enter. (Items in brackets are optional and only the information within the brackets is entered.) [d:][path]SD[/B][/H][/K][/M][/A] The parameters after the path are explained as follows: BIOS video mode This parameter causes all screens to be displayed using BIOS Int 10H calls.
  • Page 121: Starting The Configure Computer Selection From Ms-dos

    6.6.2 Starting the Configure Computer Selection from MS-DOS You can bypass the main menu and start the Configure Computer selection directly from MS-DOS. This allows you to use command line parameters to customize the operation of the utility. You must have MS-DOS and this utility installed on your fixed disk.
  • Page 122 APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE GmbH 3500 PARKSIDE GOTHAER STRASSE 8 BIRMINGHAM BUSINESS PARK POSTFACH 1548 BIRMINGHAM B37 7YS 40835 RATINGEN MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC UNITED KINGDOM DEUTSCHLAND Part No 15242531 Revision No 01...

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