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HP Visualize b1000 - Workstation Owner's Manual

Hp visualize b1000 and c3000 workstations owner's guide (a4985-90013)
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HP V
B1000/C3000 Owner's Guide
ISUALIZE
HP V
Computers
ISUALIZE
Printed in USA February 1999
Manufacturing Part Number: HP Part No. A4985-90013
Edition E0299

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  • Page 1 HP V B1000/C3000 Owner’s Guide ISUALIZE HP V Computers ISUALIZE Printed in USA February 1999 Manufacturing Part Number: HP Part No. A4985-90013 Edition E0299...
  • Page 2 The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard. This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright.
  • Page 3 3. HP does not warrant that the operation of HP products will be uninterrupted or error free. If HP is unable, within a reasonable time, to repair or replace any product to a condition as warranted, the customer will be entitled to a refund of the purchase price upon prompt return of the product.
  • Page 4 RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND. Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subdivision (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Clause in DFARS 252.227.7013. Hewlett-Packard Co., 3000 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304.
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Contents 1. System Overview Product Description ......... .23 System Unit Front Panel and Removable Devices .
  • Page 6 Contents 2. Using Your CD Drive CD Media Description ........49 Caring for CDs.
  • Page 7 Contents For More Information........78 4.
  • Page 8 Contents Removing I/O Cards ........107 Installing I/O Cards .
  • Page 9 Contents Resetting Your Computer ........178 Displaying and Setting Paths .
  • Page 10 Contents Running System Verification Tests ......214 A. Safety and Regulatory Statements Declaration of Conformity ........217 Emissions Regulations .
  • Page 11 Figures Figure 1-1. System Unit Front Panel Controls ....25 Figure 1-2. LCD Symbols HP V B1000/C3000 Features ..26 ISUALIZE Figure 1-3.
  • Page 12 Figures Figure 5-11. Removing the CD Drive Bay’s Rear Cover ... 115 Figure 5-12. Front of System Unit with the Front Panel Removed. . . 115 Figure 5-13. Removing the CD Drive Bracket and Blank ..116 Figure 5-14.
  • Page 13 Figures Figure 5-34. Installing the Floppy Disk Blank and Bracket..137 Figure 5-35. Tightening the Bracket Screws .....138 Figure 5-36.
  • Page 14 Figures...
  • Page 15 Tables Table 1-1. HP V B1000/C3000 Features....23 ISUALIZE Table 1-2. Audio Electrical Specifications ......31 Table 1-3.
  • Page 16 Tables...
  • Page 17 Preface This owner’s guide describes how to use your HP V ISUALIZE B1000/C3000 computer. This manual assumes that you have installed your computer as described in the HP V B1000/C3000 Installation Card. ISUALIZE Audience This guide is intended for HP V B1000/C3000 computer users.
  • Page 18: Installation Notice

    Installation Notice Products designated in the applicable Hewlett-Packard price list as customer-installable can be installed by computer-knowledgeable customers who carefully read and follow the instructions provided. Customers who elect to have the product installed by our field personnel are charged the applicable field installation charge, as covered under the standard terms and conditions.
  • Page 19: Revision History

    Revision History The revision history for each edition of the manual is listed below: Edition Revision History E0299 First Printing Problems, Questions, and Suggestions If you have any problems or questions with our hardware, software, or documentation, please contact either your HP Response Center or your local HP representative.
  • Page 20: Documentation Conventions

    Documentation Conventions Unless otherwise noted in the text, this guide uses the following symbolic conventions. user-supplied values Italic words or characters in syntax and command descriptions represent values that you must supply. Italics are also used in text for emphasis. Information that the system displays, commands that screen display you must use literally, and path names appear in this...
  • Page 21: System Overview

    System Overview This chapter introduces the HP V B1000/C3000 computer. Its ISUALIZE purpose is to familiarize you with your computer and its controls and indicators.
  • Page 22 System Overview Instructions in this chapter assume that you are using the HP-UX 10.20 operating system and the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements (ACE) for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) with the HP CDE interface. Note that the HP-UX 10.20 operating system is a Year 2000 compliant operating system.
  • Page 23: Product Description

    System Overview Product Description Product Description To help you gain a better understanding of the HP V ISUALIZE B1000/C3000 computer, Table 1-1 provides the computer’s key features. Table 1-1 HP V B1000/C3000 Features ISUALIZE Computer Feature Description Processor PA8500 with operating frequencies of 300MHz for the B1000 and 400MHz for the C3000.
  • Page 24: Table 1-1 Hp

    System Overview Product Description Table 1-1 HP V B1000/C3000 Features ISUALIZE Computer Feature Description Internal Storage Devices Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) SCSI hard disk drive(s) and a choice of either a floppy disk drive or CD drive or both. Standard Network RJ45, Twisted Pair 10 BaseT/100 BaseT Standard I/O...
  • Page 25: System Unit Front Panel And Removable Devices

    System Overview System Unit Front Panel and Removable Devices System Unit Front Panel and Removable Devices Before powering on your system, you should become familiar with the system unit controls. Figure 1-1 shows the system unit front panel controls. Figure 1-1 System Unit Front Panel Controls System LCD Bezel Lock...
  • Page 26: System Lcd

    System Overview System Unit Front Panel and Removable Devices System LCD The Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) is located on the left side of the front panel. There are two lines available in this LCD each line being 16 characters wide. The LCD displays messages about the state of the system, including chassis codes.
  • Page 27: Removable Media Devices

    System Overview System Unit Front Panel and Removable Devices Removable Media Devices Depending on your configuration, you can have one or both of the following removable device drives in your system unit: • CD drive • Floppy disk drive You cannot have two devices of the same type. For example, you cannot NOTE have two CD drives, and you cannot have two floppy disk drives.
  • Page 28: System Unit Rear Panel Connectors

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors System Unit Rear Panel Connectors This section describes the following connectors on the system unit’s rear panel: • Audio connectors (including headphones and microphone) • USB keyboard and mouse connectors • HP parallel IEEE 1284 I/O connector •...
  • Page 29: Figure 1-3 System Unit Rear Panel Connectors

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the connectors on the system unit’s rear panel. The Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI and Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage NOTE Differential SCSI connectors must have terminators connected to them when not in use.
  • Page 30: Audio Connectors

    Microphone Jack Headphone Jack audio connectors standard stereo audio mini-jacks. Hewlett-Packard recommends using gold-plated plugs available through audio retailers for best quality recording and playback through the external connectors. A summary of the computer audio electrical specifications follows. Chapter 1...
  • Page 31: Usb Connectors

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors Table 1-2 Audio Electrical Specifications Frequency Response 25Hz to 20kHz Max Input Sensitivity/Impedance Line in 2.8Vp-p/10Kohm Microphone 40mVp-p/47Kohm Max Output Level/Impedance Line out 2.8Vp-p/920ohm Headphone 5.6Vp-p/110ohm Speaker (internal) n.a. USB Connectors There are two Universal Serial Bus (USB) connectors located on the rear panel of the computer.
  • Page 32: Hp Parallel I/O Connector

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors HP Scroll Mouse The HP scroll mouse (USB) has a left and right button that function the same as most mice. However, it also has a scroll wheel located between the two buttons that allows for vertical scrolling in a window. Note that vertical scrolling will only occur if you are in a window’s vertical scroll bar.
  • Page 33: Rs-232C Serial Input/Output Connector

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors RS-232C Serial Input/Output Connector You can attach a variety of pointing devices (such as a mouse or trackball), or peripheral devices (such as printers, plotters, modems, and scanners) to the RS-232C Serial Input/Output (SIO) ports on this computer.
  • Page 34: Scsi Connectors

    System Overview System Unit Rear Panel Connectors SCSI Connectors Use the SCSI connectors to connect external SCSI devices such as DDS-format tape drives. Consult the documentation that accompanies each SCSI device for specific information concerning its use. Refer to the chapter “SCSI Connections”...
  • Page 35: Security Loop

    System Overview Security Loop Security Loop On the back panel of your HP V B1000/C3000 computer, you will ISUALIZE find a device called a security loop. This device allows you to secure the internal parts of your computer by providing a means for locking the computer’s left-side panel.
  • Page 36: Locking Your System Unit's Left-Side Panel

    System Overview Security Loop Locking Your System Unit’s Left-Side Panel To lock your system unit’s left side panel, follow these steps: 1. Make sure the system unit’s left side panel is closed. See Figure 1-6. Figure 1-6 Closed Left-Side Panel System Unit’s Front Panel Left Side Panel...
  • Page 37: Memory

    System Overview Memory Memory The main memory for an HP V B1000/C3000 computer can vary ISUALIZE from a minimum of 128 MBytes to a maximum of 2 GBytes. This computer has eight memory card slots. Note that you can install only 128 MByte and 256 MByte DIMM cards in these slots.
  • Page 38: Monitors

    System Overview Monitors Monitors You can use one of the following HP monitors with your computer: • 19-inch, 1280 1024 color, 75Hz (A4575A) • 19-inch, 1600 1200 color, 75Hz (A4575A) • 21-inch, 1280 1024 color (stereo capability), 75Hz (A4576A) • 21-inch, 1600 1200 color, 75Hz (A4576A) Before using your monitor, you should become familiar with its controls, connectors and indicators.
  • Page 39: Operating System Overview

    Your computer uses the HP-UX 10.20 operating system and the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999). Instant ignition systems (systems with preloaded software) have X-Windows, Hewlett-Packard’s graphical user interface, and HP CDE installed and configured. Please refer to the “Instant Ignition System Information” sheet that came with your system for details on configuration.
  • Page 40: Information You Need To Record

    System Overview Information You Need to Record Information You Need to Record Before you begin using your computer, take a moment to gather the following important information and record it in the appropriate subsection for future use: • LAN Station ID •...
  • Page 41: Powering Up Your System

    System Overview Powering Up Your System Powering Up Your System After you have connected the various parts of the computer—for details, see the B1000/C3000 Installation Sheet that came with your computer—you are ready to power up the system. At this point, there are two possibilities: •...
  • Page 42: Getting Required Information

    System Overview Powering Up Your System Getting Required Information The start-up procedure for your workstation will require you to supply the following information. Therefore, you should find out this information before you turn the workstation on for the first time. NOTE If you are not the system administrator for your workstation, and you do not know the required information, ask your system administrator for...
  • Page 43 System Overview Powering Up Your System • Optional font server parameters You need to supply these parameters if you want the workstation to obtain its fonts on a network server. Ask your system administrator if you need to configure these parameters. Font server name __________________ Font server IP address...
  • Page 44: Turning On The Power

    System Overview Powering Up Your System Turning on the Power 1. Turn on the monitor and any external peripherals (for example, printers) connected to the workstation. 2. Turn on the workstation. The workstation will run a series of self-tests. 3. After two or three minutes, a series of messages are displayed as various hardware and software subsystems are activated.
  • Page 45: Documentation

    System Overview Powering Up Your System 7. Log into your first CDE session as root. For information on logging into CDE, see the Common Desktop Environment User’s Guide. You must log into the first session as root. This is because the system NOTE contains no other user accounts.
  • Page 46 System Overview Powering Up Your System Chapter 1...
  • Page 47: Using Your Cd Drive

    Using Your CD Drive This chapter provides an overview of the optional CD drive and media as well as an explanation of how to use the CD drive.
  • Page 48 Using Your CD Drive Here are the topics covered in this chapter: • Operating the CD Drive • Mounting and Unmounting a CD • Verifying the CD Drive Operation • Configuring the CD Driver • Audio Control for the CD Drive •...
  • Page 49: Cd Media Description

    Using Your CD Drive CD Media Description CD Media Description CDs, which can be CD-ROMs, CD-Rs, or CD-RWs, are 120mm (4.7 inches) in diameter, and use one data surface with a capacity of 600 megabytes. The data surface contains pits and flat spots arranged in a continuous spiral track, which is read at a constant speed.
  • Page 50: Operating The Cd Drive

    Using Your CD Drive Operating the CD Drive Operating the CD Drive This section provides a description of the CD drive and it describes how to perform tasks with your CD drive. CD Drive The CD drive is a mass storage device that can read removable CD-ROM, CD-R, and CD-WR media.
  • Page 51: Figure 2-1 Cd Drive Controls And Features

    Using Your CD Drive Operating the CD Drive Controls and Features Figure 2-1 and Table 2-1 describe the operating controls and features of the CD drive. The exact positioning of CD Drive controls/features may vary depending NOTE on the model of the device. Figure 2-1 CD Drive Controls and Features Disk...
  • Page 52: Loading And Unloading A Cd

    Using Your CD Drive Operating the CD Drive Loading and Unloading a CD This section explains how to load or unload a CD. NOTE To use the file system on a CD, you must be superuser (root) and mount the disk as discussed in the section “Mounting a CD Using SAM.” Once the CD has been mounted, you must unmount it before removing the CD.
  • Page 53: Figure 2-3 Placing The Cd In The Disk Tray

    Using Your CD Drive Operating the CD Drive 2. Hold the disk by the edges with the label side up and place it in the disk tray as shown in Figure 2-3. Figure 2-3 Placing the CD in the Disk Tray 3.
  • Page 54: Locating Help

    Using Your CD Drive Operating the CD Drive Unloading a CD To unload a disk from the Disk Tray, follow these steps: 1. Press and release the eject button on the CD drive to open the disk tray. 2. Grasp the disk by the edges and lift it out of the disk tray. 3.
  • Page 55: Mounting And Unmounting A Cd

    Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD Mounting and Unmounting a CD This section of the chapter explains how to mount and unmount a CD using the System Administration Manager (SAM). The procedures in this section require you to log in as root. If you cannot log in as root, contact you system administrator.
  • Page 56 Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD 3. Double click on the System_Admin icon in the Application Manager window. 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen.
  • Page 57 Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD 6. Double click on the Disk Devices icon. The following screen message is displayed: Scanning the system’s hardware... The Disk and File Systems window opens containing a list of devices installed in this system. From the list of devices, choose the CD drive you would like to configure as a file system by clicking on the device to highlight it.
  • Page 58: Unmounting A Cd Using Sam

    Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD Unmounting a CD Using SAM You must unmount a CD before it will eject from the drive. NOTE Before you unmount a CD, make sure that your working directory is set to a directory other than the one under which the disk was mounted.
  • Page 59 Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen. 5. Double click on the Disk and File System icon. 6.
  • Page 60 Using Your CD Drive Mounting and Unmounting a CD 7. Click on Remove in the Actions menu. In the window that next appears, click on the Yes button. This will unmount the CD. You will need to wait for a short time before the CD is unmounted. The CD is successfully unmounted when you see Unused in the Use column of the Add Disk without LVM window.
  • Page 61: Verifying The Cd Drive Operation

    Using Your CD Drive Verifying the CD Drive Operation Verifying the CD Drive Operation To verify that your workstation can communicate with the CD drive, follow the steps covered in this section. Note that to perform the steps required in this section, you must be superuser (root). If you cannot log in as root contact your system administrator.
  • Page 62: Configuring The Cd Driver

    Using Your CD Drive Configuring the CD Driver Configuring the CD Driver If you reload software or rebuild the Instant Ignition system on your computer, you may need to reconfigure the HP-UX kernel to add the CD driver. Use the SAM utility to add the CD driver and build a new HP-UX kernel.
  • Page 63: Audio Control For The Cd Drive

    HP workstations is xmcd. This is a third-party “CD player” utility that runs on an X window system using the Motif graphical user interface. The xmcd utility is not supported by Hewlett-Packard. Since the xmcd utility is not a part of HP-UX, you will need to download it off the web using your web browser and this URL: http://metalab.unc.edu/tkan/xmcd...
  • Page 64: Using The Xmcd Utility

    Using Your CD Drive Audio Control for the CD Drive Using the xmcd Utility The instructions in the section assume that you are using the HP-UX 10.20 operating system Workstation Additional Core Enhancements (ACE) for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) with the HP CDE interface.
  • Page 65 Using Your CD Drive Audio Control for the CD Drive 4. Click on the Monitoring checkbox in the Audio window to select it. Then select the Output menu and click on the Headphones item in the menu list. In the File menu select the item Close, this will close the Audio window and save your settings.
  • Page 66 Using Your CD Drive Audio Control for the CD Drive Chapter 2...
  • Page 67: Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive This chapter describes how to perform tasks that allow you to archive to or transfer data from the 3.5-inch floppy disk drive.
  • Page 68 Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive The instructions in this chapter assume you are using the HP-UX 10.20 operating system and the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) with the HP CDE interface. NOTE When examples of user input are given in this chapter, enter them at the command-line prompt in an HP CDE terminal window.
  • Page 69: Operating The Floppy Drive

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Operating the Floppy Drive This section describes how to perform tasks with your 3.5-inch floppy disk drive. Floppy Disk Drive The floppy disk drive is a random access read/write mass storage device that uses removable floppy diskettes.
  • Page 70: Using The Floppy Diskette

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Using the Floppy Diskette This section describes basic information needed to use your floppy diskettes. Setting the Write-Protect Tab on a Diskette You can only store or change information on a diskette when the write-protect tab is in the write position.
  • Page 71: Using Device Files

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Inserting and Removing a Diskette Follow these steps to insert and remove a diskette from the floppy disk drive. 1. Insert the diskette into the drive, as shown in Figure 3-3. Figure 3-3 Inserting and Removing a Floppy Diskette 2.
  • Page 72 Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive To determine what device files are available for use with your floppy drive, use the following procedure: 1. Log in as root. 2. Move the mouse pointer to the Application Manager control for tools and click the left mouse button.
  • Page 73 Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen. 5. Double click on the Disk and File System icon. 6.
  • Page 74: Formatting A New Diskette

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Formatting a New Diskette If you have floppy diskettes that have been previously formatted using the mediainit utility, you can skip this section. Otherwise, you must always format a new floppy diskette with the mediainit utility before using the diskette.
  • Page 75: Transferring Data To And From A Floppy Diskette

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Transferring Data To and From a Floppy Diskette This section describes how to transfer data (reading and writing) to and from your floppy diskette using the HP-UX tar command with your floppy drive’s device file.
  • Page 76: Listing The Files On A Floppy Diskette

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Operating the Floppy Drive Restoring Files from a Floppy Diskette to Your System Use the following instructions to restore files from a floppy diskette to your system: 1. Load the floppy diskette into the disk drive. 2.
  • Page 77: Verifying The Floppy Drive Configuration

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Verifying the Floppy Drive Configuration Verifying the Floppy Drive Configuration To verify that your workstation can communicate with the floppy drive, use the ioscan command in a terminal window to see which devices are currently in use on your system.
  • Page 78: Additional Floppy Drive Information

    Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Additional Floppy Drive Information Additional Floppy Drive Information This section provides information about configuration of the floppy disk driver and information about useful HP-UX commands for copying and listing floppy disk files. Configuring the Floppy Driver If you reload software or rebuild the Instant Ignition system on your computer, you may need to reconfigure the HP-UX kernel to add the floppy disk driver.
  • Page 79 Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Additional Floppy Drive Information For more information on copying to or from DOS files, refer to the doscp man page by typing the following command in a terminal window at the prompt and pressing Enter man doscp For more information on listing DOS directories, refer to the dosls man...
  • Page 80 Using Your 3.5-Inch Floppy Disk Drive Additional Floppy Drive Information Chapter 3...
  • Page 81: Scsi Connections

    SCSI Connections This chapter provides information about connecting Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) devices to an HP V B1000/C3000 ISUALIZE computer.
  • Page 82 SCSI Connections Here are the topics covered in this section: • SCSI bus differences • SCSI Restrictions • Determining SCSI Bus Length • Assigning SCSI Device IDs • Connecting to the SCSI Ports The instructions in this chapter assume you are using the HP-UX 10.20 operating system and the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) with HP CDE.
  • Page 83: Scsi Bus Differences

    Low-Voltage Differential SCSI bus (LVD SCSI). The following table shows the specification differences between these SCSI buses. CAUTION Currently Hewlett-Packard does not support mixing Ultra Narrow Single-Ended and Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential devices on any one bus type. Table 4-1...
  • Page 84: Scsi Restrictions

    SCSI Connections SCSI Restrictions SCSI Restrictions This section describes the SCSI restrictions that apply to your workstation in the following areas: • Cables • Terminators • Number of Devices Per SCSI Bus • Considerations for Selecting SCSI Devices Note that the narrow single-ended SCSI bus supports only 7 devices because address 7 is reserved by the system.
  • Page 85: Table 4-3 Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential Scsi Cables

    SCSI Connections SCSI Restrictions HP offers the following SCSI cables for connecting externally connected devices to the system Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential port: Table 4-3 Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI Cables Cable Cable Description Number Length C2978A 0.5m 68-pin HDTS to 68-pin HDTS C2979A 1.5m...
  • Page 86: Terminators

    • Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI bus Considerations for Selecting SCSI Devices SCSI devices supported by the Hewlett-Packard Company for the Ultra Narrow Single-Ended (NSE) and Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) SCSI buses have been qualified as SCSI devices which meet NSE and LVD specifications.
  • Page 87 Hewlett-Packard Company to connect to the Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI bus on this system. For example, the cabling inside one of these devices in question may not have a differential impedance between 110 and 135 ohms and it may be constructed in a way such that the device has considerable crosstalk on critical signals, such as Reset, Select and Busy.
  • Page 88: Scsi Bus Length Constraints

    SCSI Connections SCSI Bus Length Constraints SCSI Bus Length Constraints This section discusses SCSI bus length constraints for the Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI bus and the Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI bus. Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI Bus Length The maximum cable length for an Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI bus is 3 meters.
  • Page 89: Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential Scsi Bus Length

    SCSI Connections SCSI Bus Length Constraints Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI Bus Length The maximum cable length for an Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI bus is 12 meters. The HP V B1000/C3000 system uses 1 ISUALIZE meter of this maximum cable length internally. This means that up to 11 meters of cable can be used for connecting external Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI devices to this workstation.
  • Page 90: Assigning Scsi Device Ids

    SCSI Connections Assigning SCSI Device IDs Assigning SCSI Device IDs Before assigning a SCSI device ID to a new SCSI device, you need to determine which SCSI device IDs are available. To view the SCSI IDs already in use, type the following command at the prompt and press Enter: /usr/sbin/ioscan -f After a few moments, the ioscan utility lists all of the I/O devices it...
  • Page 91: Assigning Ultra Narrow Single-Ended Scsi Device Ids

    SCSI Connections Assigning SCSI Device IDs 10/6 ROPEtoPCI CLAIMED BUS_NEXUS PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI processor processor CLAIMED PROCESSOR Processor processor processor CLAIMED PROCESSOR Processor memory memory CLAIMED MEMORY Memory Assigning Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI Device You can determine which Ultra Narrow Single-Ended SCSI (NSE SCSI) devices are currently in use by reviewing the output from the ioscan command discussed above and looking under the “H/W Path”...
  • Page 92: Assigning Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential Scsi Device Ids

    SCSI Connections Assigning SCSI Device IDs Assigning Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI Device IDs You can determine which Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential SCSI (LVD SCSI) devices are currently in use by reviewing the output from the ioscan command discussed above and looking under the “H/W Path” heading.
  • Page 93: Connecting To The Scsi Ports

    SCSI Connections Connecting to the SCSI Ports Connecting to the SCSI Ports This section describes how to connect to the system SCSI ports (Ultra Narrow Single-Ended and Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential). System SCSI Port Connection The system contains two SCSI connectors: •...
  • Page 94 SCSI Connections Connecting to the SCSI Ports Chapter 4...
  • Page 95: Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration This chapter describes the procedures to change your computer’s hardware configuration.
  • Page 96 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Here are the topics covered in this document: • System Unit Front Panel • Left Side Panel of the System Unit • System Unit Power Supply • I/O Cards • System Unit Fans • Removable Media Devices •...
  • Page 97 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Use the following tools to remove or replace hardware parts when changing your configuration: • Light-duty flat blade screwdriver with 150mm (6 inch) long shaft • T-10 and T-15 Torx drivers. Note that the screws these drivers are used on have a recessed slot for use by flat-bladed screwdrivers.
  • Page 98: System Unit Front Panel

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Front Panel System Unit Front Panel This section explains how to open and close the system unit’s front panel. Opening the System Unit Front Panel Perform the following steps to open the system unit. 1.
  • Page 99: Closing The System Unit Front Panel

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Front Panel 4. Swing the panel outward on its left snap hinges until the panel comes free and place the front panel in a location where it cannot get broken. Closing the System Unit Front Panel Perform the following steps to close the system unit.
  • Page 100: Left Side Panel Of The System Unit

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Left Side Panel of the System Unit Left Side Panel of the System Unit This section explains how to open and close the left side panel of the system unit. This side panel will have to be opened whenever you need access to the internal components of the computer.
  • Page 101: Figure 5-2 Opening The Left Side Panel Of The System Unit

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Left Side Panel of the System Unit 4. Grasp the back edge of the left side panel and rotate it outward approximately 30 degrees to the computer. Next, pull the panel toward you as shown in Figure 5-2. This releases the panel’s top and bottom left side hook hinges from their hinge slots.
  • Page 102: Closing The Left Side Panel Of The System Unit

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Left Side Panel of the System Unit Closing the Left Side Panel of the System Unit Perform these steps to close the left side panel. 1. Hold the left side panel so that the top and bottom hinge hooks can be inserted into their hinge slots.
  • Page 103: System Unit Power Supply

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Power Supply System Unit Power Supply This section will prove important to you as you begin to update your system unit. For example, you may need to install memory in your system unit. To do this, you need to position the power supply so you can get to the memory slots.
  • Page 104: Figure 5-4 Propping Up The Power Supply

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Power Supply 4. Lift up on the power supply. The bail will automatically engage to hold up the power supply at approximately 90 degrees. See Figure 5-4. Figure 5-4 Propping Up the Power Supply Bail Lock Bail Power Supply...
  • Page 105 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Power Supply Closing the System Unit After Propping Up the Power Supply Once you complete the task you set out to perform, you are ready to close the system unit. To close the system unit follow these steps: 1.
  • Page 106: I/O Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration I/O Cards I/O Cards Your B1000 and C3000 computer’s PCI assembly has six slots. Slots 1 through 4 are full-size PCI slots. Slots 5 and 6 are half-size Peripheral Connect Interface (PCI) slots. See Figure 5-5 for a brief description of slot capabilities.
  • Page 107: Removing I/O Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration I/O Cards Note that the six I/O slots as seen from the back of the computer are labeled from top to bottom starting with one. See Figure 5-6. Figure 5-6 I/O Slot Numbering I/O Slot 1 I/O Slot 6 Removing I/O Cards You will need a T-15 Torx driver or flathead screwdriver to remove the...
  • Page 108: Figure 5-7 Removing The I/O Card Retainer

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration I/O Cards 3. Pull evenly in the direction of the arrow on both PULL tabs of the I/O card retainer to remove it. See Figure 5-7. Figure 5-7 Removing the I/O Card Retainer I/O Card I/O Card Retainer Air Divider 4.
  • Page 109: Installing I/O Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration I/O Cards Installing I/O Cards To install an I/O card into your system unit, follow these steps. NOTE Slots two and four are the graphics card slots. The primary graphics card slot is slot number two and the secondary graphics card slot is slot number four.
  • Page 110: System Unit Fans

    CAUTION indicated by an LCD error message, you need to call your local Hewlett-Packard support representative. Continuing to operate your system unit with a bad fan will cause damage to the system unit. To determine the fan that needs to be replaced, read Chapter 7 of this document.
  • Page 111: Removing The Fan From The Hard Disk Drive Area

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Fans Removing the Fan from the Hard Disk Drive Area This section provides the procedure for removing the cooling fan from the back of the hard disk drive chassis. To remove memory cards, you will need to remove this fan.
  • Page 112: Figure 5-10 Removing The Fan From The Hard Disk Drive Chassis

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Fans 4. Lift up on the handle of the fan bracket to remove the fan. See Figure 5-10. As you lift up on the fan bracket, the top alignment tabs will be removed from their hard disk drive alignment screws, and the bottom alignment tabs will be removed from their alignment holes allowing the fan to be taken out of the system unit.
  • Page 113: Replacing The Hard Disk Drive Fan

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration System Unit Fans Replacing the Hard Disk Drive Fan To replace the bracket and fan, follow these steps: 1. Position the fan bracket so that the top alignment tabs will fit around the two hard disk drive alignment screws, and the bottom alignment tabs can slide down into their alignment holes as shown in Figure 5-10.
  • Page 114: Removable Media Devices

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices Removable Media Devices There are only two internal removable media devices allowed in a B1000/C3000 computer: • CD drive • 3.5-inch floppy disk drive. The procedures provided in the subsequent sections explain how to install and remove removable media devices.
  • Page 115: Figure 5-11 Removing The Cd Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices opened so you can get to the CD drive’s audio, ATAPI and power connectors. 2. Remove the CD drive bay’s rear cover by unscrewing the T-15 Torx/slotted screw as shown in Figure 5-11. Note that the CD drive’s rear cover is located on the rear of the removable media chassis inside the system unit.
  • Page 116: Figure 5-13. Removing The Cd Drive Bracket And Blank

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 4. Remove both CD drive bracket screws (T-15 Torx/slotted screws) and pull the CD drive bracket out of the chassis assembly as shown in Figure 5-13. Next remove the four CD drive blank filler screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) as shown in Figure 5-13 and remove the blank filler from the bracket.
  • Page 117: Figure 5-14 Installing The Cd Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 5. Remove the CD drive from its shipping container and check to see that the jumper on the back of the CD drive is set to the C Select position. Using the four blank filler screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) that were just removed, mount the disk drive to the bracket as shown in Figure 5-14.
  • Page 118: Figure 5-15 Plugging In The Audio, Atapi And Power Cables

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 7. Plug the audio, ATAPI and power cables into their appropriate connectors. Note that the connectors are keyed for proper insertion. See Figure 5-15. To help with plugging in the audio connector, you can pull its cable through the back of the CD drive chassis to the front of the CD drive chassis and connect it.
  • Page 119: Figure 5-17 Replacing The Cd Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 9. Make sure that the audio, ATAPI and power cables are positioned so that they come out of the bottom edge of the CD drive bay’s rear cover. This edge is rounded to prevent cutting of the cables. See Figure 5-17. Next, secure the CD drive bay’s rear cover using the T-15 Torx/slotted screw.
  • Page 120: Removing A Cd Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices Removing a CD Drive This section explains how to remove a CD drive from your system unit. WARNING Turn the system unit off and unplug the power cord before removing the CD drive. CAUTION CD drives are susceptible to mechanical and electronic shock.
  • Page 121: Figure 5-18 Removing The Cd Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 2. Remove the CD drive bay’s rear cover by unscrewing the T-15 Torx/slotted screw as shown in Figure 5-18. Note that the CD drive bay’s rear cover is located on the back of the removable media chassis inside the system unit.
  • Page 122 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 3. Rotate the system unit around until you see the front of the unit as shown in Figure 5-19. Figure 5-19 Front of the System Unit with the Front Panel Removed System Unit Power Switch Bracket Screw (hidden)
  • Page 123: Figure 5-20 Removing The Cd Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 4. Remove both CD drive bracket screws (T-15 Torx/slotted screws) and pull the CD drive out of the chassis assembly as shown in Figure 5-20. Next remove the four CD drive mounting screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) as shown in Figure 5-20 and remove the CD drive from the bracket.
  • Page 124: Figure 5-21 Installing The Cd Drive Blank

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 5. Insert the CD drive blank in the CD drive bracket and tighten the four CD drive mounting screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) using 6 inch-pounds of torque. This will secure the CD drive blank in place. Align the bracket runners and bracket guides and slide the CD drive blank and bracket into place.
  • Page 125: Figure 5-22. Tightening The Bracket Screws

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 6. Tighten the two CD drive bracket screws as shown in Figure 5-22. These should be tightened using 6 inch-pounds of torque. Figure 5-22 Tightening the Bracket Screws Bracket Bracket Screw Screw 7.
  • Page 126: Installing A Floppy Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 8. Replace the plastic CD drive blank in the computer’s front panel. 9. Replace the left side panel and front panel of the system unit as explained in the sections “Closing the Left Side Panel of the System Unit”...
  • Page 127: Figure 5-24 Removing The Floppy Disk Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 2. Remove the floppy disk drive bay’s rear cover by unscrewing the T-15 Torx screw as shown in Figure 5-24. Note that the floppy disk drive bay’s rear cover is located on the rear of the removable media chassis inside the system unit.
  • Page 128: Figure 5-25 Front Of System Unit With The Front Panel Removed

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 3. Rotate the system unit around until you see the front of the unit as shown in Figure 5-25. Figure 5-25 Front of System Unit with the Front Panel Removed CD Drive Blank System Unit Floppy Drive...
  • Page 129: Figure 5-26 Removing The Floppy Disk Bracket And Blank

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 4. Remove both floppy disk bracket screws (T-15 Torx/slotted screws) and pull the floppy disk bracket out of the chassis assembly as shown in Figure 5-26. Next remove the four floppy disk blank filler screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) as shown in Figure 5-26 and remove the blank from the bracket.
  • Page 130: Figure 5-27 Installing The Floppy Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 5. Remove the floppy disk drive from its shipping container. Using the four T-10 Torx/slotted blank filler screws, mount the disk drive to the bracket as shown in Figure 5-27. These filler screws require 6 inch-pounds of torque.
  • Page 131: Figure 5-28 Plugging In The Floppy Data And Power Cables

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 6. Slide the floppy disk drive and its bracket into the system unit chassis as shown in Figure 5-27. 7. Plug the floppy power cable into its connector. Next, plug the data cable into its connector.
  • Page 132: Figure 5-30 Replacing The Floppy Disk Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 9. Make sure that the floppy data and power cables are positioned so that they come out of the top edge of the floppy disk drive bay’s rear cover. This edge is rounded to prevent cutting of the cables. See Figure 5-30.
  • Page 133: Removing A Floppy Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices Removing a Floppy Disk Drive This section explains how to remove a floppy disk drive from your system unit. Turn the system unit off and unplug the power cord before WARNING removing the floppy disk drive. Floppy disk drives are susceptible to mechanical and electronic shock.
  • Page 134: Figure 5-31 Removing The Floppy Disk Drive Bay's Rear Cover

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 2. Remove the floppy disk drive bay’s rear cover by unscrewing the T-15 Torx/slotted screw as shown in Figure 5-31. Note that the floppy disk drive bay’s rear cover is located on the rear of the removable media chassis inside the system unit.
  • Page 135: Figure 5-32 Front Of System Unit With The Front Panel Removed

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 3. Rotate the system unit around until you can see the front of the unit as shown in Figure 5-32. Figure 5-32 Front of System Unit with the Front Panel Removed System Unit Power Switch Bracket Screw...
  • Page 136: Figure 5-33 Removing The Floppy Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 4. Remove both floppy disk bracket screws (T-15 Torx/slotted screws) and pull the floppy disk drive out of the chassis assembly as shown in Figure 5-33. Next remove the four floppy disk drive mounting screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) as shown in Figure 5-33 and remove the floppy disk drive from the bracket.
  • Page 137: Figure 5-34 Installing The Floppy Disk Blank And Bracket

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 5. Place the floppy disk blank in the floppy disk bracket and insert the four floppy disk mounting screws (T-10 Torx/slotted screws) into the bracket and tighten them using 6 inch-pounds of torque. See Figure 5-34.
  • Page 138: Figure 5-35 Tightening The Bracket Screws

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 7. Tighten the two floppy disk bracket screws as shown in Figure 5-35. You will need to tighten them using 6 inch-pounds of torque. Figure 5-35 Tightening the Bracket Screws Bracket Screw Bracket Screw 8.
  • Page 139 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Removable Media Devices 9. Replace the plastic floppy disk drive blank in the computer’s front panel. 10. Complete the removal of the floppy disk drive by replacing the front and side panels of the system unit as explained in the sections “Closing the Left Side Panel of the System Unit”...
  • Page 140: Hard Disk Drives

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives Hard Disk Drives This section describes how to install a hard drive in your computer and how to remove it from your computer. The first section details how to install a hard disk drive. The second section details how to remove a hard disk drive.
  • Page 141: Installing A Hard Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives Installing a Hard Disk Drive This procedure explains how to install your hard disk drive in the slot that has been preassigned SCSI ID 5. On internal hard disk drives, the slot determines the addressing. There are no cables required when installing a hard disk drive.
  • Page 142: Figure 5-38 Removing The Hard Drive Bracket

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 2. Open the hard drive slot by lifting the plastic release hook upward and pulling outward on the release lever as shown in Figure 5-38. As you pull outward on the release lever, the hard drive bracket will come out of its slot.
  • Page 143: Figure 5-39 Inserting The Hard Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 4. Insert the T-15 Torx Hard Disk Mounting Screws through the rubber mounting grommets and into the screw holes located on the sides of the hard disk drive. See Figure 5-39. You should tighten these screws using 6 inch-pounds of torque.
  • Page 144: Removing A Hard Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives Removing a Hard Disk Drive This procedure explains how to remove your hard disk drive. Note that there are no cables for you to worry about when removing a hard disk drive. To remove a hard disk drive, your computer must be turned off. NOTE If you are removing a hard disk drive that has a mounted file system on it, you will need to unmount it.
  • Page 145: Figure 5-41 Removing The Hard Disk Drive

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 2. Open the hard disk drive slot by lifting the plastic release hook upward and pulling outward on the release lever as shown in Figure 5-41. As you pull outward on the release lever, the hard disk drive bracket will come out of its slot.
  • Page 146: Figure 5-42 Removing The Hard Disk Drive From Its Bracket

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 3. Remove the four T-15 Torx shoulder screws from the hard disk drive and bracket. See Figure 5-42. You should be careful when removing the hard disk drive from its mounting bracket to avoid damaging it. Note that in order to remove the T-15 Torx screws from the sides of the hard disk drive you will have to have a T-15 Torx driver that is long enough to fit through the access holes on the sides of the hard...
  • Page 147: Figure 5-43 Replacing The Hard Disk Drive Bracket

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 4. Replace the four mounting screws on the hard disk drive bracket to store them for future use. Slide the mounting bracket into its hard drive slot, and push inward on the release lever until the front of the hard dive bracket is flush with the system unit and the release lever snaps closed.
  • Page 148: Configuring A Hard Disk Drive As A File System

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives Configuring a Hard Disk Drive as a File System This section describes how to add a hard disk drive to your system as a file system using SAM and how to remove the hard disk drive from your system.
  • Page 149 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen. 5. Double click on the Disk and File System icon. 6.
  • Page 150 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 8. Enter the mount directory name (for example, /disk1) in the Mount Directory field of the Add Disk without LVM window. 9. Click on the OK button in the Add Disk without LVM window. You will need to wait for a short time before the new file system is created and the hard disk drive is mounted.
  • Page 151 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen. 5. Double click on the Disk and File System icon. 6.
  • Page 152 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Hard Disk Drives 7. Click on Remove in the Actions menu. In the window that next appears, click on the Yes button. This will unmount the file system located on the hard disk drive you are removing from the system unit. You will need to wait for a short time before the new file system is unmounted.
  • Page 153: Memory Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards Memory Cards This section contains information regarding the installation and removal of memory (DIMM cards). However, before continuing with this section, please take time to read the following list of considerations: • Use the procedure described in “The Boot Console Interface” chapter to determine the current memory configuration for this computer.
  • Page 154: Figure 5-44 Propping Up The Power Supply

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards 2. Prop up the system unit power supply as explained in the section “Propping Up the System Unit Power Supply” in this chapter. Figure 5-44 Propping Up the Power Supply Power Supply DIMM Card DIMM Connector Chapter 5...
  • Page 155: Figure 5-45 Memory Card Slot Numbers And Loading Sequence

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards 3. Position the memory slots so they face you as shown in Figure 5-45. Note that Figure 5-45 also provides the loading sequence for the DIMM cards. This loading sequence must be maintained when you install the DIMM cards, but the size of the DIMM card put in each slot can vary.
  • Page 156: Figure 5-46 Installing Memory Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards 5. Press downward on the ejector tabs located on both sides of the DIMM connector. See Figure 5-46. This opens the connector for DIMM card insertion. Figure 5-46 Installing Memory Cards Press down on ejector tabs to Step 1 open them and place the DIMM card in the connector...
  • Page 157: Removing Memory

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards Removing Memory Perform the following steps to remove memory (DIMM cards) from your system unit. Lay the system on its right side (using the system unit’s front panel as a NOTE reference) as shown in Figure 5-47. Note that before laying the system unit on its side you should put it on a cushioned surface to avoid damage to the system unit’s exterior.
  • Page 158: Figure 5-48 Removing Memory Cards

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Memory Cards 4. Press downward on the ejector tabs located on both sides of the DIMM connector. See Figure Figure 5-48. This raises the DIMM card for easy extraction. Figure 5-48 Removing Memory Cards Notches Ejector Tab 5.
  • Page 159: Changing Your Monitor Type

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type Changing Your Monitor Type Your system ships from the factory preset to use a monitor with a specific resolution and frequency. If you replace your monitor with a different type, you must reconfigure your computer to support it. There are three ways to configure your computer to support a different monitor type.
  • Page 160: Setting The Monitor Type Using Sam

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type Setting the Monitor Type Using SAM This method for setting the monitor type requires the use of the HP CDE interface. This means that you should have already set your monitor type using one of the methods defined in a previous section, or you have an Instant Ignition system that boots up using the HP CDE interface.
  • Page 161 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type 4. Double click on the Sam icon in the Application Manager -- System_Admin window. If you are root, the System Application Manager (SAM) will appear on your screen. 5. Double click on the Display icon. 6.
  • Page 162 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type 8. Select the action Modify Monitor Type from the Action menu. You will see a window with a list of monitor type selections in it. Here is an example of a monitor type entry you may see: Entry Width Height...
  • Page 163: Troubleshooting Monitor Problems

    Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type Troubleshooting Monitor Problems In the event that your console stops displaying to your graphics device, use the following procedure to set the console for displaying to an external terminal. Here are the steps to follow: 1.
  • Page 164 Changing Your Computer Hardware Configuration Changing Your Monitor Type Chapter 5...
  • Page 165: The Boot Console Interface

    The Boot Console Interface This chapter describes the different features of the boot console interface and how to use them.
  • Page 166 The Boot Console Interface Here are the topics covered in this chapter: • Boot Console Interface Features • Accessing the Boot Console Interface • Booting Your Computer • Searching for Bootable Media • Resetting Your Computer • Displaying and Setting Paths •...
  • Page 167: Boot Console Interface Features

    The Boot Console Interface Boot Console Interface Features Boot Console Interface Features There are times when you want to interact directly with the hardware of your computer before it boots the operating system. Your computer provides a menu-driven boot console interface that allows you to perform special tasks, display information, and set certain system parameters, even if the operating system is unavailable.
  • Page 168 The Boot Console Interface Boot Console Interface Features Hear are the menus: ------ Main Menu -------------------------------------- Command Description ----------- ----------- BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>] Boot from specified path PAth [PRI|ALT|CON|KEY|[<path>] Display or modify a path SEArch [DIsplay|IPL] [<path>] Search for boot devices COnfiguration [<command>] Access Configuration menu/commands INformation [<command>]...
  • Page 169 The Boot Console Interface Boot Console Interface Features ------ Configuration Menu ----------------------------- Command Description ------- ----------- AUto [BOot|SEArch] [ON|OFF] Display or set specified auto flag BootID [<proc>] [<boot ID>] Display or modify processor boot ID BootINfo Display boot-related information BootTimer [0 - 200] Seconds allowed for boot attempt CPUconfig [<proc>] [ON|OFF] Config/deconfig processor...
  • Page 170 The Boot Console Interface Boot Console Interface Features ------ Information Menu ------------------------------- Command Description ------- ----------- Display all system information BootINfo Display boot-related information CAche Display cache information ChipRevisions Display revisions of VLSI and firmware COprocessor Display coprocessor information FwrVersion Display firmware version Display I/O interface information LanAddress...
  • Page 171 The Boot Console Interface Boot Console Interface Features ------ Service Menu ----------------------------------- Command Description ------- ----------- ChassisCodes [<proc>|ON|OFF] Display/enable/disable chassis codes CLEARPIM Clear (zero) the contents of PIM EepromRead [<addr>] {<len>} Read EEPROM locations MemRead <addr> [<len>] [<type>] Read memory locations PCIDelay [<value>] Display or set PCI delay value PDT [CLEAR]...
  • Page 172: Accessing The Boot Console Interface

    The Boot Console Interface Accessing the Boot Console Interface Accessing the Boot Console Interface If the system unit has crashed or power was turned off for some reason, press the power switch and proceed to step 3. Otherwise, to access the boot console interface, follow these steps: NOTE This procedure should be done by a system administrator or superuser...
  • Page 173 The Boot Console Interface Accessing the Boot Console Interface If auto boot and auto search are both turned on, you will see the following message: Processor is booting from first available de- vice. To discontinue, press any key within 10 seconds.
  • Page 174: Booting Your Computer

    The Boot Console Interface Booting Your Computer Booting Your Computer You usually start your computer by turning it on and waiting for HP-UX to boot automatically. However, you may not always want the usual sequence to occur. For example, you may want to start your computer from an operating system that is stored on a device that is different from your usual boot device.
  • Page 175 The Boot Console Interface Booting Your Computer A message similar to the following will be displayed: Path Number Device Path Device Type ----------- ---------------- ----------- TEAC CD-532E-B FWSCSI.6.0 SEAGATE ST39102LC At the prompt, you might type the following and press Enter Main Menu: Enter command >...
  • Page 176 The Boot Console Interface Booting Your Computer For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on your root disk (fwscsi.6.0) has become corrupted, and you wish to boot your computer from the backup kernel (/stand/vmunix.prev), type the following at the ISL> prompt and press Enter: ISL>...
  • Page 177: Searching For Bootable Media

    The Boot Console Interface Searching for Bootable Media Searching for Bootable Media To list devices that contain bootable media, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this chapter, and then type the following at the prompt and press Enter Main Menu: Enter command>...
  • Page 178: Resetting Your Computer

    The Boot Console Interface Resetting Your Computer Resetting Your Computer To reset your computer to its predefined values, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this chapter, and then type the following at the prompt and press Enter Main Menu: Enter command>...
  • Page 179: Displaying And Setting Paths

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting Paths Displaying and Setting Paths A path is the hardware address of a device that is attached to the I/O system of your computer. The path command sets the system paths shown in Table 6-1. The path command sets and displays the hardware address of a specified device attached to the I/O bus of your computer.
  • Page 180 The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting Paths To display the current setting for a particular system path, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this chapter, and then type the following at the prompt and press Enter Main Menu: Enter command>...
  • Page 181: Displaying And Setting The Monitor Type

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Your system ships from the factory preset to use a monitor with a specific resolution and frequency. If you replace your computer’s monitor with a different type of monitor, you may have to reconfigure your computer to support the new monitor.
  • Page 182 The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type The correct usage for setting the graphics configuration is: monitor graphics_path type where valid graphics_path parameters are: Graphics adapter installed in slot 1 graphics(1) Graphics adapter installed in slot 2 (primary slot) graphics(2) Graphics adapter installed in slot 3 graphics(3)
  • Page 183: Displaying The Current Monitor Configuration

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Displaying the Current Monitor Configuration To display the current monitor configuration for your system from the Configuration Menu of the boot console interface, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface” earlier in this chapter. Once you are in the Boot Console Interface Main Menu, type the following command and press Enter...
  • Page 184: Setting The Monitor Type

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Setting the Monitor Type You can set the monitor type for a graphics adapter by typing the following at the prompt and pressing Enter: Configuration Menu: Enter command> monitor graphics( n ) tt where n is the number of the graphics adapter and tt is the monitor type.
  • Page 185: Setting The Monitor Type With Sam

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type To set the monitor type for GRAPHICS(2) to monitor type 1, type the following at the command prompt and press Enter: Configuration Menu: Enter command> monitor graphics(2) 1 This will take effect on the next reboot or reset of the system. MONITOR INFORMATION Path Slot Head...
  • Page 186 The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type 2. Move the mouse pointer to the Application Manager control for tools and click the left mouse button. Alternatively you can execute sam at a terminal window command prompt and skip to step 5. 3.
  • Page 187 The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type 5. Double click on the Display icon. 6. Double click on the Monitor Configuration icon in the Display window. The Monitor Configuration window will have a monitor icon(s) in it that is/are associated with the graphics card(s) in your system units I/O card slot(s).
  • Page 188: Setting The Monitor Type At Power On

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Setting the Monitor Type at Power On If you replace your computer’s monitor with a different monitor type, you need to let the computer’s firmware know you made this change. To do this, reboot the system and use either the automatic monitor selection process or the boot console interface’s monitor command.
  • Page 189: Troubleshooting Monitor Problems

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type Once you have made your monitor type selection, the system queries you to confirm your selection. Press to save this monitor type. If you press any key other than , the following message is displayed: Monitor type not saved.
  • Page 190: Changing The Console To An External Terminal

    The Boot Console Interface Changing the Console to an External Terminal Changing the Console to an External Terminal In the event that your console stops displaying to your graphics device, use the following procedure to display the console to an external serial terminal so that you can configure the graphics console: 1.
  • Page 191: Displaying The Current Memory Configuration

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying the Current Memory Configuration Displaying the Current Memory Configuration The following sample screen output uses the memory command to show a memory configuration table with properly-installed and configured memory. To display the current memory configuration for your system, from the Information Menu of the boot console interface, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console Interface”...
  • Page 192: Memory Information Sample

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying the Current Memory Configuration Memory Information Sample The following example shows the memory information when memory modules are properly installed and configured: MEMORY INFORMATION MEMORY STATUS TABLE Slot Size Status ---- ------ ------------- 256MB Active 256MB Active 128MB...
  • Page 193: Displaying The Status Of The System I/O

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying the Status of the System I/O Displaying the Status of the System I/O The io command lets you identify all built-in I/O devices and optional I/O devices installed in the option slots. It is available in the Information Menu.
  • Page 194: Setting The Auto Boot And Auto Search Flags

    The Boot Console Interface Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags The auto boot and auto search flags are variables stored in your computer’s nonvolatile memory. (Nonvolatile memory retains its contents even after power is turned off.) If you reset these flags to new values, the change takes effect the next time you reboot the computer.
  • Page 195 The Boot Console Interface Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags The auto search command searches for devices in the following order: Primary boot path (can be set by the user) Alternate boot path (can be set by the user) Low-voltage differential SCSI (built-in) PCI 1 through PCI 6 (plug-in interface cards) Narrow single-ended SCSI (built-in)
  • Page 196: Displaying And Setting The Security Mode

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Security Mode Displaying and Setting the Security Mode The secure flag is a variable stored in non-volatile memory. (Non-volatile memory retains its contents even after power is turned off.) If you reset this flag to a new value, the change takes effect the next time you reboot the computer.
  • Page 197: Displaying And Setting The Fastboot Mode

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying and Setting the Fastboot Mode Displaying and Setting the Fastboot Mode When fastboot is enabled (set to on), your computer does a quick check of the memory and skips I/O interface testing during its power-on self tests.
  • Page 198: Displaying The Lan Station Address

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying the LAN Station Address Displaying the LAN Station Address It is sometimes necessary to supply the LAN station address of your computer to other users. For example, if your computer is to become a member of a cluster, the cluster administrator needs to know your LAN station address in order to add your computer to the cluster.
  • Page 199: Displaying System Information

    The Boot Console Interface Displaying System Information Displaying System Information The all command allows you to display the system’s processor revision and speed, cache size, memory size, flag settings, and the boot and console paths. To display system information for the Information Menu, type the following at the prompt and press Enter Information Menu: Enter command>...
  • Page 200 The Boot Console Interface Displaying System Information Chapter 6...
  • Page 201: Solving Problems

    Solving Problems This chapter contains information to help you determine what is wrong with your system when you have problems. If you have a problem that is not listed in this chapter, or if your problem persists, contact your designated service representative.
  • Page 202 Solving Problems To help speed up your service request, have your system’s model number and serial number available. Your service representative will always ask for these numbers. The instructions in this chapter assume you are using the HP-UX 10.20 operating system and the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) with the HP CDE graphical interface.
  • Page 203: Common Problems And Solutions

    Solving Problems Common Problems and Solutions Common Problems and Solutions The tables in this section lists common problems you may encounter with your computer. The tables also tell you what to do to help solve the problems. Table 7-1 Problems Powering Up the System Problem Solution The LCD screen does...
  • Page 204: Table 7-2 Problems Loading And Booting The Operating System

    Solving Problems Common Problems and Solutions Table 7-2 Problems Loading and Booting the Operating System Problem Solution The LCD screen is lit, Make sure that all SCSI devices are set to the proper and text appears on the SCSI ID. (See Appendix C for default SCSI ID screen, but more than settings.) two minutes have passed...
  • Page 205: Table 7-4 Problems Using A Hard Disk Drive

    Solving Problems Common Problems and Solutions Table 7-4 Problems Using a Hard Disk Drive Problem Solution The disk drive is not Make sure that all SCSI devices are set to the proper accessible or does not SCSI ID. (See Chapter 4 for default SCSI ID respond.
  • Page 206: Table 7-6 Problems Using The Floppy Disk Drive

    Solving Problems Common Problems and Solutions Table 7-6 Problems Using the Floppy Disk Drive Problem Solution The floppy drive does not Re-enter the commands and make sure you have respond to commands. typed them correctly. Make sure you specified the device file /dev/floppy/c0t1d0 for commands that require a device file name.
  • Page 207: Dealing With A Boot Failure

    Solving Problems Dealing with a Boot Failure Dealing with a Boot Failure If your usual boot device (typically a disk) is not responding as it should, you must try to boot from the disk (or another boot device) by selecting it manually.
  • Page 208 Solving Problems Dealing with a Boot Failure 5. If your computer still fails to boot, there is either something wrong with the file system or with the hardware. If you suspect a file system failure, see the manual Using HP-UX for help on dealing with file system failures.
  • Page 209: Memory Failures

    Solving Problems Memory Failures Memory Failures A memory failure will show up in the LCD on your system unit’s front panel as a DIMM error. Your system’s Boot Console Interface will never appear. A possible solution to the memory failure problem is to perform the procedure in the section “Installing Additional Memory”...
  • Page 210: Lcd Information

    Solving Problems LCD Information LCD Information Your computer uses an LCD panel to display firmware/OS progress codes. The codes, referred to as chassis codes, consist of one of the mnemonics listed below, followed by a 4-digit hexadecimal number identifying the code module being executed. The mnemonics and their meanings are: A hardware error has been detected Hardware being tested...
  • Page 211: Lcd Fan Failures And Warnings

    Solving Problems LCD Information If the system encounters a FLT code while the system is booting, the FLT code is interpreted and a message is displayed. For example, you may have information similar to the following in the LCD: Three character chassis code Four digit hexadecimal code 30FC Six character field replaceable unit...
  • Page 212: Figure 7-1 Fan Locations

    Solving Problems LCD Information Figure 7-1 will help you locate the problem fan within your system unit. Figure 7-1 Fan Locations I/O Fan (4) CPU Fan (5) Upper System Fan (2) Lower System Fan (3) Hard Disk Drive Fan (6) If you should receive a failure or warning in you LCD, you should record the information on a piece of paper and call in the problem to your local HP Support Representative.
  • Page 213: Troubleshooting Monitor Problems

    Solving Problems Troubleshooting Monitor Problems Troubleshooting Monitor Problems In the event that your console stops displaying to your graphics device, use the following procedure to set the console for displaying to an external terminal. Here are the steps to follow: 1.
  • Page 214: Running System Verification Tests

    Solving Problems Running System Verification Tests Running System Verification Tests HP-UX uses a diagnostics product called MESA that includes the Support Tools Manager (STM), which allows system operation verification. To use STM, you need to be on an HP-UX 10.20 operating system and to load the Workstation Additional Core Enhancements for HP-UX 10.20 (June 1999) HP-UX Diagnostic/IPR Media on your computer.
  • Page 215: Safety And Regulatory Statements

    Safety and Regulatory Statements This appendix contains safety and regulatory statements pertaining to your HP V B1000/C3000 computer. ISUALIZE...
  • Page 216 Safety and Regulatory Statements Here are the topics covered in this appendix: • Declaration of Conformity • Emissions Regulations • Third Party Emissions Regulations Compliance • Special Regulatory and Safety Information • Warnings and Cautions Appendix A...
  • Page 217: Declaration Of Conformity

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Declaration of Conformity Declaration of Conformity Appendix A...
  • Page 218: Emissions Regulations

    Hewlett-Packard's system certification tests were conducted with HP- supported peripheral devices and HP-shielded cables, such as those you receive with your computer. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Hewlett-Packard could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. Appendix A...
  • Page 219: Emi Class A Rrl (Korea)

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Emissions Regulations Operation of this device is subject to the following conditions: • This device may not cause harmful interference. • This device must accept interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. • Cables used with this device must be properly shielded to comply with the requirements of the FCC.
  • Page 220: Emi Class A (Taiwan)

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Emissions Regulations EMI Class A (Taiwan) Special Video Configuration Statement When a Video Out card has a cable connected to its video out connector, the HP V B1000/C3000 computer no longer meets FCC Class B ISUALIZE regulations.
  • Page 221: Third Party Emissions Regulations Compliance

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Third Party Emissions Regulations Compliance Third Party Emissions Regulations Compliance Any third-party I/O device installed in HP system(s) must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the preceding Emissions Regulations statements. In the event that a third-party noncompliant I/O device is installed, the customer assumes all responsibility and liability arising therefrom.
  • Page 222: Special Regulatory And Safety Information

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Special Regulatory and Safety Information Special Regulatory and Safety Information This section covers regulatory and safety information for acoustics, lasers, and LEDs. Acoustics Table A-1 Regulation On Noise Declaration For Machines -3. GSGV Lpa <70dB Lpa<70dB operator position am Arbeitsplatz normal operation...
  • Page 223: Warnings And Cautions

    Safety and Regulatory Statements Warnings and Cautions Warnings and Cautions WARNING: Removing device cover may expose sharp edges in equipment chassis. To avoid injury, use care when installing customer add-on devices. WARNUNG: Das Entfernen der Geräteabdeckung legt die scharfen Kanten im Inneren des Gerätes frei.
  • Page 224 Safety and Regulatory Statements Warnings and Cautions Appendix A...
  • Page 225: Glossary

    Glossary Attachment unit interface (AUI) A transceiver cable that conforms to IEEE 802.3 Absolute pathname The full specifications. pathname of a file, including all the directories leading to it, starting with the root directory (“/”) and ending with the filename itself See also file, filename, Backup v.
  • Page 226 Glossary diskless workstations. See also is read from and written to these boot ROM. disks. CD-RAM disks are 120 mm (4.7 inches) in diameter, use one Boot console interface The data surface, and have a capacity interactive firmware that enables of about 650 MB.
  • Page 227 Glossary uses removable CD-ROM disks. group of workstations connected The drive contains a via a Local Area Network (LAN). semiconductor laser for reading One workstation, the cluster data optically and an embedded server, acts as a file server to the controller.
  • Page 228 Glossary Command interpreter A commands. To enter a control key program that reads lines of text sequence, hold down the “Ctrl” key from standard input (typed at the while pressing another key. keyboard or read from a file) and interprets them as requests to See Central Processing execute commands or programs.
  • Page 229 Glossary on each side of the board are connected to different chips. This allows for a wider data path as Daisy-chaining A method of more modules can be accessed at connecting devices in which the the same time. signal passes from one device to the next in serial fashion along a Directory A special type of bus.
  • Page 230 Glossary Drag To move the mouse (and reprogrammed individually during hence the pointer on the screen) system operations. The EEPROM while holding down one or more of is used for storing configuration its buttons. This process specifies information that will be two separate locations on the “remembered”...
  • Page 231 Glossary Firmware The control software that is embedded in ROM and is always resident regardless of the File The basic named unit of data status of the operating system. It stored on disk See also directory, handles the booting of the system, filename.
  • Page 232 $HOME The environment HP-UX. This is Hewlett-Packard’s variable that contains the name of version of the UNIX® operating a user’s home directory. This is the system.
  • Page 233 Glossary Input device Any of several Invisible file name A filename in pieces of hardware equipment used which the first character is a to give information to a system. period (.). Invisible filenames are Examples include the keyboard not displayed by the listing and the mouse See also output commands such as ls and ll device.
  • Page 234 Glossary information required to associate it Login manager The program with the other, “real,” object. that controls the initial startup of HP CDE and accepts the user’s Local area network (LAN) A username and password data communications system that allows a number of independent Login script The shell program devices to communicate with each that runs at each login, and sets...
  • Page 235 Glossary name given to a workstation in a cluster See also cluster, node. Name A character string Nonvolatile memory System associated with a file, directory, or memory that retains its contents link. A name can include various even after workstation power is alphanumeric characters, but turned off.
  • Page 236 Glossary Permissions A set of rights (read, write, execute) associated with an object in the file system. Parent directory A directory Determines who may use the that contains other directories, object and how. each of which is then called a subdirectory See also PID Process Identifier.
  • Page 237 Glossary Process ID A unique identification number assigned to all processes by the operating RAM Random-access memory. system. Also referred to as a PID ROM Read-only memory. See also PID. root See superuser. Processor internal memory. A storage area in a processor’s Scroll bar A vertical or horizontal internal memory (for example, bar located on the side or bottom of...
  • Page 238 Glossary Shell A command-line interpreter combination See also Ultra2 program used to invoke programs. Wide Low-Voltage Differential Some examples of HP-UX shells SCSI, Ultra Narrow Single-Ended are the Bourne, Korn, Key, and C SCSI. shells. Sometimes referred to as a “command interpreter.”...
  • Page 239 Glossary Superuser A user with favorite terminal. When not permission to enter any directory running programs or executing and make changes to files and operating system commands, programs that typical users are terminal windows display the not allowed to change. To “become command-line prompt See also superuser”...
  • Page 240 Glossary Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage name.” The username is also the Differential SCSI A 16-bit-wide name that identifies you to the bus with low-power receivers and mail system and other software drivers, which allows a cable requiring secure entry. length of up to 12 meters and a data transfer rate of up to 80 MB Utility See utility program.
  • Page 241 Glossary Workspace What the screen becomes when you start HP CDE. Although you can hide the workspace under terminal windows or other graphic objects, you can never position anything behind the workspace. All windows and graphic objects appear stacked “on top of ” the workspace See also HP Common Desktop Environment, terminal window.
  • Page 243 Index Numerics cpio cstm 802.3 network Cables, SCSI Problem Care, CD-ROM Solution Cautions and warnings 802.3 twisted pair LAN CD drive Declaration of conformity connector Installing Device files, using Problem disk Removing doscp Solution dosls CD drive, controls and features Driver, disk Applications, FCC B Audio connectors...
  • Page 244 Index Operating Host name Problem HP hub, USB Keyboard, USB Removing HP scroll mouse, USB Korea RRL Solution HP VISUALIZE B1000/C3000 Verifying configuration Features Floppy diskette Hub, HP USB devices LAN station address, displaying Formatting Inserting LAN station ID Removing I/O card lan, ipl device type Restoring files...
  • Page 245 Index Memory cards (DIMM cards) path Ultra2 Wide LVD SCSI Path type USB ports Memory configuration, alternate or alt Rear panel connectors, system displaying console or con unit Memory failures keyboard or key Regulations, emissions Memory information sample primary or pri Regulatory and safety Paths, displaying and setting information, special...
  • Page 246 Index Ultra2 Wide Low-Voltage Differential xstm SCSI ports Terminal, changing the console Connecting to an external SCSI restrictions Terminators, SCSI cables Third party emissions SCSI terminators regulations compliance scsi, ipl device type Time zone search TOC button secure Transferring data, floppy Security loop diskette Security mode...

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