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Nokia
IP100 Series Installation Guide
Nokia
313 Fairchild Drive
Mountain View, CA 94043-2215
1-650-625-2000
Part Number: 45-0445-001 Rev A
info@iprg.nokia.com
October 2000

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   Summary of Contents for Nokia IP100 Series

  • Page 1

    Nokia IP100 Series Installation Guide Nokia 313 Fairchild Drive Mountain View, CA 94043-2215 1-650-625-2000 Part Number: 45-0445-001 Rev A info@iprg.nokia.com October 2000...

  • Page 2

    IMPORTANT NOTE TO USERS This software is provided by Nokia Corporation as is and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall Nokia Corporation be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services;...

  • Page 3

    IEC 1000-4-5 European Community (CE) IEC 1000-4-6 European Community (CE) IEC 1000-4-11 European Community (CE) Safety Standards UL1950 CUL/CSA 22.2 NO 950-M93 Canada EN60950:1992, A1, A2:1993, A3:1995, A4:1997, All:1998 European Community (CE)/TUV EN60950 Japanese National Deviation IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 4

    Nokia Customer Support Website: http://support.nokia.com E-mail: tac.support@nokia.com Americas (except Canada) Voice: 1-888-477-9824 or 1-650-625-2525 Fax: 1-650-625-2903 Canada Voice: 1-888-361-5030 or 1-613-271-6721 Fax: 1-613-271-8782 Europe Voice: +44 (0) 208-564-8100 Fax: +44 (0) 208-897-0674 Asia-Pacific Voice: +65-7232999 Fax: +65-7232897 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Wall Mounting ....... .13 Connecting the IP100 Series .....16 Step 1—Connecting the NAP to a Power Source.16...

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Using Voyager ........33 Monitoring IP100 Series Operations ....35...

  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Upgrading the Boot Manager ....57 Limited Warranty and Terms and Conditions APPENDIX D of Software License for Nokia Software ... . 59 General Public Licensed Software APPENDIX E .

  • Page 8: Table Of Contents

    ......... . . 89 viii IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 9: Table Of Contents

    B-1. Ethernet crossover cable pin connections . . . 41 B-2. 9-pin to 25-pin null-modem cable ..43 B-3. 9-pin to 9-pin null-modem cable ..44 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 10: Table Of Contents

    2-2. US Robotics DIP Switches ....23 2-3. Best Data AT Commands ....25 A-1. Physical Dimensions of IP100 Series NAP . 37 A-2. Environmental Characteristics of IP100 Series NAP .

  • Page 11

    Preface About the Nokia IP100 Series NAP The IP100 Series NAP offers the performance and flexibility of Nokia IP products in a small package. The small size of the network applications platform (NAP) makes it ideal for installation where space is limited. The NAP can be placed on a desk or table.

  • Page 12

    IP100 Series NAP Product Documentation Other Documents In addition to this installation guide, the documentation set for this product includes Release Notes for IPSO software and Inline Help for Voyager, which is displayed within each Voyager page. The documentation set also includes the online Voyager Reference Guide.

  • Page 13

    A file or directory Courier c:/etc/test/stuff.txt name. Text that the computer Hostname? presents, rather than text you enter yourself. Literal text that you Type fwconfig to configure the firewall. Courier Bold enter yourself, on the screen IP100 Series Installation Guide xiii...

  • Page 14

    Shows critical information which, if WARNING: ignored, could cause injuries to you or to other people. A Note calls special attention to important information. NOTE: IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 15: Chapter 1 Overview

    (NAPs) provides secure network access for small-size to medium-size organizations. IP100 Series NAPs are compact and also easy to install, configure, and use. The Nokia operating system (IPSO) is built into the IP100 Series. The series also comes with Voyager, a web-based NAP-management application.

  • Page 16: Organization Of Installation Guide

    Organization of Installation Guide The three chapters of this guide have the following organization: • This chapter describes the features of IP100 Series NAPs. • Chapter 2 explains how to connect an IP100 NAP to your network. • Chapter 3 shows how to configure the NAP.

  • Page 17: Hardware

    Hardware Hardware Figure 1-1 shows an overall view of an IP100 Series NAP. Later figures provide more details about each orientation (top, rear, and so forth). Figure 1-1. Overall view of NAP IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 18: Features

    Features NAPs in the IP100 Series have the following features: • Three 10/100 base-T ethernet interfaces (the IP110) • Two EIA-232 serial ports • A RESET button that generates a system reset. • A 5-volt DC (110/220 volt AC) power supply (part number NCZ3023FRU) •...

  • Page 19: Rear Panel

    Features Rear Panel Figure 1-2 shows the rear panel of an IP100 Series NAP. Figure 1-2. Rear panel of NAP The rear panel has: • RJ-45 shielded connectors for each network interface. Connector labels indicate the types of interfaces. •...

  • Page 20: Top View Of Nap

    Figure 1-3 shows the top of an IP100 Series NAP. Figure 1-3. Top view of NAP The three pairs of LEDs at the right of the unit correspond to the three network connectors on the rear panel. They are labeled accordingly. The top LED (ACTIVE) is yellow and flashes on and off to indicate network activity.

  • Page 21: Bottom

    LEDs. The POWER LED is green when the unit is receiving power. The FAULT LED is red when there is a system failure or abnormal condition. Bottom Figure 1-4 shows the bottom of the NAP. Figure 1-4. Bottom view of NAP IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 22

    Four sets of ventilation slots • A rubber cushion at each corner, for placing the unit on a desk or table or stacking NAPs on top of one another • Two keyhole slots for mounting the unit on a wall IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 23: Site Requirements

    There is danger of explosion if the WARNING: battery is incorrectly placed. Replace only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 24

    IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 25: Chapter 2 Installing The Hardware

    Installing the Hardware CHAPTER 2 This chapter describes how to install an IP100 Series NAP and how to connect it to a network. It also explains how to connect an external modem to the NAP, as an alternative way of accessing the NAP from a remote location.

  • Page 26: Placement Of Ip100 Series Nap

    Placement of IP100 Series NAP By Itself on Desk or Table You can place an IP100 Series NAP on a desk, table, or other flat surface. Stacking You can stack up to three NAPs on top of one another (Figure 2-1).

  • Page 27: Wall Mounting

    Wall Mounting You can mount an IP100 Series NAP on a wall by using the two keyholes slots on the back of the NAP. When mounting the NAP on a wall, the front panel should be at the top and the rear panel at the bottom, with connecting cables projecting downward from the rear panel.

  • Page 28: Wall Mounting Of Nap

    7.5 inches (19.05 cm). Drill a quarter inch (0.635 cm) hole at each mark, to accommodate the number 10 cross-head screws that come with the NAP (along with two anchors and two standoffs). IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 29

    Placement of IP100 Series NAP Insert an anchor into each hole. Then place a standoff on the end of each screw. Turn the screw so that the screw protrudes one quarter inch from the wall. Hold the NAP so that the screws are in the center of the keyholes.

  • Page 30: Connecting The Ip100 Series

    Connecting the IP100 Series To use an IP100 Series NAP you must: Step 1—Connect the NAP to a power source Step 2—Connect a console to the NAP Step 3—Connect the NAP to a network Step 1—Connecting the NAP to a Power Source Plug the power cord that comes with the NAP into the 5-volt DC adapter.

  • Page 31: Step 2—connecting A Console

    (DTE) interface with 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit, running at 9600 bps. Figure 2-4 shows a notebook computer connected to an IP100 Series NAP using the console cable. Figure 2-4. Notebook computer connected to NAP...

  • Page 32: Step 3—connecting The Nap To A Network

    NAP. Plug an RJ-45 cable into one of the interfaces. Connect the other end to a network connection. Figure 2-5. Rear panel of NAP, with network interfaces at left IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 33: Using An External Modem

    You can connect an external modem to the AUX port on the rear of the NAP. This allows you to use a remote console to communicate with the IP100 Series NAP when you do not have access to the device via a console directly connected to the unit or via a network connection.

  • Page 34: Step 2—configuring A Modem

    In Voyager, under Network Access and Services, make sure Allow COM2 Access is set to Yes. Locate this file: /etc/ttys An example of this file is reproduced on the next page. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 35

    "/usr/libexec/getty modem.9600" unknown off secure ttyd4 "/usr/libexec/getty modem.9600" unknown off secure # Pseudo terminals ttyp0 none network secure ttyp1 none network secure ttyp2 none network secure ttyp3 none network secure ttys: unmodified: line 1. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 36: Step 3—setting Modem Command Strings

    (Do not allow the terminal emulator to configure the modem by itself because this may alter some needed settings.) AT B0 F1 M1 X1 Y0 &A1 &B0 &G0 &H1 &I0 &K1 &M4 &N6&P0 &R2 &S0 &T5 &U6 &Y1S0=1 &W0 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 37: Us Robotics At Commands

    Set the DIP switches as shown in Table 2-2. Table 2-2. US Robotics DIP Switches DIP Switch Position Meaning Down Override DTR Answer incoming calls Load configuration from NVRAM instead of using defaults Down Dumb mode IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 38: Best Data 56k Data Fax Modem

    Pass this AT string to the modem: AT&F&K4E0Q1S0=1 After entering this command, you will not see your own typing or any response from the modem. Enter these two strings: AT&W0 AT&Y0 Table 2-3 shows the meanings of some of these commands. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 39: Best Data At Commands

    Write settings for profile 0 to NVRAM &Y0 Load profile 0 from VRAM Dial in to the modem. You should get a login prompt. You do not need to log out. The session will end if your modem disconnects. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 40

    IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 41: Chapter 3 Configuring The Nap

    Configuring the NAP CHAPTER 3 This chapter explains how to configure an IP100 Series NAP. It describes: • using the system startup procedure for initial configuration • using Voyager to complete the configuration IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 42: Before You Begin

    Enter an administrative password Enter a browser type Enter initial interface information Confirm or change the information you entered After completing these steps, use the Voyager web-based configuration program to complete configuration of the IP100 Series NAP. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 43: Using System Startup

    Using System Startup Using System Startup When you first boot up an IP100 Series NAP, the console screen displays miscellaneous information (such as memory checks). The following text (Figure 3-1) then displays on your screen: Syncing disks... done Rebooting... Verifying DMI Pool Data..

  • Page 44: Step 2—assigning A Password

    Step 2—Assigning a Password There are two types of accounts on the IP100 Series. The admin account provides read and write permission. The monitor account provides only read permission, which does not allow a user to configure the IP100 Series NAP. To establish an admin password, do the following: When system startup asks for a password for the admin account, enter a password.

  • Page 45: Step 4—entering Initial Interface Information

    IDs of the NAP’s interfaces. For the IP110 NAP, the display looks something like Figure 3-3: Select an interface from the following for configuration: 1)eth-s1p1 2)eth-s2p1 3)eth-s3p1 Enter choice [1-4]: Figure 3-3. System startup interface screen for IP110 NAP IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 46: Step 5—confirming The Setup

    Step 4. On this menu, type 4 to exit system startup. Change your entries by typing N to return to the menu in Step 4. When you have finished changing entries, confirm your entries. Then exit system startup. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 47: Using Voyager

    Click the interface you want to configure. Set the link speed (10 Mbits/sec or 100 Mbits/sec) and duplex mode (full or half) of the interface. The default ethernet logical IDs include the channel number of the interface IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 48

    (eth-sxpyc0). You can set multiple IP addresses for each ethernet port by entering new IP addresses and mask lengths. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 49: Monitoring Ip100 Series Operations

    Monitoring IP100 Series Operations Monitoring IP100 Series Operations After you have configured the NAP, use Voyager to monitor its operations. Click from the Voyager home page to access monitoring ONITOR functions. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 50

    IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 51: Physical

    Technical Specifications APPENDIX A Physical Table A-1. Physical Dimensions of IP100 Series NAP Dimension U.S. Metric Height 2.10 in. 5.33 cm Width 9.35 in. 23.75 cm Depth 8.34 in. 21.18 cm Weight 11.3 oz. 317.8 g IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 52: Environmental

    Technical Specifications Environmental Table A-2. Environmental Characteristics of IP100 Series NAP System Dimension Range Temperature Operating 5°C to 40°C Storage -40°C to 70°C Electrical Input Voltage 100-120/200-240 V Frequency 50/60 Hz Amps 0.9 A max input; 5 A max output...

  • Page 53: Interfaces

    Interfaces Interfaces Table A-3. Interface Characteristics of IP100 Series NAP Interface Description Connector Ethernet IEEE 802.3 RJ-45 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX Unshielded Twisted- Pair, Full-Duplex or Half-Duplex Serial Com 2 DB-9 Console Serial Com 1 DB-9 External Power 5-pin DIN Supply IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 54: Declaration Of Conformity

    EN60950:1992, A1, A2:1993, A3:1995, A4:1997, All:1998 EMC: EN55022B, EN50082-1 (1997) Supplementary Information: “The product complies with the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC and the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC with Amendment 93/68/EEC.” Alan Hutchinson Quality Engineer Mountain View, California October 2000 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 55: Ethernet Crossover Cable

    APPENDIX B Ethernet Crossover Cable Use an ethernet crossover cable when directly connecting an ethernet port on an IP100 Series NAP to an RJ-45 female connector on a host. Figure B-1. Ethernet crossover cable pin connections IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 56

    The RJ-45 is numbered from left to right with the copper tabs facing up and toward you. Use a straight-through cable (rather than an ethernet NOTE: crossover cable) to connect an ethernet port on an IP100 Series NAP to an ethernet hub. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 57: Null-modem Cable

    Use a 9-pin to 25-pin or 9-pin to 9-pin null-modem cable when directly connecting a console to the device. Pin connections for these two connectors are shown in Figure B-2 (9-pin to 25-pin) and B-3 (9-pin to 9- pin). Figure B-2. 9-pin to 25-pin null-modem cable IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 58: B-3. 9-pin To 9-pin Null-modem Cable

    Cables Figure B-3. 9-pin to 9-pin null-modem cable IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 59

    Using Boot Manager APPENDIX C IP100 Series NAPs incorporate a boot manager in one partition of the system disk to control the boot-up process. The boot manager performs a number of functions: • Provides commands that allow you to boot alternate kernels, possibly from alternate NAPs •...

  • Page 60

    Using Boot Manager Unless you set the autoboot variable to no, the NAP automatically boots IPSO after waiting at the boot manager prompt for the number of seconds specified by the bootwait variable. See Variables. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 61: Variables

    This is the string of flags that is passed to the kernel. Default: none. boot-device: This is the device from which the boot-file loads. Default: wd0. Options: wd0 (hard disk). Default: The alias disk is set to wd0. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 62: Viewing Variables And Other System Parameters

    The command has the following form: printenv For example, BOOTMGR[4]> set-defaults BOOTMGR[5]> printenv Bootmgr Revision: 3.3, base kernel= 3.3-fcs1 11.24.1999-102644 autoboot: YES bootwait: 5 boot-file: /image/current/kernel boot-flags: boot-device: wd0 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 63: Showalias

    Alias 7: <empty> BOOTMGR[33] sysinfo Use the sysinfo command to view system information such as CPU speed, memory size, and so forth. The command has the following form: sysinfo For example, BOOTMGR[35]> sysinfo CPU: 267-MHz K6-2 (586-class CPU) IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 64

    Both device and directory are optional. The default directory is /image on the wd0 device. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 65: Setting Variables

    For example, BOOTMGR[2]> setenv autoboot yes sets the value of autoboot to be yes. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 66: Unsetenv

    If you do not specify name, all variables are set to their factory defaults. For example, BOOTMGR[2]> set-defaults autoboot sets the value of autoboot to be yes, the factory default. setalias Use the setalias command to set an alias. The command has the following form: setalias name device IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 67: Unsetalias

    Use the halt command to halt the system. The command has the following form: halt help Use the help command to display a list of the available commands. The command has the following forms: help or ? IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 68: Booting The System

    (the hard disk) boot-file /image/current/kernel boot-flags none Boot Manager first searches its non-volatile memory to see if the corresponding default argument is specified there. If so, it uses that value; if not, it uses these defaults. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 69: Installing Ipso Using The Boot Manager

    Enter the information the install command requests (your system’s IP address, the server’s IP address, and other information). Reboot the NAP. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 70: Protecting The Boot Manager With A Password

    Protecting the Boot Manager With a Password To prevent accidental or unauthorized access to the hard disk on your IP100 Series NAP, you can require that the user enter a password to access the install command in boot manager. Use the passwd command to set the password.

  • Page 71: Upgrading The Boot Manager

    NOTE: complete upgrade procedures. To upgrade the boot manager, perform the following steps: Get the upgraded boot manager image from the appropriate Nokia customer support site as listed in the Nokia Contact Information section at the front of this guide.

  • Page 72

    Using Boot Manager IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 73: Of Software License For Nokia Software

    SOFTWARE LICENSE. Unless Customer is an approved Managed Service Provider, Nokia grants to Customer a personal, nonexclusive and nontransferable license to use the Software in object code form solely as embedded in equipment provided by Nokia. If Customer is an approved IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 74

    PROPRIETARY RIGHTS. All right, title and interest in and to the Software and documentation, and any copies thereof provided by Nokia or which may be made by Customer, are and shall remain the exclusive property of Nokia or Nokia’s licensors (Nokia and its licensors are collectively referred to as “Software Owners”).

  • Page 75

    (4) has been used in ultra-hazardous activities, or (5) has been used in such a way that Nokia cannot reasonably reproduce the Software error. Furthermore, the above warranty does not apply to any portion of the product supplied by a third party.

  • Page 76

    Limited Warranty and Terms and Conditions of Software License for Nokia Software INVALID FOR ANY REASON AND NOKIA BECOMES LIABLE FOR LOSS OR DAMAGE THAT MAY LAWFULLY BE LIMITED, SUCH LIABILITY SHALL BE LIMITED TO THE PURCHASE PRICE. THESE LIMITATIONS SHALL APPLY NOTWITHSTANDING ANY FAILURE OF ESSENTIAL PURPOSE OF ANY LIMITED REMEDY.

  • Page 77

    Upon termination, Customer shall cease all use of the Software and shall destroy or return to Nokia the original(s) and all copies of the Software and documentation made or furnished hereunder. Customer may terminate the License at any time by destroying all copies of the Software and documentation.

  • Page 78

    Limited Warranty and Terms and Conditions of Software License for Nokia Software party any reasonable attorneys’ fees and other costs and expenses incurred by the non-breaching party in connection with the enforcement of any provisions of this Agreement. If the Software is licensed to a U.S. Governmental user, the following shall apply.

  • Page 79

    Nokia, Inc. offers to provide machine-readable source code on industry- standard media to the recipient of the Nokia, Inc. modified READLINE and GDB code for a period of three (3) years from the date of Nokia, Inc.’s distribution of READLINE and GDB, or until January 1, 2003, whichever is longer.

  • Page 80

    Program a copy of this License along with the Program. You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option offer warranty protection in exchange for a fee. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 81: Gnu General Public License

    License. Therefore, by modifying or distributing the Program (or any work based on the Program), you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so, and all its terms and conditions for copying, distributing or modifying the Program or works based on it. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 82

    RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 83: Appendix F Troubleshooting

    Troubleshooting APPENDIX F This appendix lists problems you might encounter with an IP100 Series NAP, potential causes for these problems, and possible solutions. The last section of this appendix provides information about using the tcpdump program in troubleshooting. The material is organized in terms of broad problem areas, with specific problems (and categories of problems) listed within each area.

  • Page 84: Access And Login Problems

    Possible Cause The terminal settings are incorrect. Possible Solution Make sure that the terminal settings are: 8 data, 1 stop, no parity, 9600 bps, no flow control. Possible Cause The unit or file system is defective. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 85: Not Accepted

    Possible Solution Enter a correct password. You can find the procedure for changing the admin password in the Nokia Knowledge Base by contacting Nokia Customer Support. Possible Solution Return the database to the default settings and then run through the system-startup procedure again.

  • Page 86: No Login Prompt

    Use the full installation procedure to install a new system. The new system completely replaces the contents of the drive. This may be needed to restore or reload an NAP. This procedure erases the database on the NAP. Contact Nokia Customer Support. Problem Unable to connect to Voyager using...

  • Page 87

    The link speed is wrong. Possible Solution Verify that the port on the host and the port on the IP100 Series NAP are set for the same speed (10 Mbps/100 Mbps). A solid data/activity LED on a port indicates a speed mismatch.

  • Page 88: Interface Problems

    Possible Cause You may have used the wrong cable. Possible Solution Use a crossover cable between the IP100 Series NAP and a host, and a straight-through cable between the NAP and a hub. Problem Activity light is continuously on Possible Cause The port speed may be incorrect.

  • Page 89: High Collision Rate On The Hub

    Possible Cause There is a problem with one or more connections. Possible Solution To localize the problem, disconnect the network cables one at a time until you identify the source of the problem. Then troubleshoot further. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 90: Connectivity Problems

    Unable to ping through the unit Troubleshooting Tips Localize the problem by issuing pings to various network interfaces on the IP100 Series NAP. Use tcpdump to trace packets leaving or entering a port. (See Viewing Packets With tcpdump for further information.) Possible Cause The interfaces are not enabled.

  • Page 91

    Use Voyager to correct the information in the ARP table: Click ONFIG Click the ARP link in the Interfaces section. Click the Display or Remove Dynamic ARP Entries link. Click the Delete box for the entry you want to delete. Click PPLY IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 92: Routing Problems

    | IP address> show route ospf Codes:C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, B - BGP,O - OSPF, E - OSPF external, A - Aggregate,K - Kernel Remnant,H - Hidden S - Suppressed IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 93: Problems With Ospf

    OSPF is not configured. Possible Solution Verify that OSPF is properly configured for all interfaces that are involved in OSPF routing. For more information, view Configuring OSPF from the Configuring Routing page (press the button) in Voyager. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 94: Problems With Rip

    Under Routing Options in the Routing Configuration section in Voyager, you can enable several types of trace options for RIP. These traces are logged in /var/tmp/ipsrd.log. Possible Cause Inconsistent subnet masks are in use on the network. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 95: Problems Exchanging Routes

    Always enter a metric value if you are exporting routes from OSPF to RIP. Possible Cause Exchanging routes is not configured correctly. Possible Solution Exchanging routes involves several configuration steps. Follow the tasks in the Voyager Reference Guide (click ) to ensure that all steps are followed. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 96: Problems With Multicast

    Verify that you have IP connectivity; ping various hosts on each network. See Connectivity Problems. Possible Cause DVMRP is not enabled on the interfaces. Possible Solution Verify that DVMRP is enabled on the interfaces in use. Possible Cause Packets exceed TTL on clients. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 97

    Routing Problems Possible Solution Verify that the client is set up for the proper TTL number. Many clients are set to receive local traffic only one hop away. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 98: Using Tcpdump

    NOTE: CONTROL logical interface names for interface, as appropriate. Command Basics tcpdump for a specific interface tcpdump tcpdump -i logical interface name The following example shows slot 1 port 1 on a NAP: tcpdump -i eth-s1p1c0 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 99: An Interface

    The following example shows all BOOTP/DHCP traffic: tcpdump -i eth-s2p1c0 udp port 68 Filtering Traffic with tcpdump Hiding Specific Types of Traffic tcpdump -i logical interface name < ip or udp > not TCP/UDP application port IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 100: Viewing A Portion Of The Packet

    Generate a trace file by using tcpdump with the -w flag. This stores the packets in a local file for later viewing with tcpdump. Use this feature when you want to send a copy of the tcpdump results to Nokia Customer Support.

  • Page 101

    The following example shows all RIP traffic for that interface: tcpdump -i eth-s1p1c0 -s 320 -vv port 520 Port 520 is also the port used by the UNIX daemon process NOTE: on “routed” UNIX workstations. IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 102

    Troubleshooting IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 103: Index

    30 small caps xiii text-based 31 warning xiv, 2 web-based 30 DB-25 connector 19 cable DB-9 connector 19 ethernet crossover 41 Declaration of Conformity 40 null-modem 20, 43 depth of unit 37 serial 17 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 104

    76 keyholes 8, 13 interface 74 knowledge base activity light continuously on 74 troubleshooting 71 high collision rate 75 local ports do not appear in Voyager 74 labels no link light 74 LAN 5 routing 78 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 105

    28 browser type 30 password 30 tcpdump 84 commands 84 filtering traffic 85 saving results 86 viewing packets 84 viewing portion of packet 86 viewing specific IP address 86 technical specifications 37 temperature operating 38 IP100 Series Installation Guide...

  • Page 106

    IP100 Series Installation Guide...

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