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NEC EXPRESS 5800 ES1400 SERIES Online Service Manual

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XPRESS5800 ES1400
ERIES
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NLINE
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  Summary of Contents for NEC EXPRESS 5800 ES1400 SERIES

  • Page 1 XPRESS5800 ES1400 ERIES NLINE ERVICE UIDE...
  • Page 2: Proprietary Notice And Liability Disclaimer

    Proprietary Notice and Liability Disclaimer The information disclosed in this document, including all designs and related materials, is the valuable property of NEC Computer Systems Division, Packard Bell NEC, Inc. (hereinafter “NECCSD”) and/or its licensors. NECCSD and/or its licensors, as...
  • Page 3: Using This Guide

    Using This Guide Welcome to the Server ES1400 Service Reference. This service reference includes all the information found in the ES1400 System User’s Guide and includes disassembly and installation instructions for all field replaceable units (FRUs). This service reference also contains system board connector specifications and a complete parts list, including an exploded view of the system.
  • Page 4: Text Conventions

    Text Conventions This guide uses the following text conventions. Warnings, cautions, and notes have the following meanings: WARNING Warnings alert you to situations that could result in serious personal injury or loss of life. CAUTION Cautions indicate situations that can damage the system hardware or software. Notes give important information about the material being described.
  • Page 5: Related Documents

    Related Documents In addition to this guide, the following system documentation is included with the server either as electronic files on E or as paper copy shipped with your server. XPRESS UILDER System Release Notes Release Notes provide you with the latest information about your system. This information was not available at the time your user’s guide was developed.
  • Page 6: Safety Notices For Users Outside Of The U.s.a. And Canada

    Safety Notices To reduce the risk of electric shock which could cause personal injury, follow all safety Caution: notices. The symbols shown are used in your documentation and on your equipment to indicate safety hazards. Lithium batteries can be dangerous. Improper handling of lithium batteries may result Warning: in an explosion.
  • Page 7: Care And Handling

    Care and Handling Use the following guidelines to properly handle and care for your system. Protect the system from extremely low or high temperatures. Let the system warm (or cool) to room temperature before using it. Keep the system away from magnetic forces. Keep the system dry.
  • Page 8 Using This Guide xv...
  • Page 9: System Overview

    System Overview Overview System Chassis Power Supply Peripheral Bays Diskette Drive System Board Features System Security...
  • Page 10 Overview This server is a modular, multiprocessing server based on the Intel Pentium® II chip set. The combination of compute performance, memory capacity, and integrated I/O provides a high performance environment for many server market applications. These range from large corporations supporting remote offices to small companies looking to obtain basic connectivity capability such as file and print services, e-mail, web access, web site server, etc.
  • Page 11 As application requirements increase, you can expand your server with additional memory, add-in boards and peripheral devices: tape devices and hard disk drives. Your server features the following major components: n Single high-performance Pentium II processor packaged in a Single Edge Connector (SEC) cartridge n 32 MB to 768 MB of memory, using up to three DIMMs n Four PCI expansion slots for add-in boards (one slot shared with an ISA slot).
  • Page 12: System Chassis

    System Chassis The system chassis is an easy-to-expand, fabricated metal structure. The major system components are shown in this illustration. Removable Media Bays (3) 1.44 MB 3.5" diskette drive System Board Speaker Power supply Disk Drive Bays (4) Fan (behind disk drive bays) System Chassis 1-4 System Overview...
  • Page 13: Power Supply

    Power Supply The 260 watt power supply is switch-selectable for 115 or 230 Vac at an operating frequency of 50/60 Hz. It is designed to comply with existing emissions standards and provides sufficient power for a fully loaded system configuration. The power supply voltage selection switch is factory set to 115Vac for systems used in the United States;...
  • Page 14: System Board Features

    System Board Features The system board offers a “flat” design with the processor and memory subsystems residing on the board. This figure shows the major components on the system board. The following subsections describe the system board major components. B C D E Processor connector Reserved DIMM slot 3...
  • Page 15: Pentium Ii Processor

    Pentium II Processor The system board includes a Pentium II processor packaged in a Single Edge Contact (S.E.C.) cartridge. The cartridge includes the processor core with an integrated 16 KB primary (L1) cache; the secondary (L2) cache; a thermal plate; and a back cover. The processor implements the MMX ™...
  • Page 16: Ide Controller

    The system board has four full-length PCI connectors. One of the connectors shares a chassis expansion slot with an ISA connector. PCI features: n Bus speed up to 33 MHz n 32-bit memory addressing n 5 V signaling environment n Burst transfers of up to 133 Mbps n 8-, 16-, or 32-bit data transfers n Plug and Play ready n Parity enabled.
  • Page 17 n Support for both 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps networks, capable of full or half duplex, with back-to- back transmit at 100 Mbps. The network status LEDs on the system board indicate: n Transmit/receive activity on the LAN n Valid link to the LAN n 10/100 Mbps transfer mode.
  • Page 18: Video Controller

    Video Controller The system has a high-performance SVGA subsystem that supports the following: n BIOS compatibility with VGA, EGA, CGA, Hercules Graphics, and MDA n 2 MB of Video Random Access Memory (VRAM) video buffer n 16-bit bus for high-speed display memory access n Hardware accelerated bit block transfers (BITBLT) n Display power management system n Supports 72Hz refresh, non-interlaced at: 640x480, 800x600, 1024x768, or 1280x1024 resolutions...
  • Page 19: System Board Management Controller (Bmc)

    System Board Management Controller (BMC) Server management is concentrated in the System Board Management Controller (BMC). The BMC and associated circuitry are powered from a 5Vdc standby voltage, which remains active when system power is switched off. The BMC supports the Emergency Management Port (EMP) Console which allows remote server management via a modem or direct connection to a manager system.
  • Page 20: Software Locks Via The System Setup Utility

    Software Locks via the System Setup Utility The BIOS Setup Utility and the System Setup Utility (SSU) provide a number of security features to prevent unauthorized or accidental access to the system. Once the security measures are enabled, access to the system is allowed only after the user enters the correct password(s). For example: n Enable the keyboard lockout timer so that the server requires a password to reactivate the keyboard and mouse after a specified time-out period 1 to 120 minutes...
  • Page 22: Setting Up Your System

    Setting Up Your System Selecting a Site Unpacking the System Getting Familiar with the System Making Connections Setting the Line Voltage Connecting the Power Cord Powering On Your System...
  • Page 23: Selecting A Site

    Selecting a Site The system operates reliably in a typical office environment. Choose a site that is: n Near grounded, three-pronged power outlets. Note: For the United States and Canada, this means a NEMA 5- 15R outlets for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6-15R outlets for 200-240 VAC.
  • Page 24: Unpacking The System

    Unpacking the System WARNING Your system weighs approximately 38 pounds (17.2 kg). If your system contains numerous optional boards and peripheral devices, it will weigh more. To avoid personal injury, make sure you have someone help you lift or move the system. When you receive your system, inspect the shipping containers prior to unpacking.
  • Page 25: Front View

    Front View This figure shows the location of the front system controls and indicators. POWER DISK POWER Load/eject button, CD-ROM reader Press to load CD and eject CD. Activity light, CD-ROM reader When lit, CD-ROM reader is in use. Activity light, 3 ½-inch diskette drive When lit, diskette is in use.
  • Page 26: Rear View

    Rear View This figure shows the location of the following rear system controls and indicators. 115V AC input power connector Supplies AC power to the power supply. Line voltage selector switch Selects AC input power of 115 VAC or 230 VAC. Keyboard PS/2-compatible 6-pin mini-DIN connector.
  • Page 27: Making Connections

    LAN Status Lights Color Meaning When On Meaning When Blinking Meaning When Off Orange 100 Mbps network connection None 10 Mbps network connection Green Linked to network, no network Linked to network, sending or Not linked to network traffic receiving data Making Connections If your system normally operates without a video display or keyboard (for example, as a network server), you must install a video display and keyboard to configure the system.
  • Page 28 115V Keyboard Mouse Serial Port 1 (COMM1) Printer Serial Port 2 (COMM2) Video Display (VGA) PCI slots Combo PCI/ISA slot ISA slot Making Connections Setting Up the System 2-7...
  • Page 29: Setting The Line Voltage

    Setting the Line Voltage The system contains a 260 watt power supply that is switch-selectable for 115 or 230 VAC at an operating frequency of 50/60Hz. The power supply voltage selection switch is factory set to 115Vac for systems used in the United States; it is set to 230Vac for systems used in Europe. Line source voltages between 200 and 230 VAC are acceptable when the power supply input voltage is set to 230 VAC.
  • Page 30 115V 115V 115V 230V Voltage selector switch set to 115 VAC Voltage selector switch set to 230 VAC Setting the Line Voltage Setting Up the System 2-9...
  • Page 31: Connecting The Power Cord

    Connecting the Power Cord Plug the female end of the AC power cord into the input receptacle on the rear of the power supply cage. Plug the male end of the power cord into NEMA 5-15R outlet for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6- 15R outlet for 200-240 VAC.
  • Page 32: Powering On Your System

    Powering On Your System Power on your system as follows. Make sure all external devices, such as a video display, keyboard, and mouse (optional) have been connected, and the power cords are connected. Power on the video display and any other external devices. Press the push-button power on/off switch on the front panel.
  • Page 33 2-12 Setting Up the System...
  • Page 34: Configuring Your System

    Configuring Your System Configuring Your System BIOS Setup Utility Symbios Configuration Utility Optional RAID Controller Configuring System Board Jumpers...
  • Page 35 Configuring Your System This Configuration and setup utilities are used to change your system configuration. You can configure your system, as well as option boards you may add to your system, using the BIOS Setup Utility. Several unique system parameters are configured using the BIOS Setup, which is stored in the system FLASH memory.
  • Page 36: Using The Bios Setup Utility

    BIOS Setup Utility The BIOS Setup Utility is used to change system configuration parameters. This utility has some unique parameters and many parameters that are also configurable with the SSU. The utility is resident in the system FLASH memory and does not require a diskette or an operating system present to run.
  • Page 37: Bios Setup Configuration Settings

    Function in Setup Menu F1 or Alt-H Get Help about an item. Exit the current menu and return to the previous menu. Left or right arrow keys Move between menus. Up or down arrow keys Move cursor up and down. The cursor moves only to the settings that you can change.
  • Page 38: Main Menu

    Main Menu Feature Choices Description Your Setting System Time HH:MM:SS Sets the system time. System Date MM/DD/YYYY Sets the system date. Legacy Diskette A: Disabled Selects the diskette type. 360KB 1.2 MB 720KB 1.44/1.25 MB 2.88 MB Legacy Diskette B: Selects the diskette type.
  • Page 39: Primary/Secondary Ide Master And Slave Submenu

    Primary/Secondary IDE Master and Slave Submenu Feature Choices Description Your Setting Type Auto allows the system to attempt auto-detection of Auto the drive type. None informs the system to ignore this drive. None CD ROM allows the manual entry of some fields described below.
  • Page 40: Keyboard Submenu

    Keyboard Submenu Feature Choices Description Your Setting NumLock Auto Selects power-on state for Num Lock. Key Click Enables or disables key click. Disabled Enabled Keyboard auto-repeat rate Selects the number of times per second a key will 30/sec repeat while it is held down. 26.7/sec 21.8/sec 18.5/sec...
  • Page 41: Pci Configuration Submenus

    PCI Configuration Submenus This submenu should only be changed by qualified technical personnel. CAUTION This submenu Leave PCI Configuration Submenu at factory-default settings. should only be changed by a technically qualified person. PCI Configuration Submenus Feature Choices Description Your Setting PCI Device, Embedded SCSI Press ENTER.
  • Page 42: Integrated Peripheral Configuration Submenu

    Integrated Peripheral Configuration Submenu Feature Choices Description Your Setting COM 1: Disabled Auto forces BIOS to configure the port. OS Controlled forces OS to configure the port. Enabled (Serial Port A) Auto OS Controlled Base I/O Address Selects the base I/O address for COM port 1. Interrupt IRQ 3 Selects the IRQ for COM port 1.
  • Page 43: Advanced Chipset Control

    Advanced Chipset Control Feature Choices Description Your Setting Graphics Aperture Selects the Graphics Aperture size for the AGP video device. Some operating systems require this 16Mb value to be less than 256MB. 32Mb This feature is not used on this server. 64Mb 128Mb 256Mb...
  • Page 44 Security menu (Continued) Feature Choices Description Your Setting Set Supervisor Password When the <Enter> key is pressed, the user is Press ENTER prompted for a password; press ESC key to abort. Once set, this can be disabled by setting it to a null string, or by clearing password jumper on system board (see Configuring System Board Jumpers...
  • Page 45: Server Menu

    Server Menu Feature Choices Description Your Setting System Management Refer to “System Management Submenu.” Press ENTER Console Redirection Refer to “Console Redirection Submenu.” Press ENTER Processor Retest Select Yes to have BIOS clear all processor status and retest the processor(s) on bootup. 3-12 Configuring Your System...
  • Page 46: System Management Submenu

    System Management Submenu Feature Choices Description Your Setting Sever Management Info Refer to “System Management Info Submenu.” Press ENTER System Event Logging Disabled When enabled, system events will be logged by BIOS and BMC. Enabled Clear Event Log Yes clears the system event log (SEL) in BMC. EMP Password switch Enables EMP password.
  • Page 47: Server Management Information Submenu

    Server Management Information Submenu Items on this menu can not be modified by the user. If items require changes, consult your system administrator. Feature Choices Description Your Setting Board Part Number Information field only Board Serial Number Information field only System Part Number Information field only System Serial Number...
  • Page 48: Boot Device Priority Submenu

    Boot Menu Feature Choices Description Your Setting Floppy Check Disabled If Enabled, system verifies diskette type on boot.. Disabled results in a faster boot. Enabled Boot Device Priority Refer to “Boot Device Priority Submenu.” Press ENTER Hard Drive Refer to “Hard Drive Submenu.” Press ENTER Removable Devices...
  • Page 49: Hard Drive Submenu

    Hard Drive Submenu For options on this menu, use the up or down arrow keys to select a device, then press the <+> or <-> keys to move the device higher or lower in the boot priority list. Option Description 1.
  • Page 50: Exit Menu

    Exit Menu You can make the following selections on the Exit Menu. Select an option using the up or down arrow keys, then press <Enter> to execute the option. Pressing <Esc> does not exit this menu. You must select one of the items from the menu or menu bar to exit. Choices Description Exit Saving Changes...
  • Page 51: Running The Symbios Configuration Utility

    Symbios Configuration Utility The Symbios Configuration Utility detects the SCSI host adapter located on the system board. Use the utility to: n Change adapter and SCSI device default values n Check and/or change SCSI device settings that may conflict with those of other devices in the server.
  • Page 52: Changing The Adapter And Device Configurations

    Changing the Adapter and Device Configurations The SCSI Configuration Utility Main Menu lists the onboard SCSI adapter and shows its current settings. The adapter controls the operation of the SCSI devices in your system (hard disk drives or removable media devices). Select “Adapter Setup”...
  • Page 53 SCSI Hard Disk Drives Your Configuration Description Recommended Setting or Display Only Dev0 Dev1 Dev2 Dev3 Device Selections Press for menu. Select device and ENTER press ENTER Sync Rate Width (bits) Disconnect Read/Write I/O timeout (secs) Scan for device at boot time Scan for SCSI LUNS Queue Tags SCSI Removable Media Devices...
  • Page 54: Optional Raid Controller

    Optional RAID Controller Factory Installed Controller One of the options available for your system is the dual channel Mylex AcceleRAID 250 ( Controller board, which gives your system the added security of fault tolerance. SecuRAID 210) If you order a system with the RAID controller, the system is pre-configured at the factory. Refer to the “RAID Configurations”...
  • Page 55: Configuring System Board Jumpers

    Configuring System Board Jumpers Before You Begin Only a qualified technical person should perform the procedures in this section. CAUTION Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage the system board. Modify the system board only at an ESD workstation. Otherwise, wear an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground.
  • Page 56 System Board Jumper Summary Jumper Block Pins (default in bold) What it does at system reset BMC Boot Block BMC boot block is write protected. 9-10, Protect Write Protect 10-11, Erase BMC boot block is erasable and programmable. BMC Forced Update System boots normally.
  • Page 57: Moving System Board Jumpers

    Moving System Board Jumpers CAUTION Before doing the procedures in this section, make sure that your system is powered off and unplug the AC power cord from the back of the chassis. Failure to disconnect power before moving the jumpers can result in personal injury and equipment damage.
  • Page 58: Resetting The Cmos Nvram

    Resetting the CMOS NVRAM To reset the CMOS NVRAM: Power down the your system. Remove the left side panel as described in Chapter 4 of this User’s Guide. Move the CMOS Clear jumper from pins 1-2 to pins 2-3. Refer to “Configuring System Board Jumpers”...
  • Page 59: Recovering The Bios

    Recovering the BIOS This procedure should only be performed by qualified technical personnel. CAUTION This jumper should only Leave Recovery Boot jumper at factory-default setting. be moved by a technically qualified person. Boot Block Write Protect This procedure should only be performed by qualified technical personnel. CAUTION Programming the boot block Leave boot block jumper at factory-default setting:...
  • Page 60 Configuring Your System 3-27...
  • Page 61: Upgrading Your System

    Upgrading Your System Static Precautions Preparing Your System for Upgrade Equipment Log Removing a Side Panel Installing a Side Panel Modifying the System Board Option Boards Hard Disk Drives Front Panel Removing EMI Shields and Filler Panels Removable Media Devices Removing the Top Cover Installing the Top Cover Removing the Removable Media Drive Bay...
  • Page 62: Static Precautions

    WARNING The DC push-button on/off switch on the front panel does not turn off the system AC power. Also, +5vdc is present on the system board whenever the AC power cord is connected between the system and an AC outlet. Before doing the procedures in this manual, make sure that your system is powered off and unplug the AC power cord from the back of the chassis.
  • Page 63: Preparing Your System For Upgrade

    Preparing Your System for Upgrade Depending on the upgrade, you will need one or more of the following tools: n Phillips screwdriver (#1 bit and #2 bit) n Flat-head screwdriver n Small needle nose pliers n Pen or pencil n ESD workstation or antistatic wrist strap (recommended) Equipment Log Use the equipment log form located at the end of this manual to record the model and serial number of your system, all installed options, and any other pertinent information specific to your...
  • Page 64: Removing A Side Panel

    Removing a Side Panel To install options in your system, you must remove the side panel on the left side of the system (as viewed from the front). The side panel on the right side of the system (as viewed from the front) only has to be removed when adding removable media devices.
  • Page 65: Installing A Side Panel

    Installing a Side Panel Before replacing the side panel, make sure no tools or loose parts have been left inside the system chassis. Make sure all option boards are firmly seated in their respective slots and that all interior cables are properly connected. Insert the metal tabs on the top and bottom of the side panel into their slots on the chassis.
  • Page 66: Modifying The System Board

    Modifying the System Board The following sections provide procedures for upgrading and configuring the system board in your system. Topics covered include: n Replacing the real-time clock battery n Replacing the Pentium II processor n Installing or removing DIMMs. CAUTION Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage add-in boards and other components;...
  • Page 67 Replacing the Real-Time Clock Battery Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Insert the tip of a small flat-bladed screwdriver, or equivalent, under the plastic tab on the San- in plastic retainer (A in figure). Gently push down on the screwdriver to lift the battery (B).
  • Page 68: Replacing The Pentium Ii Processor

    Replacing the Pentium II Processor This subsection provides the procedure for upgrading the Pentium II Processor in your system. The Pentium II processor is packaged as a Single Edge Connector Cartridge (SECC), packaged as a Single Edge Processor Package (SEPP), or packaged as a Single Edge Connector Cartridge Version 2 (SECC2).
  • Page 69 Replacing the SECC Version 1. Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. 2. Press the processor latches toward the center of the SEC cartridge to free them from the retention module, Item A in Figure "Removing a Processor" below. 3.
  • Page 70 7. Remove the new processor from its antistatic package and place it on a grounded, static-free surface or conductive foam pad. 8. Position the thermal pad on top of the new processor so that the holes in the thermal pad line up with the holes in the processor. 9.
  • Page 71 Replacing the SEPP Version 1. Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. 2. Pull the processor latches, Item A in Figure "Removing a Processor" below, out away from the edges of the SEPP to free them from the Universal Retention Module (URM).
  • Page 72 7. Remove the new processor from its antistatic package and place it on a grounded, static-free surface or conductive foam pad. 8. Position the heat sink, Item C in Figure "Processor Heat Sink Assembly" above, on the front of the new processor so that the holes in the heat sink line up with the holes in the processor.
  • Page 73 Replacing the SECC2 Version 1. Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. 2. Pull the processor latches, Item A in Figure "Removing a Processor" below, out away from the edges of the SEC cartridge to free them from the Universal Retention Module (URM).
  • Page 74 7. Remove the new processor from its antistatic package and place it on a grounded, static-free surface or conductive foam pad. 8. Position the heat sink, Item B in Figure "processor Heat Sink Assembly" above, on the front of the new processor so that the holes in the heat sink line up with the holes in the processor.
  • Page 75 DIMMs The system board contains three DIMM sockets labeled 1 through 3. Each socket can hold a single 72-bit DIMM module with 32MB, 64MB, 128MB, or 256MB of memory. When all three sockets are populated, the system board supports a maximum of 768 MB of memory with 256MB DIMMs. A DIMM will always be installed in the right socket.
  • Page 76: Memory Dimm Configurations

    Memory DIMM Configurations This table lists the distribution of DIMMs for specific memory configurations. System Memory Configurations System Capacity (MB) Capacity per DIMM slot (MB) Any DIMM Slot Order Slot 1 Slot 2 Slot 3 4-16 Upgrading Your System...
  • Page 77: Installing Dimms

    Installing DIMMs Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. CAUTION Observe static precautions. Use an antistatic wrist strap. Hold DIMMs only by their edges. Holding the DIMM module only by the edges, remove it from its antistatic package. Position the DIMM so that the two notches in the bottom edge of the DIMM align with the keyed socket.
  • Page 78 Removing DIMMs CAUTION Use extreme care when removing a DIMM. Too much pressure can damage the socket slot. Apply only enough pressure on the plastic ejector levers to release the DIMM Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Gently push the plastic ejector levers out and down to eject a DIMM from its socket.
  • Page 79: Option Boards

    I/O Address Option Slot Option Board Address Set by BIOS Set by BIOS Set by BIOS PCI Slot 2 (see PCI/ISA Slot Location NEC SecuRAID 110 illustration above) Mylex AcceleRAID 150) NEC SecuRAID 210 Mylex AcceleRAID 250) Upgrading Your System 4-19...
  • Page 80: Installing An Option Board

    Installing an Option Board Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Remove and save the expansion slot screw and cover. Removing the Expansion Slot Screw and Cover CAUTION Observe static precautions. Use an antistatic wrist strap. Remove the option board from its protective wrapper, holding the board only by the edges.
  • Page 81 Installing an Option Board Align the rounded notch in the retaining bracket with the threaded hole in the expansion slot frame. The retaining bracket fits into the space that was occupied by the expansion slot cover. Reinstall the screw in the threaded hole. Be sure to push the bracket slot up against the screw before you tighten it.
  • Page 82: Removing An Option Board

    Removing an Option Board Note: Expansion slot covers must be installed on all vacant slots to maintain the electromagnetic emissions characteristics of the system and to assure proper cooling of the system components. Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Disconnect any cables attached to the option board you are removing.
  • Page 83: Hard Disk Drives

    Hard Disk Drives Your system supports a variety of optional IDE or SCSI hard disks. Contact your sales representative or dealer for a list of approved devices. The internal hard disk drives are located in the 3.5-inch drive bay. 3.5-Inch Drive Bay Locations If you are adding or removing an IDE hard disk device, consider the following: n The system board supports a primary and secondary IDE channel connector.
  • Page 84 n When adding IDE devices, such as hard disk, valid configurations are: Connector Device Secondary CD-ROM (master) HD3 or Tape (slave) Primary HD1 (master) HD2 (slave) If you are adding or removing a SCSI hard disk device, consider the following: n The system uses single-ended SCSI host adapters and supports single-ended or low Voltage Drives (LVD) drives.
  • Page 85: Installing An Internal Hard Disk Drive

    Installing an Internal Hard Disk Drive Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. CAUTION Observe static precautions. Use an antistatic wrist strap. Remove the 3.5-inch hard disk drive from its protective wrapper. Record the drive model and serial number in the equipment log.
  • Page 86 Drive Location Power Connector 1 (HD0) 2 (HD1) 3 (HD2) 4 (HD2) Any available power connector Swing the drive bay into the chassis and replace the three screws on the drive bay. Replace the left side panel and power on the system. Configure the system as described in Chapter 3, “Configuring Your System.”...
  • Page 87: Removing An Internal Hard Disk Drive

    Removing an Internal Hard Disk Drive Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Disconnect the signal and power cables from the back of the drive. It is necessary to completely remove the cables from all the drives before the drive can be removed. Remove the three screws holding the 3.5-inch drive bay to the chassis.
  • Page 88: Removing The Front Panel

    Front Panel The plastic front panel assembly is a one piece assembly. The appropriate removable filler panels are attached to the corresponding EMI shields. If you are installing peripheral devices in the external bays above the 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, you must remove the front cover along with the corresponding filler panel and EMI shield.
  • Page 89: Installing The Front Panel

    Installing the Front Panel Align the front panel tabs with the slots in the front of the chassis. Press the front panel onto the front of the system chassis until the tabs snap into their slots. Install the side panels as described earlier in this chapter. Power on the system as described earlier in this chapter.
  • Page 90: Removing Emi Shields And Filler Panels

    Removing EMI Shields and Filler Panels Power off the system and remove the front panel as described earlier in this chapter. Locate the EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) shield and filler panel covering the bay into which you are installing a peripheral device. The filler panel is released by pressing on its sides and removing it from the slots in the EMI shield.
  • Page 91: Removable Media Devices

    Removable Media Devices A variety of IDE and SCSI removable media devices can be installed in peripheral bays A, B, and C. An IDE CD-ROM is always mounted in bay C. A 3.5-inch diskette drive is always mounted in bay D. Other devices should be installed in the first available bay from the top (bay A). Contact your sales representative or dealer for a list of approved devices.
  • Page 92 CAUTION Observe static precautions. Use an antistatic wrist strap. Remove the device from its protective wrapper and place it on an antistatic surface. Record the drive model and serial number in the equipment log. Set any drive jumpers or switches before you install the drive. See the documentation that comes with the device for jumper or switch information.
  • Page 93: Removing A 5.25-Inch Device

    Removing a 5.25-Inch Device Power off the system and remove the side panels as described earlier in this chapter. Remove the front panel as described earlier in this chapter. Disconnect the power cable (A) and ribbon data cable (B) from the device you are removing. Removing a Removable Media Device Remove and save the four screws from the device.
  • Page 94: Removing The Top Cover

    Removing the Top Cover CAUTION For proper cooling and airflow, do not operate the system with the side panels and top cover removed. Always replace the panels before powering on the system. If you are removing the top panel after the system is set up, you must first power off the system and all external devices.
  • Page 95: Installing The Top Cover

    Installing the Top Cover Insert the metal tabs on bottom of the top panel into their slots on the chassis. Slide the top panel forward as far as it will go. Installing the top Cover Seat the rear of the top panel onto the chassis. Upgrading Your System 4-35...
  • Page 96 Removing the Removable Media Drive Bay Power off the system and remove both side panels and top cover as described earlier in this chapter. Remove the front panel as described earlier in this chapter. Disconnect the power cables (A) and ribbon data cables (B) from the devices installed in the drive bay.
  • Page 97 Remove the front panel as described earlier in this chapter. Position the removable media drive bay in the chassis. Supporting the bottom of the drive bay, install the two screws securing the drive bay to the top of the chassis. Installing the Removable Media Drive Bay Install the screws securing the drive bay to the front of the chassis.
  • Page 98: Removing The System Board

    Removing the System Board CAUTION The system board can be extremely sensitive to ESD and always requires careful handling. After removing it from the system, place it component-side up on a nonconductive, static-free surface to prevent shorting out the battery leads. Do not slide the system board over any surface.
  • Page 99: Installing The System Board

    Removing the System Board Carefully lift the system board out of the chassis and place it component-side up on a nonconductive, static free surface. Remove the Processor Retention Module. Save this module for installation on the replacement system board. Removing the Processor Retention Module If you are replacing the system board, make a record of the system board jumper settings so you can correctly configure the new board before you install it.
  • Page 100: Replacing The Power Supply

    Remove both side panels as described earlier in this chapter. Remove top panel as described earlier in this chapter. CAUTION Observe static precautions Install the Processor Retention Module removed from the original system board and configure the system board jumpers on the new board before you install it. If this is a replacement system board, install the Real-Time Clock battery, the Pentium II Processor(s) and any DIMMs removed from the original system board.
  • Page 101 Removing the Power Supply Remove the power supply from the system. Reverse these steps to install a replacement power supply. Upgrading Your System 4-41...
  • Page 102: Removing The Fan

    Removing the Fan Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Remove the hard disk drive bay as described earlier in this chapter. Tag and disconnect the fan cable connected to the system board. Remove the four screws that secure the fan to the chassis rear panel.
  • Page 103: Installing The Fan

    Installing the Fan Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Remove the hard disk drive bay as described earlier in this chapter. Position the fan as shown against the inside of the rear panel. The fan label faces the rear panel and the fan power cable is positioned at the bottom right side of the fan.
  • Page 104: Replacing The Speaker

    Replacing the Speaker Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. The speaker is supported by three tabs (A) and is located at the front of the chassis as shown in the following illustration. Power LED Speaker Hard Disk Drive LED...
  • Page 105: Replacing The Led Assembly

    Replacing the LED Assembly Power off the system and remove the left and right side panels as described earlier in this chapter. Tag and disconnect the power and hard disk drive LED cables from the system board. Power LED Speaker Hard Disk Drive LED Power Switch Power and Hard Disk Drive LED Cable Connections...
  • Page 106 Feed the cables of the replacement LED assembly through the mounting holes in the front and side of the chassis. Insert the bottom tab of the LED assembly into mounting hole in the front of the chassis and while pushing downward on the top tab of the LED assembly, snap the LED assembly into place.
  • Page 107: Replacing The Power Switch

    Replacing the Power Switch Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Tag and disconnect the power switch cable from the system board. Power LED Speaker Hard Disk Drive LED Power Switch Power Switch Cable Connection Remove the front panel as described earlier in this chapter.
  • Page 108 Position the replacement power switch behind the front of the chassis and secure it with two Phillips-head screws inserted through the front of the chassis. Connect the power switch cable to the system board connector. Install the front panel as described earlier in this chapter. Install the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter.
  • Page 109 Replacing the Intrusion Switch Power off the system and remove the left side panel as described earlier in this chapter. Tag and disconnect the intrusion switch cable from the system board connector. Intrusion Alarm Connector Intrusion Alarm Switch Cable Connection Using a small Phillips-head screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the intrusion switch to the rear of the chassis.
  • Page 110: Problem Solving

    Problem Solving Static Precautions Troubleshooting Checklists Additional Troubleshooting Procedures Specific Problems and Corrective Actions Problems with the Network PCI Installation Tips BIOS User’s Information...
  • Page 111: Static Precautions

    This chapter helps you identify and solve problems that may occur during system installation or while using your system. The first section of this chapter tells you how to reset your system in the event of problems. The next few sections provide troubleshooting checklists and procedural steps that help you isolate specific system problems.
  • Page 112: Troubleshooting Checklists

    Troubleshooting Checklists The following subsections provide troubleshooting checklists for problems that occur at initial system startup, when you run new application software, and after the system hardware and software have been running correctly. Initial System Startup Incorrect installation or configuration usually causes problems that occur at initial system startup. Hardware failure is a less frequent cause.
  • Page 113 n Are the correct device drivers installed? n Is the software correctly configured for the system? n Are you using the software correctly? n If other software runs correctly on the system, contact your vendor about the failing software. If the problems persist with the software, contact the software vendor's customer service representative.
  • Page 114: After System Has Been Running Correctly

    After System Has Been Running Correctly Problems that occur after the system hardware and software have been running correctly often indicate equipment failure. However, many situations that are easy to correct can also cause such problems. If you have problems after the system has been running correctly, check the following: n If you are running the software from a diskette or CD-ROM, try a new copy of the software.
  • Page 115: Additional Troubleshooting Procedures

    Additional Troubleshooting Procedures This section provides a more detailed approach to diagnostic testing and identification of a problem and locating its source. Use the following troubleshooting procedures to help you identify a problem. These general procedures lead you through the following: n Preparing the system for diagnostic testing n Monitoring POST while it is running n Verifying proper operation of key system LEDs...
  • Page 116: Monitoring Post

    Monitoring POST Each time you turn on the system, the Power-On Self-Test (POST) runs automatically and checks the system board, processor board, memory, keyboard, and most installed peripheral devices. During the memory test, POST displays the amount of memory that it is able to access and test. Depending on the amount of memory, it may take several minutes to complete the memory test.
  • Page 117: Verifying Proper Operation Of Key System Indicators

    Verifying Proper Operation of Key System Indicators As POST determines the system configuration, it tests for the presence of each mass storage device installed in the system. As each device is checked, its activity indicator should turn on briefly. Check for the following: n Does the diskette drive activity indicator turn on briefly.
  • Page 118: Specific Problems And Corrective Actions

    Specific Problems and Corrective Actions This section provides possible solutions for the following specific problems: n Power LED does not light n No beep or incorrect beep pattern n No characters appear on screen n Characters on the screen appear distorted or incorrect n System cooling fan does not rotate n Diskette drive activity LED does not light n Hard disk drive activity LED does not light...
  • Page 119: Incorrect Or No Beep Code

    Incorrect or No Beep Code Check the following: n Is the speaker enabled? n Is the speaker cable connected to the system board? If the system operates normally, but there was no beep, the speaker may be defective, contact your service representative for assistance.
  • Page 120: Characters Are Distorted Or Incorrect

    Characters are Distorted or Incorrect Check the following: n Are the brightness and contrast controls properly adjusted on the video display? Refer to the documentation supplied with your video display. n Are the video monitor signal and power cables properly installed? n If the problem persists, the video monitor may be faulty or it may be the incorrect type.
  • Page 121: Diskette Drive Activity Led Does Not Light

    Diskette Drive Activity LED Does Not Light Check the following: n Are the diskette drive power and signal cables properly installed? n Is the diskette drive properly configured? n Is the diskette drive activity light always on? If so, the signal cable may be plugged in incorrectly.
  • Page 122: Cd-Rom Drive Activity Light Does Not Light

    CD-ROM Drive Activity Light Does Not Light Check the following: n Is the power and signal cable to the CD-ROM drive properly installed? n Are all relevant switches and jumpers on the drive set correctly? n Is the drive properly configured? n Is the onboard IDE controller enabled? : The hard Note: Front panel hard disk LED indicates IDE and SCSI devices...
  • Page 123 Press to display the option menu. Enter Select and press Enable Enter If you are finished editing the settings for the system board, press . This takes you back up to the main menu, Step 3. Press again to return to the main SSU menu. Select Step 4, Save Configuration.
  • Page 124: Bootable Cd-Rom Is Not Detected

    Enable F2 Prompt by Changing a Jumper and Using SSU If you do not have an SSU diskette or CD available, you can clear CMOS memory to enable the prompt. This means you must change a jumper on the system board, run the SSU, save your changes, and change the jumper back to the default setting.
  • Page 125: Pci Installation Tips

    n Make sure you have loaded the network drivers. n Check all cable connections. n Try another port on the hub. n Make sure you have the correct type of cable between the adapter and the hub. Some hubs require a crossover cable while others require a straight-through cable (for more information on crossover cabling, see your hub documentation).
  • Page 126 BIOS Messages Message Description Cache SRAM Passed Where is the amount of system cache in kilobytes successfully tested. nnnn nnnn Diskette drive A error Diskette Drive is present but fails the BIOS POST diskette tests. Check to see that the drive is defined with the proper diskette type in Setup and that Diskette drive B error the diskette drive is correctly attached.
  • Page 127 BIOS Messages (Continued) Message Description Press <F2> to enter SETUP Optional message displayed during POST. Can be turned off in Setup. Previous boot incomplete - Default configuration Previous POST did not successfully complete. POST loads default values used and offers to run Setup. If the failure was caused by incorrect values and they are not corrected, the next boot will likely fail.
  • Page 128: Post Error Codes And Messages

    POST Error Codes and Messages Whenever a recoverable error occurs during POST, BIOS displays a message on the video display screen and causes the speaker to beep as the message appears. The “POST Error Codes and Messages” table is a list of the error codes and messages written at the start of each POST test. POST Error Codes and Messages Code Error message...
  • Page 129 POST Error Codes and Messages (Continued) Code Error message 0405 Expansion ROM not initialized 0406 Warning: IRQ not configured 0504 Resource Conflict 0505 Expansion ROM not initialized 0506 Warning: IRQ not configured 0601 Device configuration changed 0602 Configuration error - device disabled 8100 Processor failed BIST 8104...
  • Page 130 Problem Solving 5-21...
  • Page 133: Illustrated Parts Breakdown

    Illustrated Parts Breakdown Exploded View Field Replaceable Units Pentium II Processors Hard Disk Drives Tape Drives CD-ROM Drive RAID Controllers and Cache Network Option Boards Memory Expansion...
  • Page 134: Exploded View

    This section provides an exploded view and parts lists for the server’s major assemblies. Part numbers are also provided for optional hardware. Clicking your mouse on an exploded view item number links you to the parts listing. Exploded View 6-2 Illustrated Parts Breakdown...
  • Page 135: Field Replaceable Units

    Field Replaceable Units Reference Number Description Part Number CMOS/RTC 3V Battery 158-060367-000 (CR2032 available locally) 182314 System Board. No processor board or memory DIMMs. NOTE: System boards returned for repair or replacement must have RAM removed. Replacement boards will not include RAM. Extra parts returned are not recoverable.
  • Page 136 Reference Number Description Part Number LED Assembly 149971 External media devices: Select from the following: CDROM Drives: Refer to the “CDROM Drive” section of this chapter. Tape Drives: Refer to the “Tape Drives” section of this chapter. Power Switch Assy 149976 Hard Disk Drives: Refer to the “Hard Disk Drives”...
  • Page 137: Pentium Ii Processors

    Pentium II Processors Upgrades Description Part Number 266 MHz Pentium II Upgrade Kit 203360 333 MHz Pentium II Upgrade Kit 203335 350 MHz Pentium II Upgrade Kit 203337 400 MHz Pentium II Upgrade Kit 203339 Replaceable Parts Description Part Number 266 MHz Pentium II x 512KB 081788-01 333 MHz Pentium II x 512KB...
  • Page 138 Hard Disk Drives Upgrades Description Part Number Kit, 4 GB UltraWide SCSI HDD, ST34520W 200436 Kit, 9 GB UltraWide SCSI HDD, ST39140W 200438 Kit, 4 GB LVD SCSI HDD, ST34573LW 203362 Kit, 9 GB LVD SCSI HDD, ST39173LW 203364 Kit, 4.3 GB EIDE, QUANTUM SE 203124 Kit, 6.4 GB EIDE, QUANTUM SE 203354...
  • Page 139: Tape Drives

    Tape Drives Upgrades Description Part Number SCSI DAT TAPE, DDS-3, 12/24GB 203116 20/40 GB DLT Internal Kit 203299 DDS-2 DAT Tape 4/8GB,Seagate STD28000N 203391 SCSI DAT Autoloader, DDS-3 203212 Replaceable Parts Description Part Number SCSI DAT TAPE, DDS-3, 12/24GB 320548 20/40 GB Internal DLT 4000 320150 4/8 GB STD28000N...
  • Page 140: Raid Controllers And Cache

    RAID Controllers and Cache Upgrades Description Part Number Kit AMI RAIDExpress762, 1-CH, No Cache Controller 203366 Kit AMI RAIDExpress762 Cache SIMM, 4MB Upgrade 203378 Kit AMI RAIDExpress762 Cache SIMM, 8MB Upgrade 203375 Kit AMI RAIDExpress762 Cache SIMM, 16MB Upgrade 203374 Kit AMI RAIDExpress762 Cache SIMM, 32MB Upgrade 203377 Kit AMI MegaRAID LVDS 438, 1-CH Board...
  • Page 141: Network Option Boards

    Network Option Boards Upgrades Description Part Number Intel PRO/100+, Without Wake-On-LAN 203369 3COM 3C905 203253 Replaceable Parts Description Part Number NIC, 3COM 3C905-TX 204-00001 NIC, Intel PRO 100+ 030305 Memory Expansion Upgrades Description Part Number 32 MB (1 DIMM, ECC) 203325 64 MB (1 DIMM, ECC) 203327...
  • Page 142 6-10 Illustrated Parts Breakdown...
  • Page 143: System Cabling

    System Cabling Before You Begin Static Precautions Standard Configuration RAID Configuration...
  • Page 144: Before You Begin

    This appendix contains information and procedures on cabling configurations used in your system. The configurations include: n Standard Configuration n RAID Configuration. Before You Begin WARNING The DC push-button on/off switch on the front panel does not turn off the system AC power.
  • Page 145: Standard Configuration

    Standard Configuration Your system is cabled using a dual channel on-board IDE Controller and an on-board Symbios Logic SYM53C875 SCSI Controller. The on-board IDE controller supports the internally mounted CD-ROM as its first (master) device and an optional IDE device as its second (slave) device. The SCSI controller attaches to a 68-pin 16-bit (wide) SCSI connector interface and is capable of supporting a maximum of four 1-inch high SCSI hard disk drives or three 1.6-inch high SCSI hard disk drives.
  • Page 146 SCSI terminator IDE slave device (HD3 or tape) Optional SCSI tape drive Secondary IDE cable Narrow SCSI to wide SCSI adapter Secondary IDE connector Wide SCSI interface cable IDE master device (HD1) Wide SCSI connector IDE slave device (HD2) Diskette drive Primary IDE cable Diskette interface cable Primary IDE connector...
  • Page 147 n Valid IDE configurations are: Connector Device Secondary CD-ROM (master) HD3 or Tape (slave) Primary HD1 (master) HD2 (slave) Referring to the "SCSI Disk System Cable Configuration" Figure, one of the options available for your system is to use the on-board SCSI controller to control wide SCSI hard disk drives in the internal bay.
  • Page 148 SCSI terminator Diskette connector Optional SCSI tape drive IDE master device (CD-ROM) Wide SCSI interface cable IDE slave device (tape) Wide SCSI connector Secondary IDE cable Diskette drive Secondary IDE connector Diskette interface cable System board SCSI Disk System Cable Configuration A-6 System Cabling...
  • Page 149 IDE CABLE (40-pins) WIDE SCSI CABLE (68-pins) Standard System Cable Routing System Cabling A-7...
  • Page 150: Raid Configuration

    RAID Configuration One of the options available for your system is the NEC SecuRAID 110 or 210 (Mylex AcceleRAID 150 or 250) RAID Controller board, which gives your system the added security of fault tolerance. If you order a system with the RAID controller, the system is pre-cabled at the factory (see RAID System Cabling Configuration illustration below).
  • Page 151 SCSI terminator IDE master device (CD-ROM) Optional SCSI tape drive IDE slave device (tape) Wide SCSI interface cable Secondary IDE cable Wide SCSI connector Secondary IDE connector Diskette drive System board Controller Diskette interface cable Mylex AcceleRAID 250 Controller Diskette connector RAID System Cable Configuration IDE CABLE (40-pins)
  • Page 152: System Setup Utility

    System Setup Utility System Setup Utility (SSU) Creating SSU Diskettes Running the SSU Exiting the SSU...
  • Page 153: System Setup Utility (Ssu)

    System Setup Utility (SSU) The System Setup Utility (SSU) is a DOS-based utility that supports extended system configuration operations for onboard resources and add-in boards. It also allows you to view the system event log and to set system boot and security options. Use the SSU when you need to: n Add and remove ISA Legacy boards affecting the assignment of resources (ports, memory, IRQs, DMA)
  • Page 154: Creating Ssu Diskettes

    Creating SSU Diskettes SSU may be run directly from the E CD-ROM or from DOS-bootable XPRESS UILDER diskettes. Before you can run the SSU from diskettes, you must copy the SSU from the CD-ROM to a diskette. XPRESS UILDER If your diskette drive is disabled, or improperly configured, you must use the FLASH- resident BIOS Setup Utility (F2) to enable it so that you can use the SSU.
  • Page 155: Running The Ssu

    Running the SSU Turn on your video monitor and your system. There are two ways to start the SSU: Insert the SSU diskette in drive After creating an SSU diskette from the CD: A, and reboot your server from the diskette. Insert the SSU diskette From diskette after installing your operating system: in Drive A.
  • Page 156: Customizing The Ssu

    Customizing the SSU The SSU lets you customize the user interface according to your preferences. The AF sets these preferences and saves them in the AF.INI file so that they take effect the next time you start the SSU. There are three user-customizable settings: this button lets you change the default colors associated with different Color—...
  • Page 157: Launching A Task

    Launching a Task It is possible to have many tasks open at the same time, although some tasks may require complete control to avoid possible conflicts. The tasks achieve complete control by keeping the task as the center of operation until the user closes the task window. There are three ways to launch a task: n In the SSU Main window, double-click on the task name under Available Tasks to display the main window for the selected task.
  • Page 158: Resource Configuration Add-In (Rca) Window

    Resource Configuration Add-in (RCA) Window The RCA provides three major functions: n Creates representations of devices that cannot be discovered by the system (ISA cards) n Modifies the contents of the system by adding and removing devices n Modifies the resources used by devices. You can use the RCA window to define an ISA card or add an ISA card by clicking on the appropriate button.
  • Page 159: Defining An Isa Card

    Defining an ISA Card An ISA card usually comes with a vendor-created .CFG file that specifies the resources the card requires to function properly. If the .CFG file is unavailable, you must manually create it or define the card through the SSU. Defining an ISA card consists of specifying the name of the card and the resources it consumes.
  • Page 160 Adding and Removing ISA Cards Window System Setup Utility B-9...
  • Page 161: Modifying Resources

    Modifying Resources Modifying the resources of a device may be necessary to accommodate certain operating systems, applications, and drivers. It may also be necessary to modify resources to resolve a conflict. To modify the resources associated with a device: Highlight the device in the Devices section of the RCA window. Press the spacebar or double-click on the entry.
  • Page 162: Recommended Resource Settings

    Recommended Resource Settings The following table shows the recommended RCA system board settings for a sample system and provides a place for you to record any changes you make to the settings. YOUR SYSTEM GROUP NORMAL SETTING CONFIGURATION System Identification and Version Information SSU Configuration File Version Display Only MP Spec.
  • Page 163 System Resource Usage Window B-12 System Setup Utility...
  • Page 164: Multiboot Add-In (Mba) Window

    Multiboot Add-in (MBA) Window The MBA lets you set the system boot priority. The boot priority is the order the BIOS uses to boot the operating system from various devices in your system. To set the boot priority of your system: From the SSU Main Menu, launch the MBA by selecting the “Boot Devices”...
  • Page 165: System Event Log (Sel) Window

    System Event Log (SEL) Window The SEL displays information on the events stored in the system log area. The information stored includes the name of the event, the date and time the event occurred and data pertinent to the event. Event data may include POST error codes that reflect hardware errors or software conflicts within the system.
  • Page 166: Emergency Management Port

    Emergency Management Port Emergency Management Port How the EMP Works EMP Requirements and Configurations Setting Up the Server for the EMP Main EMP Window Phonebook Management Plug-ins...
  • Page 167 Emergency Management Port The Emergency Management Port (EMP) allows remote server management via a modem or direct connection. The COM2 port on your server provides an interface to Console Manager software located in a second system. Modem Managed Server Management Console Sensors Event Console...
  • Page 168: How The Emp Works

    How the EMP Works The EMP shares use of the COM 2 port with your system. When the EMP has control of the port, the port operates in command state. When the system has control of it, the port operates in redirect state.
  • Page 169: Emergency Management Port Console

    Console in Redirect State The above figure shows the EMP window in redirect state with the terminal window. The text that appears on the server monitor displays in the redirect window. Availability of the various EMP features is determined by two things: the EMP access mode selected during configuration in the System Management Submenu of the BIOS Server Menu, and if the server's COM 2 port is configured for console redirect in BIOS.
  • Page 170: Emp Requirements And Configurations

    EMP Access Modes (Server not Configured for Console Redirect) Mode Server is powered off During POST After OS boots Disabled Redirect window appears, but is blank Redirect window appears, but Redirect window appears, is blank but is blank Pre-boot EMP commands available EMP commands available Redirect window appears, but is blank...
  • Page 171 In the EMP Password area of the System Management Submenu, type in a password of up to 8 alphanumeric characters. If a beep is heard, the password was not accepted and a different password must be entered. : Choose either Disabled, Pre-boot, or Always Active, depending on the type EMP Access Modes of EMP access needed.
  • Page 172: Console Redirection Submenu

    Console Redirection Submenu These settings in the Console Redirection Submenu of the Server menu must be set exactly as noted to be able to use the EMP. : Select 2F8. This is the COM 2 port that must be used by the EMP. The IRQ# COM Port Address setting automatically populates with the correct number based on the COM Port Address choice.
  • Page 173: Server Name

    Status Bar The status bar displays at the bottom of the current window. It contains the following status information: : the name of the server (stored in the Phonebook) connected to. SERVER NAME : the type of line connection. This would be either direct or modem. LINE : either Redirect of EMP, depending on whether the EMP has control of the COM 2 port.
  • Page 174: Server Control Operations

    Server Control Operations Three server control operations are available from the menu or toolbar of the main EMP window, remote server connection, powering the server on and off, and resetting the server. The server console mode can also be switched between EMP active and BIOS redirect modes through post- power-up and reset options.
  • Page 175: Power Off

    - must be filled out when the line selection is set to Direct connect (Serial Line). Serial Line - must be 19200 for EMP to connect properly. Baud Rate - set the COM Port number to which the null modem serial cable is COM Port No.
  • Page 176: Option Group

    Reset Selecting Reset from the Action menu generates the Reset dialog so that you can remotely reset the server with post-reset options. Reset Dialog Options available in the dialog are: - resets the server with the selected post-reset options. This operation is not System Reset allowed if the server is configured in RESTRICTED mode for EMP operations.
  • Page 177: Operation

    Phonebook The EMP provides a support plug-in known as the Phonebook. The Phonebook stores names and numbers of servers in a list that can be updated by adding, modifying or deleting entries. The Phonebook can be opened from the main menu and tool bars, or launched from the Connect dialog by clicking the Config button.
  • Page 178 Save the SEL to a file View SEL summary info View all SEL entries View SEL info by event type View SEL info by sensor type Set SEL display mode to either Hex or verbose mode Set the SEL output file format to either text or binary format Close the SEL viewer Exit the EMP SEL Viewer...
  • Page 179 SEL Viewer Menu Options The following menu options are found on the SEL viewer menu bar: File - you can view SEL data from a previously saved file if it was stored in binary Open format. Selecting the Open menu item allows you to specify a filename under which the data is found.
  • Page 180: Event Description

    Using the Sensor Type Code Table Compare the message shown in the SEL viewer display (above) to the Sensor Type and Number Sensor Type/Number in Verbose column in the table below. Using information in the Sensor column in the table you can determine the physical component which generated the SEL Name message.
  • Page 181 Sensor Type Codes (continued) Sensor Type and Number in Verbose Sensor Name Generator ID Voltage # 06 5V Standby Voltage # 07 Baseboard SCSI-A Term1 Voltage # 08 Baseboard SCSI-A Term2 Voltage # 09 Baseboard SCSI-A Term3 Voltage # 0A Baseboard –12V Voltage # 0B Baseboard SCSI-B Term1...
  • Page 182: Sdr Viewer

    System Event Logging Format Table Sensor Type and Sensor Type and Event Description in hex Event type Event Description Number in verbose Number in hex System Event #EF 12 EF E7 01 -- -- System Boot Event System Boot Event … System Event #EF 12 EF E7 00 -- --...
  • Page 183: Fru Viewer

    SDR Viewer Menu Options The following menu options are found on the SDR viewer menu bar: File - closes the SDR viewer. Close - exits the EMP. Exit View - displays all records from the SDR repository. Display all Records - displays the records of a particular SDR type.
  • Page 184 FRU Viewer Menu Options The following menu options are found on the FRU viewer menu bar: File - closes the FRU viewer. Close - exits the EMP. Exit View - displays all FRU data, which consists of chassis, board, and product Display all Records information.
  • Page 185 Connectors Connector Locations ATX Power Connector AT-Style Front Panel Connector Fan Interface Server Management Hard Drive LED Connector Chassis Intrusion Connector VGA Video Port Keyboard and Mouse Parallel Port Serial Ports RJ-45 Network Diskette Drive Narrow SCSI Wide SCSI...
  • Page 186: Connector Locations

    Connector Locations This section provides connector location information about the connectors in the system. System Board This figure shows connector locations on the system board. B C D Processor connector PCI slots for add in boards DIMM slot 3 ISA slots for add in boards DIMM slot 2 VGA monitor port DIMM slot 1...
  • Page 187: Rear Panel

    Rear Panel This figure shows connector locations on the rear panel. Mouse PS/2-compatible 6-pin mini-DIN connector. Keyboard PS/2-compatible 6-pin mini-DIN connector. Printer 25-pin parallel port connector. Serial ports Serial port 9-pin connectors. LAN connector RJ-45 Telephone connector Green LAN status light When lit, LAN is linked to network.
  • Page 188 AT-Style Front Panel Connector This figure shows connector locations on the AT-style front panel connector. Power Switch (PWR) Pins 1 and 2 Hard Disk Drive LED (DRV) Pins 6 and 7 Speaker (SPKR) Pins 8, 10 and 11 Power LED (PWR LED) Pins 12 and 14 AT-Style Front Panel Connector Locations D-4 Connectors...
  • Page 189: Atx Power Connector

    ATX Power Connector ATX Power Connector Pinout Signal Wire color Signal Wire color +3.3 VDC Orange +3.3 VDC Orange 3.3 V sense Brown +3.3 VDC Orange -12 VDC Blue Black Black +5 VDC PS-ON_L Green Black Black +5 VDC Black Black Black PWR-OK...
  • Page 190: Server Management

    Fan Connector Pinout Signal +12V Fan Sensor Server Management Server Management Module Connector Pinout Signal Description CPU_SMI_L System Management Interrupt LOCAL_I2C_SCL C clock line Ground Reserved PWR_CNTRL_SFC_L Host power supply on/off control LOCAL_I2C_SDA C serial data line 5VSTNDBY +5V standby indication (power OK) KEYLOCK_SFC_L Keyboard lock signal CPU_NMI...
  • Page 191: Hard Drive Led Connector

    Hard Drive LED Connector Hard Drive LED Connector Pinout Signal DRV_ACT_L DRV_ACT_L Chassis Intrusion Connector Chassis Intrusion Connector Pinout Signal DETECT_L VGA Video Port Video Port Connector Pinout Signal Signal Green Blue DDCDAT HSYNC VSYNC DDCCLK Keyboard and Mouse The keyboard and mouse connectors are functionally equivalent. Keyboard and Mouse Connector Pinouts Keyboard signal Mouse signal...
  • Page 192: Serial Ports

    Signal Signal STROBE_L ACK_L Data bit 0 Busy Data bit 1 Data bit 2 SLCT Data bit 3 AUFDXT_L Data bit 4 ERROR_L Data bit 5 INIT_L Data bit 6 SLCTIN_L Data bit 7 18 25 Serial Ports Serial Port Connector Pinout Signal Description Data carrier detected...
  • Page 193: Diskette Drive

    RJ-45 Network RJ-45 Network Connector Pinout Signal Description Transmit data plus—the positive signal for the TD differential pair contains the serial output data stream transmitted onto the network Transmit data minus—the negative signal for the TD differential pair contains the same output as pin 1 Receive data plus—the positive signal for the RD differential pair contains the serial input data stream received from the network...
  • Page 194: Narrow Scsi

    Narrow SCSI Narrow SCSI Connector Pinout Signal Signal TERMPWR SCD0_L RESERVED RESERVED SCD1_L SCD2_L SATN_L SCD3_L SCD4_L SBSY_L SCD5_L SACK_L SCD6_L SRESET_L SCD7_L SMSG_L SCDP_L SSEL_L SCD_L RESERVED SREQ_L RESERVED SIO_L D-10 Connectors...
  • Page 195 Wide SCSI Wide SCSI Connector Pinout Signal Signal 1-16 49-50 TERMPWR TERMPWR TERMPWR TERMPWR 20-34 SCD12_L SATN_L SCD13_L SCD14_L SBSY_L SCD15_L SACK_L SCDPH_L RESET_L SCD0_L SMSG_L SCD1_L SSEL_L SCD2_L SCD_L SCD3_L SREQ_L SCD4_L SI/O_L SCD5_L SCD8_L SCD6_L SCD9_L SCD7_L SCD10_L SCDP_L SCD11_L Connectors D-11...
  • Page 196 IDE Connector Pinout Signal Signal RESET_L IDEDRQ DIOW_L DIOR_L IORDY DD10 CSEL (1 K p/d) IDEDAK_L DD11 IDEIRQ DD12 Reserved (N/C) IDESA1 DD13 PDIAG_L (tied to GND) IDESA0 DD14 IDESA2 IDECS1_L DD15 IDECS3_L IDEHDACT_L Keyed D-12 Connectors...
  • Page 197 ISA Connector Pinout Signal Signal Signal Signal IOCHK_L DACK2_L RESET BALE IRQ9 DRQ2 -12V Connector key Connector key SRDY_L SBHE_L MEMCS16_L +12V LA23 IOCS16_L IOCHRDY LA22 IRQ10 SMEMW_L LA21 IRQ11 SA19 SMEMR_L LA20 IRQ12 SA18 IOW_L LA19 IRQ15 SA17 IOR_L LA18 IRQ14 SA16...
  • Page 198 PCI Connector Pinout Signal Signal Signal Signal TRST_L -12 V AD16 AD17 +12 V +3.3 V * CBE2_L FRAME_L TD0 (NC) IRDY_L +5 V +5 V TRDY_L +3.3 V * INTA_L +5 V DEVSEL_L INTC_L INTB_L STOP_L +5 V INTD_L +3.3 V * LOCK_L Reserved...

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