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OWNER'S MANUAL
Version 5
 
 
 

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  • Page 1       OWNER’S MANUAL Version 5      ...
  • Page 2: Table Of Contents

    CONTENTS INTRODUCTION RS FEVA TECHNICAL DATA COMMISSIONING Preparation Unpacking Rigging the Mast Stepping the Mast Rigging the Boom The Daggerboard The Rudder Hoisting the Mainsail Rigging the Jib 3.10 Rigging the Gennaker 3.11 Completion SAILING HINTS Introduction Launching Leaving the Beach...
  • Page 3 WARRANTY GLOSSARY APPENDIX Useful Websites & Recommended Reading Basic RS Feva Tuning Guide RS Feva Gennaker Pole System RS Feva Life Cycle Three Essential Knots RS Feva Logbook All terms highlighted in blue throughout the Manual can be found in the Glossary of Terms.
  • Page 4: Introduction

    RS Feva, in a safe manner. It contains details of the craft, the equipment supplied or fitted, its systems, and information on its safe operation and maintenance. Please read this manual carefully and be sure that you understand its contents before using your RS Feva.
  • Page 5: Rs Feva Technical Data

    2. RS FEVA TECHNICAL DATA Length Overall (LOA): 3.64 m 12’0” Beam: 1.42 m 4’ 8” Hull Weight: 68 kg 136 lb Reefing Mainsail: 5.5 m² 57sq ft Batten Mainsail: 6.5 m² 68sq ft Jib: 2.1 m² 22sq ft Gennaker: 7.0 m²...
  • Page 6: Commissioning

    3.2 Unpacking Having unpacked your RS Feva, you should check that you have all of the items listed below before throwing away any of the packing, as there may be some small items still wrapped: •...
  • Page 7 • 1 x Foil Pack consisting: o 1 x rudder o 1 x rudder stock (fitted to Rudder blade) o 1 x Tiller arm o 1 x tiller extension o 1 x daggerboard o Self-tapping screw • 1 x main sail (S reefing mainsail or XL 3-batten mainsail) •...
  • Page 8 Mast Top Section Foil Pack Mast Lower Section Rig Pack Spinnaker Picture 3.1 RS Feva Equipment Downhaul   Jib   S heet   Mainsheet   Boom   S trop   Outhaul   Jib   H alyard   B lock  ...
  • Page 9: Rigging The Mast

    The Jib Pack and Gennaker pack are provided as standard with the RS Feva XL, and are an additional option with the RS Feva S. If you have ordered the Race Pack it should look like this: Package   Race   K icker  ...
  • Page 10 other. 2) Slide the inner sleeve of the mast top section into the end of the mast lower section (see picture 3.5). 3) Push the two mast sections together (see picture 4.6). The angle of the join should ensure that the mast track on the two sections aligns.
  • Page 11: Stepping The Mast

    3.4 Stepping the Mast The Mast-Gate Pin mast-gate pin is already fitted to your Feva. The pin has a locking nut on the bottom to prevent it from falling out. To close the mechanism (see picture 3.6): 1) Push the Pin through the gate...
  • Page 12 Picture 3.6 The Mast-Gate Pin Stepping the Mast 1) Remove the mast gate pin from the hole and open the mast gate (see picture 3.7). 2) Lay the mast along the boat with the mast foot in the mast well (see picture 3.8).
  • Page 13: Rigging The Boom

    Picture 3.8 The Mast Foot in the Mast Well Picture 3.9 The Mast Up With the Mast Gate Closed 3.5 Rigging the Boom To rig the boom, you will need: • The boom • The kicking cascade • The kicker boom strop 1) The standard outhaul will come rigged on the boom, if you have the Race pack,...
  • Page 14 Outhaul Clew hook Rope Clew Boom strap Picture 3.10 The Aft End of the Boom Picture 3.11 The Front End of the Boom and the Gooseneck 2) Take the kicker boom strop and tie a figure-of-eight knot in one end. 3) Thread the other end through the small metal eyelet on the top of the boom, about 50 cm from the front end.
  • Page 15: The Daggerboard

    3.12). Kicker Boom Strop Kicking Cascade Picture 3.12 The Kicking Cascade Attached 3.6 The Daggerboard To complete this section, you will need: • The daggerboard Daggerboard retaining elastic • Daggerboard retaining clip • Thread one end of the daggerboard retaining elastic through the daggerboard handle, and tie a figure of...
  • Page 16: The Rudder

    3.7 The Rudder To complete this section, you will require: • The rudder • The rudder stock • The Tiller • The Tiller retaining screw • The Tiller extension 1) Remove the rudder assembly from the foil pack and locate the components- the self-tapping screw is in a small bag, in with the tiller arm.
  • Page 17: Hoisting The Mainsail

    3.8 Hoisting the Mainsail To complete this section, you will need: • The mainsail (either the Feva S reefing mainsail, or the Feva XL 3-batten mainsail) • The Inglefield clip • The mainsheet 1) Take the mainsheet and thread one end through the large...
  • Page 18 16) Finally, coil up the halyard and stow it in the halyard bag. Picture 3.16 RS Feva Halyard Bag 17) Push the gooseneck onto the gooseneck mast collar. 18) Hook the clew of the...
  • Page 19 Mainsail Clew Hook Outhaul Strop Picture 3.17 The Mainsail Clew Hook 19) Take the downhaul rope and tie a large figure-of-eight knot in one end. 20) Thread the other end of the downhaul up through the gooseneck mast collar, on the port-hand side of the mast.
  • Page 20 22) Now connect the cleat on the kicking cascade to the Shackle on the mast (see picture 3.19). Picture 3.19 The Kicking Cascade If you are not fitting the jib or the gennaker, move straight on to Section 3.11 – Completion.  ...
  • Page 21: Rigging The Jib

    3.9 Rigging the Jib To complete this section, you will need: • 1 x Feva • 2 x Feva shrouds • 1 x shroud shackle • 1 x jib halyard block o 1 x jib halyard • o 1 x jib sheet •...
  • Page 22 Shroud Shackle Jib Halyard Block Tie Shrouds Picture 3.20 Fixing the Shrouds Jib Halyard Block Tie Jib Halyard Block Picture 3.21 Rigging the Jib Halyard Block...
  • Page 23 A good setting to start with is with the pins in the third hole down on shroud adjuster plate. HINT mast on the RS Feva is supported at deck level by the mast gate and the foredeck. The shrouds...
  • Page 24 Note: Instead of a rope loop, the RS Feva Race Jib has a metal eye at the head. Tie the jib halyard to this in the same way. 6) Pull the...
  • Page 25 • Find the centre of the jib sheet by folding it in half. • Take the flat stainless-steel shackle from the Jib Pack, and attach the sheet to it. • Attach the shackle to the jib clew plate. 8) Take one of the jib sheet ends and pass it through the bullseye and cleat,...
  • Page 26: Rigging The Gennaker

    Should the halyard be accidentally pulled through, please refer to Appendix 9.3 RS Feva Gennaker Pole System to re-rig. Before stepping the mast, you will need to 1) Shackle the gennaker halyard block...
  • Page 27 Now step the mast, following the instructions in Section 3.4 – Stepping the Mast TOP TIP Make sure that the gennaker halyard and the downhaul line are on opposite sides of the mast. To rig the gennaker: 1) Unroll the gennaker. 2) Take the tack line that emerges from the end of the...
  • Page 28 Knot in Tack Line Picture 3.26 The Tack of the Gennaker Picture 3.27 Threading the Gennaker Downhaul Line Picture 3.28 The Gennaker Downhaul Line 7) Find the middle of the gennaker sheet and double it over to form a loop. 8) Pass this loop through the eyelet at the clew of the gennaker.
  • Page 29: Completion

    13) Finally, pull the gennaker down into the gennaker chute. 3.11 Completion Now you are almost ready to go Feva sailing. All that is left to do is: • Fit the rudder to the back of the boat • Tidy the halyards away •...
  • Page 30: Sailing Hints

    4. SAILING HINTS 4.1 Introduction The RS Feva is a very rewarding boat to sail – to fully appreciate its handling, you should be comfortable with the basic techniques of sailing small boats. If you lack confidence or feel that a refresher is in order, there are many approved sailing schools which use the RS Feva.
  • Page 31: Leaving The Beach

    4.3 Leaving the Beach The easiest way to get going is for the helm to hop aboard while the crew holds the boat. The helm should put a little daggerboard down, with the shockcord with the plastic-tubing cover pulled forward, then move back to his normal position, and pull gently on the rudder downhaul to lower some of the...
  • Page 32: Sailing Close-hauled And Tacking

    4.4 Sailing Close-Hauled and Tacking When sailing close-hauled, or as close as possible to the wind, it is important to get boom as near as possible to the centreline, especially when sailing the RS Feva XL with the mainsail and jib. The...
  • Page 33: Sailing Downwind And Gybing

    4.5 Sailing Downwind and Gybing When sailing downwind, both sails should be let out as far as possible. Single- handed sailors should adopt a relaxing, reclined pose astride the thwart area, leaning back against the side deck. To gybe, pull the tiller towards you and, as the boat starts to turn, step across the...
  • Page 34 Picture 4.1 Hoisting the Gennaker gennaker halyard pulls the bowsprit out at the same time – when the gennaker is hoisted, you are ready to go. The crew, or the helm if sailing singlehanded, should now pull gently on the leeward gennaker sheet until the gennaker...
  • Page 35: Reefing

    There are two ways to reef a RS Feva S mainsail: HINT The jib is very effective in strong winds because the majority of its area is low down so it helps with balance.
  • Page 36 Round-Mast Furling This method of reefing is applicable to the RS Feva S mainsail, when sailed without a jib. • Detach the clew of the sail from the clew hook. • Detach the kicking cascade from the mast. • Using a firm two-handed grip, rotate the mast through three complete turns.
  • Page 37: Maintenance

    MAINTENANCE 5.1 Boat Care The RS Feva is made using Comptec PE3, a three-layer polyethylene construction. This is stiff and light, but will dent if subjected to point loading. The boat should be supported ashore on an approved RS trolley, as the...
  • Page 38: Foil Care

    RS Racing staff; however, the repair will never be invisible, due to the nature of the material. The joy of owning an RS Feva is that it is very hard wearing, and any dents and scratches it receives will not affect the structural integrity of the hull.
  • Page 39: Spar Care

    If you are going to trail your boat frequently, you may wish to invest in some RS Racing padded rudder bags. These will protect your RS Feva from any damage caused by the foils.
  • Page 40: Warranty

    This warranty does not apply if the boat has been altered, modified, or repaired without prior written approval of RS Sailing. Any changes to the hull structure, deck structure, rig or foils without the written approval of RS Sailing will void this warranty.
  • Page 41: Glossary

    7. GLOSSARY At the back Anchor Line Rope that attaches the anchor to the boat Astern Behind the boat Asymmetric Spinnaker flown from a retractable pole at the bow Back To ‘back the sail’; allowing the wind to fill the back of the sail Bailer A bucket or other container used for bailing water...
  • Page 42 Bowsprit The pole that protrudes from the front of the hull, to which the gennaker is attached. Builder’s Plate Plate that contains build information Bung A stopper for the drain hole Buoy Floating object attached to the bottom of the sea – used variously for navigation, mooring, and to mark out a race course Buoyancy Aid...
  • Page 43 Crew Helps the helmsman to sail the boat, and usually handles the jib sheets Dacron A brand of polyester sailcloth that is wrinkle-resistant and strong Daggerboard The foil that sits below the hull to counteract the sideways push of the wind, and to create forward motion Daggerboard Case The casing in the hull through which the daggerboard is...
  • Page 44 Gennaker A sail that is a cross between a genoa and a spinnaker, hoisted when sailing downwind Gennaker Downhaul The rope used to pull the gennaker down Gennaker Halyard The rope used to pull the gennaker up Gooseneck The ‘jaws’ of the boom that clip onto the mast Gooseneck Mast Collar A collar on the mast, on which the gooseneck sits Gunwhale The top edge of the hull, that you sit on when leaning out...
  • Page 45 Inglefield Clip A hook-shaped clip which attaches to an identical hook-shaped clip ‘Into the Wind’ To point the bow in the direction that the wind is blowing from, causing the sails to flap Inversion A capsize where the boat turns upside down, or ‘turtles’...
  • Page 46 Latitude Imaginary lines running parallel round the globe from east to west. They help you measure position and distance on a chart. Leech The back edge of the sail Leeward The part of the boat furthest away from the direction in which the wind is blowing Leverage The result of using crew weight as a ‘lever’...
  • Page 47 Mast Gate The fitting that, when shut, holds the mast in place Mast-Gate Pin The pin that holds the mast gate shut Mast Track The raised plastic groove that runs up the back of the mast, into which the luff of the mainsail is fed Mast Well The ‘well’...
  • Page 48 Port The left-hand side of the boat, when facing forwards RS Dealer A third-party who sells the RS range Reach Sailing with the wind on the side of the boat: Beam Reach: Point of sailing in which the wind is...
  • Page 49 To ‘run with the wind’, or to sail in the direction that the wind is blowing Safety-Boat Cover Support boats, usually RIBs, in case of emergency Sail An area of material attached to the boat that uses the wind to create forward motion Sailmaker A manufacturer of sails Sail Number...
  • Page 50 Stern The back of the boat Stern Lifting Handles The handles at the stern, used for lifting the boat Tack a) To change direction by turning the bow of the boat through the wind b) The bottom front corner of a sail Tack Bar The metal bar that is situated at the front of the boat, onto which the tack of the jib is attached...
  • Page 51 ‘Under Weigh’ A term derived from the act of ‘weighing’ anchor, meaning to be in motion Upwind To sail against the direction in which the wind is blowing, sometimes called a ‘beat’ or ‘beating against the wind’ Wetsuit Neoprene sailing suit designed to keep you warm when wet Windward The part of the boat closest to the direction in which the...
  • Page 52: Appendix

    RYA National Sailing Scheme Syllabus and Logbook ISBN 0-901501-45 RYA Start Sailing Beginner’s Handbook ISBN 0-901501-82-4 Royal Yachting Association www.rya.org.uk RNLI – for help and advice about safety at sea – www.rnli.org.uk RS Class Association and Manufacturers: www.rs-association.com www.rssailing.com www.ldcsailing.com...
  • Page 53: Basic Rs Feva Tuning Guide

    ‘tweaking’. Follow this basic tuning guide to ensure that you are getting the best from your boat. If you would like a more indepth tuning guide, or to chat to fellow Feva sailors, follow the links to the RS Feva Owner’s Club from the RS Class Association website –...
  • Page 54: Rs Feva Gennaker Pole System

    8.3 RS Feva Gennaker Pole System Your RS Feva will arrive with the Gennaker Pole System in place, and this does not need to be de-rigged. In the event that you need to re-rig the gennaker pole, please refer to the following diagram.
  • Page 55: Rs Feva Life Cycle

        When your Feva has reached the end of its life, it can be sent back to the manufacturers where it is ‘chipped’ into small pieces. These pieces are used in place of the polymer powder in the rotomoulding process to manufacture products that do not require a high grade of polyethylene.
  • Page 56: Three Essential Knots

    8.5 Three Essential Knots Bowline The bowline is a reliable knot used for tying a loop in rope. It is extremely strong when under load, and unties easily once free of load. Some people use the rhyme “the rabbit comes out of the hole, round the tree, and back down the hole” as a way of remembering how to tie a bowline.
  • Page 57 Pass the tail around the standing rope   Thread the tail back through the loop, and tighten Knot-on-Knot A ‘knot-on-knot’ is useful for tying the end of a rope to a sail or a fitting, and is particularly reliable due to the manner in which the rope binds upon itself. Tie a single overhand knot in the end of the rope.
  • Page 58 Figure-of-Eight The ‘figure-of-eight’ knot is used as a stopper knot, preventing ropes from slipping through fittings. Like the bowline, the ‘figure-of-eight’ knot unties easily once free of load. Make a loop in the end of the rope Lead the tail underneath the standing end of the rope Lead the tail of the rope back through the loop, and tighten...
  • Page 59                                     RS Sailing Premier Way, Abbey Park, Romsey, Hants SO51 9DQ Telephone: 044 (0)1794 526760 Fax: 044 (0) E-mail: info@RSsailing.com Web: www.RSsailing.com...

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