Download Print this page

Honeywell Marathon Reference Manual

Hide thumbs

Advertisement

Marathon
Hand-Held Computer
Microsoft® Windows® Embedded Standard Operating System
Microsoft® Windows® 7 Professional Operating System
Microsoft® Windows® XP® Professional Operating System
Reference Guide

Advertisement

loading

  Related Manuals for Honeywell Marathon

  Summary of Contents for Honeywell Marathon

  • Page 1 Marathon Hand-Held Computer Microsoft® Windows® Embedded Standard Operating System Microsoft® Windows® 7 Professional Operating System Microsoft® Windows® XP® Professional Operating System Reference Guide...
  • Page 2: Limited Warranty

    Disclaimer Honeywell International Inc. (“HII”) reserves the right to make changes in specifications and other information contained in this document without prior notice, and the reader should in all cases consult HII to determine whether any such changes have been made. The information in this publication does not represent a commitment on the part of HII.
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Front View Rear View Bottom View Right Side View Left Side View LED Indicators Power Button Status LEDs Using a Stylus Marathon Configuration Options Date and Time Power Management Speaker Volume Connect Bluetooth Devices Restart/Shutdown 1-10 Calibrate Touch Screen 1-10...
  • Page 4 Backup Battery Power Button Reset Button External Connectors USB Connectors Audio Connector Power Supply Connector Antenna Signal Pathway Docking Connector Keyboard Backlighting Sticky Keys Sticky Key Indicators Keyboard Help Biometric Mouse Security Features Navigation Touch Screen Calibrating the Touch Screen Refresh the Touch Screen Calibration Points Disabling the Touch Screen Using a Dock and a Second Monitor...
  • Page 5 Wi-Fi Network Configuration 802.11 Wireless Radios Ethernet Connector GPS (Optional) WWAN Bluetooth Chapter 4 - Wireless Network Configuration Introduction 802.11 Radio Summit Wireless Network Configuration Important Notes Summit Client Utility Help Summit Tray Icon Wireless Zero Config Utility Main Tab Admin Login Profile Tab Buttons...
  • Page 6 Options Tab 4-59 Bluetooth Icon 4-60 COM Ports Tab 4-60 Hardware Tab 4-61 OneClick Internet 4-62 Preparing for Initial Use on the Marathon 4-62 Install SIM Card 4-62 Load Firmware 4-62 Activation 4-62 Using OneClick Internet 4-65 How To: Connection Management...
  • Page 7 Information Buttons 4-88 Chapter 5 - Using Peripherals / Accessories Attach an Extended Battery Install a SIM Card Replacing the Main Battery Bar Code Readers 2D Imager Magnetic Stripe Reader Loading an Operating System on the Marathon The Marathon Drivers CD-ROM...
  • Page 8 Marathon Recovery DVD DVD Part Numbers Using the Recovery DVD Procedure Chapter 6 - KeyMaps Chapter 7 - Technical Specifications Physical Specifications Environmental Specifications Display Specifications AC/DC Adapter Extended Batteries (Optional) 42Whr Extended Battery 62Whr Extended Battery Pinouts USB Connector...
  • Page 9: Chapter 1 - Introduction

    Available add on modules include a magnetic stripe card reader and a 2D imager. The Marathon provides the power and functionality of a desktop computer in a portable unit. The desktop dock, much like a docking port for a conventional laptop, provides provisions for an external monitor and USB connections for devices such as a USB keyboard and mouse.
  • Page 10: Microsoft Windows License Agreement (First Boot)

    Microsoft Windows License Agreement (First Boot) If your Marathon is shipped with a Microsoft Windows operating system pre-installed, it may be necessary to complete the Windows licensing/registration screens when starting the Marathon for the first time. To complete this information, you may need the Microsoft Windows software/product key that is included with the Marathon.
  • Page 11: Components

    Components Front View Position Function Status Indicators Speakers Touch Screen / Display Microphone Power Button Biometric Mouse...
  • Page 12: Rear View

    Rear View Position Function Magnetic Stripe Card Reader Add-on Cover Camera Bar Code Imager Add-on Cover Tethered Stylus External Battery Connector Cover Internal Battery / SIM Card Cover Handstrap Connection Extended battery is not installed in image shown above.
  • Page 13: Bottom View

    External Antenna Signal Pathway (for use in vehicle mount dock) Docking Connector (for use in desktop and vehicle mount docks) Right Side View The components are on the right edge of the Marathon when viewed from the front. Position Function USB Port Cover Reset Button Two USB 2.0 Host Ports...
  • Page 14: Left Side View

    Left Side View The components are on the left edge of the Marathon when viewed from the front. Position Function Power/Audio Port Cover Audio Jack Power Connector...
  • Page 15: Led Indicators

    Function Indicates the storage drive status: Flashes green when drive is accessed Indicates the wireless status: Solid blue when Marathon is On, does not blink when connection/re-connection occurs. Indicates the battery status: Off when battery is fully charged. Solid green when battery is discharged Solid orange when battery is charging Flashing orange when battery is low or has failed.
  • Page 16: Using A Stylus

    Using a Stylus Note: Always use the point of the stylus for tapping or making strokes on the touch screen. Never use an actual pen, pencil, or sharp/abrasive object to write on the touch screen. Hold the stylus as if it were a pen or pencil. Touch an element on the screen with the tip of the stylus then remove the stylus from the screen.
  • Page 17: Marathon Configuration Options

    Marathon Configuration Options Many configuration options are available via the Microsoft Windows Control panel. For additional information, refer to Help and Support on the Start menu for configuration details. Date and Time Use the Windows interface to set date, time and time zone. Tap the time displayed in the task bar or tap: Start > Control Panel >...
  • Page 18: Restart/Shutdown

    Restart/Shutdown Use the Windows interface to restart or shut down the Marathon. Tap Start > Shut Down > Restart Tap Start > Shut Down > Shut down Calibrate Touch Screen To calibrate the touch screen, tap Start > Programs > PenMount Universal Driver > Utility > PenMount Control Panel.
  • Page 19: Data Entry

    When using the keyboard, some keys have multiple functions. The primary alpha or numeric character is printed on the key. Bar Code Data Entry The Marathon supports an accessory imager module for bar code label reading, as well as a wireless Bluetooth bar code scanner and a tethered USB scanner.
  • Page 20 1-12...
  • Page 21: Chapter 2 - Hardware

    An Intel® controller is provided for the display. The controller is capable of supporting a second display when the Marathon is docked in a desktop dock with an external display attached to the VGA port on the dock.
  • Page 22: Power Input / Main Battery

    The main battery will also recharge when the Marathon is docked in a powered desktop dock or vehicle dock. With an attached fully charged extended battery, Marathon battery life is increased to 6 or 10 hours based on the extended battery selected.
  • Page 23: Power Button

    Marathon. If the Marathon is Off, pressing the power button turns the Marathon On. If the Marathon is On, Windows determines the results of a power button press based on user configuration. For example, the Marathon may be configured to:...
  • Page 24: External Connectors

    The docking connector is located on the bottom of the Marathon. The connector interfaces with the matching connector in the Marathon desktop and vehicle mounted dock, allowing the Marathon to interface with USB, serial or other ports present on the selected dock.
  • Page 25: Keyboard

    Localized operating systems and the keyboard: Marathon operating systems are available in German, French, Spanish, etc. If using a localized operating system, view the Region and Language control panel to verify English (United States) has been chosen as the primary keyboard language.
  • Page 26: Biometric Mouse

    Windows logon can be performed with a fingerprint scan as opposed to the traditional user name and password. You must create a Windows user account with a password, then shutdown and restart the Marathon before you can add fingerprint security to that user account. After rebooting, create fingerprint security, then shutdown and restart the Marathon to save the password in the registry.
  • Page 27: Navigation

    Navigation By default, the biometric mouse is enabled for cursor navigation. Sliding a finger over the biometric mouse moves the cursor in the same direction the finger moves. The sensitivity (motion speed) may be adjusted or the feature disabled. Tapping a finger on the biometric mouse is treated as a mouse left-click. Two taps in quick succession is treated as a double- tap.
  • Page 28: Touch Screen

    When the Marathon display driver is setup to extend the Marathon display to the second monitor, cursor calibration on the Marathon touch display is offset. Do not use the touch panel on the Marathon to select items on the Marathon display. When a...
  • Page 29: The Display

    The Display The Marathon display is capable of supporting WVGA graphics modes (800x480). The display covering is designed to resist stains. The touch screen allows signature capture and touch input. A display optimized for outdoor viewing is available. The touch screen is a Resistive Panel with a scratch resistant finish that can detect touches by a stylus, and translate them into computer commands.
  • Page 30 2-10...
  • Page 31: Chapter 3 - Software

    Introduction Like any personal computer, there are many aspects to the setup and configuration of the Marathon. Much of the setup and configuration of the Marathon is dependent upon the optional features (both hardware and software) installed on the computer.
  • Page 32: Drive C Folder Structure

    Microsoft Windows device drivers, refer to commercially available Windows OS reference guides. Radio Software The Marathon is delivered with the radio software installed. Because the Marathon uses a Microsoft Windows operating system, the radio installation includes Windows device drivers.
  • Page 33: Control Panel

    This is a standard Microsoft Windows control panel applet. On the Settings tab, two displays are supported. By default, display #1 is the Marathon's built in WVGA display. Display #2 is an external display connected to the VGA port on the Marathon desktop dock.
  • Page 34: Power Options

    Power Options Power schemes can be configured that will be in effect when the Marathon is attached to an external power supply or docked in a powered dock as well as when running on battery power. On the Power Meter tab, battery #1 refers to the main battery concealed inside the Marathon case. Battery #2 is an optional extended battery that connects to the back of the Marathon.
  • Page 35: User Accounts

    User Accounts Note: The following applies to a Marathon that is not part of a domain. When the Marathon is part of a domain, the user is prompted for credentials at Windows startup or log on. The Marathon is pre-configured with an administrator account named Administrator. By default, the Marathon automatically logs onto the Administrator account at Windows startup.
  • Page 36: Network Configuration

    Configuration. Ethernet Connector A wired Ethernet connection is only available when the Marathon is docked in a desktop dock. Refer to the Marathon Dock Reference Guide for more information. For more information on configuring the Microsoft Windows network settings, refer to Help and Support on the Windows Start menu or commercially available Windows networking literature.
  • Page 37: Chapter 4 - Wireless Network Configuration

    An 802.11 radio A Bluetooth radio A WAN card. 802.11 Radio The 802.11 radio is supported by the following operating systems installed on the Marathon. Differences are marked with the icon shown: Windows® 7 Professional Windows® Embedded Standard Windows® XP Professional The 802.11 radio supports several options for wireless security.
  • Page 38: Important Notes

    Important Notes It is important that all dates are correct on the Marathon and host computers when using any type of certificate. Certificates are date sensitive and if the date is not correct authentication will fail. Verify and adjust the date using the Date and Time control panel.
  • Page 39: Summit Client Utility

    Summit Client Utility Note: When making changes to profile or global parameters, the device should be restarted afterwards. Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility or SCU Icon on Desktop or Summit Tray Icon (if present) or Wi-FI Icon in the Windows Control Panel (if present) Main Tab provides information, admin login and active profile selection.
  • Page 40: Summit Tray Icon

    The Windows Zero Config utility is not active The Tray Icon setting is On Tray icon is not shown when the Marathon is running Windows 7 or Windows Embedded Standard. Click the icon to launch the SCU. Use the tray icon to view the radio status:...
  • Page 41: Wireless Zero Config Utility

    You can use either the Wireless Zero Configuration Utility or the Summit Client Utility to connect to your network. Honeywell recommends using the Summit Client Utility to connect to your network. The Wireless Zero Configuration Utility cannot control the complete set of security features of the radio.
  • Page 42: Main Tab

    Main Tab Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility > Main tab Factory Default Settings Admin Login SUMMIT Radio Enabled Active Config/Profile ThirdPartyConfig Regulatory Domain Varies by location The Main tab displays information about the wireless client device including: SCU (Summit Client Utility) version Driver version Radio Type (ABGN is an 802.11 a/b/g/n radio).
  • Page 43: Admin Login

    The Disable Radio button can be used to disable the network card. Once disabled, the button label changes to Enable Radio. By default the radio is enabled. The Admin Login button provides access to editing wireless parameters. Profile and Global may only be edited after entering the Admin Login password.
  • Page 44: Profile Tab

    Profile Tab Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility > Profile tab Note: Tap the Commit button to save changes before leaving this panel or the SCU. If the panel is exited before tapping the Commit button, changes are not saved! Factory Default Settings Profile Default...
  • Page 45: Buttons

    Buttons Button Function Commit Saves the profile settings made on this screen. Settings are saved in the profile. Allows entry of a username and password, certificate names, and other information required to authenticate with Credentials the access point. The information required depends on the EAP type. Deletes the profile.
  • Page 46: Profile Parameters

    Options are: None, WEP (or Manual WEP), WEP EAP (or Auto WEP), WPA PSK, WPA TKIP, WPA CCKM, WPA2 PSK, WPA2 AES, or WPA2 CCKM. Encryption None CKIP is not supported in the Marathon. Note: The Encryption type chosen determines if the WEP Keys / PSK Keys button is active and also determines the available entries in the WEP or PSK pop-up window.
  • Page 47 It is important the Radio Mode parameter correspond to the AP to which the device is to connect. For example, if this parameter is set to G rates only, the Marathon may only connect to APs set for G rates and not those set for B and G rates.
  • Page 48: Status Tab

    Status Tab Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility > Status tab This screen provides information on the radio: The profile being used. The status of the radio card (down, associated, authenticated, etc.). Client information including device name, IP address and MAC address. Information about the Access Point (AP) maintaining the connection to the network including AP name, IP address and MAC address.
  • Page 49: Diags Tab

    Diags Tab Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility > Diags tab The Diags screen can be used for troubleshooting network traffic and radio connectivity issues. (Re)connect – Use this button to apply (or reapply) the current profile and attempt to associate or authenticate to the wireless LAN.
  • Page 50: Global Tab

    Global Tab Start > All Programs > Summit > Summit Client Utility > Global tab The parameters on this panel can only be changed when an Admin is logged in with a password. The current values for the parameters can be viewed by the general user without requiring a password. Note: Tap the Commit button to save changes.
  • Page 51: Custom Parameter Option

    Custom Parameter Option Honeywell does not support the parameter Custom option. The parameter value is displayed as “Custom” when the operating system registry has been edited to set the Summit parameter to a value that is not available from the parameter’s drop down list.
  • Page 52: Global Parameters

    Global Parameters Parameter Default Function If signal strength is less than this trigger value, the client looks for a different Access Point with a stronger signal. Roam Trigger -65 dBm Options are: -50 dBm, -55, -60, -65, -70, -75, -80, -85, -90 dBm or Custom. The amount by which a different Access Point signal strength must exceed the current Access Point signal strength before roaming to the different Roam Delta...
  • Page 53 Parameter Default Function Options are: On, Off Use of Cisco Compatible Extensions (CCX) radio management and AP specified maximum transmit power features. Options are: Full - Use Cisco IE and CCX version number, support all CCX features. The option known as "On" in previous versions. CCX Features Optimized Optimized –Use Cisco IE and CCX version number, support all CCX...
  • Page 54 Determines if the Summit icon is displayed in the System tray. Options are: On, Off Tray Icon The tray icon is not displayed when the Marathon is running a Windows Embedded Standard or Windows 7 Professional operating system. When On, the Summit Config Utility masks passwords (characters on the screen are displayed as an *) as they are typed and when they are viewed.
  • Page 55 Parameter Default Function for instructions on obtaining CA and User Certificates. This value is masked when the Admin is logged out. Options are: none. The complete path is C:\Program Files\Summit\certs Maximum amount of data to be transmitted on a ping. Ping Payload 32 bytes Options are: 32 bytes, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 bytes.
  • Page 56: Logon Options

    Logon Options There are two options available, a single signon which uses the Windows username and password as the credentials for 802.1x authentication and pre-logon which uses saved credentials for 802.1x authentication before Windows logon. If either option is enabled, the credentials entered here take precedence over any credentials entered on the Profile tab.
  • Page 57: Single Signon

    Single Signon To use the Single Singon option, select the checkbox for Use the Windows username and password when available. When the active profile is using LEAP, PEAP-MSCHAP, PEAP-GTC or EAP-FAST, the Summit Client Utililty ignores the username and password, if any, saved in the profile. Instead, the username and password used for Windows logon is used. Any certificates needed for authentication must still be specified in the profile.
  • Page 58: Sign-On Vs. Stored Credentials

    How to: Use Stored Credentials Credentials login and password entry window: When the Marathon attempts to connect to the network, click the flashing icon in the Notification bar to display the login screen. Enter user name and password and click OK to close the window.
  • Page 59: How To: Use Sign On Screen

    How to: Use Sign On Screen 1. After completing the other entries in the profile, click on the Credentials button. Leave the Username and Password blank. No entries are necessary on the Credentials screen for LEAP or LEAP/WPA. 2. For PEAP-MSCHAP and PEAP-GTC, importing the CA certificate into the Windows certificate store is optional. 3.
  • Page 60: Windows Certificate Store Vs. Certs Path

    Windows Certificate Store vs. Certs Path Note: It is important that all dates are correct on the Marathon and host computers when using any type of certificate. Certificates are date sensitive and if the date is not correct authentication will fail.
  • Page 61 6. Uncheck the Use full trusted store checkbox. 7. Select the desired certificate and click the Select button to return the selected certificate to the CA Cert textbox. 8. Click OK to exit the Credentials screen and then Commit to save the profile changes. 4-25...
  • Page 62: Configuring The Profile

    Configuring the Profile Use the instructions in this section to complete the entries on the Profile tab according to the type of wireless security used by your network. The instructions that follow are the minimum required to successfully connect to a network. Your system may require more parameters than are listed in these instructions.
  • Page 63: Wep

    To connect using WEP, make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to None Set Encryption to WEP or Manual WEP (depending on SCU version) Set Auth Type to Open Click the WEP keys/PSKs button.
  • Page 64: Leap

    LEAP To use LEAP (without WPA), make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to LEAP Set Encryption to WEP EAP or Auto WEP (depending on SCU version) Set Auth Type as follows: If the Cisco/CCX certified AP is configured for open authentication, set the Auth Type radio parameter to Open.
  • Page 65 To use Stored Credentials, click on the Credentials button. No entries are necessary for Sign-On Credentials as the user will be prompted for the Username and Password when connecting to the network. Enter the Domain\Username (if the Domain is required), otherwise enter the Username. Enter the password.
  • Page 66: Peap/Mschap

    PEAP/MSCHAP To use PEAP/MSCHAP, make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to PEAP-MSCHAP Set Encryption to WPA TKIP Set Auth Type to Open To use another encryption type, select WPA CCKM, WPA2 AES or WPA2 CCKM for encryption and complete other entries as detailed in this section.
  • Page 67 Click the Credentials button. No entries except the CA Certificate Filename are necessary for Sign-On Credentials as the user will be prompted for the User Name and Password when connecting to the network. For Stored Credentials, User, Password and the CA Certificate Filename must be entered. Enter these items as directed below.
  • Page 68 Once successfully authenticated, import the CA certificate into the Windows certificate store. Return to the Credentials screen and check the Validate server checkbox. If using the Windows certificate store: Check the Use MS store checkbox. The default is to use the Full Trusted Store. To select an individual certificate, click on the Browse button.
  • Page 69: Peap/Gtc

    PEAP/GTC To use PEAP/GTC, make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to PEAP-GTC Set Encryption to WPA TKIP Set Auth Type to Open To use another encryption type, select WPA CCKM, WPA2 AES or WPA2 CCKM for encryption and complete other entries as detailed in this section.
  • Page 70 Enter these items as directed below. Enter the Domain\Username (if the Domain is required), otherwise enter the Username. Enter the password. Leave the CA Certificate File Name blank for now. Click OK then click Commit. Ensure the correct Active Profile is selected on the Main Tab.
  • Page 71 Once successfully authenticated, import the CA certificate into the Windows certificate store. Return to the Credentials screen and check the Validate server checkbox. Note: Some servers may be configured to allow only a single use of the password for PEAP/GTC. In this case, wait for the token to update with a new password before attempting to validate the server.
  • Page 72: Wpa/Leap

    WPA/LEAP To use WPA/LEAP, make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to LEAP Set Encryption to WPA TKIP Set Auth Type as follows: If the Cisco/CCX certified AP is configured for open authentication, set the Auth Type radio parameter to Open.
  • Page 73 Sign-On vs. Stored Credentials for information on entering credentials. To use Stored Credentials, click on the Credentials button. No entries are necessary for Sign-On Credentials as the user will be prompted for the Username and Password when connecting to the network. Enter the Domain\Username (if the Domain is required), otherwise enter the Username.
  • Page 74: Eap-Fast

    RADIUS server must have auto provisioning enabled to send the PAC provisioning credentials to the Marathon. For automatic PAC provisioning, once a username/password is authenticated, the PAC information is stored on the Marathon. The same username/password must be used to authenticate each time. See the note below for more details.
  • Page 75 To use Sign-On credentials: Do not enter a User and Password as the user will be prompted for the Username and Password when connecting to the network. To use Stored Credentials: Enter the Domain\Username (if the Domain is required), otherwise enter the Username. Enter the password.
  • Page 76: Eap-Tls

    EAP-TLS To use EAP-TLS, make sure the following profile options are used. Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to EAP-TLS Set Encryption to WPA TKIP Set Auth Type to Open To use another encryption type, select WPA CCKM, WPA2 AES or WPA2 CCKM for encryption and complete other entries as detailed in this section.
  • Page 77 If using the Certs Path option: Leave the Use MS store box unchecked. Enter the certificate filename in the CA Cert textbox. Click OK then click Commit. The Marathon should be authenticating the server certificate and using EAP-TLS for the user authentication. 4-41...
  • Page 78 Ensure the correct Active Profile is selected on the Main tab and restart. The SCU Main tab shows the device is associated after the radio connects to the network. Certificates for information on generating a Root CA certificate or a User certificate. Note: The date must be properly set on the device to authenticate a certificate.
  • Page 79: Wpa Psk

    WPA PSK To connect using WPA/PSK, make sure the following profile options are used: Enter the SSID of the Access Point assigned to this profile Set EAP Type to None Set Encryption to WPA PSK or WPA2 PSK Set Auth Type to Open Click the WEP keys/PSKs button.
  • Page 80: Certificates

    Refer to the Honeywell Security Primer to prepare the Authentication Server and Access Point for communication. Note: It is important that all dates are correct on the Marathon and host computers when using any type of certificate. Certificates are date sensitive and if the date is not correct authentication will fail.
  • Page 81 Click the Download a CA certificate, certificate chain or CRL link. Make sure the correct root CA certificate is selected in the list box. 4-45...
  • Page 82 4-46...
  • Page 83 To download the CA certificate, click on the Download CA certificate link. Click the Save button and save the certificate. Make sure to keep track of the name and location of the certificate. Install the certificate on the Marathon. 4-47...
  • Page 84: Installing A Root Ca Certificate

    C:\Program Files\Summit\certs folder or other path specified in the Summit Certs global parameter. Copy the certificate file to the Marathon. The certificate file has a .CER extension. Locate the file and double tap on it. If presented with a security warning, confirm that you want to open the file.
  • Page 85 Tap the Install Certificate button. The certificate import wizard starts. Tap Next. Complete the Root CA Certificate Installation Select Place all certificates in the following store. Tap Browse and select Trusted Root Certification Authorities. Tap OK, then tap Next and Finish. If presented with a security warning, confirm that you want to install this certificate.
  • Page 86: Generating A User Certificate

    Generating a User Certificate The easiest way to get the user certificate is to use the browser on the Marathon or a PC to navigate to the Certificate Authority. To request the user certificate, open a browser to http://<CA IP address>/certsrv.
  • Page 87 Click the Request a certificate link. Click on the User Certificate link. 4-51...
  • Page 88: Exporting A User Certificate

    The User Certificate is issued. Install the user certificate on the requesting computer by clicking the Install this certificate link. If the requesting computer is the Marathon, then the process is finished. otherwise, export the certificate as described below. Exporting a User Certificate Select Tools > Internet Options >...
  • Page 89 Make sure the Personal tab is selected. Highlight the certificate and click the Export button. The Certificate Export Wizard is started Select Yes, export the private key and click Next. Uncheck Enable strong protection and check Next. The certificate type must be PKCS #12 (.PFX). 4-53...
  • Page 90 Browse button to select the folder where you wish to store the certificate. The certificate is saved with a .PFX extension. Click Finish. and OK to close the Successful Export message. Locate the User Certificate in the specified location. Copy to the Marathon. Install the User certificate. 4-54...
  • Page 91: Installing A User Certificate

    5. The Certificate Import Wizard starts. 6. Tap Next and use the Browse... button to locate the User certificate copied to the Marathon. If necessary, change the file type drop down list at the bottom of the explorer window from *.cer to *.pfx. After selecting the .PFX file, tap Open.
  • Page 92 Note: For Windows 7 devices, there is a third checkbox: Include all extended properties. This checkbox should remain checked. Enter the password and tap Next. On the next screen, allow Windows to automatically select the certificate store, then click Next and Finish. An import successful message is displayed.
  • Page 93: Bluetooth

    Use the Bluetooth Device Wizard in the Microsoft Windows Control Panel to discover and manage the Bluetooth scanner connection. Do not use the ComponentSoft wedge software (provided with the Honeywell 8650 series Bluetooth Ring Scanners) on the Marathon. Devices Tab The Devices tab displays any previously discovered Bluetooth devices.
  • Page 94 The wizard cannot be started until the checkbox indicating the device is set up and ready to be found is checked. If any Bluetooth devices are discovered, they are displayed. 4-58...
  • Page 95: Options Tab

    Select the desired Bluetooth device and click Next. Select the appropriate passkey option. The Bluetooth device is ready to use. Options Tab This tab contains various Bluetooth connection options. More information can be found using Help and Support on the Windows Start menu.
  • Page 96: Bluetooth Icon

    Bluetooth Icon To add the Bluetooth icon to the taskbar enable (click to place a checkmark in) Show the Bluetooth icon in the notification area. When the Bluetooth icon is in the taskbar, the following right-click menu options are available: Add a Bluetooth Device Show Bluetooth Devices Send a File...
  • Page 97: Hardware Tab

    Hardware Tab This tab displays hardware information for Bluetooth. More information can be found using Help and Support on the Windows Start menu. 4-61...
  • Page 98: Oneclick Internet

    Activation This step is only necessary for Verizon. You need the IMEI number for the Marathon when you contact Verizon prior to activating service on the Marathon. The IMEI number can be found on the Settings > Info tab.
  • Page 99 The activation screen is displayed automatically after the Verizon firmware is selected. If the activation screen is not automatically displayed, doubletap the OneClick Internet icon on the desktop. Select Settings > General tab and tap the Activate button. Make sure Automated Activation is selected and tap Next. Tap Next to complete the activation.
  • Page 100 Tap Settings. Tap the Network tab. This screen contains the settings including the telephone number from the provider, in this case Verizon. 4-64...
  • Page 101: Using Oneclick Internet

    Using OneClick Internet If OneClick Internet is not loaded, double tap the desktop icon to load it. If OneClick Internet is loaded but minimized to the system tray, tap the OneClick Internet icon in the system tray to maximize it. How To: Connection Management 1.
  • Page 102: Menu Buttons

    Update Button One Click Internet provides a built-in online update functionality that allows for an automatic update of OneClick Internet application, device drivers, and APN database. Honeywell DOES NOT recommend using this option. Contact Technical Assistance for information on upgrading to another version of OneClick Internet.
  • Page 103: Settings Button

    Settings Button Access the Settings menu by tapping the Settings button on the main window. The following tabs are available: Profile Network History Info Firmware General Profile Tab Create a connection profile to store connection information. Once a profile has been created, its name appears in the drop down Profiles list, which replaces the Profile Name textbox in the illustration above.
  • Page 104: Buttons

    Buttons Button Description Create a new profile. When this option is selected, the Profile Name is a text box. Enter a name for the profile as well as other connection specific configuration. When finished, tap the Save button to save the new profile.
  • Page 105: Network With Sim Card

    Network with SIM Card Select Connection Label Description Select automatically Selects the best suited network automatically Use GPRS/EDGE only Use only GPRS/EDGE for a connection Use UMTS/HSPA only Use only UMTS/HSPA for a connection. Select and tap Apply. A "Network changed successfully" message is displayed. Close the tab and view the signal strength icon in the main window.
  • Page 106: Cdma Network

    Select the network and tap on the register button. If the change is successful you will see the message "Network changed successfully". This item is useful when traveling . Automatic mode selects the preferred network of your network operator. If enabled, Network Selection displays a list of network options. 1.
  • Page 107: History Tab

    History Tab The history shows the data volume transferred in a specified time frame. Select the From and To dates to see the data volume sent/received in the specified period. Tap Reset to reset the counter. PIN Tab You can Activate/Deactivate the PIN or Change the PIN. Activate/Deactivate PIN This tab is only displayed when a firmware is loaded that requires a SIM card (such as AT&T or T-Mobile).
  • Page 108: Change Pin

    Change PIN This dialog lets you change your PIN. Label Description Current PIN Enter the current PIN. New PIN Enter the new PIN. Verify PIN Verify the new PIN by entering it again. 4-72...
  • Page 109: Info Tab

    Info Tab This tab displays SIM card, modem and system Information. 4-73...
  • Page 110: Firmware Tab

    Firmware Tab OneClick Internet selects the correct Firmware matching your operator automatically, if a special firmware for your operator is available and a SIM card is inserted. If no specific firmware for your operator is available, generic firmware is selected. After a firmware has been selected, it appears as the Current Profile.
  • Page 111: Activation On Cdma

    Activation on CDMA When CDMA Firmware is selected, the activation of the modem on the CDMA network starts automatically. During the process of loading CDMA firmware, an activation window pop up allowing a choice between Manual Activation and Automated Activation. Label Description Manual Activation...
  • Page 112: General Tab

    General Tab Label Description When selected OneClick Internet launches automatically when the user starts the Marathon and logs Auto Launch Connect When selected OneClick Internet automatically connects on start-up. Automatically Reconnect When selected OneClick Internet reconnects automatically when the Marathon returns from standby Automatically or hibernate.
  • Page 113: Application Tab

    Application Tab Use the Application tab to specify any application to launch automatically once the Internet connection is established. Use the Browse button to locate the desired application. 4-77...
  • Page 114: Application Buttons

    Application Buttons The SMS Center window is split into menu bar, folder view, folder content and preview window. To manage your short messages you may: Button Description Manage SMS folders Change SMS settings Create new SMS/MMS messages Reply to SMS Forward SMS 4-78...
  • Page 115: Folder

    Button Description Move SMS to a folder Delete SMS Send and receive SMS/MMS (if supported) Manage phone book contacts on SIM and in Email client. Folder By using this menu, you may change the folder structure of the SMS Center: Button Description New Folder...
  • Page 116: New Sms

    New SMS The "New Message" window is used to enter the SMS text. You may also enter texts by copy & paste from other applications. The status bar at the lower right corner indicates the length of the SMS for your convenience: the first number tells you how many parts the SMS consists of (one part has max.
  • Page 117: Addresses

    Addresses Clicking this button opens the address book. You may add new contacts to your personal address book or you may change existing addresses, delete addresses or exchange them with your SIM card and your Email client application, or export the data set.
  • Page 118: Web Browser

    Lon - Longitude: The angular distance from the Prime Meridian in degrees. After Latitude and Longitude Data are displayed, the user can tap Clipboard and the latitude and longitude data are copied to the Marathon clipboard cache. The data can be pasted into an email, document or other electronic media. 4-82...
  • Page 119: About

    This does not mean that the Marathon has been localized for these languages. Installing or Upgrading OneClick Internet Note: You must use the Honeywell supplied version of OneClick Internet. Do not change versions unless instructed by your Honeywell representative. One Click Internet is pre-installed by Honeywell before the Marathon is shipped.
  • Page 120 Review and accept the license agreement. Click Accept, if you agree. Otherwise click Reject to cancel installation. Next the installer asks for the installation directory. Use the Browse button to specify a location other than the default. 4-84...
  • Page 121 Installation process is indicated on screen. When completed. click the Finish button to exit the installer. Start OneClick Internet from the Windows Program Menu or double tap the desktop icon. 4-85...
  • Page 122: Oneclick Internet Connection Manager

    OneClick Internet Connection Manager Launch OneClick Internet from the desktop icon or Windows Start Menu. When OneClick Internet is active, a status icon appears in the system tray. The main screen for OneClick Internet opens when the application is started. This screen displays basic information on the connection as well as access to more advanced features and details.
  • Page 123: Connection Management

    Connection Management Refer to the table below for descriptions of the items in the connection management area. Icon Description Network signal strength Additionally the network name is displayed to the right of the icon. The more green bars, the stronger the signal.
  • Page 124: Information Buttons

    Information Buttons Icon Description Radio On/Off Tap this button to switch the radio state. The color of this button also indicates the state of the radio: The radio is On. Tap the button to turn the radio Off. The radio is Off. Tap the button to turn the radio On. The radio is Connecting or the radio has been disabled.
  • Page 125: Chapter 5 - Using Peripherals / Accessories

    3. Remove the 2 mounting screws securing the extended battery connector cover to the Marathon and remove the cover. Put the screws and cover aside in a safe place. 4. Line up the charging pins on the extended battery with the charging pins in the Marathon extended battery connector bay.
  • Page 126 The Marathon is ready for use. Remove the extended battery from the Marathon when preparing to recharge the extended battery in a powered desktop dock or in a Marathon multi-charger. Up to four extended batteries can be charged simultaneously in the battery multi-charger.
  • Page 127: Install A Sim Card

    Turn the Marathon off. Place the Marathon face down on a stable surface. 1. Remove the 4 mounting screws securing the battery cover to the Marathon and remove the battery cover. Put the screws aside in a safe place. 2. Lift the battery using the pull strap and move it aside. Do not disconnect the battery.
  • Page 128: Replacing The Main Battery

    4. Lift the battery using the pull strap. 5. Hold the battery out of the way and carefully separate the Marathon plug (on the right) from the plug cabled to the main battery. Do not bend the pins.
  • Page 129 7. Lower the connected battery into the battery well using the pull strap. 8. Replace the battery cover, securing it with the original 4 screws. Connect the Marathon to an external power source. The main battery will be fully charged in 2 hours. The Marathon is ready for use.
  • Page 130: Bar Code Readers

    Scanner. The Bluetooth Ring Scanner module is configured by scanning the bar codes in the Bluetooth Ring Scanner Programming Guide. 2D Imager The optional 2D Imager (bar code decoder) is attached to the top right hand area of the Marathon (when the display is visible). When present, the 2D Imager uses COM2. When...
  • Page 131: Loading An Operating System On The Marathon

    CD be available during Microsoft Windows installation and configuration. Since the Marathon does not have a CD-ROM drive, the device drivers can be copied to a USB jump drive or accessed via a USB CD drive.
  • Page 132: Marathon Recovery Dvd

    Marathon Recovery DVD DVD Part Numbers Windows Embedded Standard Recovery DVD MARATHONA476WESERECOV - English MARATHONA477WESERECOV - French MARATHONA478WESERECOV - Spanish MARATHONA479WESERECOV - German MARATHONA480WESERECOV - Simplified Chinese MARATHONA481WESERECOV - Traditional Chinese MARATHONA482WESERECOV - Korean MARATHONA483WESERECOV - Japanese MARATHONA484WESERECOV - Thai...
  • Page 133: Using The Recovery Dvd

    The Recovery DVD is a method to restore the software on your Marathon to the same state it had when it was shipped from the factory. When the Recovery DVD is used on your Marathon, it destroys any information on your hard disk so please make sure that any information on the hard disk that needs to be preserved is backed up before using the Recovery DVD.
  • Page 134 5-10...
  • Page 135: Chapter 6 - Keymaps

    Chapter 6  - KeyMaps Alt, Ctl, Fn, Num Lck and Shift are sticky keys: Press once, illuminates blue and stays sticky for next keypress. Press and hold for 1.5 seconds, illuminates blue and stays sticky until the same key is pressed again. The Num Lck key illuminates orange when in sticky mode.
  • Page 136 To get this key/function Press these keys in this order... Shift Shift Shift Shift...
  • Page 137 To get this key/function Press these keys in this order... Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Shift Num Lck ON Num Lck ON Num Lck ON Num Lck ON Num Lck ON Num Lck ON...
  • Page 138 To get this key/function Press these keys in this order... Num Lock ON . (period) - (dash or minus sign) Num Lock ON - (dash or minus sign) ' (single quote/apostrophe) , (comma) ; (semicolon) = (equal sign) I (letter i) &...
  • Page 139: Chapter 7 - Technical Specifications

    Chapter 7  - Technical Specifications Physical Specifications Features Details ® Intel 1.6 GHz Atom™ BIOS AMI BIOS Memory RAM 1 or 2 GB SDRAM Display Controller WVGA/SVGA compatible controller Storage 8, 16, 32 or 64 GB Two (2) Type A USB 2.0 Host Ports External Connectors/ Audio Connector Interfaces...
  • Page 140: Environmental Specifications

    Environmental Specifications The Marathon will withstand the following environmental characteristics and has been tested in accordance with applicable sections of MIL-STD-810E. Feature Specification -20°C to +48°C (-4°F to +118°F) Note: Without extended battery. Operating Temperature Note: With extended battery, the operating temperature is limited to -20°C to +45°C (-4°F to +113°F).
  • Page 141: Extended Batteries (Optional)

    Extended Batteries (Optional) Width 6.75 in / 17.145 cm Height 6.35 in / 16.129 cm Depth - 42Whr Battery 0.4 in / 1.016 cm - 62Whr Battery 0.59 in / 1.49 cm 42Whr Extended Battery User Replaceable. Hot swappable. Rechargeable 9 - Cell (3S3P) Lithium Ion Smart Battery Pack 3300 mAh @ 11.1V, 42WHr Over Charge Protection, Over Discharge Protection, Over Current and Output Short Protection, Over Temperature Protection.
  • Page 142: Pinouts

    Pinouts USB Connector Signal Description +5V USB Power USB2N_A USD D – USB2P_A USB D + DGND USB Power Return Docking Connector Definition Definition Definition DOCKING_LOCK DC_VSYNC_VGA DC_HSYNC_VGA DC_DATA_VGA DC_CLK_VGA DC_RED_VGA DC_BLUE_VGA DC_GREEN_VGA DSR# RTS# DTR# CTS# USB_N DCD# DK_DOCKING_ LOCK_EN# B8 DK_EC_GPIO2_ RESET# C8 USB_P VA+IN...
  • Page 143: Chapter 8 - Technical Assistance

    Limited Warranty Honeywell International Inc. ("HII") warrants its products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship and to conform to HII’s published specifications applicable to the products purchased at the time of shipment. This warranty does not cover any HII product which is (i) improperly installed or used;...
  • Page 144 The duration of the limited warranty for the Marathon Battery Charger is 1 year. The duration of the limited warranty for the Marathon 3300mAh Li-Ion and 5640mAh Li-Ion Extended Battery is 6 months. The duration of the limited warranty for the Marathon Main Battery is 6 months.
  • Page 146 Honeywell Scanning & Mobility 9680 Old Bailes Road Fort Mill, SC 29707 www.honeywellaidc.com E-EQ-MARATHONRG Rev F 4/13...