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IBM ZVM - FOR LINUX V6 RELEASE 1 Getting Started

Getting started with linux on system z
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Getting Started with Linux on System z
version 6 release 1
SC24-6194-00

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  Summary of Contents for IBM ZVM - FOR LINUX V6 RELEASE 1

  • Page 1 z/VM Getting Started with Linux on System z version 6 release 1 SC24-6194-00...
  • Page 3 z/VM Getting Started with Linux on System z version 6 release 1 SC24-6194-00...
  • Page 4 Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information under “Notices” on page 143. This edition applies to version 6, release 1, modification 0 of IBM z/VM, (product number 5741-A07) and to all subsequent releases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions.
  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    . 37 Steps for updating the CP-owned volume list . . 37 How to send your comments to IBM . . ix Steps for updating the default system identifier . . 39 Steps for updating the user volume list .
  • Page 6 Overview of defining virtual machines for Linux . . 71 Steps for taking a snapshot of system performance 120 Steps for defining a master virtual machine for Using the CP Monitor and Performance Toolkit for Linux . . 71 . 123 Steps for setting up LINMSTR’s disks .
  • Page 7: About This Document

    ® ® ® for Linux servers running on the IBM System z platform (hereafter referred to as the mainframe). The document provides requirements and guidelines to implement during z/VM installation, but primarily assumes you have installed z/VM and are ready to deploy Linux in virtual machines.
  • Page 8: Where To Find More Information

    Additional Publications ® For white papers, IBM Redbooks publications, and other useful information about Linux on the mainframe, visit the z/VM resources for Linux on IBM System z Web site at: http://www.vm.ibm.com/linux/ Publications you might be interested in are: z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 9 Linux on IBM System z: The Virtualization Cookbook for SLES9, SG24-6695 v Security on z/VM, SG24-7471 Links to Other Online Documents ® If you are viewing the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) version of this document, it might contain links to other documents. A link to another document is based on the name of the requested PDF file.
  • Page 10 viii z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 11: How To Send Your Comments To Ibm

    The topic and page number related to your comment v The text of your comment When you send comments to IBM, you grant IBM a nonexclusive right to use or distribute your comments in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
  • Page 12 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 13: Summary Of Changes

    This edition supports the general availability of z/VM V6.1. Changes made are: v A step was added to “Steps for copying the current USER DIRECT file” on page v Other minor technical and editorial changes. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 14 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 15: Chapter 1. About Z/Vm

    It also means you can perform virtual machine tasks as if they were real machine tasks: you can boot (perform an initial program load of) an operating system, attach and detach devices, and manage the work of your virtual machine operating system. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 16 Linux Linux Linux Linux (other) z/VM operator console z/VM channels control units tape disk printer Figure 2. Representation of virtual machines A virtual machine is directly associated with a z/VM user ID or logon identifier. When you log onto z/VM, you have a virtual machine at your disposal and control the virtual machine the way a system operator controls the real hardware.
  • Page 17: Overview Of The Control Program (Cp)

    v Running first level: running directly on the hardware, which is what z/VM does. v Running second level or running under VM or running on (top of) VM: running as a guest. During its time slice, a guest actually runs on the real machine. The hardware microcode handles most guest program instructions and CP takes control only when necessary, which maintains good performance.
  • Page 18: Dasd And Minidisks

    Each virtual machine has its own virtual storage. CP manages the residency of virtual machine’s pages in real storage through paging. Pages that have not been referenced can be moved out of real storage into either expanded storage or onto a paging device.
  • Page 19 console, you can enter CP commands, such as loading (IPL) an operating system. The virtual console is the device an operating system views as its system or hardware console. Note: The key assignments for your keyboard might differ from standard key assignments.
  • Page 20 Related information For more information about privilege classes, see “Privilege Classes” in z/VM: CP Commands and Utilities Reference. Examples of using the CP commands: QUERY displays information about your virtual machine. 1. To display virtual CPUs, class G users can issue the QUERY VIRTUAL CPUS command: query virtual cpus CPU 00 ID FF05152120640000 (BASE)
  • Page 21: Overview Of The Cp Spool File System

    users (those with privilege classes other than G), using QUERY without the keyword “VIRTUAL” displays information about the real machine. For instance, QUERY VIRTUAL STORAGE displays the virtual storage size of the virtual machine while QUERY STORAGE (class B and E) displays the real machine storage size.
  • Page 22: The User Directory

    Each virtual machine has a directory entry. Here is a sample directory entry. The callouts in reverse type next to each statement correspond to explanations that follow the sample. Note: In this document the user directory is modified by using the IBM Directory ™ Maintenance program, DirMaint , which handles both source and object forms of the user directory.
  • Page 23: Overview Of The Conversational Monitor System (Cms)

    ™ environment as well as run some REXX EXECs (script-like executable files) to set up Linux. After changing the environment, you can load Linux into the virtual machine. 3. The MACHINE statement describes the processor architecture of the virtual machine. The maximum number of virtual CPUs that can be defined for this virtual machine is four.
  • Page 24 represented by an alphabetic letter that determines how CMS searches for files. In Linux, path variables defining directories determine the search order for files. CMS searches for files among minidisks based on the alphabetical order of the access mode. First, CMS looks on the A minidisk, then the B minidisk, and so forth. The 191 minidisk holds a special place in CMS.
  • Page 25: Cms Files

    CMS files CMS files have a file name, file type, and file mode. File names and file types can be up to 8 characters long. The file mode corresponds to the access mode of the minidisk. Examples: PROFILE EXEC A1 MYDOC LISTING A1 DNFPFS LISTPS B1 By convention, some file types have special meanings.
  • Page 26: The Profile Exec

    CHASTING FILELIST A0 V 169 Trunc=169 Size=253 Line=1 Col=1 Alt=0 Filename Filetype Fm Format Lrecl Records Blocks Date Time CHASTING NETLOG A0 V 2132 53 10/15/03 16:02:30 KIJL0CMD HGENRPT A1 V 1 10/13/03 12:00:40 KIJL0CMD LOG A1 V 2 10/13/03 12:00:37 KIJL0CMD SCRIPT A1 V 4 10/13/03 12:00:37...
  • Page 27: The Help System

    HELP TASKS Task Help Information line 1 of 39 (c) Copyright IBM Corporation 1990, 2003 z/VM Help, main panel This panel lists other Help panels that provide information about various z/VM functions, topics, and tasks. To view a Help panel, move the cursor to any character of the name and press the ENTER key or the PF1 key.
  • Page 28 CP MENU Menu Help Information line 1 of 32 (c) Copyright IBM Corporation 1990, 2003 Help for CP commands To display a Help panel, move the cursor to any character of the name and press the ENTER key or the PF1 key.
  • Page 29: The Cms File Editor Xedit

    v For more advanced information, see z/VM: CMS User’s Guide, SC24-6173. v For online help, type help on the CMS command line, then press the Enter key. The CMS file editor XEDIT CMS provides a file editor called XEDIT, which is a not only a full-screen editor, but a powerful programming tool.
  • Page 30 Because a file can be too long to fit on one screen, various subcommands scroll the screen so you can move forward and backward in a file. Scrolling the screen is like turning the pages of a book. 4. Prefix area. The prefix area is the five left-most columns on the screen, and it displays five equal signs (=====).
  • Page 31: Input Mode

    Input mode By issuing the subcommand INPUT at the command line (you can abbreviate the subcommand as “i”), you enter input mode. FILE A1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=9 Line=0 Col=1 Alt=0 DMSXMD573I Input mode: * * * Top of File * * * |...+..1..+..2..+..3..+..4..+..5..+..6..+..7..+..
  • Page 32: Overview Of Changing Files

    6. Press the Enter key. Result: Your XEDIT screen looks like this: FILE A1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=3 Line=3 Col=1 Alt=3 DMSXMD587I XEDIT: ===== * * * Top of File * * * ===== CP IS THE Z/VM HYPERVISOR ===== CMS IS THE INTERACTIVE COMPONENT OF Z/VM ===== XEDIT IS THE CMS EDITOR |...+..1..+..2..+..3..+..4..+..5..+..6..+..7...
  • Page 33: Save, File, Quit, And Qquit

    Example of changing files Assume you are still editing the file in “Example of using input mode” on page 17. 1. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> top 2. To prevent XEDIT from turning lowercase letters to uppercase, type this command on the command line, then press the Enter key: ====>...
  • Page 34: Summary Of Linux And Z/Vm Similarities

    v Use FILE when you want to save changes to a file permanently and quit editing the file. v Use QUIT to quit editing a file you have not changed. If you have made any changes, XEDIT issues a message: DMSXSU577E File has been changed;...
  • Page 35: Chapter 2. Planning For Linux Virtual Servers

    The number of Linux guests you need to run depends on many factors. This topic discusses: v Capacity requirements v Memory and CPU requirements v DASD space you need v Network planning v User management planning v Obtaining your Linux distribution © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 36: Overview Of Z/Vm Capacity Planning

    Overview of z/VM capacity planning An important element of z/VM capacity planning is knowing what z/VM is good at: the value of z/VM is its ability to consolidate distributed Linux workloads that under-utilize CPUs or do not require peak processing at the same time. z/VM improves the cost and performance efficiencies because it shares CPU cycles among virtual servers that, if distributed on separate servers, would be idle.
  • Page 37 Applications on Same applications running in virtual servers on z/VM distributed servers 10% average CPU 74 tps z/VM 74 tps LPAR Figure 4. Server consolidation example When you have established the baseline of 74 transactions per second for the distributed servers, define an equal number of z/VM virtual servers in which to run the applications.
  • Page 38 Increasing throughput Figure 5. Workload distribution patterns (Part 1 of 3) Increasing throughput Figure 5. Workload distribution patterns (Part 2 of 3) Increasing throughput Figure 5. Workload distribution patterns (Part 3 of 3) Figure 5 shows three workload distribution patterns. Workload distribution pattern A represents the prior example of an even distribution of work activity among the z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 39: Estimating Memory And Cpu Requirements

    Estimating memory and CPU requirements In most cases, initial system sizings are done with the assistance of IBM, your business partner, or consultant. This section gives you an appreciation for the things considered during an initial sizing and the things you should consider as you add work to your system.
  • Page 40 ™ with 200 MB for the size of the Java Virtual Machine. Additionally, WebSphere Application Server requires 60 MB of memory. So the total for your new application would be 260 MB. If you have an existing WebSphere application you know requires 250 MB of memory, the total with WebSphere Application Server would be 310 MB.
  • Page 41: Steps For Estimating Memory And Cpu Requirements

    (see “Overview of z/VM capacity planning” on page 22). You must consider what each of your applications require and then estimate the overall CPU requirement. Your IBM representative, business partner, or consultant offer services to help you perform this task.
  • Page 42: Guidelines For Estimating The Amount Of Dasd You Need

    Determine a set of applications that will run in a Linux virtual server. The set might include one or more applications that process a given workload. For example, if you use a WebSphere application, you need to include the WebSphere application server and the JVM. Determine the total memory requirement for the application set.
  • Page 43: For The Linux File System

    requirement. This value can be decreased by a fraction of the real memory available. See “Paging Space” in z/VM: CP Planning and Administration. v Add paging space on a volume basis: do not use the paging volume for other purposes. “Steps for adding a paging, spooling, or user volume”...
  • Page 44: Planning Your Network

    TCP/IP connectivity for Linux guests: v Real network interfaces with connections to the LAN. A real network connection may be through any device supported by Linux, including IBM Open Systems Adapters and channel-attached devices. The real device (as defined in the Input/Output Configuration Data Set) must be dedicated to the virtual machine running Linux.
  • Page 45: Giving Linux Virtual Servers Access To Cryptographic Hardware For Ssl Acceleration

    changes for the default virtual switch controllers DTCVSW1 and DTCVSW2 , but there are other tasks you must do. These tasks are intermingled with other configuration tasks in Chapter 3, “Changing the system configuration,” Chapter 5, “Configuring TCP/IP,” and Chapter 7, “Creating your first Linux virtual machine and installing Linux.”...
  • Page 46: Planning For User Management

    SSL Server” in z/VM: TCP/IP Planning and Customization. v For information about the z90crypt device driver, see Linux on System z: Device Drivers, Features, and Commands on the IBM developerWorks Linux on System z Web site entitled “Documentation for Development stream” at: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/linux390/documentation_dev.html...
  • Page 47 directory is so important for z/VM, a corrupt or invalid online user directory can be disastrous. For example, if you inadvertently overlap minidisk definitions, it could cause serious data loss. If your z/VM system has more than a handful of virtual machines, it makes little sense to manage users manually.
  • Page 48: Steps For Obtaining Documentation And Media

    “Step for modifying the OPERATOR’s directory entry” on page 60 Related information v Program Directory for IBM z/VM Directory Maintenance Facility Feature at: http://www.ibm.com/eserver/zseries/zvm/library/ v z/VM: Directory Maintenance Facility Tailoring and Administration Guide, SC24-6190 Steps for obtaining documentation and media You must obtain your Linux distribution documentation and installation media.
  • Page 49: Chapter 3. Changing The System Configuration

    Perform these steps to format a paging, spooling, or user volume: Attach the volume to MAINT. Example: If the volume is at real address 202, type this command and press the Enter key: © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 50 attach 202 * DASD 0202 ATTACHED TO MAINT 0202 WITH DEVCTL Ready; Start CPFMTXA: cpfmtxa 202 Type in these responses and press the Enter key in response to each prompt: ENTER FORMAT, ALLOCATE, LABEL, OR QUIT: format ENTER THE CYLINDER RANGE TO BE FORMATTED ON DISK 0202 OR QUIT: 000 end ENTER THE VOLUME LABEL FOR DISK 0202: label...
  • Page 51: Steps For Releasing The Primary Parm Disk

    Record the volume label and allocation type for each volume you have defined. You will use this information later when updating the CP-owned volume list. You are done for now. Later, you will make these volumes available to CP for its use.
  • Page 52 Result: You see a file like this: SYSTEM CONFIG Z1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=277 Line=4 Col=1 Alt=0 * * * Top of File * * * /**********************************************************************/ SAMPLE SYSTEM CONFIG FILE /**********************************************************************/ /* Rules of the config file: 1) REXX style comments are permitted 2) Configuration commands can be continued to next line via a trailing comma on the previous line 3) IMBED statements can be used to imbed other files that...
  • Page 53: Steps For Updating The Default System Identifier

    You should now see something like this: SYSTEM CONFIG Z1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=277 Line=74 Col=1 Alt=0 /**********************************************************************/ CP_Owned Volume Statements /**********************************************************************/ CP_Owned Slot 1 610RES CP_Owned Slot 2 610SPL CP_Owned Slot 3 610PAG CP_Owned Slot 4 610W01 CP_Owned Slot 5 610W02 CP_Owned Slot...
  • Page 54: Steps For Updating The User Volume List

    You should now see something like this: SYSTEM CONFIG Z1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=277 Line=114 Col=1 Alt=0 /**********************************************************************/ System_Identifier Information /**********************************************************************/ System_Identifier_Default VM610A Steps for updating the user volume list Just as there is a list of DASD volumes that CP should automatically attach to the system during IPL for access to CP system areas, there is a list of DASD volumes that CP should automatically attach to the system for user minidisk definitions.
  • Page 55: Steps For Setting Up Warm Start, Clearing Tdisk Space, And Other Features

    Move the cursor to the “User_Volume_List” statements. Blank out the comments (“/*” and “*/”) on either side of the “User_Volume_List” statement and add the DASD label for the user volume. Example: User_Volume_List LINUSR Move the cursor after the User_Volume_List statements. In the prefix area, type “i”...
  • Page 56 v The Clear_TDisk feature causes CP to erase temporary disks fully (that is, overwrite the entire temporary disk with zeros) after those disks are detached. The feature prevents another user who may define an identically sized temporary disk from accessing data written by the previous user. v The Retrieve defines the default and maximum number of retrieve buffers allowed per user on your system.
  • Page 57: Steps For Controlling Access To Devices At Startup

    b. Move the cursor to the line containing the text “Logon no”. After the word “no” place a space and a comma. Move the cursor to the prefix area on the line “Vdisk Userlim 144000 blocks ,”, type “i4” followed by a space, then press the Enter key. Type these features (indent as shown) on the new lines: Disconnect_timeout off Set ,...
  • Page 58: Steps For Defining A Virtual Switch

    ====> /status of devices Find the line containing the text “Online_at_IPL.” At the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> /online_at_ipl At the command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> i Type this line, then press the Enter key twice: Offline_at_IPL rdevs, where rdevs is a list of real device numbers.
  • Page 59 Before you begin: You need to end CP’s access to the primary parm disk. See “Steps for releasing the primary parm disk” on page 37. Perform these steps to define a virtual switch: Edit the SYSTEM CONFIG Z file. Type this command and press the Enter key: xedit system config z Find the section titled “Status of Devices.”...
  • Page 60: Steps For Setting Addresses For Consoles

    Save the file. At the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> save You should now see something like this: SYSTEM CONFIG Z1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=286 Line=210 Col=1 Alt=0 /**********************************************************************/ Status of Devices /**********************************************************************/ Devices , Online_at_IPL 0000-FFFF,...
  • Page 61: Steps For Updating Special Escape Character Defaults

    Notes: a. You can have one or more console addresses. b. If you are not using 3270 devices on your system and are using 3270 integrated consoles instead, the keyword “System_3270” designates a full-screen integrated 3270 console (also known as SYSG) and the keyword “System_Console”...
  • Page 62: Steps For Checking The Syntax Of The System Config File

    Before you begin: You need to end CP’s access to the primary parm disk. See “Steps for releasing the primary parm disk” on page 37. Perform these steps to update system-wide special escape character defaults: Edit the SYSTEM CONFIG Z file. Type this command and press the Enter key: xedit system config z Find the section entitled “Special characters for system set here.”...
  • Page 63: Steps For Restoring Cp's Access To The Primary Parm Disk

    access 193 x If you are still editing SYSTEM CONFIG, exit the XEDIT session. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file Run the CPSYNTAX command. From the command line, type this command and press the Enter key: cpsyntax system config Configuration file processing complete -- no errors encountered.
  • Page 64 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 65: Chapter 4. Configuring The Directory Maintenance Facility

    If you need to repeat these tasks, be sure to shut DirMaint down. Steps for enabling DirMaint Before you begin: You need to have a license for the DirMaint product. For ordering information, see the announcement letter for z/VM or contact your IBM representative. Perform these steps to enable DirMaint: Log onto MAINT.
  • Page 66: Steps For Changing The Passwords For Dirmaint Service Machines

    Continue to the next steps. Steps for changing the passwords for DirMaint service machines As shipped with z/VM, the DIRMAINT, DATAMOVE, and 6VMDIR10 virtual machines have directory entries, but with “NOLOG” instead of passwords, which prevents the virtual machine from being logged on. You must change the directory entries to include passwords.
  • Page 67: Steps For Configuring Dirmaint

    READ state. You can place CP SET RUN ON in MAINT’s PROFILE EXEC to avoid having to execute the command every time you disconnect from MAINT. set run on disc Continue to the next steps. Steps for configuring DirMaint 6VMDIR10 is the user ID that does service and maintenance for DirMaint. In keeping with the practice for products maintained by the VMSES/E component of z/VM, the virtual machine user ID is the same as the product identifier.
  • Page 68: Steps For Authorizing Users To Perform Dirmaint Tasks

    order (CONFIG99 before CONFIG0 before CONFIGZ9 before CONFIGA, before CONFIG). For now, keep it simple by creating only one, CONFIGAA DATADVH. At the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> input Add these statements to the file: CONFIGAA DATADVH Z2 V 80 Trunc=80 Size=5 Line=1 Col=1 Alt=0 ====>...
  • Page 69: Steps For Controlling Where Dirmaint Creates Minidisks

    On the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key to enter input mode: ====> input Type these lines in the input area: ALL MAINT * 140A ADGHOPS ALL MAINT * 150A ADGHOPS Press the Enter key twice to return to editing mode. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====>...
  • Page 70 where RegionId Is the name of the region. Region names must be unique. If a region entry shares the same name with another region entry, the first record is used, the second entry is ignored. Region names may consist of the characters A-Z, 0-9, #, @, and $.
  • Page 71: Steps For Copying The Current User Direct File

    Move the cursor to the prefix area for the line with “* USERID ADDRESS”, type “i2” in the prefix area, then press the Enter key: 00139 :EXCLUDE. * USERID ADDRESS 00141 :END. Type these two lines: MAINT 012* SYSDUMP1 012* Save the file.
  • Page 72: Steps For Putting The Configuration Into Production And Starting Dirmaint

    Perform these steps to copy the current USER DIRECT file: Link to MAINT’s 2CC minidisk: link maint 2cc 2cc mr multiple Access the 2CC minidisk (MAINT’s 2CC, which is linked to 6VMDIR10): access 2cc z Copy MAINT’s USER DIRECT file to 6VMDIR10’s J-disk as USER INPUT: copy user direct z user input j Release the linked minidisk: release z (detach...
  • Page 73: Steps For Automatically Starting Dirmaint

    Steps for automatically starting DIRMAINT In this procedure, you update AUTOLOG1’s PROFILE EXEC to automatically log on (autolog) DIRMAINT when z/VM starts. Before you begin: You need to log onto MAINT. Perform these steps to have DIRMAINT automatically logged on: Link to the AUTOLOG1 191 minidisk.
  • Page 74: Steps For Testing Dirmaint

    Save the file. At the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file Detach the 091 minidisk (AUTOLOG1’s 191). Type this command and press the Enter key: release z (det Ready; You are done. Steps for testing DirMaint This procedure tests DirMaint.
  • Page 75 Perform this step to modify the OPERATOR’s directory entry: v From the command line, type this command and press the Enter key: dirm for operator ipl cms DVHXMT1191I Your IPL request has been sent for processing. Ready; DVHREQ2288I Your IPL request for OPERATOR at * has been accepted. DVHBIU3450I The source for directory entry OPERATOR has been updated.
  • Page 76 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 77: Chapter 5. Configuring Tcp/Ip

    Before you begin: You need to log on as MAINT. Perform these steps to ensure TCP/IP is started at IPL time: Link to the AUTOLOG1 191 minidisk. Type this command and press the Enter key: link autolog1 191 091 mr Ready; © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 78 Access the 091 minidisk as Z. Type this command and press the Enter key: access 091 z Ready; Edit AUTOLOG1’s PROFILE EXEC. a. Type this command and press the Enter key: xedit profile exec z b. Go to the bottom of the file. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====>...
  • Page 79 Detach the 091 minidisk (AUTOLOG1’s 191). Type this command and press the Enter key: release z (det Ready; You are done. Chapter 5. Configuring TCP/IP...
  • Page 80 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 81: Chapter 6. Restarting Z/Vm And Checking The System

    VOLID RDEV START END PAGES IN USE PAGE USED ------ ---- ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ---- 610PAG C331 3338 601020 13646 31175 2% ------ ------ ---- SUMMARY 601020 13646 USABLE 601020 13646 Ready; T=0.01/0.01 10:07:56 © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 82: Step For Checking The System Identifier

    Type this command and press the Enter key. Check the response for spooling volumes. query alloc spool EXTENT EXTENT TOTAL PAGES HIGH VOLID RDEV START END PAGES IN USE PAGE USED ------ ---- ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ---- 610SPL C330 3338 601020 1964 8432...
  • Page 83: Steps For Checking Features

    Steps for checking features Before you begin: You need to be logged on as MAINT. Perform these steps to check features: Check the shutdown time periods. Type these commands and press the Enter key after each command: query shutdowntime System shutdown time: 30 seconds; previous shutdown time: n seconds. Ready;...
  • Page 84: Step For Checking Character Defaults

    Step for checking character defaults Before you begin: You need to be logged on as MAINT. Perform this step to check character defaults: v Type this command and press the Enter key: query terminal LINEND % , LINEDEL OFF, CHARDEL OFF, ESCAPE OFF, TABCHAR " LINESIZE 080, ATTN OFF, APL OFF, TEXT OFF, MODE VM, HILIGHT OFF CONMODE 3215, BREAKIN IMMED , BRKKEY PA1 , SCRNSAVE OFF...
  • Page 85: Chapter 7. Creating Your First Linux Virtual Machine And Installing Linux

    PROTODIR. LINDFLT DIRECT is a shared profile for all Linux systems and defines common definitions for all your Linux virtual servers. LINUX PROTODIR is designed to define unique characteristics of a virtual machine, such as the DASD definitions. Before you begin: Log on to MAINT. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 86 Perform these steps to define the master virtual machine: Get the LINDFLT and LINUX samples from DirMaint. a. From the command line, type these commands and press the Enter key: dirm send lindflt direct dirm send linux protodir Result: DirMaint sends the sample files to MAINT’S reader. b.
  • Page 87 c. For all virtual machines that you clone using LINDFLT DIRECT, you cannot define other devices at virtual addresses 600, 601, and 602. All those virtual machines will have the same virtual device addresses for the virtual switch. If you want to give all your cloned Linux virtual machines access to the cryptographic facility: a.
  • Page 88 For the swap disk 151, you could use a virtual disk, but be aware of the impact a virtual disk has on your system. See “Linux Performance when running under VM” (http://www.vm.ibm.com/perf/tips/linuxper.html). b. “GRPLNX” matches the region name you created in “Steps for controlling where DirMaint creates minidisks”...
  • Page 89: Steps For Setting Up Linmstr's Disks

    WebSphere, for instance). Then, during the cloning process, you can select the master prototype that meets the needs of your clone. v The LINUX PROTODIR consumes an entire 3390-3 volume. To help slow the consumption of 3390-3 volumes, you can split the Linux file system into read-only and read/write portions and share the read-only portion.
  • Page 90 Perform these steps to set up LINMSTR’s disks: Log onto MAINT and from the command line, type this command and press the Enter key: dirm for linmstr amdisk 192 devtype autov 50 610W02 DVHXMT1191I Your AMDISK request has been sent for processing. Ready;...
  • Page 91: Installing Linux In A Virtual Machine

    Note: Add ’CP TERM LINEND %’ in case the system default line end character is changed. Guideline: In Chapter 9, “Setting up basic system automation,” on page 85, you automate the Linux virtual console, which requires a modification of the PROFILE EXEC for each Linux virtual server you want to automate. If you prefer to have this function part of every Linux clone, you can add the required statement now.
  • Page 92 Stage Description Use FTP to move the Linux boot files to a target virtual machine. As of this writing, popular Linux distributions require you to ftp the files to your virtual machine. Examples: SUSE Linux uses these boot files: v VMRDR IKR. The Linux kernel built for use with a ram disk. v INITRD.
  • Page 93: Example Of Using Ftp To Get The Linux Boot Files

    Linux configuration are 0.0.0600, 0.0.0601, and 0.0.0602. For information about device drivers, see Linux on System z: Device Drivers, Features, and Commands on the IBM developerWorks Linux on System z Web site entitled “Documentation for Development stream” at: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/linux390/documentation_dev.html Guidelines: v Before you install Linux, format the 150 and 151 minidisks.
  • Page 94: Example Of Punching Linux Boot Files To The Virtual Machine Reader

    Note: Because the directory containing the Linux boot files varies based on the Linux distribution and distribution level, the directory information used in the FTP GET commands in this topic is for example use only. access 192 a DMSACC724I 192 replaces A (191) Ready;...
  • Page 95: Example Of Booting (Ipl) The Linux Boot Files From The Virtual Machine Reader

    spool punch * close Ready; punch vmrdr ikr a (noh RDR FILE 0126 SENT FROM LINMSTR PUN WAS 0126 RECS 3129 CPY 001 A NOHOLD NOKEEP Ready; punch parm file a (noh RDR FILE 0127 SENT FROM LINMSTR PUN WAS 0127 RECS 3129 CPY 001 A NOHOLD NOKEEP Ready;...
  • Page 96: (Optional) Steps For Loading Linux Automatically At Logon

    Tip: When interacting with the Linux installation program, you might enter virtual machine console mode. For instance, the installation program might tell you to press Enter to accept a default option and pressing the Enter key results in the VM READ state.
  • Page 97: Chapter 8. Cloning Linux Virtual Servers

    To determine the status of your work units, type this command and press the Enter key: dirm query datamove * Log onto LINUX02 and IPL the Linux operating system. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 98 Telnet to the new Linux virtual server and update the network configuration files to make permanent the network changes. Example: On a SUSE SLES9 system, you need to modify the IP address and host name through a tool like yast2. Shut down the Linux operating system in LINUX02 and reboot.
  • Page 99: Chapter 9. Setting Up Basic System Automation

    Steps for automatically starting Linux virtual servers and other virtual machines This procedure configures the AUTOLOG1 virtual machine to startup virtual machines automatically whenever z/VM starts. Before you begin: You need to log on as MAINT. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 100 Perform these steps to start virtual machines at startup (IPL) time: Link to the AUTOLOG1 191 minidisk. Type this command and press the Enter key: link autolog1 191 091 mr Ready; Access the 091 minidisk as Z. Type this command and press the Enter key: access 091 z Ready;...
  • Page 101: Steps For Enabling Linux Virtual Servers To Shut Down Automatically

    Save the file. Press the Enter key to leave input mode, then, at the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file Detach the 091 minidisk (AUTOLOG1’s 191). Type this command and press the Enter key: release z (det If you want to test the autolog procedure, from the command line type this command and press the Enter key:...
  • Page 102: Setting Up The Programmable Operator

    While logged on as a superuser on Linux, check the etc/inittab file for these lines: # z/VM or LPAR is shutting down ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -h now Important: Be sure the shutdown command shuts down Linux (-h) rather than restarting it (-r). You are done.
  • Page 103: Steps For Setting Up The Routing Table

    VMUSER1 OPERATOR LGLOPR Programmable Operator Logical Messages operator OPERATOR Routing Table logon > log file shutdown > LGLOPR Figure 8. Example of a programmable operator Related information “The Programmable Operator Facility” in z/VM: CMS Planning and Administration, SC24-6171 Steps for setting up the routing table This procedure has you modify the PROP RTABLE and add comparison entries for your Linux virtual servers.
  • Page 104 Perform these steps to set up the routing table: Copy the sample routing table (PROP RTABLE) file from the CMS 190 minidisk. Because the file is mode 5 (hidden), you must access the 190 disk as C/A to copy the file. Type these commands and press the Enter key after each one: access 190 c/a DMSACP723I C (190) R/O...
  • Page 105 ====> all/NCCF ====> delete * ====> all Save the file. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> save Move the current line to the line before “SEND ALL OTHER TRAPPED DATA TO THE LOGICAL OPERATOR”. From the XEDIT command line, type these commands and press the Enter key after each one: ====>...
  • Page 106: Steps For Setting Up The Programmable Operator

    Save the PROP RTABLE file. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file You are done. Steps for setting up the programmable operator Because z/VM automatically logs on OPERATOR, you can have the programmable operator automatically invoked without the need to start it manually whenever z/VM initializes.
  • Page 107: Steps For Automating Linux Virtual Consoles

    Important: Once the programmable operator is running, do not log onto OPERATOR except when necessary. If you do log on to OPERATOR, before you can issue commands other than those that control the programmable operator, you must issue the STOP command. Steps for automating Linux virtual consoles This task shows you how to send Linux virtual console messages to the...
  • Page 108 Before you begin: You need to set up the programmable operator. See “Steps for setting up the programmable operator” on page 92. You need to be able to log onto your Linux virtual machines, but Linux must be shut down. Perform these steps to automate Linux virtual consoles: Log onto a Linux virtual machine.
  • Page 109: Steps For Testing Your Automation

    Result: The PROFILE EXEC looks like this: /* Sample PROFILE EXEC for Linux servers */ "CP TERM LINEND %" /* Use %CP to talk to CP "CP SET PF12 RETRIEVE" /* Recall previous commands */ "CP TERM MORE 1 0" /* Clear screen after 1 sec */ "CP SET RUN ON"...
  • Page 110 Where userid is the user ID of the Linux virtual server and systemid is the z/VM system ID. You know you are done when the test succeeds. z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 111: Chapter 10. Performing Run-Time Tasks

    Linux, defining the storage size of the virtual machine, and defining virtual CPUs. v Linux’s system console. The virtual console becomes the Linux system console once Linux is loaded. Linux system messages are displayed on this console. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 112: Real Operation Tasks

    “Setting up the programmable operator” on page 88 shows you how to send Linux console messages to one central operator. This section divides up run-time tasks into tasks you can do from the logical operator console (real operation tasks) and tasks you can do from the virtual console (virtual operation tasks).
  • Page 113 If you receive ... Then ... A paging capacity v Review system usage and take steps to reduce the system warning: load. 90 percent of all v Log on as MAINT and add new paging volumes: paging space is 1. Format and allocate a new paging volume. See “Steps for in use.
  • Page 114: Step For Restarting Z/Vm

    Step for restarting z/VM If you need to restart z/VM, use the SHUTDOWN REIPL command. The SHUTDOWN command sends signals to the Linux virtual servers to shut down and waits for a period of time defined in the SYSTEM CONFIG file. Before you begin: You must log on as the system operator (if you followed “Setting up the programmable operator”...
  • Page 115 ASCII console support. Also, see the console support section in Linux on System z: Device Drivers, Features, and Commands on the IBM developerWorks Linux on System z Web site entitled “Documentation for Development stream” at: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/linux390/...
  • Page 116 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Display the status of real CP QUERY rdev1 rdev2 ... devices Examples: v For DASD: query 280 7806 DASD 0280 CP SYSTEM XAUSR1 DASD 7806 ATTACHED TO ALAN 7806 R/W 610SPL Ready;...
  • Page 117 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Display the status of the CP QUERY CRYPTO APQS cryptographic facility Example: q crypto apqs AP 02 CEX2C Queue 08 is reserved for dedicated use AP 02 CEX2C Queue 09 is superseded by CEX2A AP 02 CEX2C Queue 10 is superseded by CEX2A AP 02 CEX2C Queue 11 is dedicated to GARDNERK AP 03 CEX2C Queue 08 is superseded by CEX2A...
  • Page 118 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Enable a logical path CP VARY ON PATH nn TO rdev between the host system Example: To make path C2 leading to device 140 available to and one or more real that device: devices.
  • Page 119: Step For Managing Users

    If you want to ... Then use this command ... Add expanded storage to ATTACH XSTORE userid the virtual machine Issue this command when Linux is shutdown. Example: attach xstore lantzy 15:49:56 XSTORE MIGRATION STARTED, MAY TAKE SEVERAL MINUTES TO COMPLETE 15:49:56 XSTORE CLEARING STARTED 15:49:57 XSTORE attached, size= 512M Ready;...
  • Page 120 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Display the number of CP QUERY USERS logged-on users Issue this command from LGLOPR. Example: query users 8 USERS, 0 DIALED, 0 NET Ready; Display a user ID and CP QUERY userid device address of the user Issue this command from LGLOPR.
  • Page 121: Virtual Machine Operation Tasks

    If you want to ... Then use this command ... Permanently change the DIRM FOR userid STORAGE nnnM storage size of a virtual Issue this command from MAINT. machine Example: dirm for linux01 storage 256M Check to see whether a QUERY SIGNAL Linux virtual server is Issue this command from LGLOPR.
  • Page 122: Steps For Using Cp Commands At The Linux Virtual Console

    Steps for using CP commands at the Linux virtual console Before you begin: You must have authority to log on the virtual machine that runs Linux. Perform these steps to use CP commands at the Linux virtual console: Log on the virtual machine that runs Linux. Base your action on the choices in the table: If you want to ...
  • Page 123 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Change the memory size DEFINE STORAGE of the virtual machine Attention: v Issue this command only when Linux is shut down because changing storage sizes resets the virtual machine and any operating system running in it.
  • Page 124 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Detach virtual CPUs and DETACH devices from the virtual Examples: machine v Virtual CPUs: Attention: Issue this command only when Linux is shut down because detaching virtual CPUs resets the virtual machine and any operating system running in it.
  • Page 125 If you want to ... Then use this command ... Link to another disk LINK userid vdev1 vdev2 RR (read-only mode) vdev1 is userid’s virtual address; vdev2 is an available virtual address in your virtual machine configuration. Examples: %cp link linux01 150 150 rr If you use “vmcp”...
  • Page 126: Archiving And Backing Up Critical Data

    Archiving and backing up critical data Archiving stores large bodies of data (for example, an entire disk image) for safekeeping, and should be a part of your disaster recovery plan. The data should be mutually consistent, so you can be running, but cannot be making changes. Do archiving on regular intervals, such as weekly or monthly, or whenever you do major software changes.
  • Page 127: Archiving Virtual Server Disks

    Also at installation time, you used the SPXTAPE command to archive name saved systems, for example CMS, and discontiguous saved segments. Table 7 directs you to procedures to follow for archiving the z/VM system disks, named saved systems, and discontiguous saved segments. Table 7.
  • Page 128 From the CMS command line, type the DDR command and press the Enter key: z/VM DASD DUMP/RESTORE PROGRAM ENTER: DDR prompts for control statements by issuing the ENTER: prompt. At the ENTER: prompt, type this command and press the Enter key: sysprint cons Designate the disk from which DDR dumps the data.
  • Page 129 Perform these steps to restore virtual server disks: Mount the archive tape on a tape drive. Attach the tape to MAINT. Type this command and press the Enter key: attach rdev maint 181 where rdev is the real device address of the tape drive. Link to the test Linux virtual server disk to which you want restore the archive.
  • Page 130 Restore the tape to disk. Type this command and press the Enter key, then respond to the prompts as shown: restore all HCPDDR711D VOLID READ IS LIN150 DO YOU WISH TO CONTINUE? RESPOND YES, NO OR REREAD: RESTORING LIN150 ENTER: To exit DDR, press the Enter key.
  • Page 131: Chapter 11. Monitoring Performance And Capacity

    How well is the system equipped for spooling? The paging questions apply to the spooling configuration, too. Tuning is the art of optimizing some performance measure of a workload within the constraints imposed by the hardware available. Because the hardware always © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 132: Monitoring Linux Virtual Servers With Performance Toolkit For Vm

    For additional performance data from Linux, install RMF Performance Monitor and configure Performance Toolkit for VM to access this data. Note: The RMF Performance Monitor is produced by an IBM Technical Study and is not a part of any IBM product. Related information v For more about z/VM performance, see z/VM: Performance, SC24-6208.
  • Page 133 The z/VM scheduler controls the dispatching of virtual machines by managing three scheduling lists: v The dormant list contains a list of virtual machines that are idle or waiting for completion of a long event, such as a tape read. v The eligible list contains a list of virtual machines waiting for resources.
  • Page 134: Steps For Taking A Snapshot Of System Performance

    in the eligible list, it moves back to the eligible list (if it can still be dispatched) or the dormant list (if it can no longer be dispatched). Related information For a complete description of the scheduler, see “Virtual Machine Scheduling and Dispatching”...
  • Page 135 If you want to check ... Then issue ... Virtual machines cp indicate queues exp in the dispatch Example: and eligible lists cp indicate queues exp TCPIP Q0 PS 00006309/00005795 ..-101.6 A02 Q1 R00 00001339/00001352 .I.. -91.50 A00 RSCS Q0 PG 00000614/00000613 ..
  • Page 136 If you want to check ... Then issue ... Whether a virtual cp indicate user userid exp (several times at 10–second intervals) machine is hung Example: cp indicate user bkw exp Userid=BKW Mach=XC V=V Attached xstore=NONE Iplsys=CMS Devnum=27 Spool: Reads=335 Writes=129 Owned spaces: Number=1 Owned size=247M Primary space: ID=BKW:BASE PRIVATE Defined size=256M Address limit=814M...
  • Page 137: Using The Cp Monitor And Performance Toolkit For Vm

    If you want to check ... Then issue ... Paging cp query alloc page Example: cp query alloc page EXTENT EXTENT TOTAL PAGES HIGH VOLID RDEV START END PAGES IN USE PAGE USED ------ ---- ---------- ---------- ------ ------ ------ ---- K4E40A C621 3338 600840 1846...
  • Page 138: Configuring Performance Toolkit For Vm

    (MONDCSS). Note: MONDCSS is already defined for you during system installation. An IBM-supplied program called MONWRITE retrieves monitor records from the saved segment and processes them. MONWRITE can store monitor records on disk or tape.
  • Page 139 (MONWRITE)” Setting up the performance analysis virtual machine (PERFSVM) v Installing Performance Toolkit for v Program Directory for Performance Toolkit for VM at http://www.ibm.com/eserver/zseries/zvm/ library/ v Configuring Performance Toolkit v “Steps for configuring Performance Toolkit for for VM VM” on page 126 v “Steps for checking your Performance Toolkit for...
  • Page 140 MONWRITE. Steps for configuring Performance Toolkit for VM Before you begin: You need to install Performance Toolkit for VM by following the Program Directory for Performance Toolkit for VM (http://www.ibm.com/eserver/ zseries/zvm/library/). z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 141 You need to log on to PERFSVM. Perform these steps to configure Performance Toolkit for VM: Issue the BEGIN command to remove PERFSVM from CP READ state. From the command line, type this command and press the Enter key: begin Remove the comments from the MONITOR commands in PERFSVM’s PROFILE EXEC.
  • Page 142 c. Replace the asterisk (*) in column 1 with an “F” for the “MONCOLL VMCF” statement: FC MONCOLL VMCF ON d. Save the FCONX $PROFILE. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file Create an FCONRMT SYSTEMS file that links your z/VM system and PERFSVM to a special resource name called FCXRES00.
  • Page 143 c. Type these lines and press the Enter after each line: FCONRMT AUTHORIZ A1 F 80 Trunc=80 Size=18 Line=2 Col=1 Alt=2 DMSXMD573I Input mode: * * * Top of File * * * node_id PERFSVM S&FSERV DATA node_id PERFSVM CMD node_id * CMD DATA where node_id is your z/VM system identifier.
  • Page 144 Result: FCX124 Performance Screen Selection (FL610 PITS353) Perf. Monitor General System Data I/O Data History Data (by Time) 1. CPU load and trans. 11. Channel load 31. Graphics selection 2. Storage utilization 12. Control units 32. History data files* 3. Storage subpools 13.
  • Page 145 3. Save the file. From the XEDIT command line, issue: ====> file Stay logged onto PERFSVM and continue with the next procedure. (Optional) Steps for setting up the Web interface for Performance Toolkit for VM Before you begin: You need to be logged on to PERFSVM. Later, you need to log onto TCPMAINT.
  • Page 146 d. Save the file. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====> file Log onto TCPMAINT. Edit the PROFILE TCPIP. Issue this command: xedit profile tcpip Find the PORT statement. From the XEDIT command line, type this command and press the Enter key: ====>...
  • Page 147: Using Monitoring To Analyze Performance And Capacity

    Click the name of your z/VM host system. Result: You see: SYSTEM1 Data Retrieval Session (Performance Toolkit for VM FL610)- Microsoft (SYSTEM1) Figure 11. Initial Performance Data Selection Menu Click “29. Linux Systems*” to see if the interface is displaying performance data from the Linux systems you configured.
  • Page 148 Steps for analyzing performance and capacity Before you begin: You need to set up Performance Toolkit for VM and the Web interface for Performance Toolkit for VM. See “Configuring Performance Toolkit for VM” on page 124. Perform these steps to analyze performance and capacity: Open your Web browser to the z/VM host and port for Performance Toolkit for VM.
  • Page 149: Steps For Using Cp Commands To Improve Performance

    If you want to check for Then check these possible ... screens ... Notes For the whole system: constraints 1. CPU load and trans. Check the line: PROC %CPU %CP %EMU %WT %SYS %SP %SIC %LOGLD v “%LOGLD” is the best way to identify CPU bottlenecks.
  • Page 150 You know you are done when system performance improves. Related information For advanced information about performance and the z/VM scheduler, see z/VM: Performance, SC24-6208 v “VM Performance Resources” (http://www.vm.ibm.com/perf/) v “The VM/ESA Scheduler Made Simple” (http://www.vm.ibm.com/devpages/ bitner/presentations/vmsched.html) z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 151: Chapter 12. Servicing Z/Vm

    Each release of a product has a unique set of PTFs, because the fixes may be different on each release. When IBM ships a new release of a product like z/VM, PTFs from the previous release are merged into the new release.
  • Page 152 The method of delivery depends on the form of the solution, and it is determined by you and the IBM support center. Once an APAR number is established for the problem, you can use that number to track the fix and see when a PTF is available.
  • Page 153: Appendix. Example Of Using Ftp To Install Linux From The Hardware Management Console

    Note: For supported USB flash memory drives, see System z Hardware Management Console Operations Guide. c. Click OK on the Access Removable Media panel. d. Click on OK in the Access Removable Media Task Confirmation panel. The Access Removable Media panel is displayed. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 154: Ftping To The Hmc Removable Media

    Important: Keep the Access Removable Media panel open until you finish the transfer (clicking OK on the panel closes access to the removable media). Only when you are done using the removable media should you click OK to end access. FTPing to the HMC removable media Before using FTP, you must grant authority in the FTP server to the user ID that accesses the HMC removable media.
  • Page 155 127.0.0.1 VM TCP/IP FTP Level 54 Connecting to 127...1, port 21 220-FTPSERVE IBM VM Level 54 at VM.DOMAIN.COM 220 Connection will close if idle for more than 5 minutes. USER (identify yourself to the host): simonw >>>USER simonw 331 Password required for simonw.
  • Page 156 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 157: Notices

    Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
  • Page 158 The licensed program described in this document and all licensed material available for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer Agreement, IBM International Program License Agreement or any equivalent agreement between us.
  • Page 159: Trademarks

    International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at “Copyright and trademark information” at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml ®...
  • Page 160 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 161: Glossary

    The Clocate function searches from the current location to the end of the file. It does not wrap. To search the whole file, press the Top key (PF2/F2) to go to the top of the file before using Clocate. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 162 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 163: Bibliography

    Hardware Configuration Manager User’s Guide, SC33-7989 v IBM Publications Center at www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/publications/ Customization and Tuning servlet/pbi.wss v IBM Online Library: z/VM Collection on DVD, v z/VM: CP Exit Customization, SC24-6176 SK5T-7054 v z/VM: Performance, SC24-6208 z/VM Base Library Operation and Use...
  • Page 164: Diagnosis

    Reference, SC26-4399 v z/VM: DFSMS/VM Storage Administration, v Common Programming Interface Resource Recovery SC24-6186 Reference, SC31-6821 v z/OS: IBM Tivoli Directory Server Plug-in Directory Maintenance Facility for Reference for z/OS, SA76-0148 z/VM v z/OS: Language Environment Concepts Guide, v z/VM: Directory Maintenance Facility Commands...
  • Page 165: Performance Toolkit For Vm

    RACF Security Server Macros and Interfaces, SC24-6216 Publications you might be interested in are: v z/VM: RACF Security Server Messages and Codes, v z/VM and Linux on IBM System z: The GC24-6217 Virtualization Cookbook for SLES9, SG24-6695 v z/VM: RACF Security Server Security v Security on z/VM, SG24-7471 Administrator’s Guide, SC24-6218...
  • Page 166 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 167: Index

    Linux automatically 82, 85 CP READ 5 edit mode 16 z/VM, restarting 67, 100 CP-owned volume 37 editing screen 15 input mode, editing 17 CPSYNTAX command 48 editor, XEDIT 15 INPUT prefix command 18 © Copyright IBM Corp. 2009...
  • Page 168 Insert key 18 operator consoles scheduler, overview 118 integrated ASCII console 97 monitoring 98 search order, CMS 9 overview 97 secondary console 93 setting addresses 46 service corrective 137 preventive 137 LINDFLT DIRECT 71 SERVICE DIRM ENABLE command 51 LINUX PROTODIR 71 service level 137 Linux virtual server paging volume 28, 35, 99...
  • Page 169 tasks (continued) TCP/IP (continued) disks, restoring 114 production 63 z/VM documentation and media, task roadmap 31 restarting 67, 100 obtaining 34 temporary minidisk 4 features list checking 69 updating 41 Linux unit record device 7 automating console 93 user directory creating first 71 DirMaint 33, 51 setting up 191 disk 75...
  • Page 170 z/VM: Getting Started with Linux on System z...
  • Page 172 Program Number: 5741-A07 Printed in USA SC24-6194-00...