Download Print this page

Before Setting Surface Controls; Induction Cooking Zones - Frigidaire cgis3065pf Use & Care Manual

Electric range with induction cooktop
Hide thumbs

Advertisement

BEFORE SETTING SURFACE CONTROLS

BEFORE SETTING SURFACE CONTROLS

Induction Cooking Zones

Your cooktop is equipped with four induction cooking zones
of different sizes and a radiant heat warmer zone
Figure 1:
Typical induction cooktop
Benefits of Induction Surface Cooking
Fast and efficient - Induction cooking zones heat faster and
use less energy. Induction power levels are quick to boil
and they are efficient when simmering.
A cooler cooktop - A unique feature of the induction cooking
zones is, whether it is turned on or off, the cooking zones
remain cooler than radiant type elements. Virtually no
wasted heat is produced since the heat begins with the
presence of cookware.
Easy cleanups - The cooler cooking zones make cleanup
easier. Spills resist sticking or burning so they wipe up
easily.
Magnetic detector - The cooking zone has a sensor that
automatically detects whether cookware is magnetic. This
will reduce accidental "turn-ons."
Pan size detection - The pan size recognition sensor auto-
matically detects and adapts the induction cooking zones to
the pan sizes in use for consistent, more even cooking.
More responsive - Induction cooking zones are more
responsive than their electric or gas counterparts because
only the pan heats. This type of cooking heats easier and
will be just as responsive when reducing to a simmer.
Induction cooking directly heats the pan; heating will only
begin when cookware is properly placed on the cooking
zones.
8
Induction Cookware
IMPORTANT
(Figure
1).
Before using the induction cooking zones, be sure to
carefully read and follow these cookware recommenda-
tions and the instructions in the pan sensing section.
When purchasing pans for use on the induction cooktop,
look for cookware specifically identified by the manufacturer
as induction ready, induction capable, or a similar statement
by the manufacturer that the cookware is specifically
designed for induction cooking.
The cooking zones will not activate if the cookware is not
constructed with a base magnetic material. To check if the
cookware base material is suitable, use a magnet to test
(Figure
2). If a magnet sticks to the bottom of the cookware,
the material type is correct.
Figure 2:
For the best possible surface cooking results, it is recom-
mended to only use high quality heavy gauge cookware on
the induction cooking zones. Be sure to follow all the manu-
facturer's recommendations when using cookware made for
induction cooking.
Induction Cookware Types
The most common induction cookware types available are:
Stainless steel - Generally excellent for induction
cooking. Is durable, easy to clean and resists staining.
IMPORTANT
Not all stainless steel cookware is magnetic; stainless
steel is not always suitable for induction cooking.
Cast iron - Good for induction cooking. Cooks evenly.
Do not slide cast iron cookware on cooktop. Cast iron
cookware with a rough surface will scratch ceramic
cooktop.
Porcelain-enamel coated metals - Heating characteris-
tics will vary depending on quality of base material.
Porcelain-enamel coating must be smooth to avoid
scratching the ceramic cooktop.
Testing a pan for magnetic properties

Hide quick links:

Advertisement

loading

  Related Manuals for Frigidaire cgis3065pf