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HP 3PAR StoreServ 7200 2-node Administrator's Manual

Hp 3par command line interface administrator's manual: hp 3par os 3.1.2 (qr482-96525, september 2013)
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HP 3PAR Command Line Interface
Administrator's Manual
HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2
Abstract
This manual is for all levels of system and storage administrators. This guide provides instructions for installing the HP 3PAR
CLI and using the CLI to configure and manage HP 3PAR storage systems.
HP Part Number: QR482-96525
Published: September 2013
Edition: 1

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  Summary of Contents for HP 3PAR StoreServ 7200 2-node

  • Page 1 HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Administrator’s Manual HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2 Abstract This manual is for all levels of system and storage administrators. This guide provides instructions for installing the HP 3PAR CLI and using the CLI to configure and manage HP 3PAR storage systems. HP Part Number: QR482-96525 Published: September 2013 Edition: 1...
  • Page 2 © Copyright 2007, 2013 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Confidential computer software. Valid license from HP required for possession, use or copying. Consistent with FAR 12.21 1 and 12.212, Commercial Computer Software, Computer Software Documentation, and Technical Data for Commercial Items are licensed to the U.S. Government under vendor's standard commercial license.
  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents 1 Installing the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface..........12 About the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface................12 Supported Platforms........................12 System Requirements.......................12 Disk Space Requirements......................12 Installation..........................12 Before Installation......................13 Graphical Installation on Windows..................13 Command-Line Installation on Solaris and Linux..............13 Setting the Path to the CLI on Solaris and Linux..............13 Troubleshooting the Installation....................14 Removing the HP 3PAR CLI......................14 On Windows........................14...
  • Page 4 3 Running the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface..........41 Global Options and Environment Variables................41 General Control and Help Commands..................43 Commands with Column Help.....................43 Using SSL.........................44 Setting the TPDSOCKSSL Environment Variable on Solaris and Linux........44 Setting the TPDSOCKSSL Environment Variable on Windows..........44 Using the -sockssl Option....................44 Setting the CLI Client Network Port..................44 Setting the TPDSYSNAME Environment Variable..............45...
  • Page 5 Viewing Domains........................59 Modifying a Domain.......................59 Changing a Domain Name....................59 Adding Comments to a Domain...................59 Removing a Domain.......................59 Managing Domain Objects.....................60 Moving Domain Objects to Another Domain.................60 Removing the Domain Association from a Domain Object............60 Managing Virtual Domain Autonomic Groups................60 Creating Virtual Domain Sets....................61 Adding Virtual Domains to Virtual Domain Sets..............61 Modifying Virtual Domain Sets....................61 Removing Virtual Domain Sets.....................61...
  • Page 6 Common Provisioning Group CLI Commands................79 Creating a Common Provisioning Group..................80 Modifying a Common Provisioning Group.................80 Setting Snapshot Space Usage Warnings................80 Setting a Common Provisioning Group’s Autogrow Size............80 Consolidating Common Provisioning Group Space..............81 Removing a Common Provisioning Group................81 Virtual Volume Types.......................81 Fully Provisioned Virtual Volumes..................82 Thinly Provisioned Virtual Volumes..................82 Virtual Volume CLI Commands....................82...
  • Page 7 Promoting a Virtual Copy....................96 Modifying a Virtual Copy....................96 Removing a Virtual Copy....................97 Creating a Group of Virtual Copies..................97 Physical Copies........................97 Creating an Offline Physical Copy..................98 Creating an Online Physical Copy..................98 Creating a Group of Physical Copies..................99 Resynchronizing a Physical Copy..................99 Resynchronizing a Group of Physical Copies..............99 Promoting a Physical Copy....................100 Creating an Online Copy....................100...
  • Page 8 Dismissing an Existing SED....................117 Data Encryption Commands....................117 1 1 Managing Events and Alerts..............118 Overview..........................118 Checking the Status of a System.....................118 Monitoring and Managing Alerts...................118 Viewing Alerts.........................118 Setting an Alert State......................118 Removing an Alert......................118 Setting System Alerts......................118 Setting the Raw Space Threshold Alert................119 Monitoring and Managing the Event Log.................119 Viewing the Event Log.......................120 Removing the Event Log....................120...
  • Page 9 remote_copy_sync......................132 scheduled_task........................133 snapspace_accounting.....................133 startao..........................133 system_task........................134 tune_vv...........................134 tune_vv_restart........................134 tunevv_rollback........................135 tune_sys..........................136 tune_sd..........................136 vv_copy..........................137 System Scheduler........................137 System Scheduler Commands....................137 Displaying Scheduled Tasks....................138 Scheduling Tasks......................138 Modifying a Scheduled Task.....................139 Suspending and Resuming Scheduled Tasks................139 Removing Scheduled Tasks....................139 14 Adaptive Optimization................140 Adaptive Optimization Conversion..................141 Creating an Adaptive Optimization Configuration..............142 Displaying an Adaptive Optimization Setting................144 Modifying an Adaptive Optimization Configuration..............144 Removing an Adaptive Optimization Configuration..............146...
  • Page 10 Virtualization Software....................163 Reporting........................164 Event Management......................166 16 Using the HP 3PAR SNMP Infrastructure...........167 Overview..........................167 The HP 3PAR SNMP Agent....................167 Locating the HP 3PAR MIB....................167 alertNotify Traps......................167 Registering an SNMP Manager....................167 Viewing Registered Managers...................168 Removing a Manager.......................168 Agent Community Strings....................168 Testing SNMP Managers....................168 Creating SNMPv3 Users......................168 Viewing SNMPv3 Users......................169 Removing SNMPv3 Users......................169...
  • Page 11 20 Documentation feedback...............184 A Mapping Roles and Rights...............185 3PAR AO Role........................185 3PAR RM Role........................185 Basic Edit Role........................186 Browse Role.........................188 Create Role..........................188 Edit Role..........................189 Service Role.........................191 Super Role...........................192 B Mapping Rights and CLI Commands............197 Mapping Rights and CLI Commands..................197 Index.......................201 Contents...
  • Page 12: Installing The Hp 3Par Command Line Interface

    1 Installing the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface The purpose of this chapter is to provide instructions for installing and uninstalling the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface. About the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Use the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface (CLI) to monitor, manage, and configure HP 3PAR storage systems.
  • Page 13: Before Installation

    Installation on Solaris and Linux” (page 13). The installation packages default to a command line installation on UNIX systems and graphical installation on Windows systems. Before Installation Prior to installing the HP 3PAR CLI: Shut down all active HP 3PAR CLI sessions. Disable any virus-checking software.
  • Page 14: Troubleshooting The Installation

    The <version> is the current release version, for example 3.1.2. Troubleshooting the Installation The InstallAnywhere application creates an error log named install.log in the installation directory. If you encounter a failure while installing the HP 3PAR CLI, please provide the install.log file when contacting your local service provider for technical support.
  • Page 15 so that the path stays consistent from release to release. If you do this, you must fully uninstall the previous version using the provided uninstaller before installing a new version. Multiple versions of the HP 3PAR CLI can reside on the same client system simultaneously. By default, the HP 3PAR CLI is installed in the following locations: On Windows: C:\Program Files\3PAR\inform_cli_<version>...
  • Page 16: Managing User Accounts And Connections

    2 Managing User Accounts and Connections Learning About User Accounts In order to access an HP 3PAR storage system you must have a user account. Each HP 3PAR CLI user is assigned a role, and each role is assigned a set of rights. The roles and rights assigned to the CLI user determine which tasks the user can perform with a system.
  • Page 17: Default User Accounts

    Table 2 HP 3PAR CLI User Roles (continued) User Roles Rights Assigned to Roles 3PAR AO Rights are limited to internal use by HP for Adaptive Optimization operations. 3PAR RM Rights are limited to internal use by HP for Recovery Manager operations. Default User Accounts During the HP 3PAR storage system’s moment of birth operation, the following HP 3PAR CLI user accounts are created:...
  • Page 18: Creating Users

    Reference. For more information about user roles and rights, see “Learning About User Accounts” (page 16). To view a list of the available roles on a system, issue the showrole command. To view a list of the available rights on a system, issue the showrole -lstrights command. To view the rights assigned to a specific role, issue the showrole <role_name>...
  • Page 19: Viewing Users

    NOTE: The first HP 3PAR storage system user account created must have a role with the right to create additional users. If the first user created has limited rights, the ability to configure the system will be restricted. The <object_set>_set rights include the right to remove the object. For example, the vvset_set right includes the right to remove virtual volume sets.
  • Page 20: Removing Users

    To view a list of users, the user roles, and user domain associations, issue the showuser command. For more information about the showuser command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference. To display all the users of a system, issue the showuser command. To display information for a specific user, issue the showuser <user_name>...
  • Page 21: Setting A User's Current Domain

    Setting a User’s Current Domain The current domain refers to the domain in which a user is working during a particular, single CLI session. To set a user’s current domain, issue the setclienv currentdomain <domain_name> command, where <domain_name> is the domain you wish to set as the working domain for the current CLI session.
  • Page 22: Active Directory Ldap Configuration With Sasl Binding

    Authentication is the process of using data from the LDAP server to verify a user’s name and the supplied password. Authorization is the process of using data from the LDAP server to determine the user’s group membership and rights in the system. By default, LDAP users cannot store an SSH public key using the HP 3PAR CLI setsshkey command.
  • Page 23: Configuring Connection Parameters

    NOTE: The examples used to illustrate the procedures described for Active Directory LDAP configuration with SASL binding specifically use GSSAPI as the SASL binding mechanism. As you will see, a single user is used to determine group hierarchies and path structures used in the system, which are then used to complete the LDAP configuration.
  • Page 24: Configuring Binding Parameters

    Set the Kerberos realm by issuing the setauthparam kerberos-realm <LDAP_ServiceName> command, where <LDAP_ServiceName> is the value displayed by either using the ldapsearch command or ldp.exe in Step NOTE: The value displayed for the default naming context is used later in “Configuring Account Location Parameters”...
  • Page 25 Issue the setauthparam account-name-attr sAMAccount command. Issue the setauthparam memberof-attr memberOf command. NOTE: You must know the user’s password in order to successfully use the checkpassword command. Issue the checkpassword command to obtain information about the user’s group memberships from the LDAP server. Example: % ldapsearch -LLL -x -H ldaps://192.168.10.13 -D 'NTDOM1\joeadmin' -W -b DC=3par,DC=com -s sub '(cn=3PARuser)' dn...
  • Page 26: Configuring Group-To-Role Mapping Parameters

    + search result DN: cn=hardware,ou=groups,dc=ldaptest,dc=3par,dc=com + search result: cn: hardware + mapping rule: super mapped to by software + rule match: super mapped to by software + mapping rule: edit mapped to by engineering + rule match: edit mapped to by engineering + mapping rule: browse mapped to by hardware + rule match: browse mapped to by hardware user 3paruser is authenticated and authorized...
  • Page 27: Active Directory Ldap Configuration With Simple Binding Over Ssl

    Issue the checkpassword command to verify that the users have the roles you assigned for the desired groups. Use a member of a specific group to verify the role. Example: system1 cli% setauthparam -f edit-map CN=Software,CN=Users,DC=3par,DC=com system1 cli% setauthparam -f browse-map CN=Eng,CN=Users,DC=3par,DC=com In the example above: Users belonging to the Software group are configured to have Edit rights within the system.
  • Page 28: Configuring Connection Parameters

    (Optional) Set the CA certificate using the following command: ◦ setauthparam ladp-ssl-cacert <certificate> Configure account location parameters using the following commands: ◦ setauthparam accounts-dn <DN_path> ◦ setauthparam account-obj user ◦ setauthparam account-name-attr sAMAccount ◦ setauthparam memberof-attr memberOf ◦ checkpassword <user_name> Configure group-to-role mapping parameters using the following commands: ◦...
  • Page 29: Configuring Binding Parameters

    Set the LDAP server’s host name by issuing the setauthparam ldap-server-hn <DNS_HostName> command, where <DNS_HostName> is the value displayed by either using the ldapsearch command or ldp.exe in Step NOTE: The value displayed for the defaultNamingContext is used later in “Configuring Account Location Parameters”...
  • Page 30: Configuring Account Location Parameters

    Select the Details tab. Click Copy to File..Click Next. Select Base-64 encoded x.5098 format. Click Next. Click Browse... and select a filename for the certificate (ending in the .cer file extension) and a folder in which the certificate will be stored. Click Next and then Finish.
  • Page 31 The example above corresponds to Step 1, and displays the following: joadmin is the user name of the NT Windows domain (NTDOM1) administrator searching for group information for user 3PARuser (cn=3PARuser). dn: CN=3PAR User,OU=Engineering,OU=Users,DC=3par,DC=com displays user locations in the LDAP server directory information tree. system1 cli% setauthparam -f accounts-dn OU=Users,DC=3par,DC=com system1 cli% setauthparam -f account-obj user system1 cli% setauthparam -f account-name-attr sAMAccountName...
  • Page 32: Configuring Group-To-Role Mapping Parameters

    ◦ ◦ Golfers In this example, 3PARuser is not yet authenticated or authorized because 3PARuser’s group-to-role mapping has not been configured. Configuring Group-To-Role Mapping Parameters Once you have configured the group location parameters, you must now decide what role you wish to assign the users for a given group.
  • Page 33: Openldap Configuration With Simple Binding Over Ssl

    Issue the checkpassword command to verify that the users have the roles you assigned for the desired groups. Use a member of a specific group to verify the role. Example: system1 cli% setauthparam -f edit-map CN=Software,CN=Users,DC=3par,DC=com system1 cli% setauthparam -f browse-map CN=Eng,CN=Users,DC=3par,DC=com In the example above: Users belonging to the Software group are configured to have Edit rights within the system.
  • Page 34: Configuring Connection Parameters

    ◦ setauthparam group-name-attr <attribute> ◦ setauthparam member-attr <member_attribute> Configure group-to-role mapping parameters using the following commands: ◦ setauthparam <map_param> <map_value> ◦ checkpassword <user_name> Different schemas can be used for user and group information with OpenLDAP. The instructions and example that follow describe configuration of the system using Posix users and groups. Configuring Connection Parameters To configure connection parameters, issue the setauthparam ldap-server <IP_address>...
  • Page 35: Configuring Group Location Parameters

    Issue the setauthparam user-attr <attribute> command, where <attribute> is the name of the attribute holding the user’s <user_name>. Example: system1 cli% setauthparam -f binding simple In the example above, simple binding is specified as the binding mechanism. system1 cli% setauthparam -f user-dn-base ou=people,dc=ldaptest,dc=3par,dc=com In the example above, the base of the user entries in the OpenLDAP server directory information tree is ou=people,dc=ldaptest,dc=3par,dc=com.
  • Page 36 Issue the setauthparam <map_param> <map_value> command, where: <map_param> is one of the following: ◦ super-map—provides Super user rights within the specified group. ◦ service-map—provides Service user rights within the specified group. ◦ edit-map—provides Edit user rights within the specified group. ◦...
  • Page 37 Issue the checkpassword command to verify that the users have the roles you assigned for the desired groups. Use a member of a specific group to verify the role. Example: system1 cli% setauthparam -f super-map software system1 cli% setauthparam -f edit-map engineering system1 cli% setauthparam -f browse-map hardware In the example above: Users belonging to the software group are configured to have Super rights within the...
  • Page 38: Configuring Ldap Connections On Systems Using Domains

    rights within the system, all engineering group members have Edit rights within the system, and all hardware group members have Browse rights within the system. Configuring LDAP Connections on Systems Using Domains LDAP is also available for systems using virtual domains for access control. The configuration process is nearly identical to configuring LDAP on non-Domain systems, with the only difference being an additional authorization step to map a user’s group to a domain.
  • Page 39 Configure the group-to-domain mapping parameters, as follows: Issue the setauthparam domain-name-attr <attribute> command, where <attribute> is the name of an attribute that holds the potential domain name. A common parameter to specify as the <attribute> is name. (Optional.) Issue the setauthparam domain-name-prefix <prefix> command, where <prefix>...
  • Page 40 Example using the domain-name-prefix parameter: system cli% setauthparam domain-name-attr description system cli% setauthparam domain-name-prefix SystemDomain= The example above corresponds to the second bullet in Step 2. As shown, SystemDomain= is the start point of the domain name search within the information returned from the domain-name-attr description parameter described above.
  • Page 41: Running The Hp 3Par Command Line Interface

    3 Running the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface After the CLI is installed (as described in “Installing the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface” (page 12)) and a user account is set up (as described in “Managing User Accounts and Connections” (page 16)), a CLI connection requires the following information: System name or IP address...
  • Page 42 NOTE: Environment variables can only be used if the CLI is set up remotely. Environment variables cannot be used if you are accessing the CLI through SSH. Table 3 Global CLI Options and Environment Variables Global Option Environment Variable Specifies... that the connection between the client and server is secure.
  • Page 43: General Control And Help Commands

    Table 3 Global CLI Options and Environment Variables (continued) Global Option Environment Variable Specifies... that all commands are forced and do not return confirmation TPDFORCE prompts before executing. For additional information, see “Forcing Commands” (page 51). the client-side version information, in the event of a version mismatch or other problem that prevents connection with a server.
  • Page 44: Using Ssl

    Using SSL The HP 3PAR OS provides a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol for secure transfer of data between the CLI client and system, and is set with either of the following: The TPDSOCKSSL environment variable. The -sockssl global option. NOTE: This is the default behavior.
  • Page 45: Setting The Tpdsysname Environment Variable

    Setting the TPDSYSNAME Environment Variable By setting the system name, you are not prompted for your system name, user name, and password when running the CLI, which can be useful for scripting. You can specify the system name in the following three ways: Set the TPDSYSNAME environment variable.
  • Page 46: Setting Your Name And Password

    Setting Your Name and Password Your name and password can be provided when prompted, or read from a file that is specified with the environment variable TPDPWFILE or the global option pwf (password file). CAUTION: By setting the system name, user name, and password using environment variables, you are not prompted for this information when running the CLI, which can be useful for scripting.
  • Page 47: Using The -Password Option

    Use of the pwf option overrides the use of the TPDPWFILE environment variable. CAUTION: The file containing the user's encrypted password must be protected from unwanted access. Using the -password Option You can also specify an encrypted password using the -password <encrypted_password> global option.
  • Page 48: Startup Files

    In the Environment Variable dialog box, enter TPDCACHEDIR in the Variable box. Enter the cache directory name in the Value box. Click OK. Startup Files Startup files can be used to load user-defined procedures and commands. Setting the TPDSTARTFILE environment variable causes the CLI to use a specific startup file when starting the CLI. The TPDSTARTFILE environment variable is set differently in Solaris and Linux, and Windows.
  • Page 49: Setting The Tpdcsvtable Environment Variable On Solaris And Linux

    Setting the TPDCSVTABLE Environment Variable on Solaris and Linux To set the TPDCSVTABLE environment variable in Solaris and Linux, see the following system output example: $ TPDCSVTABLE=1 $ export TPDCSVTABLE $ cli Setting the TPDCSVTABLE Environment Variable on Windows To set the TPDCSVTABLE environment variable in Windows: Perform Step 1 through...
  • Page 50: Setting The Tpdlistdom Environment Variable On Solaris And Linux

    Setting the TPDLISTDOM Environment Variable on Solaris and Linux To set the TPDLISTDOM environment variable in Solaris and Linux, see the following system output example: $ TPDLISTDOM=1 $ export TPDLISTDOM $ cli Setting the TPDLISTDOM Environment Variable on Windows To set the TPDLISTDOM environment variable in Windows: Perform Step 1 through...
  • Page 51: Setting The Environment Variable On Windows

    Setting the Environment Variable on Windows To set the TPDNOHDTOT or TPDHAFTER environment variable in Windows: Perform Step 1 through Step 4 of the procedure for setting the TPDSOCKSSL environment variable in Windows as described in “Using SSL” (page 44). In the Environment Variable dialog box, enter TPDNOHDTOT or TPDHAFTER in the Variable box.
  • Page 52: Stand-Alone Commands

    Stand-alone Commands There are two ways to issue CLI commands from a shell prompt in Solaris and Linux, or from a Windows command prompt: CLI commands can be executed like typical UNIX and MS-DOS commands. ◦ If the CLI commands are run as individual commands, you are prompted for your user name and password for each command.
  • Page 53: Cli User Name Restrictions Using Ssh

    Data integrity. Integrity checking is executed to verify that data has not been altered during transmission from sender to receiver. Server authentication. The system can be authenticated using the public key authentication scheme. The system’s public key can be stored on client machines, allowing the SSH client to compare the key presented by the system to the key stored on the client machine.
  • Page 54: Cli Scripting Through Ssh

    From any host that is running SSH client, enter the following example: $ ssh user@<System host name> In the previous example, ssh user is the first default user with Super rights and <System host name> is the array host name. If this is the first login from the client host (for example, when the host does not already have a system public key for identity), expect the following message: The authenticity of host <System host name>...
  • Page 55 CAUTION: For security purposes, the file containing the private key must be protected from unauthorized access. Failure to protect the file can cause the key to be compromised. CAUTION: If the system is operating in Common Criteria mode, LDAP users must not use a public key.
  • Page 56 The ssh–keygen utility generates two files: id_rsa.pub and id_rsa.pub (or id_dsa.pub and id_dsa.pub). Generate the key with or without a pass phrase. ◦ When the key is generated with a pass phrase, your private key is encrypted and stored in the file. NOTE: The pass phrase must be entered and the private key decrypted before a script is run.
  • Page 57 If you specified a pass phrase when creating the key pair, run ssh-agent and ssh-add to decrypt the key before running your script (<script_name> in the following example). $ ssh agent echo Agent pid 24216 $ ssh add Enter passphrase for /home/usr/user3/.ssh/id_dsa: ****** Identity added: /home/usr/user3/.ssh/id_dsa (/home/usr/user3/.ssh/id_dsa) $ <script_name>...
  • Page 58: Managing Hp 3Par Virtual Domains

    4 Managing HP 3PAR Virtual Domains Overview HP 3PAR Virtual Domains Software (domains) enables an administrator to create multiple domains, or spaces, within a system, where each domain is dedicated to a specific application. In effect, using domains restricts users to a subset of the volumes and hosts in a system, and prevents users from exporting virtual volumes to hosts outside of the users’...
  • Page 59: Viewing Domains

    For a complete list of options available for the createdomainset command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and HP 3PAR CLI Help. For additional information about domains, see the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide. Viewing Domains From time to time, you may wish to view the domains in your system. Additionally, when managing your domain objects as described in “Managing Domain Objects”...
  • Page 60: Managing Domain Objects

    Managing Domain Objects Domain objects can be moved in and out of a domain, or have their domain associations entirely removed. In doing so, all objects related either directly or indirectly to the domain object being managed are also moved or removed. These relationships include, but are not limited to, VLUNs between hosts and VVs, VVs which are drawing from CPGs and multiple VVs sharing the same LD.
  • Page 61: Creating Virtual Domain Sets

    Virtual domains added to a set inherit the rights of that set. Any action that requires Browse rights for a host requires the user to have Browse rights in any domain in the domain set. Any action that requires Edit rights for the host requires the user to have Edit rights in all domains in the domain group.
  • Page 62 To view domain sets containing domains matching a pattern, issue the showdomainset -domain <pattern>* command. Managing HP 3PAR Virtual Domains...
  • Page 63: Managing Ports And Hosts

    5 Managing Ports and Hosts Overview The system sees a host as a set of initiator port World Wide Names (WWNs) or iSCSI Names. Hosts that are physically connected to ports on the system are automatically detected. The FC port WWNs and iSCSI port iSCSI Names are displayed in the HP 3PAR CLI.
  • Page 64: Fc Port Settings

    ◦ StoreServ 10000 slots are numbered 0-9 from left to right, bottom to top in a node in the lower chassis. In the upper chassis, slots are numbered 0-9 from left to right, top to bottom. ◦ HP 3PAR StoreServ 7000 Storage systems have one slot per node. Slot 0 is reserved for onboard SAS, slot 1 is reserved for onboard FC, and slot 2 is reserved for the HBA.
  • Page 65: Iscsi Port Settings

    NOTE: Other options are available for the controlport command, including options for resetting the port’s mode, modifying Remote Copy settings, and issuing an FC Loop Initialization Primitive (LIP) procedure. These options are described in detail in the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help.
  • Page 66: Active And Inactive Hosts

    iSCSI ports use the following firmware mode setting: Target mode for ports that connect to hosts and receive commands from those hosts. Gigabit Ethernet ports use the following firmware mode setting: Peer mode for Ethernet ports, used for Remote Copy over IP (RCIP). FCoE ports use the following firmware mode setting: Target mode for ports that connect to hosts and receive commands from those hosts.
  • Page 67: Creating Hosts

    sethostset—change the name of a host set. removehost—remove a system host or paths to a host. removehostset—remove a host set from the system, or remove hosts from a set. servicehost—execute removal and replacement actions for a host. Creating Hosts When you create a new host, you are defining the characteristics of a new host path from the system to the host.
  • Page 68: Modifying Hosts

    on the host, the createhost <host_name> command creates a host without any path information. If the Host Explorer agent is running on the host, the createhost <host_name> command automatically creates a host with the path information received from the Host Explorer agent.
  • Page 69: Removing Iscsi Path Iscsi Names

    Removing iSCSI Path iSCSI Names To remove an iSCSI Name from an existing host, issue the removehost -iscsi <host_name> <iSCSI_name> command, where: <host_name> is the name of the host being modified. <iSCSI_name> is the iSCSI path being removed. Configuring iSCSI CHAP Authentication Information A host with an iSCSI path can be modified as an initiator or target with iSCSI CHAP authentication information.
  • Page 70: Removing Host Paths

    Use the HP 3PAR CLI command servicehost copy to create an inactive host on the system port to which you wish to move the host. The inactive host created with this command is identical to the active host that is to be relocated to this port. The servicehost copy command automatically exports all volumes that are currently exported to the active host to the new, inactive host once it is created.
  • Page 71: Managing Host Autonomic Groups

    Managing Host Autonomic Groups Hosts can be combined into autonomic groups. Autonomic groups are sets of objects that can be managed as one object. If you have a group of hosts in a cluster and all the hosts require the same administrative procedures, it is easier to group those hosts into a set and manage them together.
  • Page 72: Managing Host Personas

    To remove a host set from the system, or to remove hosts from a set, issue the removehostset <set_name> <host_names> command, where: <set_name> is the name of the host set being removed or modified. <host_names> are the names of the hosts being removed from the <set_name> host set. This specifier is optional and it is not required if you are removing the entire set.
  • Page 73: The Host Explorer Software Agent

    Table 5 Host Personas (continued) Persona Number Persona Name Host Operating System Additional Capabilities HPUX-Legacy HP-UX VolSetAddr AIX-Legacy NACA Egenera Egenera, NetApp SoftInq NetApp ONTAP Data ONTAP SoftInq VMware Linux and Windows SubLun, ALUA NOTE: Only the Generic, Generic-ALUA, and Generic-Legacy personas are supported for iSCSI connections.
  • Page 74: Creating A Domain-Specific Host

    Creating a Domain-Specific Host In order to create a domain-specific host, you must have Super or Edit rights in the all domain. For details about this restriction, see the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide and the createhost command in the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference. To create a domain-specific host, issue the createhost command as described in createhost “Creating a Host with a Fiber Channel Path”...
  • Page 75 stay online and host multipath software is not affected. The online software upgrade completes without any dependency on host multipath software. Persistent ports can also be used to ensure nondisruptive host I/O activity for planned and unplanned node down time, such as HBA firmware upgrades, adding or replacing HBAs, adding or replacing DIMMs, node failures, and cable or switch failures.
  • Page 76 In the showport command output shown below, primary port 0:0:1 corresponds to partner persistent port 1:0:1 with a failover of state of none. root@snodeb40:S170# showport N:S:P Mode State ----Node_WWN---- -Port_WWN/HW_Addr- Type Protocol Label Partner FailoverState 0:0:1 target ready 2FF70002AC0000AA 20010002AC0000AA host 1:0:1 none...
  • Page 77 1:0:1 target ready 2FF70002AC0000AA 21010002AC0000AA host 0:0:1 active Issue the showport command with the -ids option to shows the identities currently hosted by each port. For example, with no failovers in operation, each port hosts its own single ID. root@snodeb40:S170# showport -ids 0:0:1 1:0:1 0:4:1 1:4:1 N:S:P -Node_WWN/IPAddr- -----------Port_WWN/iSCSI_Name----------- 0:0:1 2FF70002AC0000AA...
  • Page 78: Managing Cpgs And Virtual Volumes

    6 Managing CPGs and Virtual Volumes Overview A CPG creates a virtual pool of LDs that allows up to 4,095 virtual volumes to share the CPG's resources and to allocate space on demand. Virtual volumes draw their resources from CPGs, and virtual volumes are exported as Logical Unit Numbers (LUNs) to hosts.
  • Page 79: System Guidelines For Creating Common Provisioning Groups

    There are several courses of action you can take such as adding physical disks to the system, or limiting the future growth of volumes that draw from the CPG. Your response can vary, depending on several factors: Total available space on your system. Nature of the data running on the system.
  • Page 80: Creating A Common Provisioning Group

    Creating a Common Provisioning Group To create a CPG, issue the createcpg -aw <percent> -sdgs <size> -sdgl <size> -sdgw <size> -t <RAID_type> <CPG_name> command, where: ◦ -aw <percent> is the percentage of used snapshot space and administration space that will generate a warning alert. If 0 (default) is specified, alert generation is disabled. ◦...
  • Page 81: Consolidating Common Provisioning Group Space

    To set or modify a CPG’s autogrow size, issue the setcpg -sdgs <size> <CPG_name> command, where: -sdgs <size> is the amount of LD storage created during each autogrow operation. For the minimum default growth sizes per number of nodes, see Table 6 (page 78).
  • Page 82: Fully Provisioned Virtual Volumes

    3PAR OS automatically reclaims unused snapshot space from TPVVs and fully provisioned virtual volumes and returns the space to the LDs. For greater administrative flexibility, you can provision the virtual volume’s user space and snapshot space from the same or different CPGs. If the virtual volume’s user space and snapshot space are on different CPGs, the user space remains available to the host if the CPG containing the snapshot space becomes full.
  • Page 83: Creating Virtual Volumes

    Creating Virtual Volumes After you create CPGs, you can create FPVVs and TPVVs that draw space from the CPGs. For greater administrative flexibility, you can provision the virtual volume’s user space and snapshot space from the same or different CPGs. If the virtual volume’s user space and snapshot space are on a different CPGs, the user space remains available to the host if the CPG containing the snapshot space becomes full.
  • Page 84: Modifying Virtual Volumes

    -usr_aw <percent> is the allocation warning alert limit for the user space specified as a percentage. This generates an alert when the user space of the volume exceeds a specified percentage of the volume’s size. -usr_al <percent> is the allocation limit of the user space specified as a percentage. This prevents the user space from exceeding a specified percentage of the volume’s size.
  • Page 85: Converting Fully Provisioned Virtual Volumes To Thinly Provisioned Virtual Volumes

    Similarly, if a fully-provisioned virtual volume’s storage space is largely unused, you can convert it to a TPVV in order to save storage space. Converting remote copy virtual volumes and virtual volumes that contain snapshots is not supported. You can, however, convert virtual volumes with snapshots and use the -keepvv option to create a new virtual volume with a new WWN that contains the original LDs and snapshots, in order to retain those snapshots.
  • Page 86: Manually Converting A Fully Provisioned Virtual Volume To A Thinly Provisioned Virtual Volume

    Manually Converting a Fully Provisioned Virtual Volume to a Thinly Provisioned Virtual Volume To convert an FPVV to a TPVV: For assessment and preparation considerations,, see the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide. Prepare the volumes for conversion to the new TPVV by removing unnecessary data. Perform clean-up tasks on the source volume by: Emptying trash cans.
  • Page 87: Managing Virtual Volume Autonomic Groups

    Managing Virtual Volume Autonomic Groups Virtual volumes can be combined into autonomic groups. Autonomic groups are sets of objects that can be managed as one object. If you have a group of volumes used by a database or another application and all the virtual volumes require the same administrative procedures, it is easier to group those volumes into a set and manage them together.
  • Page 88: Freeing Virtual Volume Snapshot Space

    For a complete list of options available for the removevvset command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help. Freeing Virtual Volume Snapshot Space To free unused snapshot administration and snapshot data space from a virtual volume that is not in use by the system, issue the freespace <VV_name>...
  • Page 89: Removing Virtual Volumes

    If both of the retention time and expiration time are specified, the retention time cannot be greater than the expiration time. The retention time can be set in hours or days. The minimum retention time is 1 hour and the maximum retention time is 43800 hours (1,825 days or 5 years).
  • Page 90: Validating And Repairing Virtual Volumes

    Validating and Repairing Virtual Volumes To verify that virtual volumes are valid, and to repair virtual volumes corrupted by an uncontrolled system shutdown, issue the checkvv {-y|-n} <VV_name> command, where: {-y|-n} specifies that if validity errors are found they are to be corrected (-y), or left unmodified (-n).
  • Page 91: Creating A Port Presents Vlun Template

    <host> is the name of the host to which the virtual volume is exported. This option creates a host sees VLUN template. <host_set> is the name of the host set to which the virtual volume is exported. This option creates a host set VLUN template. For detailed information about the createvlun command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference.
  • Page 92: Removing A Port Presents Vlun Template

    <host> is the name of the host. This option creates a host sees VLUN template. <host_set> is the name of the host set. For detailed information about the removevlun command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference. Removing a Port Presents VLUN Template To remove a port presents VLUN template and all active VLUNs associated with it, issue the removevlun <VV_name>|set:<set_name>...
  • Page 93: Creating Virtual Volumes In A Virtual Domain

    To create a CPG within a domain, issue the createcpg -domain <domain_name> -aw <percent> -sdgs <size> -sdgl <size> -sdgw <size> -t <RAID_type> <CPG_name> command, where: <domain_name> is the domain in which you are creating the CPG. -aw <percent> is the percentage of used snapshot space and administration space which will generate a warning alert.
  • Page 94: Growing Virtual Volumes In Domains

    See the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide and the setvv command in the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference for additional information about this restriction. To modify a virtual volume in a domain, see “Modifying Virtual Volumes” (page 84). Growing Virtual Volumes in Domains Existing domain virtual volumes can be enlarged (grown) by automatically adding capacity in increments that you specify.
  • Page 95: Managing Virtual Volume Copies

    7 Managing Virtual Volume Copies There are two types of copies that can be created from virtual volumes: virtual copies and physical copies. A virtual copy is a snapshot of an original or base volume. A virtual copy only records the changes to the original virtual volume.
  • Page 96: Promoting A Virtual Copy

    <source_VV> is the name of the virtual volume being copied. <set_name> is the name of the virtual volume set being copied. For a complete list of options available for the createsv command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help. Promoting a Virtual Copy If you have created multiple copies of a base volume, the data on a virtual copy can be rolled back to the base volume or to any of the virtual copy’s RW parents in the same tree by promoting...
  • Page 97: Removing A Virtual Copy

    Removing a Virtual Copy To remove a virtual copy, issue the removevv <VV_name> command, where <VV_name> is the snapshot you are removing. See the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference for detailed information about the removevv command. Creating a Group of Virtual Copies The HP 3PAR CLI also allows for the creation of consistent group snapshots of a list of virtual volumes.
  • Page 98: Creating An Offline Physical Copy

    Creating an Offline Physical Copy To create an offline physical copy of a virtual volume, issue the createvvcopy -p <parent_volume | parent_volumeset> -s <destination_volume> | destination_volumeset> -pri high command, where: -p <parent_volume | parent_volumeset> creates a snapshot of the parent volume or volume set, as identified by <parent_volume | parent_volumeset>, and copies the snapshot data to the destination volume.
  • Page 99: Creating A Group Of Physical Copies

    Creating a Group of Physical Copies The HP 3PAR CLI also allows for the creation of consistent group physical copies of a list of virtual volumes. A maximum group size of 100 virtual volumes is recommended for making a group of physical copies.
  • Page 100: Promoting A Physical Copy

    To resynchronize a group of physical copies, issue the creategroupvvcopy -r <destination_VV> command, where -r <destination_VV> is the volume to be resynchronized with its parent volume. Snapshots of the parent volume must have been saved during their creation (using the -s option) in order to resynchronize the volumes.
  • Page 101: Moving Snapshots

    limited to users with Super and Edit rights who belong to the all domain, and to users with Edit rights who belong to a specified domain. Snapshots inherit the domain of their parent volumes. Virtual copies can be: ◦ Created. See “Creating a Virtual Copy”...
  • Page 102: Creating And Applying Templates

    8 Creating and Applying Templates Overview You can use the HP 3PAR CLI to create templates that enable you to apply a set of parameters that automatically create LDs, virtual volumes, or CPGs with the same or similar characteristics. The following general rules apply to templates: A property can either be included in a template or not included.
  • Page 103: Creating Virtual Volumes And Logical Disks Using A Template

    Creating Virtual Volumes and Logical Disks Using a Template To create a virtual volume and its underlying LDs using a template, issue the createvv -templ <template_name> <VV_name> <size> command, where: <template_name> is the name of the template being applied to the creation of the volume and LDs.
  • Page 104: Removing Template Parameters

    Removing Template Parameters To remove parameters in an existing template, issue the settemplate -remove <option> <template_name> command, where: <option> is the parameter being removed from the template. The parameters are the options that you specified during the creation of the template. It is not necessary to specify the parameter’s value during removal.
  • Page 105: Monitoring System And Physical Disk Capacity

    9 Monitoring System and Physical Disk Capacity Overview The HP 3PAR CLI provides commands to show the amount of used space and available space in a system. These commands allow you to review space usage information at the system level and for each physical disk.
  • Page 106: Determining System Capacity By Physical Disk Type

    Unmapped volumes. System space, which includes administration volumes, log files, and physical disk system data, as well as used and unused spare space. The free space includes the total free initialized and uninitialized spaces available for use. Determining System Capacity by Physical Disk Type You can display the total capacity for all physical disks of a specific type.
  • Page 107: Determining Physical Disk Capacity By Disk Type

    As shown in the example above, physical disk capacity is displayed in MBs. The data columns are identified as follows: ID—The physical disk ID. CagePos—The position of the physical disk within the drive cage. The format varies depending on the drive cage type. Type—The physical disk type.
  • Page 108: Viewing Spare Chunklets

    How spare chunklets work: When a connection is lost to a physical disk or a physical disk fails, all future writes to the disk are automatically written to a logging LD until the physical disk comes back online or until the time limit for logging is reached. Logging disk space is allocated when the system is set up.
  • Page 109: Logical Disks And Chunklet Initialization

    Media—The current status of the physical disk media for the chunklet. The value is failed if the media has encountered errors and is unavailable, or valid if it is available for use. Sp—The spare status of the chunklet. Y indicates the chunklet is used for spare, N indicates that it is not.
  • Page 110 Along with specific component details, the showinventory command also displays the following information: Part number Serial number Assembly part number Assembly serial number Spare part number Model name Revision 1 10 Monitoring System and Physical Disk Capacity...
  • Page 111: 10 Data Encryption

    10 Data Encryption Beginning with HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2 MU2, HP 3PAR encrypted storage systems provide data encryption by using self-encrypting drives (SEDs) with a local key manager (LKM). Data encryption prevents data exposure that might result from the loss of physical control of disk drives when disk drives are: Decommissioned at their end of life.
  • Page 112: Supported Configurations

    takes about 30 seconds, and booting takes an additional 5 seconds. Rekeying under a light load takes about 15 seconds. CAUTION: Keep the encryption key file and password safe. If you lose the encryption key and the HP 3PAR StoreServ system is still functioning, you can always perform another backup of the encryption key file.
  • Page 113: Restrictions

    To view the license using the HP 3PAR CLI, issue the showlicense command: cli%showlicense License key was generated on Thu May 23 16:29:37 2013 License features currently enabled: Data Encryption To view the license using the HP 3PAR MC, navigate to the Software tab. Restrictions These restrictions apply to the first release of data encryption (HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2 MU2): Data encryption is available only with the purchase of a new HP 3PAR StoreServ system.
  • Page 114: Using The Controlencryption Command

    were moved to spare space. Specifying -nold prevents the allocation of the newly added physical disk and allows chunklets to be moved back to the new disk. After chunklets have been moved back to the new disk, the administrator can allow LDs to be allocated again by issuing the setpd command.
  • Page 115: Backing Up The Authentication Key File

    Backing up the Authentication Key File To back up the authentication key file, issue the controlencryption backup command. For example: cli% controlencryption backup backup1 The keystore must be backed up to prevent total loss of data. You will be prompted to twice for the password for the backup file.
  • Page 116: Replacing A Failed Disk Drive

    Data encryption status information is shown in Table 8 (page 116). Table 8 Data Encryption Status Status Information Description Yes if a backup has been saved. Backup Saved No if a backup has not been saved and one is required. The system is licensed with data encryption, but data Licensed encryption is not necessarily enabled.
  • Page 117: Dismissing An Existing Sed

    Dismissing an Existing SED To remove the physical disk definitions from system use, issue the dismisspd <PD_ID>..., where <PD_ID>... specifies the PDs, identified by integers, to be removed. For example, to dismiss a PD with ID 1, issue the following command: cli% dismisspd 1 After the system manager (sysmgr) dismisses the drive, it is cryptographically erased (provided data encryption was enabled).
  • Page 118: 1 Managing Events And Alerts

    1 1 Managing Events and Alerts Overview The system tracks system events internally. Some of these events require action on the part of the system administrator, so they trigger alerts that are displayed for the administrator. Events are logs created by the system which allow you to view the day-to-day health of your system. Alerts are generated by the system when a system event requires immediate operator action or attention.
  • Page 119: Setting The Raw Space Threshold Alert

    Groups” (page 78). For details about CPG creation precautions, see the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide. Limits for virtual volumes capable of allocating space on demand are also user-configurable and can trigger alerts. For information about on-demand virtual volume space allocation, see the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage Concepts Guide.
  • Page 120: Viewing The Event Log

    Viewing the Event Log To view the events log, issue the showeventlog command. The eventlog display can be refined to include only events occurring before or after a specified time, within a specified time period, or that match a specified pattern. For complete information on the events log display options, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference.
  • Page 121: 12 Viewing Statistics And Histograms

    12 Viewing Statistics and Histograms Overview The HP 3PAR CLI allows you to view aspects of system performance over time. You can view statistics for the performance of VLUNs, virtual volumes, ports, physical disks, data cache memory, and CPU usage, using variations of the stat command. In addition, the HP 3PAR CLI provides service time and I/O size histograms for system resources such as chunklets, logical and physical disks, ports, VLUNs, and virtual volumes.
  • Page 122: Viewing Vlun Statistics

    specific ports. host-connected (target) ports. disk-connected (initiator) ports. FC ports (for Remote Copy). Ethernet ports (for Remote Copy). You can use additional filters to refine the data output. For complete details about statport command options and for sample command data output, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Reference. Viewing VLUN Statistics To view VLUN statistics, issue the statvlun command.
  • Page 123: Viewing Statistical Reports Using The On-Node System Reporter

    Viewing Statistical Reports Using the On-node System Reporter This section provides instructions on using HP 3PAR CLI commands to generate reports of historical capacity and performance information that has been collected by the on-node System Reporter. The commands here are a subset of the statisics commands available. For a complete list of statistical reporting commands, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference.
  • Page 124: Viewing Statistical Histogram Reports For Performance

    Viewing Statistical Histogram Reports for Performance Performance histogram statistical reports are available for the following. You can specify whether to display I/O time and/or I/O size, the number of histogram columns, and whether to separate read and write data or display the total I/O for: Physical disks Ports Virtual volume LUN exports...
  • Page 125: Viewing Histograms For Ports

    You can use additional filters to customize the way the histogram data is displayed. For complete details about histpd command options and for sample command data output, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Reference. NOTE: The device speed number does not represent a rotational speed for SSDs without spinning media.
  • Page 126: 13 Managing Tasks

    13 Managing Tasks Overview Some system operations with long running times can be managed as system tasks and initiated at scheduled times. The larger your system, the longer some CLI command operations take to complete. With the task manager you can pause, cancel, or remove tasks running on the system. The System Scheduler allows you to create, modify, and remove schedules for initiating tasks.
  • Page 127: Starting A Task

    Table 10 Task Manager Commands (continued) Command Description settask Set the priority of a running task. showtask Display information about tasks on the system. starttask Start a CLI command that runs as a background task. waittask Ask the CLI to wait for a task to complete before proceeding. For a complete list of options available for the CLI task manager commands, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help.
  • Page 128: Setting The Priority Of A Running Task

    Detailed status: (...) The columns in the example above are identified as follows: Id—The task ID for the displayed task. Type—The task type. Task types are explained in “Task Types” (page 130). Name—The name of the system object that is being operated on. When there are multiple objects, those objects are not identified individually but as a group (for example, multiple lds or multiple cpgs).
  • Page 129: Waiting For A Task

    For a complete list of options available for the settask command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help. Waiting for a Task You can use the task ID and the waittask command to ask the system to wait for a task to complete before returning a command prompt.
  • Page 130: Removing A Task

    Removing a Task The removetask command only works on completed, failed, and cancelled tasks. Information about a task remains on the system unless it is manually removed using the removetask command and the task ID. For example: cli% removetask 454 Remove the following tasks? select q=quit y=yes n=no: y The specified task ID and any information associated with it are removed from the system.
  • Page 131 Table 1 1 Task Types by Operation and Command (continued) Task Type Operation Commands Description (Feature or Product) Remote copy volume Synchronizes remote copy remote_copy_sync syncrcopy synchronization (Remote volume groups. Copy). System scheduler. Schedules when to initiate scheduled_task checkhealth specified CLI commands. compactcpg compactld createsv creategroupsv...
  • Page 132: Background_Command

    background_command The background_command task type tracks commands initiated by the starttask CLI command. The background_command task type has only one phase and one step. See the background_command task type in Table 1 1 (page 130) for a list of the commands that can be run by the starttask command.
  • Page 133: Scheduled_Task

    For remote_copy_sync tasks, there are three phases: Phase 1 (startup): sync request has been received and synchronization is scheduled to start. Phase 2: performing the resynchronization. Phase 3: copying has completed and cleanup (such as deleting snapshots and setting state values) is taking place.
  • Page 134: System_Task

    system_task The system_task task type tracks the housekeeping tasks periodically run by the system. You can display any active housekeeping tasks with the showtask-all command. Only the 3parsvc user can run, change, or remove these tasks. CLI housekeeping tasks and commands: The move_back_chunklet runs the moverelocpd command.
  • Page 135: Tunevv_Rollback

    cli% canceltask 1 Are you sure you want to cancel task 1? select q=quit y=yes n=no: y cli% tunevv -restart testvol Task 2 started. Note that the tune_vv_restart task is a new task and receives a new task ID number. After restarting the tunevv operation, you can use the showtask command to see the cancelled and restarted tasks: cli% showtask...
  • Page 136: Tune_Sys

    Command failed error: No restart state for VV testvol2. For tune_vv_rollback tasks, there are two phases: CAUTION: Rollback operations should not be performed on TPVVs. Phase 1—Performing the actual region moves. Phase 2—Deleting the information stored in Phase 1 of the corresponding tune_vv task. The number of steps in the phase is equal to the number of regions being moved.
  • Page 137: Vv_Copy

    The number of steps in the phase is equal to the number of regions being moved. vv_copy The vv_copy task type is used to track physical copy operations. This includes creating physical copies and resynchronizing a physical copy with its parent base volume. You can create physical copies using the createvvcopy command.
  • Page 138: Displaying Scheduled Tasks

    Table 13 Commands Initiated by the System Scheduler (continued) Command Description Changes the layout of a virtual volume. tunevv Analyzes and automatically corrects space usage imbalances. tunesys Updates the snapshot space actually used by a virtual volume. This task cannot updatesnapspace be cancelled.
  • Page 139: Modifying A Scheduled Task

    Modifying a Scheduled Task To change the name of a scheduled task or change when the task is initiated, issue the setsched -s <new_schedule> -name <new_name> <schedule_name> command, where: <new_schedule> is a crontab-style argument that changes when the schedule is initiated. You can use the minute, hour, day-of-month, month, and day-of-week format, or use one of the special entries to schedule when the CLI command is initiated.
  • Page 140: 14 Adaptive Optimization

    14 Adaptive Optimization Adaptive Optimization (AO) uses System Reporter statistics gathered from LDs and physical disks to relocate customer data on physical volumes in an optimal way. AO relocation accomplishes two primary goals: Increase performance of frequently accessed regions of data by moving those regions to higher-tier storage (for example, moving to SSDs from normal spinning media).
  • Page 141: Adaptive Optimization Conversion

    Adaptive Optimization Conversion NOTE: This section applies only to HP 3PAR OS HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2. To modify an Adaptive Optimization (AO) configuration in HP 3PAR OS 3.1.1 or earlier, see the “Changing an Adaptive Optimization Configuration” section in the System Reporter Software User’s Guide.. Beginning with HP 3PAR OS 3.1.2, AO is implemented on the nodes together with an on-node version of System Reporter (SR).
  • Page 142: Creating An Adaptive Optimization Configuration

    Table 14 Adaptive Optimization Conversion Options (continued) External SR createaocfg option startao option Comment option, use the -btsecs option. For example, if the measure hours value is 2, use -btsecs -2h. The startao is even more flexible, allowing you to specify not only the beginning of the measurement interval relative to the startao command start time, but also the end of the measurement interval relative to the startao...
  • Page 143 Create an AO configuration using the createaocfg command. Example: cli% createaocfg -t0cpg tier0_R1_SSD -t1cpg tier1_R6_FC -t2cpg tier2_R6_NL -mode Performance AOCFG_name where: -t0cpg is the tier 0 CPG. tier0_R1_SSD is the tier 0 CPG name. -t1cpg is the tier 1 CPG. tier1_R6_FC is the tier 1 CPG name.
  • Page 144: Displaying An Adaptive Optimization Setting

    Table 15 Additional Options Not Available in an External System Reporter (continued) Option Description For the command in Step 3, this would ensure that the command would complete by 1 1:15 pm. CAUTION: When executed, this command attempts to complete the action within maxrunh hours, but success is not guaranteed.
  • Page 145 NOTE: Two or more tier CPGs must be present in an AO configuration at all times. If domains are used, all CPGs must be either in the same domain or not in any domain. A CPG can only belong to one AO configuration. A CPG can be removed from a tier by specifying a null string "".
  • Page 146: Removing An Adaptive Optimization Configuration

    In the following example, a CPG is removed from a tier, assuming that three tiers were initially created. If there are two tiers, this command is not permitted, because AO configurations require a minimum of two storage tiers. CLI% cli% setaocfg -t0cpg "" aocfg1 Removing an Adaptive Optimization Configuration To remove an AO configuration from the system, use the removeaocfg command: cli% removeaocfg [options] <AOCFG_name>...
  • Page 147: 15 Hp Priority Optimization

    15 HP Priority Optimization During recent years, consolidation of storage systems has reduced complexity of data storage, delivering efficiency in management, occupied floor space, and energy consumption. However, the consolidation of many disjoint workloads into a single storage system also results in contention for shared system resources on the system.
  • Page 148 VVsets are created in the MC or in the CLI. In the MC VVsets are co-created with new volumes, or created by using existing volumes. Figure 2 (page 148) shows the creation of VVset MS-SQL with member volumes MS-SQL.1, MS-SQL.2 and MS-SQL.3. At creation time, each volume member has the same provisioning type, user and copy CPG, allocation warnings, and volume size.
  • Page 149 Figure 3 VVset Creation A VVset can also be created so as to contain existing virtual volumes. Right-click a Virtual Volume Sets entry in the Provisioning tree of the MC, and then select Create Virtual Volume set (see Figure 4 (page 149)).
  • Page 150 Figure 5 Create Virtual Volume Set Click Next to show the list of all VVs on the system (see Figure 6 (page 150)). Figure 6 Adding Existing Volumes to a New VVset Select the volumes you want to be a member of VVset (Test in this example) and click the yellow arrow pointing downward to add them to the VVset;...
  • Page 151: Applying Quality Of Service Rules

    Figure 7 Test VVset with Three Pre-existing Volume Members To show a summary of the intended operation, click Next (summary window not shown). To complete the VVset creation, click Finish on the summary screen or on Figure 7 (page 151). The result is shown in Figure 8 (page 151): the Test VVset has been created with three previously...
  • Page 152: Mode Of Operation

    random, and transactional, among others), with different I/O packet sizes on a single HP 3PAR storage system. The use of QoS rules stabilizes performance in a multi-tenant environment. Mode of Operation HP 3PAR Priority Optimization operates by applying upper-limit control on I/O traffic to and from hosts connected to an HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage system.
  • Page 153: Qos Rule Actions

    between 0 and 2 - 1 , expressed in KB/second, although a more realistic upper limit is the throughput in KB/second that the particular array in question is capable of providing, given its configuration. NOTE: Throughput, also called bandwidth, is a measure of the amount of data processed by the array per unit of time.
  • Page 154: Qos Metrics

    QoS Metrics With HP 3PAR MC 4.4 and later, new charts showing historical data about how QoS operates for a particular VVset are available. To view the charts, click the Performance and Reports tab in the MC. The charts cover the following data: IOPS Bandwidth Service time...
  • Page 155: Creating A New Qos Rule With The Hp 3Par Mc

    Figure 10 Configure QoS Enter non-negative integer values either for I/O Limit (IOs/Sec), within a range of 0–2 - 1 , or for Bandwidth Limit (KBs/Sec), within a range of 0–2 - 1 , and then click OK. When a QoS rule is configured, it becomes active immediately. If values for the I/O limit, bandwidth limit, or both were defined previously, you can right-click the VVset name for a menu option to configure, clear, or disable the rule, as shown in Figure 1 1 (page...
  • Page 156 Figure 12 QoS Tree Node Right-click the VVset Name to open the same Configure QoS dialog box shown in the HP 3PAR CLI (see Figure 17 (page 158)). For an inactive rule, the Enable QoS option shown in Figure 12 (page 156) becomes available.
  • Page 157 Figure 14 VVset Icon for QoS Configuration For VVset QoS configuration, the Target Type field in the Configure QoS dialog box has a second value, System (see Figure 15 (page 157)). Figure 15 System Target Type in Configure QoS Dialog Box A System target-type rule governs all VVsets and VVs that are not subject to explicit QoS rules.
  • Page 158: Viewing A Qos Rule

    Figure 16 System Target in QoS Tree Viewing a QoS Rule To display the current values of an existing QoS rule, select Configure QoS. The Configure QoS dialog box displays current values (see Figure 17 (page 158)). Figure 17 QoS Current Values Modifying a QoS Rule Three new CLI commands are available to create and manage QoS rules.
  • Page 159: Removing A Qos Rule

    The integer value for bandwidth in the setqos command can optionally be followed with: k or K to indicate a multiple of 1000 m or M to indicate a multiple of 1,000,000 g or G to indicate a multiple of 1,000,000,000 If you specify "none", there is no limit on I/O issue bandwidth rate.
  • Page 160: Managing Qos Rules

    A QoS rule can be enabled and disabled at any moment. Once a QoS rule is disabled, the IOPS and bandwidth for the VVs in the VVset increases (if they were being delayed by the rule). Managing QoS Rules There is no limitation on the minimum number of IOPS and bandwidth that can be set on a giving VVset QoS Rule.
  • Page 161: Handling Tier- 1 Applications

    NOTE: Queue depth is the average number of I/O jobs, either processing or waiting to be processed, within a polling interval. The queue depth is a non-negative integer number. When upgrading the end-to-end SAN pathing from 4 Gb/sec to 8 Gb/sec. In general, HP recommends review of the system I/O capability and adjustment of the QoS rules in use whenever a change was made to one part of the entire chain from the host to the HP 3PAR Handling Tier- 1 Applications...
  • Page 162: Maximum Number Of Qos Rules Per Vv

    Lowering the QoS cap will result in higher I/O response times and reduced throughput on the host, and eventually queue-full errors are returned by the array to the host. NOTE: Response time is the average measured time that it takes the array to process an I/O request.
  • Page 163: Virtualization Software

    database of a particular group of users, enhances the performance stability for mail databases for other users and for other applications on the HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage systems. Microsoft Exchange is a highly interactive software, and its users demand a swift response to mouse clicks in the Outlook client.
  • Page 164: Reporting

    when a queue-full message arrives at the ESXi host. This reduction in the queue length gives the array an opportunity to decrease the number of outstanding I/Os at its end. In vSphere 5.1 U1, AQD can be configured by LUN, or globally for the ESXi host. Combining QoS rules with SIOC and ADQ provides I/O congestion control on three different levels: the workload will honor the QoS limits, and it will be impacted indirectly when SIOC reacts to latency increases and when AQD responds to queue-full messages from QoS rules.
  • Page 165 Service time (Svt_ms) Wait time (Wtt_ms) Size of the I/O requests (IOSz_KB) Number of rejected I/O requests (Rej) Averaged QoS queue length (Qlen) Averaged wait queue length (WQlen) Figure 20 (page 165) shows sample output for the statqos command. Figure 20 Run-time Statistics Shown by the statqos Command The column headers in Figure 20 (page 165) show:...
  • Page 166: Event Management

    Number of I/Os processed by QoS (including the number of I/Os Qlen delayed by QoS and number of I/Os processed by QoS without delay) You can filter by VVset by using the srstatvlun command. This can be useful in determining which VVs in a given VVset contribute the most in reaching the QoS limit.
  • Page 167: 16 Using The Hp 3Par Snmp Infrastructure

    16 Using the HP 3PAR SNMP Infrastructure Overview In addition to managing the system with the HP 3PAR CLI, the HP 3PAR OS includes an SNMP agent that allows you to perform some basic management functions via network management software running on a management station. These SNMP management functions require that you have SNMP management software not provided by HP.
  • Page 168: Viewing Registered Managers

    Viewing Registered Managers Use the HP 3PAR CLI command showsnmpmgr to see which managers are already registered with the SNMP agent. NOTE: If the manager that monitors the system has changed, remove the old manager and register the new one. Removing a Manager To remove a manager from the agent’s list of registered managers, thus preventing that manager from receiving traps, use the removesnmpmgr command.
  • Page 169: Viewing Snmpv3 Users

    To create an SNMPv3 user, issue the createsnmpuser -p <password> <user_name> command, where: <password> represents the password of the HP 3PAR OS local user. The password is converted to an SNPMv3 secret key. If a password is not specified with the -p option, the system prompts you to enter the password of the local user.
  • Page 170: 17 Using Mysnapshot

    17 Using mySnapshot Overview This chapter describes how to use the mySnapshot utility. The mySnapshot utility enables safe and easy copy and provisioning access to non-storage professionals such as DBAs, software developers, and test engineers working with systems. Users can safely and easily restore their own copies of test data in seconds, without relying on the storage administrator.
  • Page 171: Replacing A Read-Only Snapshot

    NOTE: The updatevv command can also update sets of virtual volumes. For a complete list of options available for the updatevv command, see the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help. Replacing a Read-Only Snapshot The following example shows how to replace a read-only snapshot volume with a new read-only snapshot volume.
  • Page 172 NOTE: In this example, test.rw1 can have VLUNs associated with it. The command will remember the VLUN, remove the old snapshot, create a new snapshot, and recreate the VLUN with the new snapshot. After the snapshot is replaced, testuser1 must remount the filesystem on the host. In the above example, the replaced copy (test.rw1) is a new copy of the database made from the reference copy (test.ro1), and not from the database itself (test).
  • Page 173: 18 Performance Tuning

    18 Performance Tuning Analyzing and Tuning a System The tunesys command analyzes your entire system and automatically corrects space usage imbalances in the system. Virtual volume and physical disk capacity are analyzed and rebalanced for optimal performance. Access to the virtual volumes is not interrupted during the system tuning operations.
  • Page 174: Displaying Virtual Volume Space Distribution

    NOTE: Running the tunesys command does not eliminate the need to run the tunepd command. The tunesys command performs space based balancing. The tunepd command performs service time and I/O based balancing. The tunesys command verifies that LDs associated with a CPG have the same characteristics as the CPG.
  • Page 175: Thinly-Provisioned Virtual Volumes

    Thinly-Provisioned Virtual Volumes By default, TPVVs and their underlying CPGs dedicate space from all available resources as they grow, both from preexisting and new drive capacity resources. This natural expansion capability of TPVVs reduces the need for changing the layout of TPVVs after adding disks. To change the layout of TPVVs following a hardware upgrade, perform the following: Create a new CPG.
  • Page 176: Changing Virtual Volume Fault-Tolerance Levels

    Tune the user space of the volume by issuing the tunevv usr_cpg <CPG_name> <volume_name> command, where: usr_cpg <CPG_name> is the name of the CPG created previously in Step 1, indicating the user space of the new CPG will be used. <volume_name>...
  • Page 177: Troubleshooting Modifying Virtual Volumes

    Create a new CPG with the parameters you wish to apply to the volume. See “Creating a Common Provisioning Group” (page 80) for instructions. Issue the tunevv usr_cpg <CPG_name> <volume_name> command, where: usr_cpg <CPG_name> is the name of the CPG created previously in Step <volume_name>...
  • Page 178: Compacting Logical Disks

    If the performance of one or more physical disks degrades, the throughput of the LDs is reduced and the entire system performance may decline. There are two general reasons why a physical disk may have degraded performance: The physical disk has reached its maximum throughput due to an unbalanced load. A disk in this state typically has unusually high average service times when compared to other disks.
  • Page 179: Compacting Common Provisioning Groups

    See the HP 3PAR Command Line Interface Reference and the HP 3PAR CLI Help for detailed information about this command. Compacting Common Provisioning Groups Reclaim unused CPG space with the compactld command. CPGs provide a shared pool of LD capacity for use by all virtual volumes that draw space from that pool. If volumes that draw from a CPG are deleted, or if copy space for these volumes grows and then shrinks, the underlying LDs in the CPG pool can become less efficient in space usage.
  • Page 180: 19 Support And Other Resources

    19 Support and Other Resources Contacting HP For worldwide technical support information, see the HP support website: http://www.hp.com/support Before contacting HP, collect the following information: Product model names and numbers Technical support registration number (if applicable) Product serial numbers Error messages Operating system type and revision level Detailed questions Specify the type of support you are requesting:...
  • Page 181 For information about: See: Migrating data from one HP 3PAR storage system to another HP 3PAR-to-3PAR Storage Peer Motion Guide Configuring the Secure Service Custodian server in order to HP 3PAR Secure Service Custodian Configuration Utility monitor and control HP 3PAR storage systems Reference Using the CLI to configure and manage HP 3PAR Remote HP 3PAR Remote Copy Software User’s Guide...
  • Page 182 For information about: See: Planning for HP 3PAR storage system setup Hardware specifications, installation considerations, power requirements, networking options, and cabling information for HP 3PAR storage systems HP 3PAR 7200, 7400, and 7450 storage systems HP 3PAR StoreServ 7000 Storage Site Planning Manual HP 3PAR StoreServ 7450 Storage Site Planning Manual HP 3PAR 10000 storage systems HP 3PAR StoreServ 10000 Storage Physical Planning...
  • Page 183: Typographic Conventions

    Typographic conventions Table 17 Document conventions Convention Element Bold text Keys that you press Text you typed into a GUI element, such as a text box GUI elements that you click or select, such as menu items, buttons, and so on Monospace text File and directory names System output...
  • Page 184: 20 Documentation Feedback

    20 Documentation feedback HP is committed to providing documentation that meets your needs. To help us improve the documentation, send any errors, suggestions, or comments to Documentation Feedback (docsfeedback@hp.com). Include the document title and part number, version number, or the URL when submitting your feedback.
  • Page 185: A Mapping Roles And Rights

    A Mapping Roles and Rights In this appendix “3PAR AO Role” (page 185) “3PAR RM Role” (page 185) “Basic Edit Role” (page 186) “Browse Role” (page 188) “Create Role” (page 188) “Edit Role” (page 189) “Service Role” (page 191) “Super Role” (page 192) 3PAR AO Role Table 18 3PAR AO Rights Right...
  • Page 186: Basic Edit Role

    Table 19 3PAR RM Role (continued) Right Description of Right sshkey_remove Remove users public SSH keys. sshkey_set Set the public SSH key for a user. sv_create Create a virtual copy volume. sv_promote Promote a virtual copy volume. sv_remove Remove virtual copy of a volume. sv_set Set properties of a virtual copy of a volume.
  • Page 187 Table 20 Edit Rights (continued) Right Description of Right password_setown Set a user's own password. rcopy_start Start the remote copy service. rcopy_stop Stop the remote copy service. rcopy_sync Synchronize remote copy groups. rcopygroup_create Create a remote copy group. rcopygroup_remove Remove a remote copy group. rcopygroup_set Set remote copy group properties.
  • Page 188: Browse Role

    Table 20 Edit Rights (continued) Right Description of Right vvset_create Create a virtual volume set. vvset_set Set virtual volume set properties. Browse Role Table 21 Browse Rights Right Description of Right password_checkown Check a user's own password. password_setown Set a user's own password. sshkey_remove Remove users public SSH keys.
  • Page 189: Edit Role

    Edit Role Table 23 Edit Rights Right Description of Right aocfg_start Start execution of an Adaptive Optimization configuration. ch_move Move chunklets from one physical disk to another. ch_movetospare Move chunklets from a physical disk to spare space. cpg_compact Consolidate space in a CPG. cpg_create Create CPG.
  • Page 190 Table 23 Edit Rights (continued) Right Description of Right rcopytarget_admit Add a target to a remote copy volume. rcopytarget_create Create a remote copy target. rcopytarget_dismiss Dismiss a remote copy target from a group. rcopytarget_remove Remove a remote copy target. rcopytarget_set Set remote copy target properties.
  • Page 191: Service Role

    Table 23 Edit Rights (continued) Right Description of Right vvset_create Create a virtual volume set. vvset_set Set virtual volume set properties. Service Role Table 24 Service Rights Right Description of Right alert_remove Remove alerts. alert_set Set alert properties. battery_set Set battery properties. cage_locate Locate a drive cage.
  • Page 192: Super Role

    Table 24 Service Rights (continued) Right Description of Right pd_set Set physical disk properties. pd_upgrade Update physical disk firmware. port_check Perform diagnostic tests on ports. port_control Control and configure ports. sched_create Create a schedule for tasks. sched_setany Set any user scheduled task properties. sched_setown Set a user's own scheduled task properties.
  • Page 193 Table 25 Super Rights (continued) Right Description of Right cpg_set Set CPG properties. date_set Set system date and time properties. domain_create Create a domain. domain_moveto Move objects in or out of a domain. domain_remove Remove a domain. domain_set Set domain properties. domainset_annotate Annotate the comment of a domain set.
  • Page 194 Table 25 Super Rights (continued) Right Description of Right pd_admit Admit a physical disk to the system. pd_control Spin up or spin down a physical disk. pd_dismiss Dismiss a physical disk from the system. pd_movereloc Move relocated chunklets from one physical disk to another. pd_movetospare Move used chunklets from a physical disk to spare space.
  • Page 195 Table 25 Super Rights (continued) Right Description of Right snmppw_set Set SNMP community strings. spare_create Create spare chunklet. sshkey_remove Remove users public SSH keys. sshkey_set Set the public SSH key for a user. sv_create Create a virtual copy volume. sv_promote Promote a virtual copy volume.
  • Page 196 Table 25 Super Rights (continued) Right Description of Right vvcopy_create Create physical copy volume. vvcopy_promote Promote a physical volume back to its base volume. vvcopy_remove Remove physical copy of a volume. vvcopy_set Set properties of a physical copy of a volume. vvset_annotate Annotate the comment of a virtual volume set.
  • Page 197: B Mapping Rights And Cli Commands

    B Mapping Rights and CLI Commands Mapping Rights and CLI Commands Table 26 Required Rights for CLI Commands Right CLI Commands alert_remove removealert alert_set setalert aocfg_start startao authparam_set setauthparam battery_set setbattery cage_locate locatecage cage_set setcage cage_upgrade upgradecage ch_move movech ch_movetospare movechtospare cim_set setcim...
  • Page 198 Table 26 Required Rights for CLI Commands (continued) Right CLI Commands host_set sethost hostset_annotate sethostset hostset_create createhostset hostset_set sethostset, removehostset ld_compact compactld ld_create createald createld ld_remove removeld ld_start startld mag_control controlmag mag_service servicemag node_locate locatenode node_service servicenode node_set setnode node_shutdown shutdownnode password_checkany checkpassword...
  • Page 199 Table 26 Required Rights for CLI Commands (continued) Right CLI Commands rcopylink_admit admitrcopylink rcopylink_dismiss dismissrcopytarget rcopytarget_admit admitrcopytarget rcopytarget_create creatercopytarget rcopytarget_dismiss dismissrcopytarget rcopytarget_remove removercopytarget rcopytarget_set setrcopytarget rcopyvv_admit admitrcopyvv rcopyvv_dismiss dismissrcopyvv reg_move movereg sched_create createsched sched_remove removesched sched_setany setsched sched_setown setsched snapspace_update updatesnapspace snmpmgr_add addsnmpmgr...
  • Page 200 Table 26 Required Rights for CLI Commands (continued) Right CLI Commands user_create createuser user_remove removeuser user_setany setuser user_setown setuser useracl_set setuseracl userconn_remove removeuserconn vlun_create createvlun vlun_remove removevlun vv_admit admitvv vv_check checkvv vv_create createaldvv createavv createtpvv createvv vv_grow growaldvv growavv growtpvv growvv vv_import importvv vv_remove...
  • Page 201: Index

    Index createcpg command, createhost command, accessing the CLI, createtemplate command, accessing the CLI using SSH, createvlun command, Active Directory LDAP configuration createvv command, using simple binding over SSL, createvvcopy command, active VLUNs, creating a host, adding and replacing template parameters, creating domain CPGs, adding users to domains, creating domains,...
  • Page 202 export rule, log files exporting virtual volumes, installation error log, logging logical disk allocated at set up, Fibre Channel logical disk histograms, viewing, adapter ports LUN, setting parameters, creating a host path, free chunklets, defined, management consoles freeing domain VV space, registered displayed using showsnmpmgr, freeing virtual volume snapshot space, registering for SNMP,...
  • Page 203 removing a domain, removing alerts, 1 18 task removing CPGs, removing, removing domain objects, task information, displaying, removing tasks, task management commands, removing template parameters, Tcl shell removing templates, global option limitations, removing the default domain, template parameters removing VLUN templates, adding and replacing, replacing and restoring copies, removing,...
  • Page 204 virtual copy, virtual volume histograms, viewing, virtual volume statistics, virtual volume statistics, viewing, virtual volumes exporting, growing, resynchronizing physical copy, snapshot space, unexporting, VLUN histograms, viewing, VLUN template host sees, matched set, port presents, removing, types, 204 Index...