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Cisco Aironet 1700 Deployment Manual

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Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point
Deployment Guide
Last Updated: October, 2014
Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point
Abstract
This section covers the Cisco 3700 Series Access Points theory of operation and installation as part of a Cisco wireless LAN
(WLAN) solution. Subjects related include:
Choosing the right Access Point (AP).
Differences between AP 3700 and AP 3600.
Feature module and ClientLink support.
Physical/Hardware details, mounting options, bracket choices, and installation considerations.
Antenna options, radiation patterns, and external antenna deployments.
Understanding spatial streams, MCS rates and beam-forming (802.11n Primer).
Review of 802.11ac and Wave-1 module for AP 3600.
Understanding 802.11ac and Wave-1 for the AP 3700.
Best Practices–Understanding Channel usage, 80 MHz, and available 11ac clients.
802.11ac performance considerations.
This document is intended for trained and experienced technical personnel familiar with the existing Cisco Wireless
Networking Group (WNG) product line and features.
Cisco Systems, Inc.
www.cisco.com

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  • Page 1 Last Updated: October, 2014 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Abstract This section covers the Cisco 3700 Series Access Points theory of operation and installation as part of a Cisco wireless LAN (WLAN) solution. Subjects related include: Choosing the right Access Point (AP).
  • Page 2: Choosing The Right Access Point

    Choosing the Right Access Point Models The Cisco 3700 Series Access Point (AP 3700) targets customers requiring support for mission-critical applications. The AP 3700 embodies ClientLink 3.0, an innovative antenna technology comprising four transmit radios and four receive radios called 4X4 in a Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) configuration supporting 3 spatial streams (3SS) together referenced as 4x4:3.
  • Page 3 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 2 AP 3700 Models and Eco-Packs Figure 3 AP 3600 Models and Eco-Packs Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 4 AP 3700 and AP 3600 (Backside Identical) The AP 3700e supports 802.11ac (Wave-1) native. This frees the feature module slot for additional functionality while also permitting external antenna connections for 802.11ac data rates (w/AP 3700e). Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 5: Feature Module Support

    Look out for additional modules for 3/4G support and 802.11ac Wave-2. Use of option modules may require local power supply, Cisco power injector, .3at PoE+, or the use of Cisco Enhanced PoE, as the module typically increases the power draw to greater than 15.4 W (.3af).
  • Page 6: Beamforming - Understanding Clientlink

    Compressed Beam Forming)–a new IEEE method of beamforming that is emerging but not yet fully supported in 11ac clients. Cisco ClientLink is similar but can work with all clients today including 11a/g/n as well as 11ac clients. ClientLink also takes advantage of the extra transceiver in the AP, so it beamforms to clients with 3 spatial streams.
  • Page 7 ClientLink 2.0a/g/n – AP ClientLink 3.0a/g/n/ac ECBF with 11ac Module and ECBF with 11ac Beamforming Client Count 128 – per integrated radio 128 – per integrated radio 7 – 11ac Module\ Spectrum Intelligence CleanAir CleanAir Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 8: Aps Physical Hardware And Mounting Options

    AP 1600, 2600, 3600, and 3700 have similar physical dimensions with a few differences in physical appearance, most of which are cosmetic changes to distinguish the different models. The mounting options and bracket configurations are identical and interchangeable. Figure 9 Mechanical Drawing of APs 1600, 2600, and 3600 Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 9 There are many different installation options available depending upon the requirements of the customer. Brackets are available from Cisco as well as third-party companies. During the ordering process, the customer may choose one of two brackets (but not both). Each bracket is a zero-dollar ($0) option at the time of configuration. If the customer does not choose a bracket, the selection default is AIR-AP-BRACKET-1, which is the most popular for ceiling installations.
  • Page 10: Channel Rail Adapters - Cisco Part Number Air-Chnl-Adapter

    Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 12 Different Clips are Available for Attaching to Ceiling Grid Work Channel Rail Adapters - Cisco Part Number AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER When mounting APs to ceiling channel rails such as the ones shown in Figure 13, an optional channel adapter is used, AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER.
  • Page 11 When using this bracket, the “beauty ring” is used as the template to cut the tile, which can be cut using a carpet knife or an electric tool such as a rotary cutting tool, e.g., Dremel™ or Rotozip™. Cisco does not offer custom cut tiles because there are simply too many different styles and the tiles are easy to cut.
  • Page 12: Wall Mounting The Ap

    APs with internal antennas such as the AP 3600i and AP 3700i that are wall mounted should use the Oberon mounting bracket unless roaming is not an issue, for example, hotspot, kiosk, or small venue scenario. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 13: Changing The Color Of An Ap

    If there is a desire to change the color of an AP, rather than painting the AP which would void the warranty, consider using colored vinyl tape or a colored plastic cover from Oberon (Figure 18). Figure 18 Third-Party Option for Changing AP Color, Adding Custom Logo, or Hiding the LED Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 14: Unique Installations

    Many hospitals and factories have requirements to wipe down or gently spray the environment with a chemical (often diluted material that has cleaning / disinfectant properties). The Cisco AP 3600 is designed with a purpose guild Wi-Fi chipset with enterprise and industrial class components (Figure 19).
  • Page 15: Above The Ceiling Tiles

    When this is a hard requirement, optional T-Bar hangar accessories from third-party companies, such as Erico and Cooper, can be used (Figure 21). The Erico Caddy 512a, the Cooper B-Line BA50a, or similar T-Bar Grid T-Bar hangars can be used. For more information see: www.erico.com www.cooperindustries.com Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 16: Stadium/Harsh Environments

    Customers wishing to install the AP in harsh environments where it may be exposed to weather, such as sporting areas, stadiums, open garden areas, or warehouse freezers, may wish to use a NEMA type enclosure. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 17: Areas With High Vibration

    This seems to vary with regard to weather radar compliance and often UNII-1 compliance and so on. Check with your Cisco account team or the communications regulatory agency that has jurisdiction in your part of the world.
  • Page 18: Warehouse And Factory

    Omni-directional antennas on the ceiling (such as dipoles) or units with integrated antennas because high gain omni-directional antennas tend to have more nulls. See Figure Another option is to mount the AP lower using pipe and electrical box mounting techniques. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 19 External dipole “e” series or internal antenna “I” series version could be used. When mounting an AP at the end of a pipe or electrical conduit box, use the universal bracket Cisco AIR-AP-BRACKET-2 because it will fit to the holes of most electrical boxes (Figure 26).
  • Page 20: Ethernet Cable Recommendation

    (ULL) cables, which have the same characteristics as Times Microwave LMR-400 and LMR-600. Cisco cables carry the part number AIR-CAB (Aironet Cable) and then a length. For example, a 20 Ft length of LL cable with RP-TNC connector is Cisco AIR-CAB-020LL-R. These heavy black cables are not Plenum rated and are primarily for outdoor use or manufacturing areas.
  • Page 21: Access Point Spacing Recommendations

    Due to the dual-band nature of the antenna system on the AP 3700 and AP 3600, along with key features such as ClientLink beamforming, it is not recommended for deployments on DAS. Customers wishing to integrate a Wi-Fi over DAS solution should understand that Cisco does not certify, endorse, or provide RF support for Wi-Fi deployments over any DAS.
  • Page 22: Installations Inside And Around Elevators

    Voice over WLAN (VoWLAN) and medical devices. While Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) and Cisco field teams do not provide support for RF issues that arise in a Cisco WLAN used over a DAS, they provide support for non-RF related issues in Cisco products as per the customer's support agreement with Cisco Systems.
  • Page 23: Antennas For Outdoor Deployments

    Always use Cisco antennas whenever possible – refer to the following URL: Note http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps10981/white_paper_c11-671769.pdf Cisco has also introduced a new smaller size dipole. While this antenna does not have an articulating knuckle, it is much smaller in size and is a good choice when aesthetics is a primary concern. Figure 28...
  • Page 24 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 29 Radiation Pattern for the Short Dipole AIR-ANT2535SDW-R In addition, the antennas below may also be used with 1600, 2600, 3600 and 3700 “e” Series APs. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 25 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 30 Specifications for the AIR-ANT2524Dx-R Dual-Band Dipole Antenna Figure 31 Radiation Pattern for the AIR-ANT2524Dx-R Dual-Band Dipole Antenna Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 26 Radiation Pattern for the AIR-ANT2566P4W-R Dual-Band Patch Antenna Assuming that the antenna is mounted on a wall, the Azimuth (in Red) is the signal going forward from the antenna. The elevation, in Blue, is the “up/down” pattern. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 27 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 34 Specifications for the AIR-ANT2524V4C-R Dual-Band Omni Antenna Figure 35 Radiation Pattern for the AIR-ANT2524V4C-R Dual-Band Omni Antenna Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 28: Stadium Antenna Option For Ap 3702P

    2 vertically polarized and 2 horizontally polarized ports. Antenna connectors on the back of the antenna are “N” style female RF connectors. An optional cable assembly (4 cables) can be ordered–part number AIR-CAB005LL-R-N or the installers can use their own cable assemblies. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 29 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 38 Mechanicals for AIR-ANT2513P4M-N Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 30 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 39 Radiation Pattern of 2.4 GHz AIR-ANT2513P4M-N Figure 40 Radiation Pattern of 5 GHz AIR-ANT2513P4M-N Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 31 Antenna patterns for the AP 2600i integrated antenna model are shown in Figure 45 Figure Antenna patterns for the AP 1600i integrated antenna model are shown in Figure 47 Figure Figure 41 Radiation pattern for AP 3700i Internal Antenna @ 2.4 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 32 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 42 Radiation Pattern for AP 3700i Internal Antenna @ 5 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 33 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 43 Radiation Patterns for the AP 3600i @ 2.4 GHz Figure 44 Radiation Patterns for the AP 3600i @ 5 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 34 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 45 Radiation Patterns for the AP 2600i @ 2.4 GHz Figure 46 Radiation Patterns for the AP 2600i @ 5 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 35: Understanding External Antenna Deployments

    Understanding External Antenna Deployments All Cisco antenna connectors are labeled; “A,” “B,” “C,” and so on. “A” has a higher priority than “B” or “C/D” so, if the AP supports say 3 or 4 antennas and you only have 2 antennas, you can use them on ports “A” and “B” for a short term until you install the additional antennas.
  • Page 36 (side by side) in the plastic housing, there will be a slight improvement if you use the outer two elements on the Patch on ports “A” and “B”. This is only a small improvement and not a critical one and that is why we do not label them. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 37 6 dBi Patch Antenna – While Not Critical, Ideally Ports “A” and “B” are Used on the ends. Figure 50 AP 1600 Note port “A” is Spaced Furthest from “B” and “C” for Best Diversity Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 38 Antennas for the 1260 and 3500 series are single radiating element antennas made for each individual band. The 3600, 2600, and 1600 APs use dual band - dual radiating element antennas and are branded with an orange marking see Figure 49 Figure Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 39 Of course, if you have a clear shot, a patch antenna at the end of an aisle at roughly the same height or just above the (WLAN client) is preferred. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 40: 802.11N Primer - Understanding Spatial Streams

    The AP 3500 supports up to 300 Mbps MCS rate 15 when configured with a bonded channel and short guard interval (GI). Refer to Figure 55. The MCS values correspond to actual data rates. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 41 Using a dual-band design, the AP 3600 has a total of 8 transceivers (transmitter/receivers) using only 4 antennas (Figure 56). Four radios are used in each band, 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 42 AP 2600/3600 Supports up to 450 Mbps (MCS rates 0-23) AP 1600 (MCS rates 0-15) These additional MCS rates permit more choices for the client supporting 3SS when making rate-shifting decisions because the rate-shifting algorithm maintains the best overall throughput connection. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 43: Clients That Support 3 Spatial Streams

    3SS as a subset to 802.11ac. Additionally, unlike many of our competitors the Cisco AP 1600/2600/3600 and 3700 fully supports all the DFS channels for more usable channels in the 5 GHz range.
  • Page 44 In order to beamform to clients using 3 spatial streams, since 3 transmitters are used in the transmissions, Note the AP needs at least one additional radio to beamform. The AP 3600 and AP 3700 use 4 radios per band and can beamform to clients using 3 spatial streams. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 45: Understanding Cisco Txbf (Clientlink) And Ieee (Ecbf)

    Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point To summarize, Cisco ClientLink takes the received signals heard from the client on the uplink, calculates how the multipath signal looks from those streams, and then on the reciprocal side (transmit downlink) figures out the optimal way using all four radios to best form the signal (transmit beamforming) to enable the client to best decode (receive the signal on the downlink) with the least amount of retries.
  • Page 46 AP 3600 Site Survey Ranges (Typical Cell Sizes Have Not Changed; AP 3500 and AP 3600 Cell Sizes are the Same) Figure 62 Site Survey Sensitivity and SNR The SNR for 3SS is 28 dB per IEEE, but Cisco RF engineers recommend 30 - 32 dB for best Note performance. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 47: General Considerations Regarding Aps

    When using the 2.4 GHz frequency, the same 1, 6, and 11 channel scheme is used as the 5 GHz channel scheme (Figure 64). Avoid putting all of the APs on the same channel, and reuse channels as you can. See our other deployment guides for more on this topic. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 48 AP 3500. The AP 3600 and AP 3700 can beamform to 802.11n and legacy 11a/g clients. So, it is important to understand the data requirements if you are mixing Cisco Aironet 1260, 3500, and 3600 Series Access Points in the same areas.
  • Page 49 Cisco ClientLink which is still used by the primary 802.11n radios as ClientLink benefits all 802.11a,g, and n clients. With regard to Cisco products, the 802.11ac module in the AP 3600 is a 5 GHz only module because 802.11ac does not •...
  • Page 50 Faster speed occurs when you use multiple spatial streams. Newer smart phones may likely support only 1 spatial stream, but higher-end tablets and notebooks will typically support 2 or more spatial streams. Let us look at speeds when using 2 and 3 spatial streams. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 51: Understanding 802.11Ac And The Option Module

    Understanding 802.11ac and the Option Module Figure 69 AP 3600 and Feature Module AP 3600 Radio Module Cisco Part Number (AIR-RM3000AC-x-K9=) Independent radio module providing 802.11ac (Wave-1) support within the AP 3600. Features include: Complements existing 5 GHz 802.11n radio by providing an independent 802.11ac overlay.
  • Page 52: Radio Module Operational Overview

    This is a significantly better approach allowing installers to perform full functionality site surveys at 15.4 W (802.11af) rather than compromising RF power and shutting down Spatial Streams and other ports. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 53 Because the module antennas are internal, the module radiates much like an AP 3600i would because there are no RF connectors on the module, so the antennas “appear” as they would on the internal models. Figure 72 Top Covers Removed from AP and Module to Show How Antennas are Mounted Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 54 Both the integrated radio and the module also share the same SSIDs. This virtual radio approach requires both radios to be enabled. You cannot disable the integrated 5 GHz radio and just run the .11ac radio module. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 55: Client Band Steering

    It is a significant advantage to allow the module to service the 802.11ac clients while the integrated radio services the non-802.11ac clients. Should the 802.11ac client require something the module radio does not support, (for example, Cisco Client Extensions “CCX elements”) the 802.11ac module will push the client to the integrated radio to service that request.
  • Page 56: Troubleshooting The Module (Basics)

    If the module is present, you will see the following message in the console: “module radio found and ok”. • Console’s CDP message for Power “Power ok – HIGH POWER inline power source”. • Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 57 AP 3700 is indeed Cisco’s best of breed AP. The AP 3700 runs at 800 MHz w/512 MB of RAM running a purpose built Cisco Custom Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). This custom chip incorporates Spectrum Intelligence, ClientLink 3.0 along with proprietary Cisco IP for data plane hardware acceleration.
  • Page 58: Power Over Ethernet And The Ap 3700

    Cisco understands the need that some customers have to stay in the .3af (15.4 power budget). If the customer has lower PoE requirements and still wishes to use the AP 3700 and say the WSSI module, the AP 3700 will still function with the module but in a 2x2:2 mode with the module enabled.
  • Page 59 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 79 AP 3700 Running in 802.3af (15.4 Watt) Mode Figure 80 AP 3700 Running in Full Power Mode when it has 18 Watts or More of Available Power Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 60: Best Practices - Understanding Channels, Clients And So On

    Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 81 AP 3700 Powering Options via Cisco Access Layer Switches Best Practices – Understanding Channels, Clients and so on Currently in the US, there are 22 (20 MHz) channels, 9 (40 MHz) channels, and 4 (80 MHz) channels. 802.11ac (Wave-2) supports 160 MHz channels but there is only 1 channel available today;...
  • Page 61 With the opening up of 5.35-5.47 GHz and 5.85-5.925 GHz, the number of channels increases to 34/16/8/3. • If the industry manages to take back the TDWR channels, the number increases to 37/18/9/4. • So, as time progresses we should see additional channels becoming available. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 62: Understanding Channels And How They Relate To The Client

    Most clients (USB) that are emerging are 2 spatial stream and by using 80 MHz bonding, you can achieve up to 866 Mbps. The following figure shows the Netgear A6200 client card. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 63 36, 40, 44, and 48. Figure 86 Example of a Bonded 80 MHz Channel For clients to link at 80 MHz, you have to set the channel width to 80 MHz on the AP. Note Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 64: 802.11Ac And Legacy Client Recommendations

    802.11ac devices. It is expected that integrated notebooks and tablets (those devices often supporting 2 and 3 spatial streams) will start to become commonplace. Currently Cisco’s test bed for interoperability (for the 7.6 release) supporting the new AP 3700 has the following configuration types.
  • Page 65 7.0.3 (11B511) Asus Transformer Android 4.0.3 Sony Tablet S Android 3.2.1 Toshiba Thrive Android 3.2.1 Samsung Galaxy Tab Android 3.2 Motorola Xoom Android 3.1 Intermec CK70 Windows Mobile 6.5 / 2.01.06.0355 Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 66: 802.11Ac Devices On The Market

    802.11ac Devices on the Market Integrated Devices – Shipping • Apple – Macbook Air Intel® Dual Band Wireless- AC 7260 Samsung S4 HTC ONE ZTE Grand Memo • USB Clients - Shipping LinkSys AE6000 1x1 Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 67: Variables That Could Impact Performance

    3600/3700 into SE Connect mode and have a look on Spectrum Expert or Metageek Chanalyzer Pro. This will allow you to see Wi-Fi and non-Wi-Fi interference on all channels. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 68: A Quick Look At A Few "Non-Optimal" Installations

    A Quick Look at a Few “Non-Optimal” Installations The figures below present examples of installations that are not recommended. It is very difficult to provide good Wi-Fi service with a poor installation. Always try to avoid metal and clutter. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 69 Cisco Aironet Series 3700 Access Point Figure 88 Example of an AP Installation Near Metal and Clutter (Try to Avoid Metal and Clutter) Figure 89 Patch Antenna Against a Metal Fence Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 70 When mounting devices, the AP should be level and secured so that it does not sway or move. Keep the AP away from metal objects and try to place it as close to the users as possible. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 71 (angle down) the signal to the intended target area and always mount dipoles in the correct orientation. Figure 93 When Using Dipole Antennas Observe the Correct Orientation (Vertical Polarity) Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 72 Always Mount Antennas Outdoors with Leads DOWN (Indoors Does not Matter) Figure 95 If Antenna Connectors are Exposed to Weather – Coax-Seal Should be Used but if Present, Do Not Cover Antenna Drain Holes. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 73: Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point

    Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Cisco Aironet series 2700 AP is a 802.11ac Wave-1 and 3x4:3 MIMO AP. It supports the following features: An additional non-PoE GigE port for downward device connectivity •...
  • Page 74: Identifying Cisco Access Points

    Monitor Mode • Enhanced Local Mode (with wIPS) SE Connect Mode • Indoor Mesh Mode • Support for wIDS/wIPS solutions on the 11ac radio • BandSelect, VideoStream, QoS in hardware, and DTLS • Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 75: Auxiliary Ethernet Port (New Feature)

    If you configure the switch port to trunk, the AP 2700 will be in the native VLAN and the AUX will also be in native by default. Traffic from the AUX port will not be sent to the WLC, and the AP 2700's built-in switch will drop the traffic in the native VLAN. Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 76 PoE to 15.4 W. This will be fixed in the next release 8.0MR or 8.1. Figure 100 AUX port is active when PoE status is at FULL power or when a local power supply is used Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 77: Mounting Options

    Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Mounting Options Cisco Bracket-1, Bracket-2, or the flush mount Bracket-3 may be used. Figure 101 All mounting brackets are Orderable Options and Fully Supported Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 78: Supported Antennas (Ap 2700E Model)

    2 / 4 omni (4-pack) AIR-ANT2535SDW-R Dual-resonant “stubby” 3 / 5 monopole Internal Omni-Directional 4 / 4 AIR-ANT2544V4M-R Dual-resonant omni (4-pack) 4 / 4 AIR-ANT2566P4W-R Dual-resonant “directional” 6 / 6 antenna (4-pack) Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 79 Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Antenna Patterns – AP 1700i, 2600i, 2700i, & 3700i Figure 103 Patterns Azimuth and Elevation Plane @ 2.4 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 80 Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Figure 104 Patterns Azimuth and Elevation Plane @ 5 GHz Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 81 Cisco Aironet Series 2700 Access Point Figure 105 Heat maps are similar between AP 2700 and AP 3700 because antennas are similar Cisco Aironet Series 1700/2700/3700 Access Point Deployment Guide...
  • Page 82: Cisco Aironet Series 1700 Access Point

    Figure 106 Cisco Aironet Series 1700 Access Point Cisco Aironet Series 1700 AP is an 802.11ac Wave-1 and 3x3:2 MIMO AP. It supports the following features and caveats: • No need to specify Unified or Autonomous image (both present on the AP) •...
  • Page 83 Cisco Aironet Series 1700 Access Point Figure 107 Cisco Aironet 1700 Series is slightly darker than the 2700 Series Differences Between the AP 1700 and AP 2700 Table 9 Feature Differences between the AP 1700 and AP 2700 AP 1700...
  • Page 84: Changing The Operation Of The Access Point To Autonomous Mode

    The Cisco 2K and 3K series has more memory and processes the SI functions locally. The AP 1600/1700 contains the Cisco custom silicon “CleanAir hardware chip” and therefore can recognize all the interferers that the 2K and 3K series AP can recognize.
  • Page 85: Power Over Ethernet Requirements For Ap 1700

    I wish to use higher gain antennas? Consider deploying the Cisco Mesh products (1550 and 1530 series) or look for Access Points ending in “P” for professional install, such as the 3702P series or our outdoor bridging products.
  • Page 86 “wave” or iteration. Fortunately, with a modular AP approach such as the AP 3600, upgrading to Wave-1 today is easy. Also, unlike the competition, both the AP 3600 and newer Cisco Access Points such as the AP 3700 with modular support will make upgrading to Wave-2 a painless process without having to perform a complete rip and replace.
  • Page 87: Url Links And Other Resources

    Installations should be done based on lessons learned from the site survey – the better the survey the less likely any • connectivity problems will occur. Cisco has an advanced services team that can perform WLAN surveys or help with the wireless design if a partner is • not available or able to do the same.
  • Page 88 URL Links and Other Resources Cisco Mobility Services Engine – WLAN Location Deployment Guide http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9742/products_tech_note09186a00809d1529.shtml WLAN Design Guide for High Density Client Environments in Higher Education http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps10981/design_guide_c07-693245.pdf Mobility Design Guides http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns820/networking_solutions_program_home.html Software Support and Downloads http://www.cisco.com/tac New Generation of Cisco Aironet Access Points http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps10981/at_a_glance_c45-636090.pdf...

This manual is also suitable for:

Aironet 3700Aironet 2700 seriesAironet 1700 series

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