Page of 12

HP 2230s - Compaq Business Notebook Manuallines

Password localization guidelines.
Hide thumbs
HP Business Notebook
Password Localization
Guidelines
November 2009
 
Table of Contents:
1.
Introduction........................................................................................................2
2.
Supported Platforms.............................................................................................2
3.
Overview of Design..............................................................................................3
4.
Supported Keyboard Layouts in Preboot and Drive Encryption.......................................3
5.
HP ProtectTools Security Manager Filter Logic.............................................................6
6.
7.
Exceptions..........................................................................................................8
8.
What to do when a password is rejected..................................................................12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V1.0
 

Advertising

   Related Manuals for HP 2230s - Compaq Business Notebook

   Summary of Contents for HP 2230s - Compaq Business Notebook

  • Page 1

    HP Business Notebook Password Localization Guidelines V1.0 November 2009   Table of Contents: Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Supported Platforms………………………………………………………………………………...2 Overview of Design……………………………………………………………………………..3 Supported Keyboard Layouts in Preboot and Drive Encryption…………………………………3 HP ProtectTools Security Manager Filter Logic……………………………………………….……6 How Preboot BIOS Implements the Password Filter And Handles Dead Keys……………….…7 Exceptions………………………………………………………………………………………….…8 What to do when a password is rejected…………………………………………………...……12  ...

  • Page 2: Supported Platforms

    Introduction   HP has implemented the One Step Logon feature on its 2008 and newer commercial portable computers. The HP ProtectTools Security Manager wizard enables various security levels to protect the computer system and the data. The security levels that can be set are: ...

  • Page 3: Overview Of Design, Supported Keyboard Layouts In Preboot And Drive Encryption

    Overview of Design   The goal of the HP ProtectTools implementation is to use password filters to  reject passwords that might lock out a user at the Preboot BIOS level or Drive  Encryption level.  The ProtectTools Security Manager will be responsible to  reject a user password at setup or password change time.  A password can be  acceptable for the Windows password, but if allowed may cause a lock out at  Preboot BIOS or Drive Encryption level.   These passwords will therefore be  rejected by the HP ProtectTools password filter.      The BIOS Preboot and Drive Encryption each preloads tables of key mapping  from Scan Code to Unicode based on the supported keyboard layout.  (see table  Figure ‐1 below).  When the user enters the password before OS starts, the BIOS  or the Drive Encryption software will convert the key strokes to the correct  Unicode based on key mapping tables and then compare the password with the  one stored.    The ProtectTools Security Manager will pass the keyboard layout  information to BIOS Preboot and Drive Encryption.      In addition, the BIOS Preboot and Drive Encryption may implement additional  methods to assist password entering.  E.g. In 2008 Business Notebook BIOS, a  soft keyboard will be loaded to enter glyphs directly with the mouse instead of  pressing a key on the keyboards if a user fails to type their password correctly.    The Drive Encryption software allows the user to dynamically load the  keyboard layouts.       Supported Keyboard Layouts in Preboot and Drive Encryption   The Preboot BIOS and Drive Encryption support a subset of Windows’ keyboard  layouts due to space and other limitations.  Below is a list (Figure 1) of  supported keyboards in Preboot and Drive Encryption. In some cases, the  common name for a particular keyboard layout differs in Windows Vista from  the HP designation. In order to clarify, we provide both names.   ...

  • Page 4

    HP Keyboards Common Name in Code (hex) Microsoft Windows Vista Arabic (101) Arabic (101) 0401 Belgian (Comma) Belgian (Comma) 1080c Canadian French Canadian French 0c0c (Legacy) (Legacy) Canadian French Canadian French 1009 Chinese Bopomofo Chinese (Traditional) - US 0404 Keyboard Chinese ChaJei Chinese (Simplified) - US 0804...

  • Page 5

    HP Keyboards Common Name in Code (hex) Microsoft Windows Vista Norwegian Norwegian 0414 Polish Polish (Programmers) 0415 (Programmers) Polish (214) Polish (214) 10415 Portuguese Portuguese 0816 Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian 0416 (Brazilian) ABNT) Romanian Romanian (Legacy) 0418 Slovakian Slovak 041b Slovenian Slovenian 0424 Spanish...

  • Page 6: Hp Protecttools Security Manager Filter Logic

    HP ProtectTools Security Manager Filter Logic   In order to prevent a lock out situation, the first level of defense is implemented  by the HP ProtectTools Security Manager.   It installs a password filter to reject  those Windows passwords that may possibly cause a lock out in Preboot BIOS  or Drive Encryption.     6 ...

  • Page 7: How Preboot Bios Implements The Password Filter And Handles Dead Keys

    How Preboot BIOS Implements the Password Filter And Handles Dead Keys   The HP BIOS implements a second level password filter to further prevent the  lock‐out situation.    HP BIOS Preboot and HP Drive Encryption contain the keyboard mappings for  all the supported keyboards listed above.  When a user is setting up Preboot  Security with the BIOS Preboot or Drive Encryption levels enabled, or when a  user changes his/her password, the BIOS Preboot and Drive Encryption  receives the Unicode password from the OS.  The BIOS is responsible to  guarantee that the keyboard being associated with that user is able to type the  password. Otherwise, the BIOS will reject the password.  However, there still  may be an instance where the user changes the keyboard in Windows without  the BIOS’s knowledge or when the user is not aware of the keyboard layout  currently in use.  To compensate for the situation where the user may not be  able to physically type their password due to these two situations, the BIOS will  automatically provide the user the ability to “click” out her/his password after  failing with the physical keyboard.  This is done by showing every character on  the screen that could be typed with the keyboard currently associated with the  user, each of them as buttons and which can be clicked with the mouse to form  the password.  This method provides a way for the user to enter the password  without the physical keyboard.  (Please note: When using the “On‐Screen Keyboard” in the BIOS, there are many characters shown and some characters  may look very similar to others on some keyboards.  If experiencing trouble using this feature, so please look at all of  the characters before clicking out your password to ensure you are entering the correct characters.)    In the BIOS, the use of Dead Keys has also been added to try to provide the user  with as much keyboard functionality as possible.  If for some reason a certain  character is produced on the OS level that cannot be typed in the BIOS, this will  cause the password change to be rejected.  Unless rejected, the user should feel  safe and confident in using Dead Keys for passwords associated with the  Preboot Security feature. ...

  • Page 8: Exceptions

    Exceptions Windows IME is not supported at the Preboot Security Level and the HP Drive Encryption Level   In Windows, the user can choose an IME (Input Method Editor) to enter  complex characters and symbols, such as Japanese or Chinese characters, by  using a standard western keyboard.    The IME is not supported at Preboot and HP Drive Encryption level.  Windows  password entered with IME may not be entered at the Preboot or HP Drive  Encryption level and may result in a lockout situation.  In some cases, the  Microsoft Windows doesn’t display the IME when user enters password.    For example, for some Japanese installations of Windows XP, the default IME is  called the “Microsoft IME Standard 2002” for Japanese , which actually  translates as keyboard layout E0010411. However, this is an IME and not a  keyboard layout (the keyboard layout coding scheme is simply preserved by  Microsoft for IMEs, which themselves extend the concept of a keyboard layout).  Since this is not a keyboard layout that can be represented in the typing  environment for the BIOS Preboot password prompt or the Drive Encryption  password prompt, any password typed with this IME is rejected by  ProtectTools. The solution is to switch to a supported keyboard layout, such as  Microsoft IME for Japanese or the Japanese keyboard layout itself, both of which  translate to keyboard layout 00000411 (despite its “IME” designation in the  former case). Another “IME” that actually translates to keyboard layout  00000411 is the “Office 2007 IME” for Japanese .    ...

  • Page 9

    Password change on different keyboard layouts may have potential issues If the password is initially set with one keyboard layout – e.g. US English (409)  and then the user changes the password using a different but also supported  keyboard layout – e.g. Latin American (080A), the password change will work in  Drive Encryption but will fail in BIOS if the user uses characters which exist on  the latter (say ē) but not on the former.     Note: this issue is worked by the dev team and maybe fixed in the later release.    A simple solution to this problem is to remove the user in question from HP  ProtectTools by running the HP ProtectTools Manage Users application to  remove the user from HP ProtectTools. Then, it is possible to run the Getting  Started wizard again for the same user, ensuring that the desired keyboard  layout is selected in the OS prior to running the wizard. This way, the BIOS  stores the desired keyboard layout, and passwords that can be typed on this  keyboard layout will be properly set in the BIOS.    Another potential issue is the use of different keyboard layouts that can all  produce the same characters. For example, both the U.S. International keyboard  layout (20409) and the Latin American keyboard layout (80A) can produce the  character, é, though different keystroke sequences might be required. If a  password is initially set with the Latin American keyboard layout, then the  Latin American keyboard layout is set in the BIOS, even if the password is  subsequently changed using the U.S. International keyboard layout.    Special Key Handling    Chinese, Slovakian, Canadian French, Czech, Korean  When a user selects one of the above keyboard layouts and enters a  password (e.g. abcdef),  the same password has to be entered with a shift  key for lower case and the shift key and cap key for upper case in Preboot ...

  • Page 10

    Characters Not Supported   Windows BIOS Drive Arabic Encryption keys keys , ‫أل‬ , ‫إل‬ ‫ال‬ , ‫أل‬ , ‫إل‬ ‫ال‬ generate two generate one keys , ‫أل‬ , ‫إل‬ ‫ال‬ characters character generate one character Windows BIOS Drive Encryption French Canadian ç, è, à, é...

  • Page 11

    Windows Czech   The ğ key is rejected     The į key is   rejected   The ų key is   rejected   The ė ı ż keys   are rejected   The ģ ķ ļ ņ ŗ   keys are  ...

  • Page 12: What To Do When A Password Is Rejected

    (Unsupported characters are listed above).  Then the user can go through the  HP ProtectTools Security Manager wizard again to enter the new Windows  password.     © 2009 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

Comments to this Manuals

Symbols: 0
Latest comments: