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Experion LX
Station Planning Guide
EXDOC-X128-en-500A
April 2017
Release 500

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   Summary of Contents for Honeywell Experion LX

  • Page 1

    Experion LX Station Planning Guide EXDOC-X128-en-500A April 2017 Release 500...

  • Page 2

    In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any direct, special, or consequential damages. The information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Distributed System Architecture Inter-release support DSA and firewalls About point data in a DSA system eServer Remote Engineering and Station Server Server scripts Naming rules for computers Servers and the Enterprise Model Database ESM Server Networks Network redundancy Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 4

    Connection options Network connections Direct serial connections Indirect serial (terminal server) connections Modems Specialized links Points Point naming conventions Point IDs and Distributed System Architecture (DSA) Standard point types Container points System interfaces Algorithms History collection Periodic history Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 5

    SES event notification behavior Network tree planning summary Alarms and events Planning and designing your alarm system Honeywell products that support effective alarm strategies Factors that contribute to excessive alarms Dealing with excessive alarms Dynamic Alarm Suppression Planning and application guidelines for Dynamic Alarm Suppression...

  • Page 6

    Free Format reports Output options Specialized features Recipes Point requirements in recipes Point control schedules Honeywell Digital Video Manager Exchanging data with other applications Microsoft Excel Data Exchange ODBC Data Exchange Experion OPC Client Interface Experion OPC Advanced Client Experion OPC Display Data Client...

  • Page 7

    Experion OPC Integrator Creating custom applications Installation and commissioning tasks Installation and configuration tasks Configuration tools Configuration Studio Enterprise Model Builder Alarm Suppression display Quick Builder Control Builder System displays HMIWeb Display Builder Experion server utilities Station Special-purpose utilities Notices Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 8: About This Guide

    Provides a comprehensive overview of Experion, including basic concepts and Overview terminology. Software Contains last-minute information that was not able to be included in the Change Notice standard documents. It may include important details that could affect your (SCN) planning or design decisions. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 9: Enterprise Models

    An asset model forms the core of an enterprise model: it is a hierarchical representation of your assets, similar to the one shown in the figure below. An asset represents a particular physical item, such as a piece of plant equipment, a production line or a building. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 10: About Assignable Assets And Scope Of Responsibility

    If an asset is changed from non-assignable to assignable, any scope of responsibility that was previously inherited is cleared. As a result, control of this asset is temporarily lost until the asset is included in the operator's or Station's scope of responsibility. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 11: About System Models

    You can also create a dashboard hierarchy for the System Status display to provide graphical information about the status of your system and network components in a way that allows relationships and criticality to be represented. For more information, see “About dashboard displays” in the HMIWeb Display Building Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 12: About Generic Displays

    Each precipitator might have 2 points (whose tag names are VLV001 and VLV002 respectively). For a generic display, you would use the same item name for the points (for example, Valve): \assets\precipitation\train1\precipitator1\Valve \assets\precipitation\train1\precipitator2\Valve You can then create a generic display that references Valve. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 13: Guidelines For Designing Enterprise Models

    Experion Specification. Assets (like points) constitute 'tags' in an Experion system, and therefore count towards the total number of tags (or points) on a server. Note, however, that assets do not count towards the server's licensed point count. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 14: Guidelines For Defining Scope Of Responsibility

    Experion system security comprises oth: Windows operating system security Station security: Station-based or operator-based System security enables you to control who has access to the system and to control what users can do within the system when access is granted. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 15

    This assignment is configured by a user with sufficient security level (see “Adding an operator account”). If you have chosen to use Station-based security then a profile can be assigned to each station by a user with Mngr access or, optionally, by the operator currently using the station. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 16

    The assets that can be accessed by the operator or station assigned to it. The times during which those assets can be accessed. For more information about configuring scope of responsibility, see the topic "Configuring system security" in the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 17: Naming Rules For Assets

    The first character of a tag name and an item must not be any of the following characters: At sign (@) Dollar sign ($) Space Tag names and item names cannot contain any of the following characters: Asterisk (*) Backslash (\) Braces { } (rule applies to item names only) Brackets [ ] Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 18: Guidelines For Determining The Optimal Topology For Your Plant

    Keep your topology as simple as possible As a general rule, we strongly recommend that you keep your topology as simple as possible—the more complicated your topology, the harder it will be to efficiently engineer, maintain and operate your plant. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 19: Example Enterprise Models And Topologies

    With this design, you can assign either or both Precipitation and Thickeners to operators, as appropriate. For example, if you only assign Precipitation to an operator, that operator will have access to all assets below it, except for the Thickeners branch. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 20: Implementing An Enterprise Model

    Familiarize yourself with the concepts, guidelines and examples included in this section. In the case of networking and security, you also need to read the Network and Security Planning Guide. Define your system name using Enterprise Model Builder. See the Enterprise Model Builder User's Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 21

    If appropriate, define alarm groups and system alarm groups using Enterprise Model Builder. See the Enterprise Model Builder User's Guide. If appropriate, create generic displays. See the “About generic displays” topic in the “About display types” section of the HMIWeb Display Building Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 22: Servers

    Database (EMDB) and Engineering Repository Database (ERDB) are located on the preferred backup (missing or bad snippet) server. If the preferred backup Experion server is not available, the system is considered in a degraded state and no changes are allowed to be made to either database. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 23

    In the figure below, if Server1B is acting as the primary server, Server Location 1 will be the active server location and Server Location 0 will be the backup server location. Additionally, Server1A, Server0A, and Server0B would be considered secondary (backup) servers. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 24

    BCC system. If the OPC client is only required to connect within a server location, then RDM may still be used. If an OPC client is required to connect across server locations, please contact the Honeywell Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for advice with this configuration.

  • Page 25: Distributed System Architecture

    For example, you can have a DSA system in which some servers are running the current release while others are running the previous (or an even earlier) release of Experion. Please consult the Experion LX Software Change Notice for specific details about which releases are supported.

  • Page 26: Dsa And Firewalls

    'Configuring Distributed System Architecture' topic in the Station Configuration Guide. You can check the current number of DSA points (and other types of unlicensed points) on the Server License Details display. See 'Checking your Experion license' in the 'Configuration overview' topic in the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 27: Eserver

    An eServer license allows an unlimited number of standard access connections. Premium access connections are purchased separately. The eServer software must be loaded on a separate computer, not on one of the Experion servers in your process control network. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 28: Phd

    Process Historian Database (PHD) collects, stores, and replays continuous and other historical plant data. While PHD resides on a separate node from Experion servers, they can interact, enabling PHD to store long-term history data. PHD provides a more compact storage mechanism. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 29: Remote Engineering And Station Server

    Station and to the Experion configuration tool, Configuration Studio. You can set up a Remote Engineering and Station Server to enable remote access to either eServer Premium displays (Mobile Access for eServer Premium) or to full Station functionality (Mobile Access for Station). Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 30: Server Scripts

    Guide and 'Configuring Remote Engineering and Station Server' in the Station Configuration Guide Server scripts You can add extra functionality to your system with server scripts. A server script runs when its associated event occurs—for example, when: A point changes state An operator acknowledges an alarm Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 31: Naming Rules For Computers

    The base name must not end with ‘A’ or ‘B’. (The use of A and B as the last letter in a name is reserved for naming redundant servers.) To avoid potential confusion, the node name should not end with a ‘0’ or ‘1’, as these numbers are used in hosts files to identify redundant links. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 32

    The next two characters are reserved for A/B redundant server suffix and the 0/1 redundant link suffix. The next three characters are reserved for the server location number, A/B redundant server suffix, and the 0/1 redundant link suffix. The next character is reserved for 0/1 redundant link suffix. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 33: Servers And The Enterprise Model Database

    You can have only one ESM Server in a system, and the ESM Server must be located on a server-grade computer. During the installation of Experion nodes, you can choose to install the ESM Server on an Experion node, or you can install an ESM Server on a non-Experion node from the ESM application media. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 34: Networks

    Overviewdescribes the basic concepts and terminology as well as the capabilities of an Experion process control network. Fault Tolerant Ethernet Overview and Implementation Guide includes information about configuring a system that conforms to Honeywell's High Security Network architecture. It contains information about network equipment specifications, configuration, IP addressing, and network topologies.

  • Page 35: Network Redundancy

    Networks Network redundancy Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) Honeywell's Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) provides redundancy and a highly available networking scheme using commercial network interface cards (NIC) and standard Ethernet hardware (switches). For more information about FTE, see the Fault Tolerant Ethernet Overview and Implementation Guide.

  • Page 36: Time Synchronization

    Time synchronization Time synchronization The following topics are important for understanding and planning the time synchronization requirements of your Experion LX system. Experion time requirements Reliable and coordinated time is an important element in an Experion system. It is used in...

  • Page 37

    W /PTP W /NTP PTP IEEE-1588 version 1 and PTP IEEE-1588 version 2 are supported for Safety Manager devices. For all other devices, only PTP IEEE-1588 version 2 is supported. Including ESXi hosts With Experion LX Server install Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 38

    At level 2, time is a gating factor used in many supervisory functions such as: redundancy event processing system monitoring Time stamping is also used in diagnostic messages. For example, Safety Manager notifies Experion of all abnormal changes in system behavior by means of time-stamped diagnostic messages. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 39: About Time Protocols

    About setting up time synchronization in your Experion LX control system Because the default Windows NTP implementation is not set up for the tolerances needed for control systems, Honeywell recommends that you use the NTPConfig tool to configure time synchronization on your Windows nodes. The NTPConfig tool corrects the tolerance deficiencies and converts the Active Directory default settings to be compatible with control system requirements.

  • Page 40: Planning Your Time Hierarchy

    Windows domains, by default, implement a hierarchy of time distribution across the domain. The domain controller that is the PDC Emulator is the node that synchronizes with a reliable external source. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 41

    The redundant Experion servers are set up as NTP servers which serve time to all time clients, such as Flex Stations, Console Stations, and Safety Manager. If the primary Experion server fails over, time is served by the backup Experion server. An external source serves time to the C300 controller. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 42

    If an external source is not used, the internal CMOS of the domain controller (or PDC Emulator) is used as the time source. This time source is not as accurate and will create deviations in time seen throughout the hierarchy. Systems with strict requirements on sequence of events should not implement this topology. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 43: Planning Considerations For Time Synchronization

    DST (applicable as per server time zone). For controllers and CEEs that are in different time zones to the Experion servers, Honeywell recommends not to use Automatically Apply DST option and to manually Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 44

    For controllers and CEEs that are in the same time zone as the Experion servers, you can use the Automatically Apply DST option. Therefore, the 'Automatically Apply DST' option can be applied to specific controllers and CEEs within an Experion cluster. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 45: Stations

    Identifying user types and assessing their needs Before you can determine your Station requirements, you must first identify each user type, and then assess their respective needs. Typical user types include: operators, maintenance engineers, managers and production controllers. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 46: Connection Options For Flex Stations

    Therefore, if the Experion server is unavailable these functions are not available on the Console Station. For details, see the “Functions available on the Console Station” and “What happens when the Experion server is unavailable” topics in the “Configuring Console Stations” section of the Station Configuration Guide. Attention: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 47: Mobility

    NDM, see the “NDM Overview’” topic in the “Alarm and Event Processing” section of the Control Hardware Notifications Theory Guide. Licensing For more information about Station licensing, contact your Honeywell representative. Mobility There are several solutions for mobility and remote access to Experion data.

  • Page 48: Station Update Rates

    For more detailed information about the various types of update rates and how they are used to determine the 'actual update rate', see the topic 'Understanding update rates' in the 'Customizing Stations' section of the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 49: Specialized Station Hardware

    The following Stations meet the requirements: Two Console Stations in the control room. Each Station is fitted with four monitors, and uses Multi-window Station and SafeView to ensure that the critical displays are always visible. Five rotary Stations on the production line. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 50

    Two modem-connected rotary Stations at the homes of the production controllers. Because of the anticipated usage levels of the rotary Stations, you decide you only need a license for six Stations: three static (includes the two Console Stations) and three rotary. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 51: Printers

    Typically, each report is directed to the most convenient printer on the network. Reports For example, an alarm report might be printed on the printer in engineering office. Display If you need to capture display contents, such as trends, you should consider a captures color printer. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 52: Controllers

    You should configure controllers so that they do not impose excessive communications or processing loads on the server. It is important to remember that the server's primary tasks are Monitor system activity Start/stop processes Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 53: Connection Options

    Note that you can add more serial ports to the server with a serial adapter. An advantage of serial adapters is that they provide a choice of interfaces, such as RS-422 and RS-485, which are suitable for medium-distance links. For a list of qualified serial adapters, contact your local Honeywell representative. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 54: Indirect Serial (terminal Server) Connections

    Windows-based computers over a network. Terminal servers are particularly useful if you have a: Plant-wide LAN, and you want to connect controllers to the LAN—as shown in the following figure. Geographically-dispersed controllers on a WAN. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 55

    Terminal servers and server redundancy If you have redundant servers, you must use terminal servers to connect controllers that only have serial ports. (Unlike the controllers, terminal servers can automatically switch communications to whichever server is running as primary.) Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 56: Modems

    Note that you can also use modems to connect remote Flex Stations—for example to give engineers after-hours access from home. Specialized links If modem connections are not suitable, you can also use radio, satellite or other specialized links. In such cases, discuss your requirements with your local Honeywell representative. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 57: Points

    If you have multiple servers, review information on point data in a DSA Multiple servers system. Point naming conventions All points within your system have a tag name (also called a point ID or point name) and Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 58

    Tag names and item names cannot contain any of the following characters or strings: Ampersand (&) Asterisk (*) Backslash (\) Braces { } (rule applies to item names only) Brackets [ ] Caret (^) Colon (:) Comma (,) Double quote (") Equals (=) Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 59

    Using the same prefix for related points, so that users can easily find related points. Starting each part of a name with a capital, to improve readability. For example: Boiler1Temp. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 60: Point Ids And Distributed System Architecture (dsa)

    Experion provides the following types of standard (SCADA) point that are used to exchange data with controllers other than Experion Process Controllers. Standard point type Use Analog Continuous values, such as temperature or pressure. Status Digital values (on and off). Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 61

    1. If the value is not a number (NaN), the quality is set to UNCERTAIN. 2. If there is a communications error, the quality is set to BAD with a substatus of Comm Failure. 3. If neither of the above is true, the quality is set to GOOD. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 62: Container Points

    For more information about container points, see 'About container points' in Quick Builder. System interfaces Experion includes a number of high-level interfaces—called system interfaces—that allow it to exchange data with other applications or subsystems without the need for separately defining points. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 63: Algorithms

    OPC HDA server rather than the OPC DA server, because the HDA server will prevent duplicate load on the control network. Also, all point parameters collected into the third–party historian should be assigned to Experion history. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 64: Periodic History

    Extended history stores 1, 8, and 24-hour snapshots. If you need to further customize the periodic history collection intervals, please contact your Honeywell technical representative. Note that history collection is synchronized to the system time. For example, the 6-second collection occurs at 6, 12, 18 (and so on) seconds after the minute boundary on the system.

  • Page 65: Offset Groups

    However, note that it may not be possible to configure the maximum number of history parameters available. For more information about the maximum number of point parameters for which you can collect history, contact your Honeywell representative.

  • Page 66: Archiving History Samples

    If trend displays on Station need to access historical information that has been archived, the archives should be located on the server otherwise there will be performance issues. See 'Configuring a trend' in the chapter on 'Group and trend displays' in the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 67: Groups

    In order to make a trend meaningful, you need to select the appropriate type of history collection for each point parameter. For example, you need fast history for rapidly changing parameters, but extended history for slowly changing ones. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 68: Scanning Strategy

    An efficient scanning strategy provides the required level of monitoring and control, while keeping system load to a minimum. Issue                                          Comments Basic principles Ensure that your strategy conforms to the basic principles. Scanning techniques Use scanning techniques that are appropriate to your needs. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 69: Basic Principles Of Scanning

    Exception scanning is: Exception Not supported by all controllers More difficult to implement than periodic scanning because it usually requires additional logic in the controller, additional configuration in Experion, or both Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 70: Scan Optimization

    Choose a scanning period appropriate to the values being scanned. For example, you do not need to scan a temperature every 5 seconds if it changes only slightly over an hour. Minimize the number of scan packets as follows: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 71: Estimating The Number Of Points Required

    Use this figure, with an appropriate safety margin, to determine your licensing requirements. Remember that the composite nature of Experion points means that you do not need one point per I/O value. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 72: System Status Network Tree

    Network tree in the System Status display is built and visible to operators with the appropriate scope of responsibility assignment. In order to view event and performance data for the items appearing in the Network tree, you deploy the Experion System Event Server and System Performance Server. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 73: About System Event Server And System Performance Server

    This kind of information is vital for system monitoring and problem analysis. While third-party tools provide some trending and analysis of computer and network performance information, the SPS provides capabilities that integrate this information into the process control environment. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 74: Identifying A Network Topology

    Experion systems, refer to the Network and Security Planning Guide. Workgroup topology In the following figure, a workgroup topology is shown to illustrate planning considerations to support event notifications to the System Status display and its Network tree. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 75: Domain With No Organizational Units (ous)

    Domain with no Organizational Units (OUs) In the following figure, a simple domain with no Organizational Units (OUs) topology is shown to illustrate planning considerations to support event notifications to the System Status display and its Network tree. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 76

    When there are multiple Experion servers in an FTE Community, the Distributed System Architecture (DSA) option should be enabled so that the servers can share SES event data. Each server in the FTE Community subscribes to the server hosting the SES. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 77: Domain With Organizational Units (ous)

    The System Event Server is installed on only one of the redundant server pairs. The System Event Server scope of 'domain' (its default setting) is appropriate for this topology. When there are multiple Experion servers in an FTE Community, the Distributed Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 78: Multiple Domains Or Multiple Workgroups

    A topology of multiple workgroups within the same multicast group should follow these same planning considerations. In this example: Redundant servers support several Stations in each workgroup or domain topology. All nodes belong to the same IP Multicast group using the same IP Multicast address, Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 79: Ses Event Notification Behavior

    No event loss occurs. Network tree planning summary Honeywell recommends that one of the above topologies be chosen when implementing Experion. Utilizing these topologies will allow for simplified configuration and cater to future...

  • Page 80

    It is strongly recommended that you implement a topology featuring one SES per cluster server. For information on implementing this topology, see Technote 234 available from the Honeywell HPS Online Support website. Recommendations For typical domain and workgroup environments, establishing all nodes to use the same multicast address and SES scope provides you with the most ease of use and flexibility for future growth.

  • Page 81

    The Auxiliary Status display should be installed on any other clients needing view of SES or SPS auxiliary status. Other managed component auxiliary displays need to be installed (for example, Redirection Manager) if used within the system. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 82: Alarms And Events

    Tracker respond to abnormal situations like alarm floods. Alarm Tracker is an Experion license option. Consider using alerts for notifications whose urgency and priority are not high Alerts Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 83: Planning And Designing Your Alarm System

    The following topics describe: Honeywell product solutions that support effective alarm strategies Factors that contribute to excessive alarms Strategies for dealing with such factors...

  • Page 84: Honeywell Products That Support Effective Alarm Strategies

    Alarms and events Honeywell products that support effective alarm strategies Consider the following Honeywell products when planning your alarm system and strategies for dealing with abnormal situations. Alarm Configuration Manager Alarm Configuration Manager (ACM) is a product that is separate but complementary to Experion.

  • Page 85: Factors That Contribute To Excessive Alarms

    The likely impact of these factors is summarized in the following table. Cause Most likely consequence Standing alarms Alarm floods Alarm design Maintenance Equipment mode Compound event Other causes Dealing with excessive alarms Recommended strategies for dealing with excessive alarms are described below. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 86

    Often, operators put the point into the Disable or Journal-only state when this occurs, or manipulate some other alarm attribute, such as alarm priority. However, putting an alarm into “maintenance” means that this alarm will no longer protect the process. The site alarm strategy should therefore identify a work process to: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 87

    Note that while DAS can be useful for suppressing alarms on a device that is out of service, it cannot adjust alarm properties like trip points. Caution: Any solution that affects safety-related or otherwise critical alarms should be carefully considered as well as carefully designed and implemented. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 88: Dynamic Alarm Suppression

    Summary. Alarms are removed in accordance with a set of rules that you configure. By temporarily removing specific alarms from the Alarm Summary when pre-configured conditions are met, DAS helps operators to focus on the issue at hand or on other more critical conditions in the plant. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 89: Planning And Application Guidelines For Dynamic Alarm Suppression

    As a general principle, keep your DAS strategy simple and conservative to ensure that important alarms requiring operator attention are not inadvertently suppressed. A well-designed and well-managed alarm system is an important precondition for alarm suppression. It is therefore strongly recommended that, before implementing DAS, sites: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 90: Alarm And Alert Shelving

    Shelving is typically used by operators to hide “nuisance” alarms that are distracting them from other more important alarms. Although multiple alarms can be shelved at the same time, you can only shelve one alarm at a time. Alarm shelving is most suitable for the following situations and scenarios: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 91: What Happens When A Shelved Alarm Is Suppressed

    However, where an alarm is both shelved and suppressed, information about the suppression state of an alarm is considered to be more important (or of greater interest) than information about its shelving state. For example, in the Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 92: Alarm Prioritization

    Alarm prioritization It is essential that alarms are correctly prioritized so that operators are able to respond to alarms in a systematic manner. You therefore need to formulate a set of guidelines so that Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 93

    All alarms, except Journal, appear in the Alarm Summary and are therefore responded to by operators. All alarms, including Journal, are written to the event journal. System alarms are assigned a Honeywell default priority and sub-priority. These can be adjusted at the server cluster level as required. For more information, see “Configuring system alarm priorities”...

  • Page 94: Alarm Annunciation

    You can specify the system-wide characteristics of alarm notification, such as the duration of the sound, and the frequency at which the sound repeats if an alarm is not acknowledged. You can also disable audible alarming on particular Stations, as appropriate. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 95: External Horn Or Siren

    By grouping alarms in this way, an alarm tracker helps operators to respond more quickly to alarms in abnormal situations like alarm floods. Alarm Tracker is an Experion license option. Best practice recommendations If you want to implement alarm trackers at your site, it is strongly recommended that: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 96: Alerts

    Stations, Consoles, or Console Stations, see “Configuring alarm trackers” in the Station Configuration Guide. An example of an Alarm Tracker pane in the Alarm Summary Alerts Alerts are notifications whose urgency and priority are not high enough to be alarms. There are several types of alerts: Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 97: Messages

    Each Station displays the message text defined on its local server. If you have a DSA system, the message indexes and text should be the same on all servers to ensure that appropriate messages are displayed for remote points. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 98: Events

    Events archived to a network file server can be copied to other media such as CD, or included in a system backup. For more information about Event Archiving, see the “Configuring Event Archiving” section of the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 99: Displays

    With tabbed displays, operators can call up displays in individual tabs within a Station window. Whenever they call up a display, operators can choose to open it in an existing tab or in a new tab. An example of Station with tabbed displays enabled. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 100: Custom Displays

    With custom displays, you can insert your own graphics (for example, photographs and layout diagrams) using any of the following formats. GIF (.gif) Wimdows Bitmap (.bmp) JPEG (.jpg) Metafile (.wmf) Portable Network Graphic (.png) The following figure shows a typical custom display created using HMIWeb Display Builder. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 101: Custom Display Features And Considerations

    A faceplate is a specialized type of popup window that shows critical information about a point, and provides a convenient means of controlling the point. Many faceplates, such as the following example, look like the front panels of the field devices they represent. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 102: Display Scripts

    As with custom displays, you create custom faceplates using HMIWeb Display Builder. A typical faceplate Display scripts You can add extra functionality to your displays with display scripts. For example, you could write a script that runs an animation when an object changes state. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 103: Display Design

    'Stopped' and 'Running' are more meaningful in displays than the raw parameter values '0' and '1'. Experion includes a comprehensive collection of acronyms that are suitable for most purposes (Open/Closed, Manual/Automatic, and so on). However, you can create your own acronyms if needed. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 104: Web Pages And Other Documents

    You can also include links to Web pages and ActiveX documents in custom displays, as shown in the following example. If you subsequently update the document, the display is automatically updated because it includes a link to the document. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 105: Reports

    Asset Alarm This report can be configured to generate alarm counts for assets within the SOR Count of either the user who is currently logged on or (if you are logged on at MNGR Report level) another specified user. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 106

    Provides a centralized view of OPC items being collected by OPC clients. Usage Performance Provides information about data consumers and providers on the primary Experion Statistics server Point Lists all points with specified attributes, such as 'off scan' or 'alarm inhibited', or Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 107: Integrated Microsoft Excel Reports

    Generate an X-Y plot of the historical values for two points Store new values or calculations in the server database or in operating system files You can also use free format reports to write information back to the server database, providing your needs are simple. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 108: Output Options

    Online. Typically used to see a 'snapshot' of a particular part of the system, and then discarded. For example, you may want to check the current status of a particular production line. File. Suited for further processing by another application. For example, you may want to import the report file into a spreadsheet. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 109: Specialized Features

    Point Control Schedules enable you to control points on a periodic or one- Schedules off basis. Honeywell Digital Honeywell Digital Video Manager is a Closed Circuit Television product Video Manager that can be easily integrated with Experion. Recipes The Recipe Manager allows an operator to quickly reconfigure a unit—such as a chemical cracker or production line.

  • Page 110: Point Control Schedules

    For more information about Point Control Schedules, see 'Configuring a point control schedule' in the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell Digital Video Manager Honeywell Digital Video Manager (Honeywell DVM) is a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) product that combines the advantages of digital video with the latest Web and networking technologies.

  • Page 111

    Specialized features • Can initiate recordings in response to Experion alarms and events For more information about Honeywell DVM, contact your Honeywell representative. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 112: Exchanging Data With Other Applications

    Microsoft Excel Data Exchange provides: Read/write access to point parameter values Read access to history data Read/write access to server database files (user files) For more information, see 'Using the Microsoft Excel Data Exchange wizard' in the Station Configuration Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 113: Odbc Data Exchange

    RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Advanced Client. For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime component, see : Experion “Installing Redirection Manager” in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 114

    For example, when an OPC alarm is received, it appears in the Alarm Summary; and when an operator acknowledges the alarm, confirmation of the acknowledgement is sent to the OPC alarm and event server. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 115: Experion Opc Display Data Client

    If you want to integrate a third-party OPC AE server that utilizes OPC condition events with Experion, you should contact Honeywell. The risks with OPC simple and tracking events are lower than for OPC condition events. However, due to different interpretations of the OPC AE standard, integration issues may still be found.

  • Page 116: Experion Opc Historical Data Access Server

    Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server. For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime component, see the following topic: Experion R500 > Installation and Upgrades > Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide > Installing Redirection Manager. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 117: Experion Opc Integrator

    Experion OPC server will send the new values to OPCI. This is standard OPC server/client interaction. OPCI then writes these values to the corresponding items configured on the destination OPC server. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 118

    Experion server to achieve communication between controllers. OPC Integrator can read and/or write to each controller. The controllers can be: Honeywell Process controllers (C200, C300) Experion SCADA Fail Safe Controllers (FSC) SCADA controllers connected using the Experion OPC Client Interface...

  • Page 119

    Transferring data between Experion and a third-party OPC server In this topology, OPC Integrator interfaces with the local Experion OPC server and a remote third-party OPC server connected to another system to achieve data transfers between other OPC connected systems and Experion. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 120

    OPC servers. If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, OPCI can be used to manage the redundancy. However, Honeywell recommends that you use Redirection Manager when communicating with redundant third-party OPC servers, as it can give better performance during OPC server failover, because it builds OPC groups on both OPC servers.

  • Page 121: Creating Custom Applications

    Custom applications can be written in Visual C/C++ or Visual Basic. The Server API Library incudes libraries of functions, header files, and sample source programs to help programmers create applications. For more information about the Server API, see the Application Development Guide. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 122: Installation And Commissioning Tasks

    Hardware Planning Guide and the Control Hardware Installation Guide. For controllers other than Process Controllers, see: Configure your controllers. The manufacturer's documentation. The Experion interface reference for the controller type or communication protocol. Build your asset model. “Enterprise models” section of the Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 123

    Quick Builder (for SCADA controllers). The Experion interface reference for the controller type or communication protocol. HMIWeb Display Building Guide or the Create custom displays. associated help. If applicable, write server scripts. Server Scripting Reference. Fine-tune your configuration. Station Configuration Guide Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 124: Configuration Tools

    Alarm Suppression display The Configure Alarm Suppression task in Configuration Studio calls up the Alarm Suppression display. You use this display to configure Dynamic Alarm Suppression (DAS) by creating, modifying and then loading alarm suppression groups to your system’s servers. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 125: Quick Builder

    Station settings, Console Stations, and so on. The procedures for configuring these items are documented in the Station Configuration Guide. HMIWeb Display Builder HMIWeb Display Builder is the specialized drawing tool you use to create your own (custom) displays. Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 126: Experion Server Utilities

    For more information, see the HMIWeb Display Building Guide or the help. Typical layout of HMIWeb Display Builder Experion server utilities Utilities that run on the server are available to assist you in configuration and administration tasks. Utilities that apply to specific controllers, such as communications testing utilities, are Honeywell 2017...

  • Page 127: Station

    If you use Station to modify the configuration database, it will no longer be synchronized with your Quick Builder projects. Honeywell strongly advises that you keep your Quick Builder projects synchronized with the configuration database by uploading configuration data from the server at regular intervals.

  • Page 128: Notices

    Documentation feedback You can find the most up-to-date documents on the Honeywell Process Solutions support website at: http://www.honeywellprocess.com/support If you have comments about Honeywell Process Solutions documentation, send your feedback to: hpsdocs@honeywell.com...

  • Page 129

    Notices Honeywell investigates all reports of security vulnerabilities affecting Honeywell products and services. To report a potential security vulnerability against any Honeywell product, please follow the instructions at: https://honeywell.com/pages/vulnerabilityreporting.aspx Submit the requested information to Honeywell using one of the following methods: Send an email to security@honeywell.com.

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