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Wireless Cable
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Gateway
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   Summary of Contents for RCA DCW615

  • Page 1

    010011110101110110111000 101010101011100110111011 10110110101100101111110 11010110110110011100111 Wireless Cable 011101001110111101101101 10101010101101101110010 Gateway 0101101011101010011010 10111010110111100110100 0100101101001111010111 101010101011100110111011 10110110101100101111110 11010110110110011100111 011101001110111101101101 10101010101101101110010 0101101011101010011010 10111010110111100110100 010011110101110110111000 101010101011100110111011 10110110101100101111110 11010110110110011100111 011101001110111101101101 10101010101101101110010...

  • Page 2: Safety Information

    Safety Information CAUTION CAUTION Disconnect power before To ensure reliable operation and to prevent overheating, provide servicing. adequate ventilation for this modem and keep it away from heat sources. Do not locate near heat registers or other heat- producing equipment. Provide for free air flow around the cable modem and its power supply.

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Introduction ................... 4 Wireless Cable Gateway Features ................4 What’s on the CD-ROM .................... 5 Computer Requirements ................... 6 Wireless Cable Gateway Overview..........6 Important Information ....................7 System Overview ................8 Understanding the Wireless Cable Gateway.......

  • Page 4

    Table of Contents Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Advanced User Configuration ............ 29 Status Web Page Group .............. 30 Software Web Page ....................30 Connection Web Page ..................... 31 Security Web Page ....................32 Event Log Web Page ....................33 Diagnostics Web Page .................... 33 Basic Web Page Group ..............

  • Page 5

    Table of Contents Chapter 4: Additional Information Troubleshooting ................46 Front of the Unit ................. 47 Back of the Unit ................48 Description of Jacks ....................48 Detailed Explanation of Jacks............ 49 Care and Cleaning ............... 50 Service Information ..............50 FCC Declaration of Conformity and Industry Canada Information ..............

  • Page 6: Introduction

    – up to 600 times faster than a 56K dial-up modem. Once the DCW615 is activated, you are online to enjoy real-time 3D animation, video conferencing, and perform other data intensive tasks.

  • Page 7: What's On The Cd-rom

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup What’s on the CD-ROM If you connect a PC using the USB port on your gateway, you’ll need the USB drivers found on the CD-ROM. CD-ROM Contents: • Electronic copy of this user’s guide (.pdf format) •...

  • Page 8: Computer Requirements

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Computer Requirements • USB 1.0 or 1.1 (PC only), Ethernet (10/100), 802.11b, or HPNA 1.0 or 2.0 connectivity • A TCP/IP network protocol for each machine • A network cable with RJ-45 connector for Ethernet connection •...

  • Page 9: Important Information

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup • The Internet Service Provider (ISP): Your cable company provides you access to an Internet Service Provider (ISP). The ISP is your gateway to the Internet. It provides you with a pipeline to access Internet content on the World Wide Web (WWW). Check with your cable company to make sure you have everything you need to begin;...

  • Page 10: System Overview

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup System Overview The Wireless Cable Gateway is connected between your cable company and the PCs within your home, as pictured previously in the Wireless Cable Gateway Overview. The connection to the cable company is made by a coaxial cable, and is referred to as the WAN (Wide Area Network) side of your Wireless Cable Gateway.

  • Page 11: Your Pc: Installing A Pc Network Card

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Your PC: Installing a PC Network Card If your PC does not already support Ethernet or USB, you must install a network interface card. Following is an example setup procedure: 1. Install an Ethernet card on your motherboard, following the card’s directions. 2.

  • Page 12: Your Pc: Installing A Tcp/ip Stack

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Your PC: Installing a TCP/IP Stack Follow these instructions to install the TCP/IP protocol stack on one of your PCs only after a network card has been successfully installed inside the PC. These instructions are for Windows Me. For TCP/IP setup under Windows NT, 2000, and XP, refer to your Windows documentation.

  • Page 13

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup 7. After a few seconds, the main Network window will appear. The TCP/IP Protocol should now be listed. Fig. 10 8. Click the OK button again. Windows may ask you for the original Windows installation disk or additional files. Supply them by pointing to the correct file location, e.g., D:\win9x, c:\windows\options\cabs, etc.

  • Page 14: Your Pc: Configuring Dhcp On A Tcp/ip Stack On A Pc

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Your PC: Configuring DHCP on a TCP/IP Stack on a PC These instructions will help you configure each of your computers to be able to communicate with the gateway to obtain an IP (or TCP/IP) address automatically (called DHCP, Dynamic Host Cofiguration Protocol).

  • Page 15: Configuring Windows Me Pcs

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Configuring Windows Me PCs 1. Go to the Network screen by clicking the Start button. Click Settings and then Control Panel. From there, double-click the Network icon. 2. On the Configuration tab, select the TCP/IP line for the applicable Ethernet adapter.

  • Page 16: Configuring Windows 2000 Pcs

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Configuring Windows 2000 PCs 1. Go to the Network screen by clicking the Start button. Click Settings and then Control Panel. From there, double-click the Network and Dial-up Connections icon. 2. Select the Local Area Connection icon for the applicable Ethernet adapter (it’s usually the first Local Area Connection listed).

  • Page 17: Connecting Your Devices

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Connecting Your Devices 1. Before you begin, make sure that all of your hardware is powered off, including the gateway, PCs, hubs, and switches. 2. Connect one end of an Ethernet cable to one of the LAN ports (labeled 1, 2, 3, or 4) on the back of the gateway and the other end to a standard port on a network device, e.g., a PC, print server, hub, or switch.

  • Page 18: Mandatory User Configuration

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup • USB - When Receive, Cable-Link, and USB are flashing, the modem is now communicating start-up data both downstream and upstream. • WLAN - When Receive, Cable-Link, USB, and WLAN are flashing, the modem has received its IP address and is downloading its configuration file from the Internet Service Provider (ISP).

  • Page 19

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup 3. If you are in CM or CH mode, the Basic webpage group hyperlink is visible. In this case, select the Basic Setup web page by using the hyperlinks in the sidebar at the left of the screen. Otherwise, skip to step 4.

  • Page 20

    Chapter 1: Connections and Setup Some examples of Internet-sharing software are Internet LanBridge, Wingate, ICS, and Sygate. To disable your Internet-sharing software: • If you are running Netscape Navigator: Click Edit >> Preference >> Advanced >> Proxies >, and click Direct Connection to the Internet. •...

  • Page 21: Chapter 2: Networking Communications

    Chapter 2: Networking Communications Data communication involves the flow of packets of data from one device to another. These devices include personal computers, Ethernet and USB hubs, cable modems, digital routers and switches, and highly integrated devices that combine functions, like the Wireless Cable Gateway. The gateway integrates the functionality often found in two separate devices into one.

  • Page 22

    Chapter 2: Networking Example: The Wireless Cable Gateway offers a number of built-in web pages which you can use to configure its networking side; when you communicate with the networking side, your communication is following this path. Each packet on the Internet addressed to a PC in your home travels from the Internet downstream on the cable company’s system to the WAN side of your Wireless Cable Gateway.

  • Page 23

    Chapter 2: Networking address by various means, including a DHCP server, by you directly entering it, or sometimes by a PC generating one of its own. Ethernet requires that each TCP/IP stack on the Wireless Cable Gateway also have associated with it an Ethernet MAC (Media Access Control) address.

  • Page 24

    Chapter 2: Networking Cable Modem (CM) Mode Cable Operator CM Mode Wireless Cable Gateway Fig. 3 Internet behaves as a bridge Cable HPNA adapter RJ 11 111.111.1.11 RJ 45 RJ 45 Wireless Cable Gateway CPE 1 CPE 2 CPE 3 CPE 4 111.111.2.11 111.111.2.12...

  • Page 25

    Chapter 2: Networking CM (Cable Modem) Mode provides basic home networking. In this mode, two IP stacks are active: • IP Stack 1 - for use by the cable company to communicate with the cable modem section only. This stack receives its IP address from the cable company during CM initialization. It uses the MAC address printed on the label attached to the Wireless Cable gateway.

  • Page 26

    Chapter 2: Networking Residential Gateway (RG) Mode RG & CH Modes Cable Wireless Cable Gateway Operator behaves as a gateway Internet HPNA adapter Cable 111.111.1.11 RJ 11 192.168.0.1 RJ 45 RJ 45 3360 Wireless Cable Gateway CPE 1 CPE 2 CPE 3 CPE 4 192.168.0.2...

  • Page 27

    Chapter 2: Networking RG (Residential Gateway) Mode provides basic home networking plus NAT (Network Address Translation). In this mode, three IP stacks are active: • IP Stack 1 - for use by the cable company to communicate with the Cable Modem section only.

  • Page 28

    Chapter 2: Networking CableHome (CH) Mode Networking IP Stack 1 IP Stack 5 IP Stack 4 IP Stack 3 111.111.1.11 192.168.0.1 111.111.2.12 111.111.2.11 Fig. 7 CH (CableHome) Mode provides all the functionality of RG mode and adds the ability of the cable company to control the home networking configuration of your Wireless Cable Gateway for you, so you don’t need to perform the configuration yourself.

  • Page 29: Usb Mac Address

    Chapter 2: Networking • IP Stack 4 - for use by you to remotely (i.e. from somewhere on the WAN side, such as at your remote workplace) communicate with the Cable Modem and Networking sections, to remotely access the internal web page diagnostics and configuration. This stack is also used by your cable company to deliver packets between the Internet and the Wireless Cable Gateway’s Networking section so they can be routed to/from your PCs.

  • Page 30: Mac And Ip Addresses Summary

    Chapter 2: Networking MAC and IP Addresses Summary This table summarizes all the MAC and IP addresses that may be associated with the TCP/IP communication stacks and USB handling in your Wireless Cable Gateway. The ones actually used depend upon your gateway Operating Mode, as explained above. At minimum, your cable company will need to know the MAC address associated with IP Stack 1, which is the MAC address shown on the modem label.

  • Page 31: Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Advanced User Configuration The Wireless Cable Gateway offers local management capability through a built in HTTP server and a number of diagnostic and configuration web pages. These pages are available from http:// 192.168.0.1 in RG and CH modes, and http://192.168.100.1 in CM Mode. Not all pages are available in some modes.

  • Page 32: Status Web Page Group

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Status Web Page Group Software Web Page (Fig. 17) The Information section of this page provides hardware and software information about your gateway that may be useful to your cable company. You can view your operating software version but not change it.

  • Page 33: Connection Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Connection Web Page (Fig. 18) This page reports diagnostic information about the initialization and operating status of your gateway that can be useful at the time of installation. It can also be useful to your cable company’s support technician if you’re having problems.

  • Page 34: Security Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Security Web Page (Fig. 19) This page is used to set a password that enables you to access all the internal web pages as explained before under Mandatory User Configuration. The password can be a maximum of 8 characters and is case sensitive.

  • Page 35: Event Log Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Event Log Web Page (Fig. 20) This page provides diagnostic information regarding the cable modem section of your gateway that may be useful to your cable company if you are having startup or operation issues. As long as your gateway startup and operational performance is normal, any messages contained in this log can be ignored.

  • Page 36: Basic Web Page Group

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Basic Web Page Group Setup Web Page (Fig. 22) This page gives you the ability to enter some data your cable company may require, as explained before in Mandatory User Configuration. In addition, it enables you to change your default LAN side IP address from 192.168.0.1, and to view your WAN side IP address and lease information.

  • Page 37: Dhcp Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration DHCP Web Page (Fig. 23) This page gives you the ability to activate and deactivate the DHCP server function of your gateway, and, if the DHCP server is activated, to see DHCP leases it has provided. With this function activated, your cable company’s DHCP server provides one IP address for your gateway, and your gateway’s DHCP server provides IP addresses, starting at the address you set in Starting Local Address, to your PCs.

  • Page 38: Advanced Web Page Group

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Advanced Web Page Group Options Web Page (Fig. 24) This page allows you to enable/disable some features of the Wireless Cable Gateway. Check WAN Blocking and then Apply to prevent others on the WAN side from being able to ping your gateway.

  • Page 39: Ip Filtering Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration IP Filtering Web Page (Fig. 25) This page enables you to enter the IP address ranges of PCs on your LAN that you don’t want to have outbound access to the WAN. These PCs can still communicate with each other on your LAN, but packets they originate to WAN addresses are blocked by the gateway.

  • Page 40: Port Filtering Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Port Filtering Web Page (Fig. 27) This page enables you to enter ranges of destination ports (applications) that you don’t want your LAN PCs to send packets to. Any packets your LAN PCs send to these desination ports will be blocked.

  • Page 41: Forwarding Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Forwarding Web Page (Fig. 28) For LAN <=> WAN communications, the gateway normally only allows you to originate an IP connection with a PC on the WAN; it will ignore attempts of the WAN PC to originate a connection onto your PC.

  • Page 42: Port Triggers Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Port Triggers Web Page (Fig. 29) Some Internet activities, such as interactive gaming, require that a PC on the WAN side of your gateway be able to originate connections during the game with your game playing PC on the LAN side.

  • Page 43: Dmz Host Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration DMZ Host Web Page (Fig. 30) Use this page to designate one PC on your LAN that should be left accessible to all PCs from the WAN side, for all ports. For example, if you put an HTTP server on this machine, anyone will be able to access that HTTP server by using your gateway IP address as the destination.

  • Page 44: Firewall Web Pages Group

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Firewall Web Pages Group Web Filter Web Page (Fig. 31) This page allows you to enable, disable, and configure a variety of firewall features associated with web browsing, which uses the HTTP protocol and transports HTML web pages. On this page, you designate the gateway packet types you want to have forwarded or blocked.

  • Page 45: Event Log Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Event Log Web Page (Fig. 32) The gateway builds a log of firewall blocking actions that the Firewall has taken. Using this page lets you specify an email address to which you want the gateway to email this log. You must also tell the gateway your outgoing (i.e.

  • Page 46: Wireless Web Pages Group

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Wireless Web Pages Group Basic Web Page (Fig. 33) Use this page to configure the wireless 802.11b channel in the 2.4 GHz band you want to use and the SSID you will use. These must match the settings you make on your wireless-equipped PC you want to be a part of your LAN.

  • Page 47: Privacy Web Page

    Chapter 3: Advanced Configuration Privacy Web Page (Fig. 34) The Privacy feature in the wireless section encrypts, i.e. effectively “scrambles,” all radio communication between your gateway and remote wireless-connected PCs. This provides Wired- Equivalent Privacy (WEP) on your wireless LAN. Use this page to activate encryption if desired, and set the type to use, as well as the encryption keys.

  • Page 48: Chapter 4: Additional Information

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Troubleshooting You can correct most problems you have with your product by consulting the troubleshooting list that follows. If you need service, please contact your service provider. Unit won’t turn on • Make sure the unit is plugged in. •...

  • Page 49: Front Of The Unit

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Link/Act Cable-Link Power HPNA Full/Col Receive Test WLAN 100/10 Send Link/Act Cable Ethernet Front of the Unit 1. Power Indicates when the unit is on. 2. Test Indicates when the unit goes through its self-diagnosis mode during boot-up and restart.

  • Page 50: Back Of The Unit

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Wireless PC Card Power HPNA Reset CABLE 1 2 3 4 5 Back of the Unit Description of Jacks (from left to right) 1. Wireless PC card Connects to the Wireless Network PC Card to enable wireless features.

  • Page 51: Detailed Explanation Of Jacks

    USB- connects one USB cable to your PC. The PC must be equipped with a USB network interface. In addition, the USB driver on the DCW615 CD-ROM must be installed on the connected PC, and the PC must have the TCP/IP protocol configured to operate over that USB interface.

  • Page 52: Care And Cleaning

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Care and Cleaning CAUTION: Unplug your unit before cleaning. You can clean the unit as required, using a soft lint-free cloth. Be sure to occasionally dust the ventilation slots in the cabinet to help assure adequate ventilation. Never use strong cleaning agents, such as ammonia-based cleaners, or abrasive powder.

  • Page 53: Fcc Declaration Of Conformity And Industry Canada Information

    This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. Trade Name: RCA Model: DCW615 Equipment Classification:...

  • Page 54: Additional Fcc Information

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Additional FCC Information This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules and the requirements adopted by the ACTA. On the back or bottom side of this equipment is a label that contains, among other information, a product identifier in the format US:AAAEQ##TXXXX.

  • Page 55

    Chapter 4: Additional Information If your home has specially wired alarm equipment connected to the telephone line, ensure that the installation of this Wireless Cable Gateway does not disable alarm equipment. You may need to consult your Telephone Company or qualified installer. This product meets the applicable Industry Canada technical specifications.

  • Page 56: Product Specifications

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Product Specifications Cable Interface F type female 75 ohm 4 10/100 BASE-T 1 USB, 1.1 Connector Type B, 1 HomePNA2.0 RJ-11, 1 IEEE 802.11b (2.4 GHz Unlicensed ISM radio band) System Power 12V/700mA Power Supply 12V/1.25A EMI/EMC FCC Class B, CE Class B, VCCI Class B.

  • Page 57

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Wireless Interface • 11 Mbps IEEE 802.11b Wireless LAN • Frequency band: 2400-2497 MHz • Supports 64/128 bit RC4 authentication and encryption • Fallback rates of 5.5, 2, and 1Mbps • Communicates with all Wi-Fi certified wireless adapters Networking •...

  • Page 58

    Chapter 4: Additional Information Service attacks, including: • Reassembly attacks • SYN Attack (SYN Flood) • ICMP Flood • Ping of Death Attack • Tear Drop Attack • IP Spoofing Attack • LAND Attack • Jolt • Winnuke Attack (Netbios out-of-bound) •...

  • Page 59

    Chapter 4: Additional Information • FTP • IRC • H.323 • Quake • Blizzard games • Chat ALG • Real Audio/Video • CUSEEME • Netmeeting • MS Games (excluding game zone) • DIABOLO II • Activision Games • PCAnywhere • SSL •...

  • Page 60

    Visit the RCA web site at www.rca.com Please do not send any products to the Indianapolis address listed in this manual or on the carton. This will only add delays in service for your product. Thomson Inc. 10330 North Meridian Street Indianapolis, IN 46290 ©...

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