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hp 17bII+ Financial Calculator
Owner's Manual
Edition 2
Part Number F2234-90020

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Table of Contents

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  • Page 1 17bII+ Financial Calculator Owner’s Manual Edition 2 Part Number F2234-90020...
  • Page 2 Hewlett-Packard Company, except as allowed under the copyright laws. The programs that control your calculator are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation of those programs without prior written permission of Hewlett-Packard Co. is also prohibited.
  • Page 3 Welcome to the hp 17bII+ The hp 17bII+ is part of Hewlett-Packard’s new generation of calculators: The two-line display has space for messages, prompts, and labels. Menus and messages show you options and guide you through problems. Built-in applications solve these business and financial tasks: Time Value of Money.
  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Contents List of Examples Important Information Getting Started Power On and Off; Continuous Memory Adjusting the Display Contrast Setting the Language What You See in the Display The Shift Key ( Backspacing and Clearing Doing Arithmetic Keying in Negative Numbers ( Using the Menu Keys The MAIN Menu Choosing Menus and Reading Menu Maps...
  • Page 5 Error Messages Modes Calculator Memory ( Arithmetic The Calculator Line Doing Calculations Using Parentheses in Calculations The Percent Key The Mathematical Functions The Power Function (Exponentiation) The MATH Menu Saving and Reusing Numbers The History Stack of Numbers Reusing the Last Result (...
  • Page 6 Cash Flow Diagrams and Signs of Numbers Creating a Cash-Flow List Entering Cash Flows Viewing and Correcting the List Copying a Number from a List to the Calculator Line Naming and Renaming a Cash-Flow List Starting or GETting Another List...
  • Page 7 The SUM Menu Creating a SUM List Entering Numbers and Viewing the TOTAL Viewing and Correcting the List Copying a Number from a List to the Calculator Line Naming and Renaming a SUM List Starting or GETting Another List Clearing a SUM List and Its Name...
  • Page 8 The Time Menu Setting the Time and Date (SET) Changing the Time and Date Formats (SET) Adjusting the Clock Setting (ADJST) Appointments (APPT) Viewing or Setting an Appointment (APT1-APT10) Acknowledging an Appointment Unacknowledged Appointments Clearing Appointments Date Arithmetic (CALC) Determining the Day of the Week for Any Date Calculating the Number of Days between Dates Calculating Past or Future Dates The Equation Solver...
  • Page 9 How the Solver Works Halting and Restarting the Numerical Search Entering Guesses Printing The Printer’s Power Source Double-Space Printing Printing the Display( Printing Other Information ( Printing Variables, Lists, and Appointments (LIST) Printing Descriptive Messages (MSG) Trace Printing (TRACE) How to Interrupt the Printer Additional Examples Loans Simple Annual Interest...
  • Page 10 Assistance, Batteries, Memory, and Service Obtaining Help in Operating the Calculator Answers to Common Questions Power and Batteries Low-Power Indications Installing Batteries Managing Calculator Memory Resetting the Calculator Erasing Continuous Memory Clock Accuracy Environmental Limits Determining If the Calculator Requires Service...
  • Page 11 Odd-Period Calculations Advance Payments Modified Internal Rate of Return Menu Maps RPN: Summary About RPN About RPN on the hp 17bII+ Setting RPN Mode Where the RPN Functions Are Doing Calculations in RPN Arithmetic Topics Affected by RPN Mode Simple Arithmetic Calculations with STO and RCL Chain Calculations-No Parentheses!
  • Page 12 Reusing Numbers Chain Calculations Exercises RPN: Selected Examples Error Messages Index Contents File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 13: List Of Examples

    List of Examples The following list groups the examples by category. Getting Started Using Menus Using the Solver Arithmetic Calculating Simple Interest Unit Conversions Simple Interest at an Annual Rate (RPN example on page 276) General Business Calculations Percent Change Percent of Total Markup as a Percent of Cost Markup as a Percent of Price...
  • Page 14 An Individual Retirement Account Calculating a Lease Payment Present Value of a Lease with Advanced Payments and Option to Buy Displaying an Amortization Schedule for a Home Mortgage Printing an Amortization Schedule Calculations for a Loan with an Odd First Period Discounted Mortgage APR for a Loan with Fees (RPN example on page 276)
  • Page 15: Bonds

    Bonds and Notes Price and Yield of a Bond A Bond with a Call Feature A Zero-Coupon Bond Yield to Maturity and Yield to Call Price and Yield of a Discounted Note Depreciation Declining-Balance Depreciation ACRS Deductions Partial-Year Depreciation Running Total and Statistical Calculations Updating a Checkbook Mean, Median, and Standard Deviation Curve Fitting...
  • Page 16: Important Information

    C (the gold-edged pages). Before doing any time-value-of-money or cash-flow problems, refer to pages 64 and 92 to learn how the calculator uses positive and negative numbers in financial calculations. For a deeper treatment of specific types of calculations, refer to chapter 14, “Additional Examples.”...
  • Page 17: Getting Started

    (note OFF printed above the key). Since the calculator has Continuous Memory, turning it off does not affect the information you’ve stored there. To conserve energy, the calculator turns itself off after 10 minutes of no use. If you see the low battery symbol ( should replace the batteries as soon as possible.
  • Page 18: Setting The Language

    What You See in the Display Menu Labels. The bottom line of the display shows the menu labels for each of the six major menus (work areas) in the calculator. More about these later in this chapter. The Calculator Line. The calculator line is where you see numbers (or letters) that you enter, and the results of calculations.
  • Page 19: The Shift Key

    Alarm going off (or past due). (page 147) (that is, first , then , then pressing turns the calculator off. ). This symbol stays on by mistake, just press 1: Getting Started Print data : 2004/3/9 Batteries low. (page 224)
  • Page 20 <<    < In addition, there are more drastic clearing operations that erase more information at once. Refer to “Resetting the Calculator” on page 228 in appendix A. 1: Getting Started File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description clears <...
  • Page 21: Doing Arithmetic

    Doing Arithmetic The “ ” in the margin is a reminder that the example keystrokes are for ALG mode. This is a brief introduction to doing arithmetic. More information on arithmetic is in chapter 2. Remember that you can erase errors by pressing <...
  • Page 22: Keying In Negative Numbers

     Using the Menu Keys The calculator usually displays a set of labels across the bottom of the display. The set is called a menu because it presents you with choices. The MAIN menu is the starting point for all other menus.
  • Page 23: The Main Menu

    Menu Labels Menu Keys The top row of keys is related to the labels along the bottom of the display. The labels tell you what the keys do. The six keys are called menu keys; the labels are called menu labels. The MAIN Menu The MAIN menu is a set of primary choices leading to other menu options.
  • Page 24 Table 1-3. The MAIN Menu Menu Label   (Finance)   (Business Percentages)  (Statistics)   (Time Manager)  (Equation Solver)  (Currency Exchange) 1: Getting Started File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Operations Done in This Category TVM: Time value of money: loans, savings, leasing, amortization.
  • Page 25: Choosing Menus And Reading Menu Maps

    Choosing Menus and Reading Menu Maps Below is a menu map illustrating one possible path through three levels of menus: from the MAIN menu to the BUS menu to the MU%C (markup as a percent of cost) menu. There are no menus that branch from the MU%C menu because the MU%C menu is a final destination—you use it to do calculations, rather than to choose another menu.
  • Page 26 index and examine the menu maps in appendix C. Displaying the MU%C menu: Step 2. To display the MAIN menu, press start from a known location on the menu map. Step 3. Press  Step 4. Press  Using the MU%C menu: Step 5.
  • Page 27: Calculations Using Menus

    Notice that the two calculations use the same three variables; each variable can be used both to store and calculate values. These are called built-in variables, because they are permanently built into the calculator. File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Store 4.60 Store 4.10...
  • Page 28: Clearing Values In Menus

    For example, To transfer a value to another menu, do nothing if it is displayed (that is, it is in the calculator line). A number in the calculator line remains there when you switch menus. To transfer more than one value from a menu, use storage registers.
  • Page 29: Solving Your Own Equations (solve

    This chapter has introduced some of the built-in menus the calculator offers. But if the solution to a problem is not built into hp 17bII+ , you can turn to the most versatile feature of all: the Equation Solver. Here you define your own solution in terms of an equation.
  • Page 30: Typing Words And Characters: The Alphabetic

    Typing Words and Characters: the ALPHAbetic Menu The ALPHAbetic menu is automatically displayed when you need it to type letters and characters. The ALPHA menu also includes characters not found on the keyboard: Uppercase letters. Space. Punctuation and special characters. Non-English letters.
  • Page 31: Editing Alphabetic Text

    Keys                         Note that the  is just a character, part of the variable’s name. It is not an operator, which ÷...
  • Page 32: Calculating The Answer (calc

    Displays the ALPHA menu again. Keyboard Backspaces and erases the character before the cursor. Clears the calculator line. Calculating the Answer (CALC) After an equation is input, pressing customized menu to go with the equation. Menu labels for your variables Each of the variables you typed into the equation now appears as a menu label.
  • Page 33 Calculate the cost of carpet needed to cover a 9’ by 12’ room. The carpet costs $22.50 per square yard. Starting from the MAIN menu (press Keys: Display:     22.5        ...
  • Page 34: Controlling The Display Format

    (12 digits maximum). Internal Precision Changing the number of displayed decimal places affects what you see, but does not affect the internal representation of numbers. The number inside the calculator always has 12 digits. You see only these digits in 2...
  • Page 35: Rounding A Number

    Rounding a Number function rounds the number in the calculator line to the number of displayed decimal places. Subsequent calculations use the rounded value. Starting with two displayed decimal places: Keys: Display: 5.787       ...
  • Page 36: Error Messages

    Error Messages Sometimes the calculator cannot do what you “ask”, such as when you press the wrong key or forget a number for a calculation. To help you correct the situation, the calculator beeps and displays a message. Press to clear the error message.
  • Page 37 Refer to “Managing Calculator Memory” on page 227 in appendix A. The calculator also allows you to erase at once all the information stored inside it. This procedure is covered in “Erasing Continuous Memory” on page 229.
  • Page 38: Arithmetic

    ALG mode. The Calculator Line The calculator line is the part of the display where numbers appear and calculations take place. Sometimes this line includes labels for results, such as  . Even in this case you can use the number for a calculation.
  • Page 39: Using Parentheses In Calculations

    File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc key acts like the key by displaying the 456 - 75 × 18.5 85 -12 , the calculator would calculate the Description: No calculation is done. Calculates 85 − 12. Calculates 30 / 73. Calculates 0.41x 9. 2: Arithmetic...
  • Page 40: The Percent Key

    Note that you must include a imply multiplication. The Percent Key key has two functions: Finding a Percentage. In most cases, The one exception is when a plus or minus sign precedes the number. (See “Adding or Subtracting a Percentage,” below.) For instance, 25 results in ...
  • Page 41: The Power Function (exponentiation

    Table 2-1. Shifted Math Functions Keys: Display:   47.2    The Power Function (Exponentiation) The power function, the following number. Keys: Display:    File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description reciprocal square root square Description: Reciprocal of 4. Calculates Calculates 4.47 + 47.20.
  • Page 42: The Math Menu

    SUM you might want to use a MATH function. Just press , then perform the calculation. Pressing to SUM. The MATH result remains in the calculator line. Remember, however, that you must exit MATH before you resume using SUM. 2: Arithmetic File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc...
  • Page 43: Saving And Reusing Numbers

    Saving and Reusing Numbers Sometimes you might want to include the result of a previous calculation in a new calculation. There are several ways to reuse numbers. The History Stack of Numbers When you start a new operation, the previous result moves out of the display but is still accessible.
  • Page 44 Reusing the Last Result ( key copies the last result—that is, the number just above the calculator line in the history stack—into a current calculation. This lets you reuse a number without retyping it and also lets you break up a complicated calculation.
  • Page 45: Storing And Recalling Numbers

    0 through 9. The key recalls stored numbers back to the calculator line. lf there is more than one number on the calculator line, the last number in the display. To store or recall a number: 1.
  • Page 46: Doing Arithmetic Inside Registers And Variables

    (in the MU%C menu) stores the rightmost number from the display into the variable M%C. M%C into the calculator line. If there is an expression in the display (such as  ), then the recalled number replaces only the last number.
  • Page 47: Scientific Notation

    You can also do arithmetic with the values stored in variables. For  example, contents of M%C by 2 and stores the product in M%C. Scientific Notation Scientific notation is useful when working with very large or very small numbers. Scientific notation shows a small number (less than 10) times 10 raised to a power.
  • Page 48: Range Of Numbers

    Range of Numbers The largest positive and negative numbers available on the calculator are ± 9.99999999999 x 10 ; the smallest positive and negative numbers available are ± 1 x 10 –499 2: Arithmetic File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 49: Percentage Calculations In Business

    Percentage Calculations in Business The business percentages (BUS) menu is used to solve four types of problems. Each type of problem has its own menu. %CHG %TOTL Table 3-1. The Business Percentages (BUS) Menus Menu Percent change The difference between two numbers (OLD and ...
  • Page 50: Using The Bus Menus

    The calculator retains the values of the BUS variables until you clear them by pressing the %CHG menu clears OLD, NEW, and %CH. To see what value is currently stored in a variable, press label. This shows you the value without recalculating it.
  • Page 51: Percent Of Total (%totl

       90000   95000   What would this year’s sales have to be to show a 12% increase from last year? OLD remains 90,000, so you don’t have to key it in again. Just enter %CH and ask for NEW. ...
  • Page 52: Markup As A Percent Of Cost (mu%c

    Markup as a Percent of Cost (MU%C) Example. The standard markup on costume jewelry at Balkis’s Boutique is 60%. The boutique just received a shipment of chokers costing $19.00 each. What is the retail price per choker? Keys: Display:   ...
  • Page 53: Sharing Variables Between Menus

    %CHG %TOTL The calculator keeps track of the values you key in according to those labels. For example, if you key in COST and PRICE in the MU%C menu, exit to the BUS menu, and then display the MU%P menu, the calculator retains those values.
  • Page 54: Currency Exchange Calculation

    Currency Exchange Calculations The CURRX menu does currency exchange calculations between two currencies using an exchange rate that you calculate or store. The CURRX Menu To display the currency exchange menu from the MAIN menu, press  Currency #1 is US$ (U.S Dollar) 4: Currency Exchange Calculation File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc...
  • Page 55: Selecting A Set Of Currencies

    Table 4-1. The CURRX Menu Menu Key curr1 Current currency#1;stores or calculates the number of units of this currency. curr2 Currency currency#2;stores or calculates the number of units of this currency.   Stores or calculates the exchange rate between the two current currencies.
  • Page 56 Table 4-2. Currencies    United States Austria, of America Belgium, (Dollars) Germany, Spain, Finland, France,    Switzerland Israeli (Francs) (New Shekel)   Russia Argentina (Rouble) South Africa (Band) Saudi Arabia (Riyals)    Bolivia Chile, Hong Kong (Dollars) Colombia,...
  • Page 57: Entering A Rate

    Entering a Rate The following two examples illustrate the two ways to enter an exchange rate. Example: Calculating an Exchange Rate. You have just flown from Canada to United States, and you need to exchange your Canadian Dollars for U.S Dollars. The conversion chart looks this : United States Conversion Chart (in US$) Currency Euro (EUR€)
  • Page 58   0.6584   Part 2: The following keystrokes show that you can reverse the order in which the two currencies are selected. Keys: Display:      Select US$ as currency #1     ...
  • Page 59: Converting Between Two Currencies

    Converting Between Two Currencies Once the currencies are selected and a RATE has been entered, you can convert any number of units of one currency to the other. Example : Converting between Hong Kong and U.S Dollars. Part 1: Use the exchange rate stored in the previous example to calculate how many U.S dollars you would receive for 3,000 Hong Kong Dollars.
  • Page 60: Clearing The Currency Variables

    Recalling Sets of Currencies. To recall a stored set of currencies and  their exchange rate, press , followed by the appropriate menu key. The hp 17bII+ automatically returns to the CURRX menu. The equivalency message and menu labels show the recalled currencies and RATE. Clearing the Currency Variables...
  • Page 61: Time Value Of Money

    Time Value of Money The phrase time value of money describes calculations based on money earning interest over a period of time. The TVM menu performs compound-interest calculations and calculates (and prints) amortization schedules. In compound interest calculations, interest is added to the principal at specified compounding periods, thereby also earning interest.
  • Page 62 The time value of money (TVM) menu does many compound-interest calculations. Specifically, you can use the TVM menu for a series of cash flows (money received or money paid) when: The dollar amount is the same for each payment. The payments occur at regular intervals. The payment periods coincide with the compounding periods.
  • Page 63 Table 5-1. TVM Menu Labels Menu Label Stores (or calculates) the total number of payments or  compounding periods. monthly payments, N=12 x 30=360.) Shortcut for N: Multiplies the number in the display by  P/YR, and stores the result in N. (If P/YR were 12, then Stores (or calculates) the nominal annual interest rate ...
  • Page 64: Cash Flow Diagrams And Signs Of Numbers

    Sets End mode: payments occur at the end of each period. Typical for loans and investments.  Accesses the amortization menu. See page 78. The calculator retains the values of the TVM variables until you clear them by pressing pressing clears N, I%YR, PV, PMT, and FV.
  • Page 65 (receipts) as positive. Perform a calculation from the point of view of either the lender (investor) or the borrower, but not both! (Loan) Money re- ceived is a positive number Money paid out is a negative number Figure 5-3. A Cash Flow Diagram for a Loan from Borrower’s Point of View (End Mode) Loan Figure 5-4.
  • Page 66: Using The Tvm Menu

    Payments occur at either the beginning of each period or the end of each period. End mode is shown in the last two figures; Begin mode is shown in the next figure. Capitalized value of lease Figure 5-5. Lease Payments Made at the Beginning of Each Period (Begin Mode) Using the TVM Menu First draw a cash-flow diagram to match your problem.
  • Page 67: Loan Calculations

    4. Store the values you know. (Enter each number and press its menu key.) 5. To calculate a value, press the appropriate menu key. You must give every variable—except the one you will calculate—a value, even if that value is zero. For example, FV must be set to zero when you are calculating the periodic payment (PMT) required to fully pay back a loan.
  • Page 68 Keys: Display:                    10.5 7250 1500      To calculate the interest rate that reduces the payment by $10, add 10 to reduce the negative PMT value.
  • Page 69 Keys: Display:        Clears history stack and         11.5   &      12000  Example: A Mortgage with a Balloon Payment. You’ve taken out a 25-year, $75,250 mortgage at 13.8% annual interest.
  • Page 70 75 ,250 The problem is done in two steps: 1. Calculate the monthly payment without the balloon (FV=0). 2. Calculate the balloon payment after 4 years. Keys: Display:        Clears history stack and  ...
  • Page 71: Savings Calculations

    Step 2. Calculate the balloon payment after 4 years.  894.33 &       Savings Calculations Example: A Savings Account. You deposit $2,000 into a savings account that pays 7.2% annual interest, compounded annually. If you make no other deposits into the account, how long will it take for the account to grow to $3,000? Since this account has no regular payments (PMT=0), the payment mode (End or Begin) is irrelevant.
  • Page 72 Keys: Display:        Clears history stack and           2000 &  3000    There is no conventional way to interpret results based on a non-integer value (5.83) of N.
  • Page 73 2,000 Keys: Display:                 2000   & &     File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc 2 12; End mode 15 12 2 Description: Displays TVM menu.
  • Page 74: Leasing Calculations

    2) finding the present value (capitalized value) of a lease. Leasing calculations typically use “advance payments”. For the calculator, this means Begin mode because all payments will be made at the beginning of the period. If there are two payments in advance, then one payment must be combined with the present value.
  • Page 75    13500 &    7500    Example: Present Value of a Lease with Advance Payments and Option to Buy. Your company is leasing a machine for 4 years. Monthly payments are $2,400 with two payments in advance. You have an option to buy the machine for $15,000 at the end of the leasing period.
  • Page 76 Keys: Display:        Clears history stack and          Step 1: Find the present value of the monthly payments.     2400 &   ...
  • Page 77: Amortization (amrt

      Step 4: Add the results of step 2 and 3.  Amortization (AMRT) The AMRT menu (press following values: The loan balance after the payment(s) are made. The amount of the payment(s) applied toward interest. The amount of the payment(s) applied toward principal. I%YR P/YR File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc...
  • Page 78: Displaying An Amortization Schedule

    Table 5-2. AMRT Menu Labels Menu Label Stores the number of payments to be amortized, and  calculates an amortization schedule for that many payments. Successive schedules start where the last schedule left off. #P can be an integer from 1 through 1,200.
  • Page 79 2. Store the values for I%YR , PV, and PMT. (Press negative number.) If you need to calculate one of these values, follow the instructions under “Using the TVM Menu,” on page 66. Then go on to step 3. 3. Press ...
  • Page 80 To calculate a subsequent schedule with a different number of payments, key in that number and press To start over from payment #1 (using the same loan information), press and proceed from step 7. Example: Displaying an Amortization Schedule. To purchase your new home, you have taken out a 30-year, $65,000 mortgage at 12.5% annual interest.
  • Page 81                     To calculate the balance after 42 payments (3½ years), amortize 18 additional payments (42-24=18):       ...
  • Page 82: Printing An Amortization Table

    Printing an Amortization Table (TABLE) To print an amortization schedule (or “table”) do steps 1 through 5 for displaying an amortization schedule (see page 78). 6. Press  . Ignore the message     . 7. Press  8.
  • Page 83                        File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc  The 72nd is the last payment in year 6.  Each table entry represents 12 payments (1 year).
  • Page 84: Interest Rate Conversions

    Interest Rate Conversions The interest conversion (ICNV) menu converts between nominal and effective interest rates. To compare investments with different compounding periods, their nominal interest rates are converted to effective interest rates. This allows you, for example, to compare a savings account that pays interest quarterly with a bond that pays interest semiannually.
  • Page 85: The Icnv Menu

    The ICNV Menu NOM% EFF% The ICNV menu converts between nominal and effective interest rates, using either: Periodic compounding; for example, quarterly, monthly, or daily compounding. Continuous compounding. Converting Interest Rates To convert between a nominal annual interest rate and an effective annual interest rate that is compounded 1.
  • Page 86 To convert between a nominal annual interest rate and an effective annual interest rate that is compounded 1. Press   2. Press  for “continuous”. 3. To convert to the effective rate, key in the nominal rate and press ...
  • Page 87: Compounding Periods Different From Payment Periods

            6.65          The calculations show that bank #3 is offering the most favorable interest rate. Compounding Periods Different from Payment Periods The TVM menu assumes that the compounding periods and the payment periods are the same.
  • Page 88 interest rate in the TVM menu. (You can also use TVM if PMT = 0, regardless of the compounding periods.) 1. Call up the periodic interest-rate conversion menu (  2. Calculate the effective annual interest rate from the nominal annual interest rate given by the bank.
  • Page 89 Calculates equivalent nominal interest rate for monthly compounding. Switches to TVM menu; NOM% value is still in calculator line. Stores adjusted nominal interest rate in I%YR. Sets 12 payments per year; Begin mode. 6: Interest Rate Conversions Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 90    &      If the interest rate were the unknown, you would first do the TVM calculation to get I%YR (5.01). Then, in the ICNV PER menu, store 5.01 as NOM% and 12 as P for monthly compounding. Calculate EFF% (5.13).
  • Page 91: Cash Flow Calculations

    The net present value (NPV), net uniform series (NUS), and net future value (NFV) for a specified periodic interest rate (I%). You can store many separate lists of cash flows. The maximum number depends on the amount of available calculator memory. The CFLO menu ICNV...
  • Page 92: Cash Flow Diagrams And Signs Of Numbers

     Turns the prompting for #TIMES on and off. To see the calculator line when this menu is in the display, press once. (This does not affect number entry.) To see this menu when the calculator line is in the display, press...
  • Page 93 Money received is a positive number Time periods Money paid out is a negative number Figure 7-1. Cash Flows (Ungrouped) The horizontal timeline is divided into equal compounding periods. The vertical lines represent the cash flows. For money received, the line points up (positive);...
  • Page 94: Creating A Cash-flow List

    1 through 5, and $200 at the end of periods 6 through 8. The investment returns $1,950 at the end of period 9. For every cash flow you enter, the calculator prompts you to indicate how many times (#TIMES) it occurs.
  • Page 95: Entering Cash Flows

    Entering Cash Flows To enter cash flows into a CFLO list: 1. Press   list is empty, or  or more  if the list is not empty. This is the bottom of the current list. 2. If the list is not empty, you can do either a or b: Clear the list by pressing Get a new list by pressing named first.
  • Page 96 To change #TIMES, key in the number and press 7. Continue entering each cash flow and, for grouped flows, the number of times it occurs. The calculator recognizes the end of the list when a flow is left blank (no value is entered).
  • Page 97: Viewing And Correcting The List

    The #TIMES prompting is usually on, because it is automatically turned on whenever you clear or get a cash-flow list. Example: Entering Cash Flows. Enter the following ungrouped cash flows in a list and find the percentage internal rate of return (IRR). $-500 Keys: Display:...
  • Page 98: Copying A Number From A List To The Calculator

    Deleting Cash Flows from a List. Pressing current flow and its #TIMES. Copying a Number from a List to the Calculator Line To copy a number from the list into the calculator line, use display the number, then press Naming and Renaming a Cash-Flow List A new list has no name.
  • Page 99: Clearing A Cash-flow List And Its Name

    The name can be up to 22 characters long and include any character except:+ - x ÷ ( ) < > : = space But only the first three to five characters (depending on letter widths) of the name are used for a menu label. Avoid names with the same first characters, since their menu labels will look alike.
  • Page 100: Cash-flow Calculations: Irr, Npv, Nus, Nfv

    To remove just one value at a time from a list, use Cash-Flow Calculations: IRR, NPV, NUS, NFV Once you have entered a list of cash flows, you can calculate the following values in the CALC menu. Sum (TOTAL). Internal rate of return (IRR%). This is a periodic rate of return. To calculate an annual nominal rate when the period is not a year, multiply the IRR% by the number of periods per year.
  • Page 101 (2) the sum (TOTAL) of the cash flows is positive. Remember that the calculator determines a periodic IRR%. If the cash flows occur monthly, then IRR% is a monthly value, too. Multiply it by 12 for an annual value.
  • Page 102 Example: Calculating IRR and NPV of an Investment. An investor makes an initial investment of $80,000, and expects returns over the next five years as illustrated below. 5,000 80,000 (Initial flow) Calculate the total of the cash flows and the internal rate of return of the investment.
  • Page 103 Changes cash flow #4 to     File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Prompts for next cash flow. Calculator line shows last number entered. Stores $5,000 for FLOW(1), prompts for next flow. Stores FLOW(2). Stores FLOW(3). Stores FLOW(4). Stores final cash flow and shows end of list.
  • Page 104 Example: An Investment with Grouped Cash Flows. You are considering an investment that requires a cash outlay of $9,000, with the promise of monthly cash flows as shown. Calculate IRR%. Also find NPV and NFV at an annual interest rate of 9%. $ _ 9,000 Since some of these cash flows are grouped (consecutive and equal), the #TIMES prompting must be on so you can specify a number other...
  • Page 105    1000    1500              Example: An Investment with Quarterly Cash Returns. You have been offered an opportunity to invest $20,000. The investment returns quarterly payments over four years as follows: Year 1 Year 2...
  • Page 106 Calculate the annual rate of return for this investment. (The prompting for #TIMES should be on.) Keys: Display:           20000 &     1000   2000   3000 ...
  • Page 107: Doing Other Calculations With Cflo Data

          Doing Other Calculations with CFLO Data If you would like to do other calculations with cash flows besides those in the CALC menu, you can do so by writing your own Solver equations. There are Solver functions that can access data stored in CFLO lists, and there is a summation function that can combine all or part of the values stored in specific lists.
  • Page 108: The Bond Menu

    Bonds The BOND menu calculates the yield to maturity or price of a bond. It also calculates yield to call on a coupon date and accrued interest. You can specify the: Calendar basis: 30/360 or actual/actual (days per month/days per year).
  • Page 109 Calculates the interest accrued from the last coupon-payment date until the settlement date, per $100 face value. The calculator retains the values of the BOND variables until you clear them by pressing Clearing sets CALL to 100 and all other variables to zero.
  • Page 110: Doing Bond Calculations

    Doing Bond Calculations Remember that values in the BOND menu are expressed per $100 face value or as a percentage. A CALL value of 102 means that the bond will be worth $102 for every $100 of face value when called. Some corporate bonds in the United States use the convention that the price of the bond is set to 100 if the coupon rate equals the yield, whether or not the settlement date is a coupon date.
  • Page 111 maturity, the CALL value must equal 100. (See step 3.) 8. To calculate a result, first press labels. Do either a or b: Key in the yield and press price. Key in the price and press yield. To calculate the accrued interest, press the seller is PRICE + ACCRU, that is: Calculating Fractional Values.
  • Page 112      6.75           Suppose that the market quote for the bond is 88¼. What yield does it represent?  88.25    Example: A Bond with a Call Feature. What is the price of a 6% corporate bond maturing on March 3, 2022 and purchased on May 2, 2003 to yield 5.7%? It is callable on March 3, 2006 (a coupon date), at a value of 102.75.
  • Page 113   5.022003      Stores maturity date. 3.032022           3.032006  102.75       Example: A Zero-Coupon Bond. Calculate the price of a zero-coupon, semi-annual bond using a 30/360 calendar basis.
  • Page 114: Depreciation

    Depreciation The DEPRC (depreciation) menu calculates depreciation values and remaining depreciable values one year at a time. The methods available are: Declining balance. Sum-of-the-years’ digits. Straight line. Accelerated Cost Recovery System. The DEPRC Menu ICNV CFLO BASIS SALV LIFE FACT% Pressing ...
  • Page 115  Calculates the straight-line depreciation for the year. Displays the remaining depreciable value, RDV, after you have pressed The calculator retains the values of the DEPRC variables until you clear them by pressing File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description ...
  • Page 116: Doing Depreciation Calculations

    To see the value currently stored in a variable, press Doing Depreciation Calculations DB, SOYD, and SL Methods To calculate the depreciation for an asset: 1. Display the DEPRC menu: press 2. Define the characteristics of the asset: Key in the cost basis and press Key in the salvage value and press value, enter zero.
  • Page 117 Example: Declining-Balance Depreciation. A metalworking machine, purchased for $10,000, is to be depreciated over 5 years. Its salvage value is estimated at $500. Find the depreciation and remaining depreciable value for each of the first 3 years of the machine’s life using the double-declining-balance method (200% of the straight-line rate).
  • Page 118: The Acrs Method

     The ACRS Method To calculate the amount of tax deduction under the U.S. Accelerated Cost Recovery System: 1. Display the DEPRC menu: press 2. Enter the cost basis of the asset and press 3. The Internal Revenue Service publishes tables that list the percentage of an asset’s basis that can be deducted each year of its prescribed life.
  • Page 119: Partial-year Depreciation

            Partial-Year Depreciation When the acquisition date of an asset does not coincide with the start of the tax or fiscal year, then the amounts of depreciation in the first and last years are computed as fractions of a full year’s depreciation. Except in SL, the intermediate years are computed as sums of fractions.
  • Page 120 Calendar Year 1 (Oct.-Dec.) 4 (Jan.-Sept.) Example: Partial-Year Depreciation. A movie camera bought for $12,000 has a useful life of 10 years with a salvage value of $500. Using sum-of-the-years’-digits depreciation for the fourth year. Assume the first depreciation year was 11 months long.
  • Page 121: Running Total And Statistics

    Running Total and Statistics The SUM menu stores and statistically analyzes sets of numbers. As you enter the numbers, the calculator displays their running total. Once you’ve entered the numbers into a list, you can: Calculate the mean, median, standard deviation, and range.
  • Page 122: The Sum Menu

    The SUM Menu CALC INSR TOTAL MEAN MEDN SORT The SUM menu creates lists of numbers and performs calculations with a SUM list. Table 10-1. SUM Menu Labels Menu Label  Accesses the CALC menu to calculate the total, mean, median, maximum, sorting, and linear regression (including weighted mean and summation statistics).
  • Page 123: Creating A Sum List

    Remember that you can do calculations with a number before entering it. This does not interfere with the list. Whenever you press I , the number (or evaluated expression) in the calculator line is entered into the list. If you need to use the MATH menu, just press to return to where you were in SUM.
  • Page 124: Viewing And Correcting The List

    4. To enter ITEM(2), key in the value and press ITEM(3) and the new, updated total appear. 5. Continue entering values for ITEM(3), ITEM(4), etc. The calculator recognizes the end of the list when an item is left blank (no value is entered).
  • Page 125 Deleting Numbers from a List. Pressing item. Example: Updating a Checkbook. On May 31, your checking account balance was $267.82. The transactions for the first 10 days in June are: Date Transaction Balance Deposit Check Check Update the checkbook by calculating the running balance. Keys: Display: ...
  • Page 126: Naming And Renaming A Sum List

      Copying a Number from a List to the Calculator Line To copy a number from the list into the calculator line, use display the number, then press Naming and Renaming a SUM List A new list has no name. You may name it before or after filling the list, but you must name it in order to store another list.
  • Page 127: Clearing A Sum List And Its Name

    Starting or GETting Another List When you press  To start a new list or switch to a different one, the current list must be named or cleared. If it is named, then: 1. Press  . The GET menu contains a menu label for each named list plus ...
  • Page 128: Calculations With One Variable

    The calculator finds the sample standard deviation. The formula assumes that the list of numbers is a sampling of a larger, complete set of data. If the list is, in fact, the entire set of data, the true population standard deviation can be computed by calculating the mean of the original list, placing that value into the list, and then calculating the standard deviation.
  • Page 129 Phone Month Expense 1. May $340 2. June $175 3. July $450 Calculate the mean, median, and standard deviation of the monthly phone bills. Then display the smallest value in the list. Keys: Display:        ...
  • Page 130: Calculations With Two Variables (frcst

        Calculations with Two Variables (FRCST) The FRCST menu does the following two-variable calculations using two SUM lists: Fits x- and y-data to a linear, logarithmic, exponential, or power curve. Forecasts estimated values based on that curve. Finds the weighted mean and grouped standard deviation.
  • Page 131 TOTAL MEAN x-list MODL After pressing  lists—one for the x-variable and one for the y-variable. The two lists must have the same number of items. File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc CALC MEDN STDEV RANGE MORE SORT FRCST MORE (select x and y) y-list CORR W.MN...
  • Page 132 Table 10-3. FRCST Menu Labels Menu Label list name for x-variable list name for y-variable             For the non-linear models, the calculation uses the transformed data values. 132 10: Running Total and Statistics File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description These specify the two lists of data to be...
  • Page 133: Curve Fitting And Forecasting

    Curve Fitting and Forecasting Curve fitting is a statistical method for finding a relationship between two variables, x and y. Based on this relationship, you can estimate new values of y based on a given x-value, and vice-versa. Each SUM list holds the numbers (data values) for one variable.
  • Page 134 To do curve fitting and forecasting : 1. Enter the data into two SUM lists: one for the x-values and one for the y-values. Make sure each list has the same number of items so that the items are in matched pairs. 2.
  • Page 135 Number of Minutes Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 BJ’s wants to determine whether there is a linear relationship between the amount of radio advertising and the weekly sales. If a strong relationship exists, BJ’s wants to use the relationship to forecast sales. A graph of the data looks like this: 3,000 2,000...
  • Page 136 Keys: Display:               MINUTES   Now enter and name the second list.    1400   1100  2265  2890  2200  ...
  • Page 137           The correlation coefficient calculated above is acceptable to BJ’s. Using the linear model, estimate what the level of sales would be if the business purchased 7 minutes of advertising time per week. ...
  • Page 138: Weighted Mean And Grouped Standard Deviation

    Weighted Mean and Grouped Standard Deviation Data in one list (x) can be weighted or grouped (by frequency) by data in another list (y). To find the mean of weighted data and the standard deviation of grouped data: 1. Enter the data values—the x-variable—into a SUM list. 2.
  • Page 139: Summation Statistics

     Summation Statistics The summation values are of interest if you want to perform other statistical calculations besides those provided by the calculator. To find Σ x, Σ x , Σ y, Σ y , Σ (xy), and n, the number of elements in either list: 1.
  • Page 140: Doing Other Calculations With Sum Data

    statistics for just one list of data, specify the same list for both x and y. 2. To see n, press    3. Press again to display the summation menu, and press the menu label for the value you want. Doing Other Calculations with SUM Data If you would like to do other statistical calculations with SUM data besides those in the CALC menu, you can do so by writing your own...
  • Page 141: Time, Appointments, And Date Arithmetic

    Time, Appointments, and Date Arithmetic The calculator contains a clock and calendar in the TIME menu. You can select a 12-hour or 24-hour clock, and a month-day-year or day- month-year calendar. You can: Record appointments that set alarms with optional messages.
  • Page 142: The Time Menu

    The TIME Menu CALC APT1 Table 11-1. The TIME Menu Labels Menu Label  Displays the CALC menu, for calculating the day of the week and other date arithmetic.  Displays the APPT menu for setting and viewing appointments.  Displays the ADJST menu for adjusting the clock setting.
  • Page 143: Setting The Time And Date (set

    Setting the Time and Date (SET) Table 11-2. The SET Menu Labels Menu Label  Sets the date to the displayed number (MM.DDYYYY or DD.MMYYYY).  Sets the time to the displayed number (HH.MMSS).  Switches between AM and PM (12-hour clock). ...
  • Page 144: Changing The Time And Date Formats (set

    Example: Setting the Date and Time. Set the date and time to April 5, 2003, 4:07 p.m. Keys: Display:    4.052003    time   4.07    xx Changing the Time and Date Formats (SET) Use the SET menu to change the time and date formats.
  • Page 145: Appointments (appt

    Appointments (APPT) You can record up to ten appointments, each with an alarm. An appointment can contain a message. You can also create repeating appointments—appointments that recur at regular intervals. APT1 DATE TIME A/PM MSG Viewing or Setting an Appointment (APT1-APT10) Table 11-3.
  • Page 146 To set an appointment or view its current setting: 1. Press  , then  (numbered 1-10) are set and which are past due (expired with unacknowledged alarms).  Pressing displays the status and menu labels for appointments 6 through 10. ...
  • Page 147: Acknowledging An Appointment

    ( The message (or, if none, the time and date) is displayed. If the calculator is in the middle of a complex calculation when an appointment comes due, the alarm annunciator comes on and the calculator beeps once. When the calculation is done, the alarm goes off.
  • Page 148: Unacknowledged Appointments

    Unacknowledged Appointments An appointment not acknowledged during its alarm becomes past due. The alarm annunciator remains on. To acknowledge a past-due appointment:   1. Press 2. Press the menu key for the past-due appointment. 3. Press to return to the APPT menu. The acknowledged appointment is no longer listed as past due.
  • Page 149: Date Arithmetic (calc

        Clears appt. #4.    2.15         4.22       STAFF              ...
  • Page 150: Determining The Day Of The Week For Any Date

    Table 11-4. CALC Menu Labels for Date Arithmetic Menu Label Stores or calculates a date. Also displays the day of  the week. If you omit the year, the calculator uses the  current year.  Stores or calculates the number of actual days between DATE1 and DATE2 , recognizing leap years.
  • Page 151: Calculating Past Or Future Dates

    2. Key in the second date and press 3. Press   using that calendar. Example: Calculating the Number of Days between Two Dates. Find the number of days between April 20, 2003 and August 2, 2040, using both the actual calendar and the 365-day calendar. Assume the date format is month/day/year.
  • Page 152 3. Press  This calculation always uses the actual calendar. Example: Determining a Future Date. On February 9, 2003, you purchase a 120-day option on a piece of land. Determine the expiration date. Assume the date format is month/day/year. Keys: Display: ...
  • Page 153: The Equation Solver

    The Equation Solver The Equation Solver (the SOLVE menu) stores equations that you enter and creates menus for them. You can then use those menus to do calculations. Enter Solver equations in algebraic form regardless of the calculation mode (ALG or RPN). The Solver can store many equations—the number and length of equations is limited only by the amount of memory available.
  • Page 154 Regardless of how you do this calculation (even if you do it longhand), you are using an equation: Next Forecast = Old Forecast + Change in Old Forecast = Old Forecast + (Projected Percentage Changes xOld Forecast) NEXT = OLD + ((A% + B% + C%) ÷ 100 x OLD) Using the SOLVE and ALPHAbetic menus, you can type in this equation ...
  • Page 155                  Calculating with the Solver. Suppose last month’s forecast for a product was 2,000 units. In the meantime, three market changes have occurred that affect this forecast. A) The price of the product has dropped, causing an expected 20% increase in sales.
  • Page 156: The Solve Menu

    &      Suppose your boss wants next month’s forecast to be 2,300 units. You can’t affect A% or C%, but you can affect B% through the sales training program. Determine what B% must be for NEXT to equal 2,300 units. All you need to do is re-enter the one value you are changing: Keys: Display:...
  • Page 157: Entering Equations

    File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description . (To insert the new entry at the bottom of the list, < to backspace or to bring up the ALPHA-Edit menu. the calculator displays: 12: The Equation Solver 157 Print data : 2004/3/9 to start...
  • Page 158: Calculating Using Solver Menus (calc

    Solver checks that the equation is mathematically valid. (However, the Solver has no way of checking whether the equation is the right one for your problem.) If the equation cannot be solved, the calculator briefly displays:   ...
  • Page 159 1. Store values in all but one of the variables (for example, 2000  , etc.). Remember that you can verify stored values by pressing menu label. 2. To start the calculation, press the menu key for the variable you want to calculate.
  • Page 160 Keys: Display:        ASSET   DEBT    EQTY       2000       1500          ...
  • Page 161: Editing An Equation (edit

    If you don’t name an equation initially, you can name it later using Type the name just as you type the rest of the equation. The calculator knows that whatever comes before the colon is not part of the equation.
  • Page 162: Finding An Equation In The Solver List

    COST variable in the MU%C and MU%P menus in BUS. To transfer values between built-in variables and Solver variables, store them into storage registers. Recall them after switching menus. Remember that the value in the calculator line stays there when you switch menus. Clearing Variables...
  • Page 163: Deleting Variables And Equations

    (See “Deleting All Equations or Variables in the Solver,” page 164.) Deleting Variables and Equations Each equation in the Solver list uses calculator memory to store 1) itself, and 2) its variables. Deleting a variable is quite different from clearing it: Clearing a variable sets it to zero;...
  • Page 164: Deleting One Equation Or Its Variables (delet

    Deleting One Equation or Its Variables (DELET) To delete an equation or its variables: 1. Display the equation.  2. Press in the SOLVE menu. 3. To delete the equation, respond                     ...
  • Page 165 For example, earlier (page 154) we used the equation Next Forecast=Old Forecast + which was entered into the calculator as                            .
  • Page 166: What Can Appear In An Equation

    × could be entered as                 × What Can Appear in an Equation Long Equations. There is no limit on the length of an equation (or the number of variables it has) if there is enough memory to store it.
  • Page 167 Parentheses. Do not use brackets or braces. Parentheses determine order, but do not imply multiplication. For example, the equation P (1-F) would be typed into the Solver as             . The × sign must be inserted between ...
  • Page 168: Solver Functions

                 2. Using a Typing Aid Keys: Display:          Solver Functions Here is a complete list of functions that you can include in Solver equations.
  • Page 169 Table 12-2. Solver Functions for Equations Function ABS(x) ALOG(x) CDATE CTIME DATE(d1:n) DDAYS(d1:d2:cal) EXP(x) EXPM1(x) FACT(x) FLOW(CFLO-listname:flow#) FP(x) G(x) File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description Absolute value of x. Common (base 10) antilogarithm; Current date. Current time. The date n days after (when n is positive) or before (when n is negative) date d1.
  • Page 170 Table 12-2. Solver Functions for Equations (Continued) Function HMS(time) HRS(time) IDIV(x:y) IF(cond:expr :expr INT(x) INV(x) IP(x) ITEM(SUM-listname:item#) L(x:expr) LN(x) LNP1(x) LOG(x) MAX(x:y) MIN(x:y) MOD(x:y) RND(x:y) S(variable name) SGN(x) 170 12: The Equation Solver File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description Converts time in decimal hours to HH.MMSS format.
  • Page 171 Table 12-2. Solver Functions for Equations (Continued) Function Σ (cfr:c :s:expr) SIZEC(CFLO-listname) SIZES(SUM-listname) SPFV(i%:n) SPPV(i%:n) SQ(x) SQRT(x) #T( CFLO-listname:flow# ) TRN( x : y ) USFV( i% : n ) USPV( i% : n ) File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description Summation of the algebraic expression expr for values of the counter ctr, stepping from c...
  • Page 172 Example Using a Solver Function (USPV): Calculations for a Loan with an Odd First Period. Suppose an auto purchase is financed with a $6,000 loan at 13.5% annual interest. There are 36 monthly payments starting in one month and five days. What is the payment amount? Use the following formula when the time until the first payment is more than one month but less than two months.
  • Page 173 Keys: Display:          (type in equation as  shown above)     6000   13.5          File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description: Displays SOLVE menu and bottom of Solver list.
  • Page 174: Conditional Expressions With If

    Conditional Expressions with IF Equations can include conditional expressions using the function IF. The syntax of the IF function is: IF  conditional expression  algebraic expression  algebraic expression  then For example, the solver accepts the equation:                                          According to this equation, if SALES is greater than 3000, then the BONUS equals .02 ×...
  • Page 175 Examples of Conditional Equations.  =                            Means: If A is greater than 7 and is less than or equal to 15, then B =...
  • Page 176: The Summation Function

    Press   , then enter the equation:                                         To do the calculation: Keys: Display:...
  • Page 177: Accessing Cflo And Sum Lists From The Solver

    calculated and added to the sum. Thus the stored value of X is used to calculate X + 2 X + 3 X The following equation uses a variable as the ending value, 0 as the beginning value, and a step size of 2. ...
  • Page 178: Creating Menus For Multiple Equations

    “Chi-Squared Statistics” in chapter 14 illustrates another use of the Σ function with SUM lists. Creating Menus for Multiple Equations (S Function) The S ( solving for ) function is used in conjunction with the IF function to group related equations together and to specify the criteria for choosing one of them to solve.
  • Page 179: How The Solver Works

    The Solver has two ways of finding an answer. First, it tries to find a direct solution by rearranging the equation and then solving for the variable. If the Solver finds a direct solution, the calculator displays the result. If the Solver is unable to find a direct solution, it tries to find the answer indirectly by iteration .
  • Page 180 “Entering Guesses,” below. Case 4: The calculator displays                 . Check to see if your equation and stored values are correct. If the equation is correct, you might be able to find a solution by entering very good guesses.
  • Page 181: Entering Guesses

    Entering Guesses Entering your own guesses serves two purposes. First, it can save time by telling the Solver where to start searching. Second, if more than one solution exists, entering guesses may lead the Solver to a solution in a specified range.
  • Page 182 Profit = (Price × Quantity) - (Variable costs × Quantity) The C-Sharp Piano Corporation sells pianos for $6,000. Variable costs are $4,100; fixed costs per year are $112,000. How many pianos must C-Sharp sell this year in order to earn a profit of $130,000? (In past years, C-Sharp has had to sell between 100 and 200 pianos to make an acceptable profit.
  • Page 183    Solves for QTY iteratively.      12: The Equation Solver 183 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 184: Printing

         . Since the hp-17bII+ cannot send control characters to the printer, portions of the printer’s manual pertaining to control codes and graphics characters do not apply.
  • Page 185: The Printer's Power Source

                       so that the calculator will not transmit data too rapidly.
  • Page 186: Printing Variables, Lists, And Appointments (list

    Printing Other Information ( LIST The PRINTER menu provides the ability to print most of the information you’ve stored, including the contents of variables, lists, appointments, the history stack, registers, and the current date and time. You can also transmit descriptive notes to label the output. (To print amortization schedules, see “Printing an Amortization Table,”...
  • Page 187 Printing the Values Stored in Variables. You can print a listing giving the values of all variables whose menu labels are displayed. For example, if the calculator is in the FIN TVM menu, it displays the labels      ...
  • Page 188: Printing Descriptive Messages (msg

    2. Type (and edit) the label or message. 3. Press to print out the label or message. Now print out the number itself (if it’s in the calculator line, press Trace Printing (TRACE) Trace printing produces a record of all the keys you’ve pressed and of calculated results.
  • Page 189: How To Interrupt The Printer

     4800   How to Interrupt the Printer Pressing a calculator key during a printing operation will interrupt transmission, but not immediately stop the printing. To stop the printer immediately, turn it off. File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc  again to display the ×...
  • Page 190: Additional Examples

    Additional Examples Loans Simple Annual Interest See appendix F for RPN keystrokes for this example . Example: Simple Interest at an Annual Rate. Your good friend needs a loan to start her latest enterprise and has requested that you lend her $450 for 60 days.
  • Page 191: Yield Of A Discounted (or Premium) Mortgage

    For instructions on entering Solver equations, see “Solving Your Own Equations,” on page 29. If you know the dates for the course of the loan, rather than the number of days, use this for an actual-calendar basis:  or use this for a 360-day basis: ...
  • Page 192 3. Finally enter current values for N (less number of payment periods already passed, or 5 × 12-42) and PV (proposed purchase price, $79,000); then calculate I%YR for the annual yield. Step 1: Calculate PMT . Make sure FV = 0. Keys: Display: ...
  • Page 193: Annual Percentage Rate For A Loan With Fees

    Step 3: Enter actual, current values for N and PV ; then find new I%YR for discounted mortgage with balloon. Keys: Display:     79000 &      Annual Percentage Rate for a Loan with Fees See appendix F for RPN keystrokes for the next two examples .
  • Page 194 1. Since the payment amount is not given, calculate it ( PMT ) first. Use the given mortgage amount ( PV = $60,000) and interest rate ( I%YR = 2. To find the APR (the new I%YR ), use the PMT calculated in step 1 and adjust the mortgage amount to reflect the points paid (PV = $60,000 -...
  • Page 195: Loan With An Odd (partial) First Period

    calculate the monthly PMT = ( loan x 12%) ÷ 12 mos.) When calculating the I%YR , the FV (a balloon payment) is the entire loan amount, or $1,000,000, while the PV is the loan amount minus the points. Keys: Display: ...
  • Page 196 first payment, and a 30-day month is assumed. A Solver Equation for Odd-Period Calculations:    (For the  character, press PV = the loan amount. I% = the periodic interest rate. DAYS = the actual number of days until the first payment is made. PMT = the periodic payment.
  • Page 197: Canadian Mortgages

    In Canadian mortgages, the compounding and payment periods are not the same. Interest is compounded semi-annually while payments are made monthly. To use the TVM menu in the hp 17bII+, you need to calculate a Canadian mortgage factor to store as I%YR .
  • Page 198 2. Store 0   3. Add 200 to the annual interest rate, make the number negative, and store it in  4. Press  to calculate the Canadian mortgage factor. 5. Continue the problem by supplying the other mortgage values and solving for the unknown item.
  • Page 199: Advance Payments (leasing

    (For the  operator press PV = loan amount, or present value. PMT = monthly payment amount. I%YR = annual (Canadian) interest rate as a percent. N = total number of payment periods for the life of the loan. FV = remaining balance, or future value. For instructions on entering Solver equations, see “Solving Your Own Equations,”...
  • Page 200: Savings

    I%YR = the annual interest rate as a percent. N = the total number of payments. #ADV = the number of advance payments. The following example assumes that you have entered the equation ADV, above, into the Solver. For instructions on entering Solver equations, see “Solving Your Own Equations,”...
  • Page 201 1. Because the compounding periods and the withdrawal periods are not coincident, you must first convert the nominal interest rate to one in terms of the withdrawal periods. You can do this using the ICNV menu, as explained on page 87, “Compounding Periods Different from Payment Periods.”...
  • Page 202: Deposits Needed For A Child's College Account

    See appendix F for RPN keystrokes for this example . 202 14: Additional Examples File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Clears message to show NOM% value still in calculator line. Stores adjusted nominal interest rate in I%YR . Sets 4 payments (withdrawals) per year Begin mode.
  • Page 203 Suppose you want to start saving now to accommodate a future series of cash outflows. An example of this is saving money for college. To determine how much you need to save each period, you must know when you’ll need the money, how much you’ll need, and at what interest rate you can invest your deposits.
  • Page 204 $0 $0 Figure 14-1. Flow of Withdrawals Figure 14-2. Flow of Deposits Keys: Display:          204 14: Additional Examples File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc 9.00 Description: Displays current cash-flow list and CFLO menu keys. Clears current list or gets a new one.
  • Page 205 Step 1: Set up a CFLO list.     15000     15000     15000     15000         File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Sets initial cash flow, FLOW(0) , to zero.
  • Page 206: Value Of A Tax-free Account

    Step 2: Calculate NUS for the monthly deposit. Keys: Display:        Value of a Tax-Free Account See appendix F for RPN keystrokes for this example . You can use the TVM menu to calculate the future value of a tax-free or tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or Keogh account.
  • Page 207 Example: Tax-Free Account. Consider opening an IRA account with a dividend rate of 8.175%. 1) If you invest $2,000 at the beginning of each year for 35 years, how much will you have at retirement? 2) How much will you have paid into the IRA? 3) How much interest will you have earned? 4) If your post-retirement tax rate is 15%, what is the after-tax future value of the account? Assume only the interest will be taxed.
  • Page 208: Value Of A Taxable Retirement Account

     & + R            Value of a Taxable Retirement Account See appendix F for RPN keystrokes for this example . This problem uses the TVM menu to calculate the future value of a taxable retirement account that receives regular, annual payments beginning today (Begin mode).
  • Page 209: Modified Internal Rate Of Return

    Keys: Display:              8.175       3000 &          Modified Internal Rate of Return When there is more than one sign change (positive to negative or negative to positive) in a series of cash flows, there is a potential for more than one IRR% .
  • Page 210 a liquid account. The figure generally used is a short-term security (T-bill) or bank passbook rate. Positive cash flows are reinvested at a reinvestment rate that reflects the return on an investment of comparable risk. An average return rate on recent market investments might be used. 1.
  • Page 211     180000 &     100000 &                    100000    File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc new one. Stores initial cash flow, FLOW(0) .
  • Page 212    200000                                    212 14: Additional Examples File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc 5 times.
  • Page 213: Price Of An Insurance Policy

    Price of an Insurance Policy The price of an insurance policy, other than term life insurance, is rarely apparent at first glance. The price should include not only the premium payments, but also the interest that could have been earned on the cash value or savings portion of the policy.
  • Page 214 Example: Insurance Policy. You are evaluating your $50,000 insurance policy. The premium of $1,010 is due at the beginning of the year, and a dividend of $165 is received at the end of the policy year. The cash value of the policy is $3,302 at the beginning of the year; it will grow to $4,104 by the end of the year.
  • Page 215: Bonds

    Reference: Joseph M. Belth, Life Insurance—A Consumer’s Handbook , Indiana University Press, 1973, p. 234. Bonds Example: Yield to Maturity and Yield to Call. On March 16, 2003 you consider the purchase of a $1,000 bond that was issued on January 1, 2001.
  • Page 216: Discounted Notes

    Second, calculate the yield to call: Keys: Display:    1.012006         Discounted Notes A note is a written agreement to pay to the buyer of the note a sum of money plus interest. Notes do not have periodic coupons, since all interest is paid at maturity.
  • Page 217: Statistics

    The following example assumes that you have entered the NOTE equations into the Solver. For instructions on entering Solver equations, see “Solving Your Own Equations,” on page 30. Example:Price and Yield of a Discounted Note. What are the price and yield of the following U.S. Treasury Bill: settlement date October 14, 2003;...
  • Page 218 A Solver Equation for Moving Averages:  name  N = the number of values averaged in each calculation. LAST = the item number of the most recent value to be averaged. name = the name of the SUM list whose data will be averaged. When you create and name the SUM list, make sure its name matches the name in the Solver equation.
  • Page 219  4040  3200       (use if necessary)                         Chi-Squared ( ) Statistics χ...
  • Page 220 In other words, it tests whether discrepancies between the observed frequencies ( O ) and the expected frequencies ( E whether they might reasonably result from chance. The equation is: If there is a close agreement between the observed and expected frequencies, χ...
  • Page 221 Number Frequency Observed Keystroke: Display:                     ( use if necessary )         The number of degrees of freedom is ( n –1)=5. Consult statistical tables to find χ...
  • Page 222: Obtaining Help In Operating The Calculator

    Assistance, Batteries, Memory, and Service Obtaining Help in Operating the Calculator Hewlett-Packard is committed to supporting users of HP calculators. You can obtain answers to your questions about using the calculator from our Calculator Support department. We suggest reading “Answers to Common questions,” below, before contacting us.
  • Page 223 Q: How do I change the number of decimal places the calculator displays? A: The procedure is described in “Decimal Places” on page 34. Q: How do I clear all or portions of memory? clears the calculator line. clears the data lists or variables accessible from the current menu.
  • Page 224: Low-power Indications

    Q: The messages and the menu labels in the display are not in English. How do I restore the English? A: Models of the hp 17bII+ sold in many countries outside of the United States include a menu to select the language for messages and labels.
  • Page 225: Installing Batteries

    If you continue to use the calculator after the battery annunciator comes on, power can eventually drop to a level at which the calculator stops powering the display and keyboard. The calculator will require fresh batteries before it can be turned back on. When you turn the calculator on after fresh batteries have been installed, the calculator returns to the previous display if your stored data is intact.
  • Page 226 . Put the batteries back in and turn the calculator on. You should see               .
  • Page 227: Managing Calculator Memory

    Managing Calculator Memory The calculator has approximately 30,740 units (or “bytes”) of user memory available. (This is separate from the system memory that stores all the unerasable information with which the calculator is manufactured.) The calculator displays   if you attempt an operation that uses more memory than is currently available.
  • Page 228: Resetting The Calculator

                to confirm that reset has occurred. The calculator can reset itself if it is dropped or if power is interrupted. If the calculator still does not respond to keystrokes, use a thin, pointed object to press the reset hole near of the battery compartment.
  • Page 229: Erasing Continuous Memory

    Erasing Continuous Memory Erasing Continuous Memory is a way of freeing a large amount of memory so that you can use it for other things. In addition, the calculator is set to certain “default” settings. Clears the calculator line and history stack.
  • Page 230: Clock Accuracy

    (104°F) maximum. Determining If the Calculator Requires Service Use these guidelines to determine if the calculator requires service. If it does, read “Service” on page 235. If the calculator won’t turn on: Attempt to reset the calculator (see page 228).
  • Page 231 If the calculator responds to keystrokes but you suspect that it is malfunctioning: 1. Do the self-test (described below). If the calculator fails the self test, it requires service. If the calculator passes the self-test, it is quite likely you’ve made a mistake in operating the calculator.
  • Page 232: Confirming Calculator Operation: Self-test

    6. To halt the self-test, hold down key from the left. The calculator displays             . If you press any other key instead, the test halts and the calculator displays a ...
  • Page 233: Warranty

    Replacement products may be either new or like-new. HP warrants to you that HP software will not fail to execute its programming instructions after the date of purchase, for the period specified above, due to defects in material and workmanship when properly installed and used.
  • Page 234 8. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services .
  • Page 235: Service

    Service Europe Country : Austria Belgium Denmark Eastern Europe countries Finland France Germany Greece Holland Italy Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Czech Republic South Africa Luxembourg Other European countries Asia Pacific Country : Australia Singapore L.America Country : Argentina Brazil A: Assistance, Batteries, Memory, and Service 235 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc...
  • Page 236 Costa Rica N.America Country : U.S. Canada ROTC = Rest of the country Please logon to http://www.hp.com for the latest service and support information. 236 A: Assistance, Batteries, Memory, and Service File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Mx City 5258-9922; ROTC 01-800-472-6684...
  • Page 237: Regulatory Information

    This section contains information that shows how the hp 17bII+ Financial calculator complies with regulations in certain regions. Any modifications Hewlett-Packard could void the authority to operate the 17bII+ in these regions. This calculator generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and may interfere with radio and television reception.
  • Page 238: Possible Outcomes Of Calculating Irr

    In most cases, the calculator finds the desired answer, since there is usually only one solution to the calculation. However, calculating IRR% for certain sets of cash flows is more complex. There may be more than one mathematical solution to the problem, or there may be no solution.
  • Page 239: Halting And Restarting The Irr% Calculation

    To continue the calculation, you must store a guess. Case 5: The calculator displays:           There is no answer. This situation might be the result of an error, such as a mistake in keying in the cash flows.
  • Page 240: Solver Calculations

    may be additional positive or negative answers, or no true solution at all. You can continue searching for other solutions by halting the calculation and entering a different guess. One way to obtain a good guess for IRR% is to calculate NPV for various interest rates ( I% ).
  • Page 241 For certain equations, the unknown can be isolated, but an answer cannot be calculated with the values stored. Then the calculator displays:                 For example, if you enter an equation:...
  • Page 242: Iterative Solutions

    ( LEFT - RIGHT ) for each estimate, as shown. Since calculators cannot do calculations with infinite precision (the hp 17bII+ uses 12 digits in its calculations), sometimes the Solver will be unable to find an estimate where LEFT - RIGHT is exactly zero. However, the Solver can distinguish between situations where the current estimate could be a solution, and situations where no solution is found.
  • Page 243 Case 1: The calculator displays an answer. This is very likely the true solution for the unknown variable. There are two situations in which the Solver returns a case 1 answer: Case la: LEFT -...
  • Page 244 Case 2: The calculator displays the values of LEFT and RIGHT , which are unequal. To see the calculator’s result, press and RIGHT are relatively close to one another in value, the result is probably a true solution. Otherwise, the result is probably not a true solution.
  • Page 245 Case 2c: have the same sign.. Case 3: The calculator displays:                             ...
  • Page 246: Equations Used By Built-in Menus

    The closer you can estimate the answer, the more likely that the Solver will find a solution. Case 4: The calculator displays:    The Solver is unable to find a solution. Check your equation to make sure you have made no errors in entering it.
  • Page 247: Percentage Calculations In Business (bus

    USFV i Percentage Calculations in Business (BUS) CHANGE TOTAL = MARKUP C MARKUP P Time Value of Money (TVM) S = payment mode factor (0 for End mode; 1 for Begin mode).  × =   Amortization ∑INT = accumulated interest ∑PRIN =...
  • Page 248: Interest Rate Conversions

    INT’ = BAL x i (INT’ is rounded to the current display setting; INT’ = 0 for period 0 in Begin mode) INT = INT’ (with sign of PMT ) PRIN = PMT + INT’ PRIN = PMT + INT’ =...
  • Page 249: Bond Calculations

    = = USPV i TOTAL = Bond Calculations Reference: Lynch, John J., Jr. and Jan H. Mayle, Standard Securities Calculation Methods, Securities Industry Association, New York, 1986. A = accrued days, the number of days from beginning of coupon period to settlement date.
  • Page 250: Depreciation Calculations

       PRICE =           ∑ +        The “end-of-month” convention is used to determine coupon dates in the following exceptional situations. (This affects calculations for YLD%, PRICE, and ACCRU.) If the maturity date falls on the last day of the month, then the coupon payments will also fall on the last day of the month.
  • Page 251: Sum And Statistics

    For the last year of depreciation, DB equals the remaining depreciable value for the prior year. Sum and Statistics n = number of items in the list. x’ = an element of the sorted list. TOTAL Σ ′ MEDIAN MEDIAN Σ...
  • Page 252: Equations Used In (chapter 14

    Let: = Σ − = Σ Then: B = b for LIN and LOG models, and B = e for EXP and PWR models, − where CORR Equations Used in Chapter 14 Canadian Mortgages = −    where: ...
  • Page 253: Odd-period Calculations

    Odd-Period Calculations  DAYS ×   − × × Where: PV = loan amount i = periodic interest rate as a decimal DAYS = actual number of days until the first payment PMT = periodic payment amount N = total number of payments FV = balloon payment amount S = 1 if DAYS <...
  • Page 254: Menu Maps

    Menu Maps The following maps show how to display each of the menus. There is a map for each menu label in the MAIN menu and for each menu found on the keyboard. The menu labels for variables are enclosed in boxes to illustrate how they are used: Variable used to store and calculate values.
  • Page 255 CURRX CURR1 CURR2 RATE C.STO C.RCL SELCT Currencies Figure C-2. CURRX Menu C: Menu Maps 255 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 256 NOM% EFF% CALC INSR TOTAL IRR% I%YR P/YR Figure C-3. FIN Menu 256 C: Menu Maps File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc ICNV CFLO NOM% EFF% DELET NAME *NEW Names of Lists OTHER AMRT PRIN NEXT TABLE FIRST LAST INCR Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 257 BOND DEPRC BASIS SALV LIFE ACRS MORE SOYD MORE TYPE SETT MORE YLD% PRICE SEMI Figure C-3 (continued). FIN Menu C: Menu Maps 257 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 258 CALC INSR DELET ALPHA-Edit menu* ALPHA menu* TOTAL MEAN MEDN y-list x-list CORR MODL W.MN Figure C-4. SUM Menu For the complete menu, see pages 30-31. 258 C: Menu Maps File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc NAME TOTAL Names of lists RANG MORE SORT FRCST MORE...
  • Page 259 TIME APPT CALC APT1 APT2 ...MORE ... A/PM MSG HELP TIME A/PM M/D 12/24 HELP 360D 365D DATE1 DAYS Figure C-5. TIME Menu For the complete menu, see pages 30-31. C: Menu Maps 259 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 260 SOLVE CALC EDIT ALPHA-Edit menu* ALPHA menu* Figure C-6. SOLVE Menu DISP MATH MODES BEEP PRNT INTL PRINTER LIST REGS TIME TRACE Figure C-7. DSP, MATH, MODES, and PRINTER Menus For the complete menu, see pages 30-31. 260 C: Menu Maps File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 261: About Rpn

    Except for the RPN appendixes, the examples and keystrokes in this manual are written entirely using Algebraic (ALG) mode. About RPN on the hp 17bII+ This appendix replaces much of chapter 2, “Arithmetic.” It assumes that you already understand calculator operation as covered in chapter 1, “Getting Started.”...
  • Page 262: Setting Rpn Mode

    It identifies keystrokes that are shown in ALG mode and must be performed differently in RPN mode. Appendixes D, E, and F explain how to use your calculator in RPN mode. The mode affects only arithmetic calculations - all other operations, including the Solver, work the same in RPN and ALG modes.
  • Page 263: Where The Rpn Functions Are

    Where the RPN Functions Are Function Name ENTER Enters and separates one number from the next. LASTX Recalls last number in X-register. R ↓ Rolls down stack contents. R ↑ Rolls up stack contents. X < > Y X-register exchanges with Y-register.
  • Page 264: Doing Calculations In Rpn

    The LAST X function ( RPN mode does not affect the MATH menu, recalling and storing numbers, arithmetic done inside registers, scientific notation, numeric precision, or the range of numbers available on the calculator, all of which are covered in chapter 2. Simple Arithmetic Here are some examples of simple arithmetic.
  • Page 265 To select RPN mode, press To Calculate: 12 + 3 12 – 3 12 x 3 12 ÷ 3 1/12 You do not need to use keyed-in numbers. Key in both numbers (separated by pressing the operator key. The Power Function (Exponentiation). The power function uses the keys.
  • Page 266: Calculations With Sto And Rcl

    RPN Mode 27% of 200 200 less 27% Calculations with STO and RCL The store ( ) and recall ( and RPN modes (see “Storing and Recalling Numbers” and “Doing Arithmetic Inside Registers and Variables” in chapter 2). The keystrokes are the same for simple storing and recalling and for doing arithmetic inside registers and variables.
  • Page 267 The cube root example and the percentage addition example (previous topics) are two simple examples of chain calculations. For another example, calculate Start the calculation inside the parentheses by finding 12 + 3. Notice that you don’t need to press before proceeding.
  • Page 268: What The Stack Is

    RPN: The Stack This appendix explains how calculations take place in the automatic memory stack and how this method minimizes keystrokes in complicated calculations. What the Stack Is Automatic storage of intermediate results is the reason that RPN mode easily processes complicated calculations - without using parentheses. The key to automatic storage is the automatic RPN memory stack.
  • Page 269: Reviewing The Stack (roll Down

    , the value in the X-register rotates around into the T-register. Notice that the contents of the registers are rolled, while the registers themselves maintain their positions. The calculator displays only the X-register. Variable Stack Size. Clearing the stack by pressing the stack to one register (X) with a zero in it.
  • Page 270: Arithmetic-how The Stack Does It

    function is used primarily to swap the order of numbers in a calculation. For example, an easy way to calculate 9 ÷ (13x8) is to press 13 Arithmetic-How the Stack Does It The contents of the stack move up and down automatically as new numbers enter the X-register (lifting the stack), and as operators combine two numbers to produce one new number in the X-register (dropping the stack).
  • Page 271: How Enter Works

    How ENTER Works You know that other. In terms of the stack, how does it do this ? Suppose the stack is filled with a, b, c, and d. Now enter and add two new numbers: a (lost) replicates the contents of the X-register into the Y-register. The next number you key in (or recall) writes over (instead of lifting) the copy of the first number left in the X-register.
  • Page 272: Clearing Numbers

    Calculate future sales by pressing Sales for the next 3 years are projected to be $168,000; $336,000; and $672,000. Clearing Numbers Clearing One Number. Clearing the X-register puts a zero in it. The next number you key in (or recall) writes over this zero. There are two ways to clear the number in the X-register: Press <...
  • Page 273: The Last X Register

    Because of the automatic movement of the stack, it is not necessary to clear the stack before starting a calculation. Note that if an application menu is currently displayed, pressing application’s variables. The LAST X Register Retrieving Numbers from LAST X The LAST X register is a companion to the stack: It stores the number that had been in the X-register just before the last numeric operation (such as operation).
  • Page 274: Chain Calculations

    This is an advantage the RPN stack has over algebraic calculator logic. Other features of RPN include the following: You never work with more than two numbers at a time.
  • Page 275: Exercises

    Exercises Here are some extra problems that you can do to practice using RPN. Calculate: (14 + 12) x (18 – 12) ÷ (9 – 7) = 78.00 A Solution: 14 Calculate: 23 – (13 x 9) + A Solution: 23 ×...
  • Page 276 RPN: Selected Examples The following examples selected from chapter 14 (“Additional Examples”) have been converted to RPN keystrokes. These examples illustrate how to convert algebraic to RPN keystrokes in less common situations: with , with Example: Simple Interest at an Annual Rate. Your good friend needs a loan to start her latest enterprise and has requested that you lend her $450 for 60 days.
  • Page 277 adjust the mortgage amount to reflect the points paid (PV = $60,000 - 2%). All other values remain the same (term is 30 years; no future value). Keys: Display:            ...
  • Page 278 Keys: Display:             1000000      1000000  % - &      Example: Savings for College. Your daughter will be going to college in 12 years and you are starting a fund for her education.
  • Page 279 Keys: Display:           Step 1: Set up a CFLO list. Keys: 15000 15000 File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc Description: Displays current cash-flow list and CFLO menu keys. Clears current list or gets a new one.
  • Page 280   15000  15000        Step 2: Calculate NUS for the monthly deposit. Then calculate net present value. Keys: Display:        Calculates the net present Example: Tax-Free Account. Consider opening an IRA account with a dividend rate of 8.175%.
  • Page 281 after-tax future value of the account ? Assume only the interest will be taxed (the principal was taxed before deposit). 5) What is the purchasing power of that amount, in today’s dollars, assuming an 8% annual inflation rate ? Keys: Display: ...
  • Page 282      Example: Taxable Retirement Account. If you invest $3,000 each year for 35 years, with dividends taxed as ordinary income, how much will you have in the account at retirement ? Assume an annual dividend rate of 8.175% and a tax rate of 28%, and that payments begin today.
  • Page 283: Error Messages

    The Solver cannot begin a numerical search using the initial estimates. See pages 180 and 239.      To conserve battery power, the calculator will not transmit data to the printer until fresh batteries have been installed.   ...
  • Page 284   Attempted to raise a negative number to a non-integer power.   An internal result in a calculation was too large for the calculator to handle.   Attempted to take the square root of a negative number or calculate G.SD given any negative frequencies.
  • Page 285 Attempted to do curve fitting using the logarithmic or power models with a list for which the transformed values of x (ln x) are equal.   The calculator has insufficient memory available to do the operation you’ve specified. Refer to “Managing Calculator Memory” on page 227 for additional information.
  • Page 286 Attempted to calculate I%YR with N ≦ 0.99999 or N ≧ 10          Calculation of IRR% produced a negative answer, but the calculator has determined that there is also a unique positive answer. (Refer to page 238.) ...
  • Page 287     The calculator is unable to calculate I%YR. Check the values stored in PV, PMT, and FV. Make sure the signs of the numbers are correct. If the values of PV, PMT, and FV are correct, the calculation is too complex for the TVM menu.
  • Page 288 Refer to page 246 in appendix B.  A warning - not an error - that the magnitude of a result is too small for the calculator to handle, so it returns the value zero. See page 47 for limits.   ...
  • Page 289: Index

    Index Special Characters - , 47 low-battery annunciator, 17, 184, 224 shift annunciator, 19 % , 40 %TOTL menu formula, 247 using, 51 & , 22 Σ , 139, 171, 176 – 77 , 220  , 35  , 35 ...
  • Page 290  , 36, 262  , 109  key, 34   through , 145  , appointment-setting menu, 145 ABS (absolute value) function, Accrued interest, on bond, 109 , Accuracy of the clock, 230 Acknowledging appointments, Actual calendar actuarial equations, 246 for arithmetic, 149 for bonds, 110 Addition, 21...
  • Page 291 Arithmetic priority, 154 Arrow keys for changing current equation, for editing, 32 for finding an equation, 162 for rolling the history stack, for viewing long equations,  , 56  , 132  , 78  , 64  , 115 ...
  • Page 292 Calculations, RPN order of, 274 parenthesis in, 266, 274 Calculator not functioning, 230 – 31 resetting, 225, 228 Support, 222 Calculator line arithmetic in, 38 – 48 definition, 18 displaying alphabetic information, 31 – 32 editing, 20 Calendar. See also Date...
  • Page 293 %CHG variables, 50 %T variables, 50 AMRT variables, 80 appointments, 146, 148 BOND variables, 109 BUS variables, 50 calculator memory, 28 – 29 CFLO lists, 95, 99 ICNV variables, 86 menu variables, 28 menus, 28 MU%C variables, 50 MU%P variables, 50...
  • Page 294 Cost markup on, 49, 52 of capital, 101 Counter variable,in summation function, 176 Coupon basis, 108 – 9 payments, 108 Creating a CFLO list, 94 – 96 , 99 a new equation, in the Solver, 157 – 58 a SUM list, 123 – 24 , 127 CTIME, 169 Cube root, 41 in RPN, 265...
  • Page 295 DDAYS, 169 Decimal places, 34 , 47 Decimal point, 35 Declining balance depreciation. See Depreciation Deleting all information, 225, 228 – 29 characters, 32 equations, 162 – 64 from a CFLO list, 98, 100 from a SUM list, 125 , 127 variables in the Solver, 162 –...
  • Page 296 166 naming, 161 verifying, 157 – 58 writing, 164 Erasing. See also Clearing; Deleting Erasing calculator memory, 225, Error messages, 36, 283 Estimates, entering in the Solver, 181 – 83 Examples, 190 in RPN, 276–82 Exchanging registers, RPN, 269...
  • Page 297 Hierarchy of menus, 24 Hierarchy of operations, in equations, 165 History stack, 43 . See also Stack, RPN printing, 186 HMS, 170 HP Solve. See Solver HRS, 170 Humidity requirements, 230  , 78  in CFLO list, 92, 98 in SUM list, 122, 124 ...
  • Page 298  , 18  key, 63 ,  , 56 I , 98 for storing equations, 30 in CFLO menu, 92 in RPN, 264 in the Solver list, 157 – 58 in SUM list, 123 I%, 101 ICNV equations, 248 menu, 84 –...
  • Page 299 Iteration in Solver, 179 – 83 , 240, 242 – 46  , 115  , 132  , 186  , 42  , 42 L , 44 in RPN, 273 L, 170 Language, setting, 224 Large number available, 47 in a list, 128 Large numbers, keying in and displaying, 47...
  • Page 300 MAIN menu, 19 Manual, organization of, 16 Markup on cost, 49, 52 on price, 49, 52 Math in equations, 165 , 167 MATH menu, 42, 260 MAX, 170 Mean, 251 calculating, 128 – 30 weighted, 138 – 39 Median, 251 calculating, 128 –...
  • Page 301  , 63  in CFLO list, 98 – 99 in SUM list, 126  , 101  , 101  , 101  , 157  , 56  , 56  , 56  , 42  , 85 – 86 ...
  • Page 302 Option to buy, for a lease, 74 – 75 OR, 174 Order of calculation, in the Solver, 165 OTHER menu, 146 – 47 Overdue appointments. See Past- due appointment Overview, 3  , 56 , 63  , 78  , 63 ...
  • Page 303 PI, 42 , 170 PMT. See also Payments in TVM, 63 rounded amortization calculations, 78 Positive numbers in cash flow calculations, 92 – 94 in TVM, 64 Power. See also Low power; Batteries function, 41, 265 raising a number to, 41 Power curve, 130, 132, 133 Power on and of, 17 Precision of numbers, internal,...
  • Page 304 Replacing batteries, 225 – 26 Required rate of return, 101 Resetting the calculator, 228 Reusing a number, RPN, 271, 273 calculator memory, 37 , 229 Reverse Polish Notation, 261 RND, 170 Rounding a PMT, 71 Rounding numbers, 35 RPN. See appendixes D, E, and F, or individual entries Running total, 123 –...
  • Page 305 S (function), 170 Sample standard deviation, Saving numbers, 43 Savings account, 71–72 college, 202 – 6 college, RPN, 278 regular, 200 – 202 retirement, 208 retirement, RPN, 282 tax free, 206 – 9 tax free, RPN, 280 Savings calculations, 71 – 73 Scientific notation, 47 Self-test, 232 Service, 235 –...
  • Page 306 Solver menu, 156 – 57 for multiple equations, 178 Solver solutions, types of, 243 – 46 Solver variables. See Variables, Solver Sorting numbers, 128 Spaces in equations, 166 Specifying the number of decimal places, 34 SPFV, 171 , 246 SPPV, 171 , 246 SQ, 171 SQRT, 171 Square root...
  • Page 307 Trace-printing, 188 TRN, 171 Troubleshooting, 222–24 True population standard deviation, 128 Truncating function, in Solver, Turning calculator on and off, calculations, 61 – 83 equation, 247 instructions, 66 – 67 menu, 61 – 64 , 66 variables, clearing, 64 Index 307...
  • Page 308 Typing aids, 167 Typing alphabetic characters,  , 56  , 56 Unacknowledged appointments, Unit conversions, in the Solver, Unknown variables in Solver, 240 , 241 Up-arrow key, 43 USFV, 171 , 246 USPV, 171 , 246 Values clearing, 28 – 29 . See also recalling, 28, 45 –...
  • Page 309 of lease, 74 – 75 to call, bonds, 108 to maturity, bond, 108 y-intercept, in curve-fitting, 132 , File name : English-M02-1-040308(Print).doc y-values, in forecasting, 133 – 34 Zero-coupon bond, 113 Index 309 Print data : 2004/3/9...
  • Page 310 This regulation applies only to The Netherlands Batteries are delivered with this product, when empty do not throw them away but collect as small chemical waste. produkt zijn batterijen geleverd. Wanneer deze leeg zijn, moet u ze niet weggooien maar inleveren als KCA.

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  • Frank Dec 21, 2015 08:02:
    Wrong manual. it's 17bii+ and NOT 17bii