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hp 9g
Graphing Calculator
Contents
Chapter 1 : General Operations ................................... 4
Power Supply .................................................................... 4
Turning on or off ........................................................................... 4
Battery replacement ...................................................................... 4
Auto power-off function ................................................................ 4
Reset operation ............................................................................. 4
Contrast Adjustment .......................................................... 4
Display Features ................................................................ 5
Graph display............................................................................... 5
Calculation display........................................................................ 5
Changing Modes ............................................................... 6
Selecting an Item from a Menu ........................................... 6
Key Labels......................................................................... 6
Using the 2nd and ALPHA keys .......................................... 7
Cursor .............................................................................. 7
Inserting and Deleting Characters....................................... 7
Recalling Previous Inputs and Results .................................. 8
Memory ............................................................................ 8
Running memory........................................................................... 8
Standard memory variables .......................................................... 8
Storing an equation ...................................................................... 8
Array Variables............................................................................. 8
Order of Operations .......................................................... 9
Accuracy and Capacity .................................................... 10
Error Conditions .............................................................. 12
Chapter 3 : Basic Calculations .................................... 13
Arithmetic Calculation...................................................... 13
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   Summary of Contents for HP 9g

  • Page 1: Table Of Contents

    9g Graphing Calculator Contents Chapter 1 : General Operations ... 4 Power Supply ... 4 Turning on or off ... 4 Battery replacement ... 4 Auto power-off function ... 4 Reset operation ... 4 Contrast Adjustment ... 4 Display Features ... 5 Graph display...
  • Page 2 Display Format ... 13 Parentheses Calculations ... 14 Percentage Calculations ... 14 Repeat Calculations ... 14 Answer Function... 14 Chapter 4 : Common Math Calculations... 15 Logarithm and Antilogarithm ... 15 Fraction Calculation ... 15 Converting Angular Units ... 15 Trigonometric and Inverse Trigonometric functions ...
  • Page 3 Probability Distribution (1-Var Data) ... 23 Regression Calculation ... 24 Chapter 7 : BaseN Calculations ... 24 Negative Expressions... 25 Basic Arithmetic Operations for Bases... 25 Logical Operation ... 25 Chapter 8 : Programming... 25 Before Using the Program Area ... 26 Program Control Instructions ...
  • Page 4: Chapter 1 : General Operations

    Reset operation If the calculator is on but you get unexpected results, press [ MODE ] or ]. If problems persist, press [ 2nd ] [ RESET ]. A message appears asking you to confirm that you want to reset the calculator.
  • Page 5: Display Features

    2-digit positive or negative exponent. Results that exceed this limit are displayed in scientific notation. Indicators The following indicators appear on the display to indicate the status of the calculator. Indicator Meaning Values are stored in running memory –...
  • Page 6: Chapter 2 : Before Starting A Calculation

    SCIENG SCIentific or ENGineering display format Number of decimal places displayed is fixed Hyperbolic trig function will be calculated The displayed value is an intermediate result There are digits to the left or right of the display There are earlier or later results that can be displayed. These indicators blink while an operation or program is executing.
  • Page 7: Using The 2nd And Alpha Keys

    If you press [ 2nd ] by mistake, press [ 2nd ] again to remove the 2nd indicator Pressing [ ALPHA ] [ 2nd ] locks the calculator in 2nd function mode. This allows consecutive input of 2nd function keys. To cancel this, press [ 2nd ] again.
  • Page 8: Recalling Previous Inputs And Results

    [ MRC ]. To clear running memory, press [ MRC ] twice. See Example 4. Standard memory variables The calculator has 26 standard memory variables—A, B, C, D, …, Z—which you can use to assign a value to. See Example 5. Operations with variables include: [ SAVE ] + Variable assigns the current answer to the specified variable •...
  • Page 9: Order Of Operations

    memories can be added in this way, giving you a maximum of 59 memories (26 + 33). Note: To restore the default memory configuration—26 memories—specify Defm 0. Expanded memories are named A [ 1 ] , A [ 2 ] etc and can be used in the same way as standard memory variables.
  • Page 10: Accuracy And Capacity

    Abbreviated multiplication format involving variables, π, RAND, RANDI. ( – ) Abbreviated multiplication format in front of Type B functions, Alog2, etc. nPr, nCr × , 10. +, – 11. Relational operators: = =, < , >, ≠, ≤ , ≥ 12.
  • Page 11 –1 sinh x, cosh x tanh x sinh –1 1 ≦ x < 5 × 10 cosh –1 tanh –1 log x, ln x 1 × 10 –1 × 10 –1 × 10 0 ≦ x < 1 × 10 0 ≦...
  • Page 12: Error Conditions

    DIVIDE BY O You attempted to divide by 0. OVERFLOW Er The result of a calculation exceeds the limits of the calculator. SYNTAX Er 1. Input error. 0 ≦ r ≦ n, n < 10 | x | < 1 × 10 ,| y | <...
  • Page 13: Chapter 3 : Basic Calculations

    2. An improper argument was used in a command or function. 3. An END statement is missing from a program. LENGTH Er An entry exceeds 84 digits after implied multiplication with auto-correction. OUT OF SPEC You input a negative C NEST Er Subroutine nesting exceeds 3 levels.
  • Page 14: Parentheses Calculations

    You can enter a number in mantissa and exponent format using the • [ EXP ] key. See Example 13. This calculator also provides 11 symbols for input of values using • engineering notation. Press [ 2nd ] [ ENG SYM ] to display the symbols.
  • Page 15: Chapter 4 : Common Math Calculations

    When you enter a numeric value or numeric expression and press [ the result is stored in the Answer function, which you can then quickly recall. See Example 19. Note: The result is retained even if the power is turned off. It is also retained if a subsequent calculation results in an error.
  • Page 16: Trigonometric And Inverse Trigonometric Functions

    To convert from DMS notation to decimal notation, select ° (degrees), ’(minutes), ”(seconds). See Example 27. Trigonometric and Inverse Trigonometric functions The calculator provides standard trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions: sin, cos, tan, sin Note: Before undertaking a trigonometric or inverse trigonometric calculation, make sure that the appropriate angular unit is set.
  • Page 17: Other Functions ( X , ^ )

    Defm Memory expansion. Other Functions ( x The calculator also provides reciprocal ( [ x root ( [ ] ), square ( [ x exponentiation ( [ ^ ] ) functions. See Example 32. Unit Conversion You can convert numbers from metric to imperial units and vice versa.
  • Page 18: Physics Constants

    Enter the number you want to convert. Press [ 2nd ] [ CONV ] to display the units menu. There are 7 menus, covering distance, area, temperature, capacity, weight, energy, and pressure. Press [ ] or [ appropriate units menu is shown, then press [ Press [ ] or [ Physics Constants...
  • Page 19: Multi-statement Functions

    Position your cursor where you want the constant inserted. Press [ 2nd ] [ CONST ] to display the physics constants menu. Scroll through the menu until the constant you want is underlined. Press [ ]. (See Example 34.) Multi-statement functions Multi-statement functions are formed by connecting a number of individual statements for sequential execution.
  • Page 20: Graph ↔ Text Display And Clearing A Graph

    After setting the range, press [ Graph ] and enter the expression to be graphed. See Example 37. Graph ↔ Text Display and Clearing a Graph Press [ G T ] to switch between graph display and text display and vice versa.
  • Page 21: Scrolling Graphs

    This function lets you move a pointer around a graph by pressing [ ]. The x- and y-coordinates of the current pointer location are displayed on the screen. This function is useful for determining the intersection of superimposed graphs (by pressing [ 2nd ] [ X Note: Due to the limited resolution of the display, the position of the pointer may be an approximation.
  • Page 22: Process Capability

    Press [ variables until you reach the variable you are interested in (see table below). Variable Number of x values or x–y pairs entered. Mean of the x values or y values. Xmax or Ymax Maximum of the x values or y values. Xmin or Ymin Minimum of the x values or y values.
  • Page 23: Correcting Statistical Data

    Cpx or Cpy Potential capability precision of the x values or y values, Cpkx or Cpky Minimum (CPU, CPL) of the x values or y values, where CPU is the upper spec. limit of capability precision and CPL is lower spec. limit of capability precision. Parts per million, Defection Per Million Opportunities.
  • Page 24: Regression Calculation

    R(t) The cumulative fraction of the standard normal distribution that lies between t and 0. R(t) = 1 – t. Q(t) The cumulative fraction of the standard normal distribution that is greater than t. Q(t) = | 0.5– t |. Regression Calculation There are six regression options on the REG menu: Linear Regression...
  • Page 25: Negative Expressions

    You can enter numbers in base 2, base 8, base 10 or base 16. To set the number base, press [ 2nd ] [ dhbo ], select an option from the menu and press [ ]. An indicator shows the base you selected: d, h, b , or o. (The default setting is d: decimal base).
  • Page 26: Before Using The Program Area

    See Array Variables above. Program Type: You must specify in each program the calculation mode that the calculator should enter when executing the program. To perform binary, octal or hexadecimal calculations or conversions, choose BaseN; otherwise choose MAIN.
  • Page 27: Conditional Branching

    INPUT memory variable ⇒ Makes the program pause for data input. memory variable = appears on the display. Enter a value and press [ assigned to the specified variable, and the program resumes execution. To input more than one memory variable, separate them with a semicolon (;).
  • Page 28: Increment And Decrement

    ⇒ Each program needs an END command to mark the end of the program. This is displayed automatically when you create a new program. Increment and decrement Post-fixed: Memory variable + + or Memory variable – – Pre-fixed: + + Memory variable or – – Memory variable ⇒...
  • Page 29: Relational Operators

    Select one of the ten program areas (P0123456789) and press [ Enter your program’s commands. • You can enter the calculator’s regular functions as commands. • To enter a program control instruction, press [ 2nd ] [ INST ] and make your selection.
  • Page 30: Debugging A Program

    Debugging a Program A program might generate an error message or unexpected results when it is executed. This indicates that there is an error in the program that needs to be corrected. Error messages appear for approximately 5 seconds, and then the •...
  • Page 31: Program Examples

    To erase all the programs, select ALL. A message appears asking you to confirm that you want to delete the program(s). Press [ ] to move the cursor to Y and then press [ To exit DEL mode, select EXIT from the program menu. Program Examples See Examples 54 to 63.
  • Page 32 Example 3 Enter 14 0 × 2.3 and then correct it to 14 14 [ ] 0 [ × ] 2.3 [ (after 5 Seconds ) ] 1 [ Example 4 [ ( 3 × 5 ) + ( 56 3 [ ×...
  • Page 33 56 [ ] 7 [ M+ ] [ MRC ] [ 74 [ – ] 8 [ × ] 7 [ 2nd ] [ M– ] [ MRC ] [ [ MRC ] [ MRC ] [ Example 5 (1) Assign 30 into variable A [ 2nd ] [ CL-VAR ] 30 [ SAVE ] [ A ] [ 0 (2) Multiply variable A by 5 and assign the result to variable B...
  • Page 34 [ SAVE ] [ B ] [ 1 (3) Add 3 to variable B [ ALPHA ] [ B ] [ + ] 3 [ 2 (4) Clear all variables [ 2nd ] [ CL-VAR ] [ 2nd ] [ RCL ] Example 6 (1) Set PROG 1 = cos (3A) + sin (5B), where A = 0, B = 0 [ cos ] 3 [ ALPHA ] [ A ] [...
  • Page 35 [ PROG ] 1 [ ] 20 ] 18 Example 7 (1) Expand the number of memories from 26 to 28 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ 4 (2) Assign 66 to variable A [ 27 ] 66 [ SAVE ] [ A ] [ ALPHA ] [ [ ] ] 27 [ E-35...
  • Page 36 5 (3) Recall variable A [ 27 ] [ ALPHA ] [ A ] [ ALPHA ] [ [ ] ] 27 [ 6 (4) Return memory variables to the default configuration [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ ] 0 [ Example 8...
  • Page 37 12369 [ × ] 7532 [ × ] 74103 Example 11 6 7 = 0.857142857 ] 7 [ [ 2nd ] [ FIX ] [ [ 2nd ] [ FIX ] 4 [ 2nd ] [ FIX ] [ • ] Example 12 1 6000 = 0.0001666...
  • Page 38 [ 2nd ] [ SCI / ENG ] [ [ 2nd ] [ SCI / ENG ] [ [ 2nd ] [ SCI / ENG ] [ Example 13 0.0015 = 1.5 × 10 1.5 [ EXP ] [ (–) ] 3 [ Example 14 20 G byte + 0.15 K byte = 2.000000015 ×...
  • Page 39 20 [ 2nd ] [ ENG SYM ] [ ] [ + ] 0.15 [ 2nd ] [ ENG SYM ] Example 15 ( 5 – 2 × 1.5 ) × 3 = 6 [ ( ) ] 5 [ – ] 2 [ × ] 1.5 [ [ ×...
  • Page 40 88 [ ] 55 [ 2nd ] [ % ] Example 18 3 × 3 × 3 × 3 = 81 3 [ × ] 3 [ [ × ] 3 [ 8 Calculate 6 after calculating 3 × 4 = 12 3 [ ×...
  • Page 41 789 [ – ] [ 2nd ] [ ANS ] Example 20 ln7 + log100 = 3.945910149 [ ln ] 7 [ ] [ + ] [ log ] 100 9 10 = 100 [ 2nd ] [ 10 ] 2 [ 10 e –5 = 0.006737947...
  • Page 42 4 [ A ] 2 [ A [ 2nd ] [ A [ 2nd ] [A Example 23 4 [ A ] 1 [ A ] 2 [ 2nd ] D ] [ Example 24 8 [ A ] 4 [ A ] 5 [ + ] 3.75 [ Example 25...
  • Page 43 ] 2 [ 2nd ] [ [ 2nd ] [ DMS ] [ Example 26 1.5 = 1 ( DMS ) 1.5 [ 2nd ] [ DMS ] [ Example 27 10.5 = 2.752916667 2 [ 2nd ] [ DMS ] ] 45 [ 2nd ] [ DMS ] ] 10.5 [ 2nd ] [ DMS ] E-43...
  • Page 44 Example 28 sin30 Deg. = 0.5 [ DRG ] ] [ sin ] 30 [ 11 sin30 Rad. = – 0.988031624 [ DRG ] [ ] [ sin ] 30 [ 12 sin 0.5 = 33.33333333 Grad. –1 [ DRG ] [ ] [ 2nd ] [ sin 0.5 [ Example 29...
  • Page 45 [ 2nd ] [ HYP ] [ cos ] 1.5 ] [ + ] 2 [ 13 sinh –1 7 = 2.644120761 [ 2nd ] [ HYP ] [ 2nd ] [ sin Example 30 If x = 5 and y = 30, what are r and 80.53767779 [ 2nd ] [ R ] 5 [ ALPHA ] [...
  • Page 46 [ 2nd ] [ R P ] [ ] 25 [ ALPHA ] [ 56 [ [ 2nd ] [ R P ] [ ] 25 [ ALPHA ] [ 56 [ Example 31 5 ! = 120 5 [ MATH ] 15 Generate a random number between 0 and 1 [ MATH ] [ E-46...
  • Page 47 16 Generate a random integer between 7 and 9 [ MATH ] [ ] 7 [ ALPHA ] [ 17 RND ( sin 45 Deg. ) = 0.71 ( FIX = 2 ) [ MATH ] [ ] [ sin ] 45 [ 2nd ] [ FIX ] [ 18 MAX ( sin 30 Deg.
  • Page 48 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ ] [ sin ] 30 ] [ ALPHA ] [ ] [ sin ] 90 20 SUM (13, 15, 23 ) = 51 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ ] 13 [ ALPHA ] [ 15 [ ALPHA ] [ ] 23 21 AVG (13, 15, 23 ) = 17...
  • Page 49 ] 10 [ ] 8 [ 23 INT (10 8 ) = INT ( 1.25 ) = 1 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] ] 10 [ ] 8 [ 24 SGN ( log 0.01 ) = SGN ( – 2 ) = – 1 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] ] [ log ] 0.01 25 ABS ( log 0.01) = ABS ( –...
  • Page 50 26 7 ! [ ( 7 – 4 ) ! ] = 840 7 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] ] 4 [ 27 7 ! [ ( 7 – 4 ) ! × 4 ] = 35 7 [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ MATH ] [ ] 4 [...
  • Page 51 4 [ 2nd ] [ ] 81 30 7 = 2401 7 [ 2nd ] [ ^ ] 4 [ Example 33 1 yd = 9 ft = 0.000000836 km 1 [ 2nd ] [ CONV ] [ 2nd ] [ CONV ] [ Example 34 3 ×...
  • Page 52 3 [ × ] [ 2nd ] [ CONST ] Example 35 Apply the multi-statement function to the following two statements: ( E=15 ) 15 [ SAVE ] [ E ] [ [ ALPHA ] [ E ] [ × ] 13 [ ALPHA ] [ ]180 [ [ ALPHA ] [ E ] [...
  • Page 53 [ Graph ] [ 2nd ] [ e Example 37 (1) Range : X min = – 180, X max = 180, X scl = 90, Y min = – 1.25, Y max = 1.25, Y scl = 0.5, Graph Y = sin (2 x) [ Range ] [ ( –...
  • Page 54 31 (2) Zoom in and zoom out on Y = sin (2x) [ 2nd ] [ Zoom x f ] [ 2nd ] [ Zoom x f ] [ 2nd ] [ Zoom Org ] [ 2nd ] [ Zoom x 1 / f ] [ 2nd ] [ Zoom x 1 / f ] Example 38 Superimpose the graph of Y = –...
  • Page 55 [ Range ] [ (–) ] 8 [ ] 2 [ ] [ (–) ] 15 [ 15 [ ] [ Graph ] [ ALPHA ] [ X ] [ 2nd ] [ x ] [ + ] 3 [ ALPHA ] [ X ] [ x ] [ –...
  • Page 56 [ Graph ] [ cos ] [ [ Trace ] [ 2nd ] [ X Example 41 Draw and scroll the graph for Y = cos ( x ) [ Graph ] [ cos ] [ Example 42 Place points at ( 5 , 5 ), ( 5 , 10 ), ( 15 , 15 ) and ( 18, 15 ), and then use the Line function to connect the points.
  • Page 57 [ Range ] 0 [ ] 35 [ ] 0 [ ] 23 [ ] [ 2nd ] [ PLOT ] 5 [ ALPHA ] [ [ 2nd ] [ X [ 2nd ] [ X Y ] [ 2nd ] [ PLOT ] 5 [ ALPHA ] [ [ 2nd ] [ LINE ] [ [ 2nd ] [ PLOT ] 15 [ ALPHA ]...
  • Page 58 Example 43 Enter the data: X = 2, X = 9, X = 12, FREQ Cax = 0 , and Cpx = 0.503655401 [ MODE ] 1 ] [ DATA ] [ ] 13 [ [ DATA ] ] 5 [ ] 9 [ = 13, X = 3, FREQ...
  • Page 59 [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ Graph ] [ [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ [ Graph ] E-59...
  • Page 60 [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ Graph ] Example 44 Enter the data : X = 2, X = 5 , Y = 7, X 0, Cay = 0.111111111 [ MODE ] 1 [ ] [ DATA ] [ ] 2 [ ] 8 [ ] 9 [...
  • Page 61 [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ [ Graph ] Example 45 In the data in Example 44, change Y = 8, then find Sx = 2.645751311 [ DATA ] = 4 to Y E-61 = 9 and X = 5 to X...
  • Page 62 [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ Example 46 Enter the data : a = 12, FREQ Q( t ) = 0.4346, R ( t ) =0.9346 [ MODE ] 1 ] [ DATA ] [ ] 2 [ [ DATA ] [ ] 3 [ ] 5 [ ] 9 [...
  • Page 63 Example 47 Given the following data, use linear regression to estimate x ’ =? for y =573 and y ’= ? for x = 19 [ MODE ] 1 [ ] [ DATA ] ] 15 [ ] 451 [ 17 [ ] 475 [ ] 21 [...
  • Page 64 [ 2 nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ Graph ] [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ ] 573 [ [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ ] 19 [ Example 48 Given the following data, use quadratic regression to estimate y ’ = ? for x = 58 and x ’...
  • Page 65 ] [ DATA ] ] 57 [ ] 101 [ 61 [ ] 117 [ ] 67 ]155 [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ Graph ] [ 2 nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ ] 143 [ [ 2nd ] [ STATVAR ] [ E-65...
  • Page 66 ] 58 [ Example 49 = 1F = 11111 [ MODE ] 2 31 [ [ dhbo ] Example 50 4777 = 1001010101001 = 37 E-66...
  • Page 67 [ MODE ] 2 [ dhbo ] [ ] [ dhbo ] [ ] 4777 [ Example 51 What is the negative of 3A [ MODE ] 2 [ dhbo ] [ ] [ NEG ] 3 [ /A ] Example 52 1234 + 1EF...
  • Page 68 [ MODE ] 2 [ dhbo ] [ ] [ dhbo ] [ ] 1234 [ + ] [ dhbo ] [ ] 1[ IE ] [ IF ] [ [ dhbo ] [ ] 24 [ dhbo ] [ Example 53 E-68...
  • Page 69 1010 AND ( A [ MODE ] 2 [ dhbo ] [ ] [ dhbo ] [ ] 1010 [ AND ] [ ( ) ] [ dhbo ] [ ] [ /A ] [ OR ] [ dhbo ] ] 7 [ [ dhbo ] [ Example 54...
  • Page 70 • Quotient : Z When the message “1 : + ”, “ 2 : – ”, “ 3 : × ”, “ 4 : / ” appears on the display, you can input a value for “ O ” that corresponds to the type of operation you want to performed, as follows: 1 for Z 3 for Z...
  • Page 71 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 17 [ ] [ ( – ) ] 3 [ ] ( 5 Seconds ) E-71...
  • Page 72 ] 10 [ 13 [ ] 6 [ ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 2 [ [ ( – ) ] 5 [ ] 11 ] 17 ] 17 E-72...
  • Page 73 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 6 [ ] [ ( – ) ] 3 [ Example 55 Create a program to determine solutions to the quadratic equation A X + B X + C = 0, D = B 1) D >...
  • Page 74 (1) 2 X – 7 X + 5 = 0 ] [ ( – ) ] ] 7 (2) 25 X – 70 X + 49 = 0 25 [ ] [ ( – ) ] ] 49 = 2.5 , X X = 1.4 E-74...
  • Page 75 (3) X + 2 X + 5 = 0 ] 2 [ Example 56 Create a program to generate a common difference sequence ( A : First item, D : common difference, N : number ) Sum : S ( N ) = A+(A+D)+(A+2D)+(A+3D)+... Nth item : A ( N ) = A + ( N –...
  • Page 76 When the message “ 1: A(N), 2 :S(N) ” appears on the display, you can input a “ P ” value to specify the type of operation to be performed: 1 for A(N) 32 (1) A = 3 , D = 2, N = 4 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 3 [ 2 for S(N)
  • Page 77 (2) A = 3 , D = 2, N = 12 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 3 [ ] 12 Example 57 Create a program to generate a common ratio sequence ( A : First item, R : common ratio, N : number ) Sum : S ( N ) = A + AR + AR 1) R 2) R = 1...
  • Page 78 When the message “ 1: A(N), 2 :S(N) ” appears on the display, you can input a “ P ” value to specify the type of operation to be performed: 1 for A(N) (1) A = 5 , R = 4, N = 7 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 5 [ 2 for S(N)
  • Page 79 (2) A = 5 , R = 4, N = 9 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 5 [ (3) A = 7 ,R = 1, N = 14 ] ( 5 Seconds ) ] 7 [ ] 14 S (N) = S (9) = 436905 S (N) = S (14) = 98 E-79...
  • Page 80 Example 58 Create a program to determine the solutions for linear equations of the form: E-80...
  • Page 81 ] [ ( – ) ] 1 [ 30 [ ] 5 [ ] 17 Example 59 Create three subroutines to store the following formulas and then use the GOSUB-PROG command to write a mainroutine to execute the subroutines. Subroutine 1 : CHARGE = N × 3 Subroutine 2 : POWER = I Subroutine 3 : VOLTAGE = I ( B ×...
  • Page 82 N = 1.5, I = 486, A = 2 VOLTAGE = 2 ] ( 5 Seconds ) CHARGE = 4.5, POWER = 243, E-82...
  • Page 83 ] ( 5 Seconds ) Example 60 Create a program that graphs Y = – following range settings: X min = –3.4, X max = 3.4, X scl = 1, Y min = –3, Y max = 3, Y scl = 1 and Y = 2 X with the E-83...
  • Page 84 Example 61 Use a FOR loop to calculate 1 + 6 = ? , 1 + 5 = ? 1 + 4 = ?, 2 + 6 = ?, 2 + 5 = ? 2 + 4 = ? E-84...
  • Page 85 Example 62 Set the program type to “BaseN” and evaluate ANS = 1010 (1) If Y = /A , Ans = 10 [ dhbo ] [ ] / A (2) If Y =11011 , Ans = 1010 AND ( Y OR 7 EDIT E-85...
  • Page 86 ] [ dhbo ] [ [ dhbo ] [ ] 11011 Example 63 Create a program to evaluate the following, and insert a display result command ( B = log ( A + 90 ), C = 13 × A, D = 51 ) to check the content of a memory variable E-86 ( A ×...
  • Page 87 A = 10 C = 130 , D = 2.55 [ 2nd ] [ RCL ] [ E-87...

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