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Casio fx-7400G Programing Manual

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Programming
Your
Calculator
Casio fx-7400G PLUS
Barry Kissane

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  • Page 1 Programming Your Calculator Casio fx-7400G PLUS Barry Kissane...
  • Page 2 Australia, provided due acknowledgement of its origins, including this page, is made. This publication makes reference to the Casio fx-7400G PLUS graphics calculator. This model description is a registered trademark of CASIO, Inc.
  • Page 3: Entering A Program

    Barry Kissane INTRODUCTION The Casio fx-7400G PLUS does not have all the capabilities of larger, more sophisticated (and considerably more expensive) graphics calculators. This booklet contains examples of programs that you can use to extend its capabilities in various ways.
  • Page 4: Running A Program

    These are accessed by first accessing all programming commands are, while Chapter 8 describes in detail how each command works. When you have finished entering the program into the calculator, press to return to the programming list menu.
  • Page 5: Deleting Programs

    ( ) if you don't. Programs can also be deleted from the Memory mode, accessed by mode, you have a choice of finding out how much calculator memory is being used for various things (Memory Usage) or of resetting the calculator (Reset).
  • Page 6 Programming your calculator I express my gratitude to Debbie Taylor, who has been encouraging during this project and especially helpful in checking the text and the programs in this book, although I remain responsible for any lingering errors that you may find.
  • Page 7: Table Of Contents

    Barry Kissane INDEX OF PROGRAMS Page Calendar ...1 Heron...2 Zero...3 2 x 2 EQ...4 3 x 3 EQ...5 QuadEqtn...6 Intrsect...7 Minimum...8 Maximum...9 Search...10 Integral...11 Decimal...12 Factors...13 Dice...14 TwoDice...15 Coin...16 FreqDist...17 DiffList...18 LongRun...19 SRansamp...20 Normal...21 Binomial ...22 BinProb...23 CmpndInt ...24...
  • Page 8 Programming your calculator...
  • Page 9: Calendar

    Purpose Gives the week day for any date, according to the Gregorian calendar, which is in everyday use today in western countries. The program evaluates a formula that takes leap years appropriately into account. Operation Enter the day, month number and year (all four digits), pressing example, 31 August 1949 is entered as Important Note: January and February must be entered as the 13th and 14th months of the previous year.
  • Page 10: Heron

    Programming your calculator HERON Purpose Uses the lengths of the three sides of a triangle to calculate the area of any triangle, using Heron's formula, known since ancient times. Operation Enter the length of each side, followed by . Both numbers and expressions (such as 2) are permitted.
  • Page 11: Zero

    Barry Kissane ZERO Purpose The program finds approximately a zero of a function, i.e. a value of the variable for which the function has zero value. Operation The function must be entered as in the function list and then graphed. Trace to a point near a zero you want to find and then activate the program.
  • Page 12: X 2 Eq

    Programming your calculator Purpose Solving a set of two simultaneous linear equations, by entering only the coefficients of each. Operation The program reminds you of the form for the equations: x + a y = b x + a y = b You may have to rewrite your equations into this form before entering them.
  • Page 13: X 3 Eq

    Purpose Solving a set of three simultaneous linear equations, by entering only the coefficients of each. Operation The program reminds you of the form for the equations: x + a y + a z = b x + a y + a z = b x + a y + a...
  • Page 14: Quadeqtn

    Programming your calculator QUADEQTN Purpose Finding the roots of a quadratic equation, using the quadratic formula. Operation The program reminds you of the form of the equation: ax + bx + c = 0. You may have to rewrite your equations into this form before entering them.
  • Page 15: Intrsect

    Barry Kissane INTRSECT Purpose To find the coordinates of a point of intersection of the graphs of two functions. This can be used to solve a pair of simultaneous equations. Operation Start by graphing the two functions, using Y1 and Y2. Trace to a point close to the point of intersection.
  • Page 16: Minimum

    Programming your calculator MINIMUM Purpose Find the coordinates of a relative minimum of a function. Operation The function must be in Y1 in the list. Draw a graph of the function and trace to a point near a minimum point.
  • Page 17: Maximum

    Barry Kissane MAXIMUM Purpose Find the coordinates of a relative maximum of a function. Operation The function must be in Y1 in the list. Draw a graph of the function and trace to a point near a maximum point. Activate the program, which will give the coordinates of the maximum point, correct to three decimal places.
  • Page 18: Search

    Programming your calculator Purpose To search systematically through a range of values in order to solve a problem. Operation In its present form, the program checks each of the numbers from 10 to 100 in turn to see whether any of them satisfy the following condition: The product of the tens and units digit, added to the sum of the tens and units digit, gives the original number.
  • Page 19: Integral

    Barry Kissane INTEGRAL Purpose To find the area under a curve and above the x-axis between two points, using the integral of a function. Operation The program reminds you that the function must be in Y1. Enter the function in Graph mode and then start the program in Program mode. Enter the x-value for the lower limit and the upper limit, pressing after each.
  • Page 20: Decimal

    Programming your calculator DECIMAL Purpose To give the decimal expansion of a fraction to as many decimal places as desired. Operation Enter the numerator and the denominator, both whole numbers, pressing after each. Each time you press , the next digit in the decimal expansion will be given. Record these on paper if you wish.
  • Page 21: Factors

    Purpose To find all the prime factors of a positive integer. Operation Enter an integer at the prompt and press Each time you press , another prime factor will be displayed. To test the program, enter 234 and check that the prime factors are 2 FACTORS to start.
  • Page 22: Dice

    Programming your calculator DICE Purpose To simulate rolling a standard six-sided die, for which each of the six possible scores are equally likely. Operation Enter the number of rolls required. (The maximum is 255.) Press to start. The program will display the mean score of the simulated dice rolls.
  • Page 23: Twodice

    Barry Kissane TWODICE Purpose To simulate rolling two standard six-sided die, for which each of the six possible scores are equally likely on each die. The two die rolls are added each time to produce a score. Operation Enter the number of rolls required. (The maximum is 255.) The program will display the mean score of the simulated dice rolls.
  • Page 24: Coin

    Operation Enter the (whole) number of tosses. There is no limit on the number, except your time and batteries. With fresh batteries, the calculator will need about 30 seconds for each thousand tosses. The program will display how many of the tosses were 'heads'.
  • Page 25: Freqdist

    Lists 2 and 3. Any data already in List 2 and List 3 will be lost. When finished, the calculator displays a message reminding you that List 2 shows the possible scores and List 3 shows the frequencies of each score. Press...
  • Page 26: Difflist

    Programming your calculator DIFFLIST Purpose Find the first and second differences for a sequence. Operation Delete the contents of List 1 and then enter your sequence into List 1. The program will store the first differences between elements of the sequence into List 2 and the second differences into List 3.
  • Page 27: Longrun

    Purpose To illustrate what happens in the long run when events with a certain probability are generated. For example, to see what happens when a fair coin is tossed repeatedly, by plotting the proportion of the heads after various numbers of tosses. Operation Enter the probability concerned and press The program will display the 'ideal' theoretical probability as a horizontal line.
  • Page 28: Sransamp

    Start the program, enter the sample size and press The calculator will select a simple random sample of the chosen size and display the mean of the sample. The sample will be stored into List 6. Any data already in List 6 will be lost.
  • Page 29: Normal

    Barry Kissane NORMAL Purpose To generate values for areas between two values of a normal probability distribution with mean M and standard deviation S. Operation Enter the mean and standard deviation, each followed by . (For the standard normal (z) distribution, enter M = 0 and S = 1.) Then enter the lower value and the upper value, each followed by .
  • Page 30: Binomial

    Programming your calculator BINOMIAL Purpose To simulate a binomial random variable, consisting of a number of trials each of which has the same probability of success. For example, tossing a set of 12 coins, each of which has a probability of 0.5 of landing 'heads', and counting how many of the twelve land heads each time.
  • Page 31: Binprob

    Barry Kissane BINPROB Purpose To generate values for the binomial and cumulative binomial probability distributions. Operation Enter the number of trials (N) and the probability of success for each (P), followed by in each case. The probability of zero successes is displayed on the screen. Write this result down on paper.
  • Page 32: Cmpndint

    25 = 300 compounding periods. (If you wish, you can enter 12 25, and let the calculator do the multiplication.) The variable TIMES/YEAR refers to the number of compounding periods per year. For example, if interest is added monthly, the value is 12, while for quarterly interest, the value is 4.

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Fx-7400g plus