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HP A5120 EI Switch Series
High Availability
Abstract
This document describes the software features for the HP A Series products and guides you through the
software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration examples to
help you apply software features to different network scenarios.
This documentation is intended for network planners, field technical support and servicing engineers, and
network administrators working with the HP A Series products.
Part number: 5998-1785
Software version: Release 2208
Document version: 5W100-20110530

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   Summary of Contents for HP A5120 EI

  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    Configuration Guide Abstract This document describes the software features for the HP A Series products and guides you through the software configuration procedures. These configuration guides also provide configuration examples to help you apply software features to different network scenarios.

  • Page 2

    The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an...

  • Page 3: Table Of Contents

    Contents High availability overview ·············································································································································· 1 Availability requirements ·················································································································································· 1 Availability evaluation ······················································································································································ 1 High availability technologies ········································································································································· 2 Fault detection technologies ···································································································································· 2 Protection switchover technologies ························································································································· 3 Ethernet OAM configuration ·········································································································································· 4 Ethernet OAM overview ··················································································································································· 4 Background ······························································································································································· 4 Major functions of Ethernet OAM ··························································································································...

  • Page 4: Table Of Contents

    Displaying and maintaining CFD ································································································································· 28 CFD configuration example ·········································································································································· 29 DLDP configuration ························································································································································ 35 Overview········································································································································································· 35 Background ···························································································································································· 35 How DLDP works ··················································································································································· 36 DLDP configuration task list ··········································································································································· 41 Enabling DLDP ································································································································································ 42 Setting DLDP mode ························································································································································· 43 Setting the interval for sending advertisement packets ······························································································...

  • Page 5: Table Of Contents

    Displaying and maintaining track entries ·················································································································· 113 Track configuration example ······································································································································ 113 Static routing-track-NQA collaboration configuration example ····································································· 113 Support and other resources ····································································································································· 119 Contacting HP ······························································································································································ 119 Subscription service ············································································································································ 119 Related information ······················································································································································ 119 Documents ···························································································································································· 119 Websites ······························································································································································...

  • Page 6: High Availability Overview

    High availability overview Communication interruptions can seriously affect widely-deployed value-added services such as IPTV and video conference. Therefore, the basic network infrastructures must be able to provide high availability. The following are the effective ways to improve availability: Increasing fault tolerance ...

  • Page 7: High Availability Technologies

    High availability technologies As previously mentioned, increasing MTBF or decreasing MTTR can enhance the availability of a network. The high availability technologies described in this section meet the level 3 high availability requirements by decreasing MTTR. High availability technologies can be classified as fault detection technologies or protection switchover technologies.

  • Page 8: Protection Switchover Technologies

    Technology Introduction Reference The track module is used to implement collaboration between different modules. The collaboration here involves three parts: the application modules, the track module, and the detection modules. These modules collaborate with one another through collaboration entries. The detection modules trigger the application modules to perform certain operations through the Track configuration in Track...

  • Page 9: Ethernet Oam Configuration

    Ethernet OAM configuration Ethernet OAM overview Background Ethernet, because of its ease of use and low price, has become the major underlying technology for local area networks (LANs). With the emergence of Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet, Ethernet is gaining popularity in metropolitan area networks (MANs) and wide area networks (WANs) as well, increasing the need for an effective management and maintenance mechanism for Ethernet.

  • Page 10

    Table 4 Description of the fields in an OAMPDU Field Description Destination MAC address of the Ethernet OAMPDU It is a slow protocol multicast address, 0180c2000002. Bridges Dest addr cannot forward slow protocol packets, so Ethernet OAMPDUs cannot be forwarded. Source MAC address of the Ethernet OAMPDU Source addr It is the bridge MAC address of the sending side and is a unicast MAC...

  • Page 11

    when the settings for loopback, link detecting, and link event of both sides match. After an Ethernet OAM connection is established, Ethernet OAM takes effect on both sides. For Ethernet OAM connection establishment, a device can operate in active Ethernet OAM mode or passive Ethernet OAM mode.

  • Page 12

    Only the Gigabit optical ports are able to send information OAMPDUs carrying Link Fault events.  A5120 EI Switch Series is able to send information OAMPDUs carrying Dying Gasp events when the device is rebooted or relevant ports are manually shut down. Physical IRF ports, however, are unable to send this type of IRF Configuration Guide OAMPDU.

  • Page 13: Protocols And Standards

    OAMPDUs to its peer. After receiving these frames, the peer does not forward them according to their destination addresses. Instead, it returns them to the sender along the original path. Remote loopback enables you to check the link status and locate link failures. Performing remote loopback periodically helps to detect network faults promptly.

  • Page 14: Configuring The Ethernet Oam Connection Detection Timers

    After the timeout timer of an Ethernet OAM connection expires, the local OAM entity ages out its connection with the peer OAM entity, causing the OAM connection to be disconnected. HP recommends setting the connection timeout timer to at least five times the handshake packet transmission interval, ensuring the stability of Ethernet OAM connections.

  • Page 15: Configuring Errored Symbol Event Detection

    Configuring errored symbol event detection An errored symbol event occurs when the number of detected symbol errors during a specific detection interval exceeds the configured threshold. Follow these steps to configure errored symbol event detection: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view...

  • Page 16: Configuring Errored Frame Seconds Event Detection

    Configuring errored frame seconds event detection An errored frame seconds event occurs when the number of error frame seconds detected on a port during a detection interval exceeds the error threshold. Follow these steps to configure errored frame seconds event detection: To do…...

  • Page 17: Rejecting The Ethernet Oam Remote Loopback Request From A Remote Port

    NOTE:  Ethernet OAM remote loopback is available only after the Ethernet OAM connection is established and can be performed only by the Ethernet OAM entities operating in active Ethernet OAM mode.  Remote loopback is available only on full-duplex links that support remote loopback at both ends. ...

  • Page 18: Ethernet Oam Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the statistics on Ethernet display oam link-event { local | remote } [ OAM link error events after an interface interface-type interface-number ] [ | { Ethernet OAM connection is begin | exclude | include } regular-expression established display oam { local | remote } [ interface Display the information about an...

  • Page 19

    [SwitchB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] oam enable [SwitchB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit Verify the configuration. Use the display oam configuration command to display the Ethernet OAM configuration. For example: # Display the Ethernet OAM configuration on Switch A. [SwitchA] display oam configuration Configuration of the link event window/threshold : -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Errored-symbol Event period(in seconds) Errored-symbol Event threshold...

  • Page 20

    The output indicates that 35 errors occurred since Ethernet OAM was enabled on Switch A, 17 of which are caused by error frames. The link is unstable.

  • Page 21: Cfd Configuration

    CFD configuration Overview Connectivity Fault Detection (CFD), which conforms to IEEE 802.1ag Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) and ITU-T Y.1731, is an end-to-end per-VLAN link layer Operations, Administration and Maintenance (OAM) mechanism used for link connectivity detection, fault verification, and fault location. Basic concepts in CFD Maintenance domain A maintenance domain (MD) defines the network where CFD plays its role.

  • Page 22

    An MA serves a VLAN. Packets sent by the MPs in an MA carry the relevant VLAN tag. An MP can receive packets sent by other MPs in the same MA. Maintenance point An MP is configured on a port and belongs to an MA. MPs fall into two types: maintenance association end points (MEPs) and maintenance association intermediate points (MIPs).

  • Page 23: Cfd Functions

    By cooperating with MEPs, a MIP can perform a function similar to ping and traceroute. Like a MEP, a MIP forwards packets at a higher level without any processing and only processes packets of its own level or lower. Figure 6 demonstrates a grading example of the CFD module.

  • Page 24

     Test (TST) Connectivity faults are usually caused by device faults or configuration errors. CC checks the connectivity between MEPs. This function is implemented through periodic sending of CCMs by the MEPs. As a multicast message, a CCM sent by one MEP is intended to be received by all the other MEPs in the same MA.

  • Page 25

    which carries the reception time and transmission time of the DMM and the transmission time of the DMR. Upon receiving the DMR, the source MEP records the DMR reception time, and calculates the link transmission delay and jitter according to the DMR reception time and DMM transmission time. DMM frames and DMR frames are multicast frames.

  • Page 26: Configuring Basic Cfd Settings

    Tasks Remarks Configuring LM Optional Configuring one-way DM Optional Configuring two-way DM Optional Configuring TST Optional NOTE: A port blocked by STP cannot receive or send CFD messages except in the following cases:  The port is configured as an outward-facing MEP. ...

  • Page 27: Configuring Meps

    A service instance is indicated by an integer to represent an MA in an MD. The MD and MA define the level and VLAN attribute of the messages handled by the MPs in a service instance. Service instances fall into two types: Service instance with the MD name, which takes effect in any version of CFD.

  • Page 28: Configuring Mip Generation Rules

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required cfd meplist mep-list service- Configure a MEP list By default, no MEP list is instance instance-id configured. interface interface-type interface- Enter Ethernet interface view — number cfd mep mep-id service-instance Required Create a MEP instance-id { inbound | outbound...

  • Page 29: Configuring Cfd Functions

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Configure the rules for generating cfd mip-rule { explicit | default } By default, neither MIPs nor the MIPs service-instance instance-id rules for generating MIPs are configured. CAUTION: Any of the following actions or cases can cause MIPs to be created or deleted after you have configured the cfd mip-rule command: ...

  • Page 30: Configuring Lb On Meps

    Table 9 Relationship between the interval field value, interval between CCM messages, and timeout time of the remote MEP Interval between CCM Timeout time of the remote Interval field value messages 1 second 3.5 seconds 10 second 35 seconds 60 seconds 210 seconds 600 seconds 2100 seconds...

  • Page 31: Configuring Ais

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Required Enable LT messages automatic cfd linktrace auto-detection [ size sending size-value ] Disabled by default. Configuring AIS The AIS function suppresses the number of error alarms reported by MEPs. Follow these steps to configure AIS: To do…...

  • Page 32: Configuring One-way Dm

    Configuring one-way DM The one-way DM function measures the one-way frame delay between two MEPs, and monitors and manages the link transmission performance. Follow these steps to configure one-way DM: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view —...

  • Page 33: Displaying And Maintaining Cfd

    CAUTION:  The TST function takes effect only in CFD IEEE 802.1ag.  To view the test result, use the display cfd tst command on the target MEP. Displaying and maintaining CFD To do... Use the command... Remarks display cfd status [ | { begin | exclude | Display CFD and AIS status Available in any view include } regular-expression ]...

  • Page 34: Cfd Configuration Example

    To do... Use the command... Remarks display cfd tst [ service-instance instance-id Display the TST result on the [ mep mep-id ] ] [ | { begin | exclude | Available in any view specified MEP include } regular-expression ] Clear the one-way DM result on reset cfd dm one-way history [ service- Available in user view...

  • Page 35

    Configuration procedure Configure a VLAN and assign ports to it. On each device shown in 8, create VLAN 100, and assign ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 through Figure GigabitEthernet 1/0/4 to VLAN 100. Enable CFD. # Enable CFD on Device A. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] cfd enable Enable CFD on Device B through Device E using the same method.

  • Page 36

    [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] cfd mep 2001 service-instance 2 outbound [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] cfd mep service-instance 2 mep 2001 enable [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] quit # On Device D, configure a MEP list in service instances 1 and 2, respectively. Create and enable outward-facing MEP 4001 in service instance 2 on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, and then create and enable inward-facing MEP 4002 in service instance 1 on GigabitEthernet 1/0/3.

  • Page 37

    [DeviceD] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/3 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] cfd cc service-instance 1 mep 4002 enable [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] quit # On Device E, enable the sending of CCM frames for MEP 5001 in service instance 1 on GigabitEthernet 1/0/4. [DeviceE] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/4 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/4] cfd cc service-instance 1 mep 5001 enable [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/4] quit Configure AIS.

  • Page 38

    Far-end frame loss: 40 Near-end frame loss: 40 Reply from 0010-FC00-6512 Far-end frame loss: 0 Near-end frame loss: 10 Reply from 0010-FC00-6512 Far-end frame loss: 30 Near-end frame loss: 30 Average Far-end frame loss: 20 Near-end frame loss: 25 Far-end frame loss rate: 25% Near-end frame loss rate: 32% Send LMMs: 5 Received: 5...

  • Page 39

    # Test the bit errors on the link from MEP 1001 to MEP 4002 in service instance 1 on Device A. [DeviceA] cfd tst service-instance 1 mep 1001 target-mep 4002 Info: TST process is done. Please check the result on the remote device. # Display the TST result on MEP 4002 in service instance 1 on Device D.

  • Page 40: Dldp Configuration

    DLDP configuration Overview Background Unidirectional links occur when one end of a link can receive packets from the other end, but the other end cannot receive packets sent by the first end. Unidirectional links result in problems such as loops in an STP-enabled network.

  • Page 41: How Dldp Works

    The Device link detection protocol (DLDP) detects unidirectional links (fiber links or twisted-pair links) and can be configured to shut down the related port automatically or prompt users to take actions to avoid network problems. As a data link layer protocol, DLDP cooperates with physical layer protocols to monitor link status. When the auto-negotiation mechanism provided by the physical layer detects physical signals and faults, DLDP performs operations such as identifying peer devices, detecting unidirectional links, and shutting down unreachable ports.

  • Page 42

    DLDP timers Table 11 DLDP timers DLDP timer Description Determines the interval for sending Advertisement packets with RSY tags, which defaults to 1 second. By default, a switch in the active DLDP link state sends one Active timer Advertisement packet with RSY tags every second. The maximum number of advertisement packets with RSY tags that can be sent successively is 5.

  • Page 43

    DLDP mode DLDP can operate in normal or enhanced mode.  In normal DLDP mode, when an entry timer expires, the switch removes the corresponding neighbor entry and sends an Advertisement packet with the RSY tag. In enhanced DLDP mode, when an entry timer expires, the Enhanced timer is triggered and the ...

  • Page 44

     Non-authentication: The sending side sets the Authentication field and the Authentication type field of DLDP packets  to 0. The receiving side checks the values of the two fields in received DLDP packets, and drops any  packets where the two fields conflict with the corresponding local configuration. Plain text authentication: ...

  • Page 45

    Packet type Processing procedure If the corresponding neighbor entry already exists, resets the Entry timer and transits to Probe state. If the corresponding neighbor entry does not exist, creates the neighbor entry, triggers the Entry timer, and transits to Probe Normal Retrieves the state.

  • Page 46: Dldp Configuration Task List

    Table 15 DLDP process when no echo packet is received from the neighbor No echo packet received from the Processing procedure neighbor In normal mode, no echo packet is received DLDP transits to the Disable state, outputs log and tracking when the Echo timer expires.

  • Page 47: Enabling Dldp

    Task Remarks Setting DLDP mode Optional Setting the interval for sending advertisement packets Optional Setting the DelayDown timer Optional Setting the port shutdown mode Optional Configuring DLDP authentication Optional Resetting DLDP state Optional CAUTION:  To ensure that DLDP works properly on a link, you must configure the full duplex mode for the ports at two ends of the link, and configure a speed for the two ports, rather than letting them negotiate a speed.

  • Page 48: Setting Dldp Mode

    If the interval is too short, the number of advertisement packets will increase. HP recommends that you use the default interval in most cases. Follow these steps to set the interval to send Advertisement packets: To do…...

  • Page 49: Setting The Port Shutdown Mode

    Instead, the DLDP state machine generates log and traps to prompt you to manually shut down unidirectional link ports with the shutdown command. HP recommends that you do as prompted. Then the DLDP state machine transits to the Disable state.

  • Page 50: Resetting Dldp State

    To do… Use the command… Remarks dldp authentication-mode { md5 md5- Required Configure DLDP authentication password | none | simple simple- none by default password } NOTE: To enable DLDP to operate properly, make sure that DLDP authentication modes and passwords on both sides of a link are the same.

  • Page 51: Displaying And Maintaining Dldp

    To do… Use the command… Remarks port group Configurations made in Ethernet view port view apply to the current port Enter port group port-group manual port-group- only. Configurations performed in view name port group view apply to all the ports in the port group. Reset DLDP state dldp reset Required...

  • Page 52

    Figure 11 Network diagram for configuring automatic shutdown of unidirectional links Correct fiber connection Cross-connected fibers Device A Device A GE1/0/49 GE1/0/50 GE1/0/49 GE1/0/50 GE1/0/49 GE1/0/50 GE1/0/49 GE1/0/50 Device B Device B Ethernet Fiber link Tx end Rx end optical port Configuration procedure Configuration on Device A # Enable DLDP globally.

  • Page 53

    Configuration on Device B # Enable DLDP globally, configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50 to operate in full duplex mode and at 1000 Mbps, and then enable DLDP on the two ports. <DeviceB> system-view [DeviceB] dldp enable [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/49 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/49] duplex full [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/49] speed 1000 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/49] dldp enable...

  • Page 54

    Neighbor port index : 60 Neighbor state : two way Neighbor aged time : 12 The output shows that both GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50 are in Advertisement state, which means both links are bidirectional. # Enable system information monitoring on Device A, and enable the display of log and trap information. [DeviceA] quit <DeviceA>...

  • Page 55: Manually Shutting Down Unidirectional Links

    Manually shutting down unidirectional links Network requirements As shown in 12, Device A and Device B are connected with two fiber pairs.  Figure Configure DLDP to send information when a unidirectional link is detected, to remind the network  administrator to manually shut down the faulty port.

  • Page 56

    [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/50] dldp enable [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/50] quit # Set the DLDP mode to enhanced. [DeviceA] dldp work-mode enhance # Set the port shutdown mode to manual. [DeviceA] dldp unidirectional-shutdown manual Configuration on Device B # Enable DLDP globally, configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50 to operate in full duplex mode and at 1000 Mbps, and then enable DLDP on the two ports.

  • Page 57

    Neighbor aged time : 11 Interface GigabitEthernet1/0/50 DLDP port state : advertisement DLDP link state : up The neighbor number of the port is 1. Neighbor mac address : 0023-8956-3600 Neighbor port index : 60 Neighbor state : two way Neighbor aged time : 12 The output shows that both GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50 are in Advertisement state, which means both links are bidirectional.

  • Page 58: Troubleshooting Dldp

    The output shows that the link status of both GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50 is down. Assume that in this example, the unidirectional links are caused by cross-connected fibers. Correct the fiber connections, and then bring up the ports shut down earlier. # On Device A, bring up GigabitEthernet 1/0/49 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/50: [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/50] undo shutdown [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/50]...

  • Page 59: Rrpp Configuration

    RRPP configuration RRPP overview The Rapid Ring Protection Protocol (RRPP) is a link layer protocol designed for Ethernet rings. RRPP can prevent broadcast storms caused by data loops when an Ethernet ring is healthy, and rapidly restore the communication paths between the nodes in the event that a link is disconnected on the ring. RRPP features fast topology convergence.

  • Page 60

    As shown in Figure 13, Domain 1 is an RRPP domain, including two RRPP rings: Ring 1 and Ring 2. All the nodes on the two RRPP rings belong to the RRPP domain. RRPP ring A ring-shaped Ethernet topology is called an “RRPP ring”. RRPP rings fall into two types: primary ring and subring.

  • Page 61

    As shown in Figure 13, Ring 1 is the primary ring and Ring 2 is a subring. Device A is the master node of Ring 1, and Device B, Device C, and Device D are the transit nodes of Ring 1. Device E is the master node of Ring 2, Device B is the edge node of Ring 2, and Device C is the assistant-edge node of Ring 2.

  • Page 62: Rrppdus

    RRPPDUs Table 17 RRPPDU types and their functions Type Description The master node initiates Hello packets to detect the integrity of a ring in a Hello network. The transit node, the edge node, or the assistant-edge node initiates Link-Down Link-Down packets to notify the master node of the disappearance of a ring in case of a link failure.

  • Page 63: How Rrpp Works

    How RRPP works Polling mechanism The polling mechanism is used by the master node of an RRPP ring to check the Health state of the ring network. The master node sends Hello packets out its primary port periodically. These Hello packets travel through each transit node on the ring in turn.

  • Page 64: Typical Rrpp Networking

    Device B is the master node of Ring 1 in Domain 2. With such configurations, traffic of different VLANs can be transmitted on different links to achieve load balancing in the single-ring network. RRPP ring group In an edge node RRPP ring group, only an activated subring with the lowest domain ID and ring ID can send Edge-Hello packets.

  • Page 65

    Figure 15 Schematic diagram for a tangent-ring network Device E Master node Domain 2 Ring 2 Device F Transit node Device A Device B Master node Transit node Ring 1 Domain 1 Device D Device C Transit node Transit node Intersecting rings As shown in Figure...

  • Page 66

    Figure 17 Schematic diagram for a dual-homed-ring network Domain 1 Device B Edge node Device A Ring 2 Device E Master node Master node Ring 1 Device F Device D Master node Ring 3 Transit node Device C Assistant edge node Single-ring load balancing In a single-ring network, you can achieve load balancing by configuring multiple domains.

  • Page 67

    Figure 19 Schematic diagram for an intersecting-ring load balancing network Device A Device B Device E Domain 1 Ring 1 Ring 2 Domain 2 Device D Device C Protocols and standards RFC 3619, Extreme Networks' Ethernet Automatic Protection Switching (EAPS) Version 1 RRPP configuration task list CAUTION: ...

  • Page 68: Creating An Rrpp Domain

    Task Remarks Optional Configuring RRPP timers Perform this task on the master node in the RRPP domain. Optional Configuring an RRPP ring group Perform this task on the edge node and assistant-edge node in the RRPP domain. Creating an RRPP domain When creating an RRPP domain, specify a domain ID, which uniquely identifies an RRPP domain.

  • Page 69: Configuring Protected Vlans

    Configuring protected VLANs Before configuring RRPP rings in an RRPP domain, configure the same protected VLANs for all nodes in the RRPP domain. All VLANs that the RRPP ports are assigned to should be protected by the RRPP domains. Perform this configuration on all nodes in the RRPP domain to be configured. Follow these steps to configure protected VLANs: To do…...

  • Page 70: Configuring Rrpp Nodes

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Assign the trunk port to the port trunk permit vlan { vlan-id-list By default, a trunk port allows protected VLANs of the RRPP | all } only packets of VLAN 1 to pass domain through.

  • Page 71

    Specifying a transit node Perform this configuration on a device to be configured as a transit node. Follow these steps to specify a transit node: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter RRPP domain view rrpp domain domain-id —...

  • Page 72: Activating An Rrpp Domain

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Specify the current device as the ring ring-id node-mode assistant- assistant-edge node of the edge [ edge-port interface-type Required subring, and specify an edge port interface-number ] Activating an RRPP domain To activate an RRPP domain on the current device, enable the RRPP protocol and RRPP rings for the RRPP domain on the current device.

  • Page 73: Configuring An Rrpp Ring Group

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Configure the Hello timer and Fail timer hello-timer hello-value fail- By default, the Hello timer value is timer for the RRPP domain timer fail-value 1 second, and the Fail timer value is 3 seconds. Configuring an RRPP ring group To reduce Edge-Hello traffic, adopt the RRPP ring group mechanism by assigning subrings with the same edge node/assistant-edge node to an RRPP ring group.

  • Page 74: Rrpp Configuration Examples

    To do… Use the command… Remarks display rrpp statistics domain domain-id [ ring Display RRPP statistics ring-id ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] reset rrpp statistics domain domain-id [ ring Available in user Clear RRPP statistics ring-id ] view RRPP configuration examples...

  • Page 75

    # Disable physical state change suppression and STP on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2, and configure the two ports to trust the 802.1p precedence of the received packets. Configure the two ports as trunk ports, and assign them to VLANs 1 through 30. [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo link-delay [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo stp enable...

  • Page 76: Intersecting Ring Configuration Example

    [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo link-delay [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] qos trust dot1p [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 4092 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 through 32 as the protected VLANs of RRPP domain 1.

  • Page 77

     Device C is the transit node of primary ring 1 and the assistant-edge node of subring 1, and GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 is the edge port. Device D is the transit node of primary ring 1, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as the primary port and ...

  • Page 78

    # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 4092 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLANs of RRPP domain 1. [DeviceA] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceA-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 4092 [DeviceA-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1 # Configure Device A as the master node of primary ring 1, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as the primary port and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as the secondary port.

  • Page 79

    # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 4092 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLANs of RRPP domain 1. [DeviceB] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 4092 [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1 # Configure Device B as a transit node of primary ring 1, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as the primary port and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as the secondary port.

  • Page 80

    [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port link-type trunk [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] quit # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 4092 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLANs of RRPP domain 1. [DeviceC] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceC-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 4092 [DeviceC-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1...

  • Page 81

    # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 4092 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLANs of RRPP domain 1. [DeviceD] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceD-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 4092 [DeviceD-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1 # Configure Device D as the transit node of primary ring 1, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as the primary port and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as the secondary port.

  • Page 82: Intersecting-ring Load Balancing Configuration Example

    [DeviceE-rrpp-domain1] ring node-mode master primary-port gigabitethernet 1/0/1 secondary-port gigabitethernet 1/0/2 level 1 [DeviceE-rrpp-domain1] ring 2 enable [DeviceE-rrpp-domain1] quit # Enable RRPP. [DeviceE] rrpp enable Verify the configuration. Use the display command to view RRPP configuration and operational information on each device. Intersecting-ring load balancing configuration example Networking requirements Device A, Device B, Device C, Device D, and Device F form RRPP domain 1, and VLAN 100 is the...

  • Page 83

    Figure 22 Network diagram for intersecting-ring load balancing configuration Domain 2 Device E GE1/0/1 Master node Device B GE1/0/2 Assistant edge node Ring 2 Device A GE1/0/1 GE1/0/3 GE1/0/1 Master node GE1/0/4 GE1/0/2 GE1/0/2 Ring 1 GE1/0/2 GE1/0/1 GE1/0/3 Device D Transit node GE1/0/2 GE1/0/4...

  • Page 84

    [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] qos trust dot1p [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 100 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLAN mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLAN of RRPP domain 1.

  • Page 85

    [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo link-delay [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo stp enable [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] qos trust dot1p [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo link-delay [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] qos trust dot1p [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk...

  • Page 86

    [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] ring 1 enable # Configure Device B as the assistant-edge node of subring 3 in RRPP domain 1, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/4 as the edge port. Enable subring 3. [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] ring 3 node-mode assistant-edge edge-port gigabitethernet 1/0/4 [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] ring 3 enable [DeviceB-rrpp-domain1] quit # Create RRPP domain 2.

  • Page 87

    [DeviceC] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo link-delay [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] qos trust dot1p [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Disable physical state change suppression and STP on GigabitEthernet 1/0/3, and configure the port to trust the 802.1p precedence of the received packets.

  • Page 88

    # Create RRPP domain 2. configure VLAN 105 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 2, and configure the VLAN mapped to MSTI 2 as the protected VLAN of RRPP domain 2. [DeviceC] rrpp domain 2 [DeviceC-rrpp-domain2] control-vlan 105 [DeviceC-rrpp-domain2] protected-vlan reference-instance 2 # Configure Device C as the transit node of primary ring 1 in RRPP domain 2, with GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as the primary port and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as the secondary port.

  • Page 89

    [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 100 as the primary control VLAN of RRPP domain 1, and configure the VLAN mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLAN of RRPP domain 1. [DeviceD] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceD-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 100 [DeviceD-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1...

  • Page 90

    [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceE] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo link-delay [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] qos trust dot1p [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 20 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create RRPP domain 2. Configure VLAN 105 as the primary control VLAN, and configure the VLAN mapped to MSTI 2 as the protected VLAN.

  • Page 91: Troubleshooting

    [DeviceF-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceF-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo port trunk permit vlan 1 [DeviceF-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 10 [DeviceF-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create RRPP domain 1. Configure VLAN 100 as the primary control VLAN, and configure the VLAN mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLAN. [DeviceF] rrpp domain 1 [DeviceF-rrpp-domain1] control-vlan 100 [DeviceF-rrpp-domain1] protected-vlan reference-instance 1...

  • Page 92

     Use the display rrpp brief command to check whether the domain ID and primary control VLAN ID are the same for all nodes. If they are not, set the same domain ID and primary control VLAN ID for the nodes. Use the display rrpp verbose command to check the link state of each port in each ring.

  • Page 93: Smart Link Configuration

    Smart Link configuration Smart Link overview Background To avoid single-point failures and guarantee network reliability, downstream devices are usually dual uplinked to upstream devices. As shown in 23, a downstream device connects to two different Figure upstream devices. Figure 23 Diagram for a dual uplink network Core network Port3 Device A...

  • Page 94: Terminology

    Smart Link is a feature developed to address the slow convergence issue with STP. It provides link redundancy as well as fast convergence in a dual uplink network, allowing the backup link to take over quickly when the primary link fails. To sum up, Smart Link has the following features: Dedicated to dual uplink networks ...

  • Page 95: How Smart Link Works

    How Smart Link works Link backup mechanism As shown in 23, the link on Port1 of Device C is the master link, and the link on Port2 of Device C Figure is the slave link. Typically, Port1 is in the forwarding state, and Port2 is in the standby state. When the master link fails, Port2 takes over to forward traffic and Port1 is blocked and placed in the standby state.

  • Page 96: Smart Link Configuration Task List

    downlink ports to the up/down state of uplink ports, triggering Smart Link to perform link switchover on the downstream device. NOTE: For more information about Monitor Link, see the chapter “Monitor link configuration.” Smart Link configuration task list Complete the following tasks to configure Smart Link: Task Remarks Configuring protected VLANs for a smart link group...

  • Page 97: Configuring Member Ports For A Smart Link Group

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Create a smart link group, and smart-link group group-id — enter smart link group view Required Configure protected VLANs for protected-vlan reference-instance By default, no protected VLAN is the smart link group instance-id-list configured for a smart link group. NOTE: The protected-vlan command configures protected VLANs for a smart link group by referencing MSTIs.

  • Page 98: Enabling The Sending Of Flush Messages

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required Enable role preemption preemption mode role Disabled by default Optional Configure the preemption delay preemption delay delay-time 1 second by default NOTE: The preemption delay configuration takes effect only after role preemption is enabled. Enabling the sending of flush messages Follow these steps to enable the sending of flush messages: To do…...

  • Page 99: Displaying And Maintaining Smart Link

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet port view or Layer interface interface-type interface- — 2 aggregate port view number Required Configure the control VLANs for smart-link flush enable [ control- By default, no control VLAN exists receiving flush messages vlan vlan-id-list ] for receiving flush messages.

  • Page 100

    Figure 24 Network diagram for single smart link group configuration Device A Device B Device E GE1/0/3 GE1/0/3 Master link Slave link Smart link group GE1/0/1 GE1/0/1 GE1/0/2 GE1/0/2 Device C Device D Configuration procedure Configure Device C. # Create VLANs 1 through 30, map these VLANs to MSTI 1, and activate the MST region configuration. <DeviceC>...

  • Page 101

    # In smart link group 1, enable flush message sending, and specify VLAN 10 as the control VLAN. [DeviceC-smlk-group1] flush enable control-vlan 10 [DeviceC-smlk-group1] quit # Bring up ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2. [DeviceC] interface gigabitethernet1/0/1 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] undo shutdown [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceC] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo shutdown...

  • Page 102

    [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceD] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo shutdown [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit Configure Device B. # Create VLANs 1 through 30. <DeviceB> system-view [DeviceB] vlan 1 to 30 # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, and assign it to VLANs 1 through 30. Enable flush message receiving on it, and configure VLAN 10 and VLAN 20 as the receive control VLANs.

  • Page 103

    [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] smart-link flush enable control-vlan 10 20 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit [DeviceE] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/3 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port link-type trunk [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] undo stp enable [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] smart-link flush enable control-vlan 10 20 [DeviceE-GigabitEthernet1/0/3] quit Configure Device A.

  • Page 104: Multiple Smart Link Groups Load Sharing Configuration Example

    Received flush packets Receiving interface of the last flush packet : GigabitEthernet1/0/3 Receiving time of the last flush packet : 16:25:21 2009/02/21 Device ID of the last flush packet : 000f-e23d-5af0 Control VLAN of the last flush packet Multiple smart link groups load sharing configuration example Network requirements As shown in Figure...

  • Page 105

    [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 200 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceC] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] shutdown [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] undo stp enable [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 200 [DeviceC-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit # Create smart link group 1, and configure all VLANs mapped to MSTI 1 as the protected VLANs for smart link group 1.

  • Page 106

    [DeviceB] vlan 1 to 200 # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port and assign it to VLANs 1 through 200. Enable flush message receiving and configure VLAN 10 and VLAN 101 as the receive control VLANs on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1. [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 200...

  • Page 107

    [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 200 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] smart-link flush enable control-vlan 10 101 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 200 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] smart-link flush enable control-vlan 10 101 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit Verify the configuration.

  • Page 108: Monitor Link Configuration

    Monitor Link configuration Overview Monitor Link is a port collaboration function. Monitor Link usually works together with Layer 2 topology protocols. The idea is to monitor the states of uplink ports and adapt the up/down state of downlink ports to the up/down state of uplink ports, triggering link switchover on the downstream device in time, as shown in Figure Figure 26 Monitor Link application scenario...

  • Page 109: How Monitor Link Works

    When any uplink port goes up, the monitor link group goes up and brings up all its downlink ports. CAUTION: HP does not recommend manually shutting down or bringing up the downlink ports in a monitor link group. Configuring Monitor Link...

  • Page 110: Displaying And Maintaining Monitor Link

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Configure member ports for the monitor port interface-type interface-number Required link group { uplink | downlink } In port view Follow these steps to configure member ports for a monitor link group in port view: To do…...

  • Page 111

    Figure 27 Network diagram for monitor link configuration Device A Device B Device D Device C Configuration procedure Configure Device C. # Create VLANs 1 through 30, map these VLANs to MSTI 1, and activate MST region configuration. <DeviceC> system-view [DeviceC] vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceC] stp region-configuration [DeviceC-mst-region] instance 1 vlan 1 to 30...

  • Page 112

    Configure Device A. # Create VLANs 1 through 30. <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] vlan 1 to 30 # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as trunk ports, assign them to VLANs 1 through 30, and enable flush message receiving on them. [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30...

  • Page 113

    # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, assign it to VLANs 1 through 30, and enable flush message receiving on it. [DeviceD] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan 1 to 30 [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] smart-link flush enable [DeviceD-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 as a trunk port and assign it to VLANs 1 through 30.

  • Page 114: Track Configuration

    Track configuration Track overview Introduction to collaboration The track module works between application and detection modules, as Figure 28 shows. It shields the application modules from the differences between various detection modules. Collaboration is enabled after you associate the track module with a detection module and an application module respectively.

  • Page 115: Collaboration Application Example

    The following detection modules can be associated with the track module:   Interface management module Collaboration between the track module and an application module When the status of the track entry changes, the track module notifies the associated application module, which then takes proper actions.

  • Page 116: Associating The Track Module With A Detection Module

    Associating the track module with a detection module Associating track with NQA An NQA test group periodically detects whether a destination is reachable, or whether the TCP connection to a TCP server can be set up. An NQA test group functions as follows when it is associated with a track entry: If the consecutive failure times exceed the specified threshold, the NQA module tells the track ...

  • Page 117: Associating The Track Module With An Application Module

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Create a track entry, associate it with the interface management module to track track-entry-number interface monitor the physical status of an interface-type interface-number [ interface, and specify the delay time delay { negative negative-time | for the track module to notify the positive positive-time } * ] associated application module when...

  • Page 118: Displaying And Maintaining Track Entries

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Associate the static route ip route-static dest-address { mask | mask-length } Required with a track entry to check { next-hop-address } track track-entry-number [ Not configured by the accessibility of the next preference preference-value ] [ tag tag-value ] [ default.

  • Page 119

     Configure static routing-track-NQA collaboration to determine whether the master route is available in real time. If the master route is unavailable, the backup route takes effect, and Switch D forwards packets to 20.1.1.0/24 through Switch C. Figure 29 Network diagram for static routing-track-NQA collaboration configuration Switch B Vlan-int2 Vlan-int5...

  • Page 120

    # Configure reaction entry 1, specifying that five consecutive probe failures trigger the static routing-track- NQA collaboration. [SwitchA-nqa-admin-test-icmp-echo] reaction 1 checked-element probe-fail threshold-type consecutive 5 action-type trigger-only [SwitchA-nqa-admin-test-icmp-echo] quit # Start NQA probes. [SwitchA] nqa schedule admin test start-time now lifetime forever # Configure track entry 1, and associate it with reaction entry 1 of the NQA test group (with the administrator admin, and the operation tag test).

  • Page 121

    # Configure reaction entry 1, specifying that five consecutive probe failures trigger the static routing-track- NQA collaboration. [SwitchD-nqa-admin-test-icmp-echo] reaction 1 checked-element probe-fail threshold-type consecutive 5 action-type trigger-only [SwitchD-nqa-admin-test-icmp-echo] quit # Start NQA probes. [SwitchD] nqa schedule admin test start-time now lifetime forever # Configure track entry 1, and associate it with reaction entry 1 of the NQA test group (with the administrator admin, and the operation tag test).

  • Page 122

    Duration: 0 days 0 hours 1 minutes 13 seconds Notification delay: Positive 0, Negative 0 (in seconds) Reference object: NQA entry: admin test Reaction: 1 # Display the routing table of Switch A. [SwitchA] display ip routing-table Routing Tables: Public Destinations : 10 Routes : 10 Destination/Mask...

  • Page 123

    Reply from 20.1.1.1: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=254 time=1 ms --- 20.1.1.1 ping statistics --- 5 packet(s) transmitted 5 packet(s) received 0.00% packet loss round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms...

  • Page 124: Support And Other Resources

    Related information Documents To find related documents, browse to the Manuals page of the HP Business Support Center website: http://www.hp.com/support/manuals For related documentation, navigate to the Networking section, and select a networking category. ...

  • Page 125: Conventions

    Conventions This section describes the conventions used in this documentation set. Command conventions Convention Description Boldface Bold text represents commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown. Italic Italic text represents arguments that you replace with actual values. Square brackets enclose syntax choices (keywords or arguments) that are optional. Braces enclose a set of required syntax choices separated by vertical bars, from which { x | y | ...

  • Page 126

    Network topology icons Represents a generic network device, such as a router, switch, or firewall. Represents a routing-capable device, such as a router or Layer 3 switch. Represents a generic switch, such as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 switch, or a router that supports Layer 2 forwarding and other Layer 2 features.

  • Page 127: Index

    Index A B C E F H I M P R S T Configuring RRPP nodes,65 Configuring RRPP ports,64 Associating track with interface management,1 1 1 Configuring service instances,21 Associating track with NQA,1 1 1 Configuring the CFD protocol version,21 Associating track with static routing,1 12 Configuring...

  • Page 128

    Protocols and Standards,8 Rejecting the Ethernet OAM remote loopback request from a remote port,12 RRPP timers,57 RRPPDUs,57 Single ring configuration example,69 Single smart link group configuration example,94 Smart Link collaboration mechanisms,90 Static routing-track-NQA collaboration configuration example,1 13 Terminology,89 Terminology,103 Typical RRPP networking,59...

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