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Sharp PW-E500A Operation Manual

Sharp PW-E500A Operation Manual

Pw-e500 operation-manual gb
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Oxford Dictionary of English
New Oxford Thesaurus of English
Oxford Dictionary of Quotations
MODEL
PW-E500
ELECTRONIC DICTIONARY
OPERATION MANUAL
• Getting Started ........................................................ 2
• Using the Super Jump function ............................ 23
• Using the History function .................................... 25
• Using the Calculator function ............................... 26
• Using the Converter function ................................ 27
• Appendices ........................................................... 29
• Introductions to the Dictionaries ........................... 32
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Summary of Contents for Sharp PW-E500A

  • Page 1: Table Of Contents

    Oxford Dictionary of English New Oxford Thesaurus of English Oxford Dictionary of Quotations MODEL PW-E500 ELECTRONIC DICTIONARY OPERATION MANUAL Page • Getting Started ... 2 • Using the Oxford Dictionary of English ... 14 • Using the New Oxford Thesaurus of English ... 18 •...
  • Page 2 After reading this manual, store it in a convenient location for future reference. NOTICE • SHARP will not be liable nor responsible for any incidental or consequential economic or property damage caused by misuse and/or malfunction of this product and its peripherals, unless such liability is acknowledged by law.
  • Page 3 CONTENTS Getting Started Using the PW-E500 for the first time ... 2 Layout ... 5 Basic Operation ... 7 Set-up Menu ... 11 Inputting Characters ... 12 Using the Oxford Dictionary of English Looking up a word (Filter search) ... 14 Phrase search ...15 Crossword solver ...
  • Page 4: Getting Started

    Getting Started Using the PW-E500 for the first time Be sure to perform the following operations before using the PW-E500 for the first time. 1. Set the battery replacement switch on the bottom of the unit to the ‘REPLACE BATTERY’ position. 2.
  • Page 5 Turning the power on/off The power can be switched on by pressing the keys listed below. To turn off the power, press o. Display status upon start-up Restores the display as it was before the unit was switched off (Resume function). The main menu screen appears.
  • Page 6 Data contained in the PW-E500 The dictionary data contained in this unit is based on the following dictionaries: • Oxford Dictionary of English 2e © Oxford University Press 2003 • New Oxford Thesaurus of English © Oxford University Press 2000 •...
  • Page 7: Layout

    Layout Display symbols Display (Refer to the next page for details) Dictionary/function selection key Menu key Font size shift key Clear key Power on/off key Back space key 2nd function key Page scroll key Utility keys for Dictionaries Escape key Cursor keys Enter key...
  • Page 8 Key assignments : Opens the input screen for the Oxford Dictionary of English : Opens the input screen for the New Oxford Thesaurus of English : Opens the input screen for the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations : Opens the input screen for the spell checker : Opens the calculator function screen : Opens the history list of each Dictionary : Brings up a ‘digest’...
  • Page 9: Basic Operation

    Find definitions of ‘sharpen’ in the Oxford Dictionary of English . 1. Press d to display the input screen for the Oxford Dictionary of English , then input ‘sharp’. The entries starting with ‘sharp’ is listed. 2. Enter ‘en’ to complete the spelling. The list is narrowed down further.
  • Page 10 List view: selecting an item; scrolling Press d to display the initial screen of the Oxford Dictionary of English , then press e. The list view of the Oxford Dictionary of English appears. Selecting an item or a word Use the corresponding number key to the index number on the left of each item, or use the { or } key to place the cursor on the desired item, followed by pressing the e key.
  • Page 11 Detail view: scrolling Press d, then type A, and e. The detail view with definitions appears. Browsing contents above/below the screen ‘ ’ and/or ‘ ’ may appear on the left side of the screen, indicating that more information can be browsed by scrolling up/down the view.
  • Page 12 Listing a summary of detail view items (q) The Quick View function suppresses some examples and additional information, and lists out the main sections and senses (or quotations) from each detail view entry. Use this function to browse quickly through the summary of an entry. <Example>...
  • Page 13: Set-Up Menu

    Note: Using the r key will display the following: • Oxford Dictionary of English • Usage notes • Additional (boxed) information • New Oxford Thesaurus of English • Tables (lists of items relevant to particular headwords) • Awkward synonyms and confusable terms •...
  • Page 14: Inputting Characters

    Setting the Auto power off activation time This product automatically turns its power off to save the battery. The turn-off time is set to five minutes by default. 1. Press m, 5, then 2. The Auto power off setting screen appears.
  • Page 15 • Convert uppercase letters to lowercase. <Example> Word • Spell out the numbers when applicable. <Example> Word • Enter ‘and’ instead of ‘&’. • To enter ‘£’, place ‘l’ instead. Likewise, place ‘a’ for ‘@’ instead. • When searching for a word with accented characters (such as ‘ü’, ‘á’, etc.), enter their unaccented equivalents via the keypad (such as ‘u’, ‘a’, etc.).
  • Page 16: Using The Oxford Dictionary Of English

    Using the Oxford Dictionary of English In this Dictionary, definitions of a word can be found by entering its spelling. Features such as Phrase search, Crossword solver, and Anagram solver are also available. Looking up a word (Filter search) A definition of a word can be looked up by inputting its spelling. <Example>...
  • Page 17: Phrase Search

    Phrase search To search for idioms or phrasal verbs, enter no more than three words in the input field. The phrases containing ALL the entered words can be searched for. <Example> Search for a phrase containing ‘take’ and ‘care’. 1. Press d to open the Oxford Dictionary of English . Press } once to place the cursor at the ‘Phrase search’, then press e.
  • Page 18: Anagram Solver

    Anagram solver A word or series of letters can be entered to find any matching anagrams found in the Oxford Dictionary of English . <Example> Find anagrams for ‘dear’. 1. Press d to open the Oxford Dictionary of English . Press the } three times to place the cursor at the ‘Anagram solver’, then press e.
  • Page 19: Further Information

    4. In the list, select a desired word using the number keys (press 1, in this example). The detail view with descriptions of the word is displayed. • If a word selected is not in its original form, and cannot be found as a headword, then the detail view of the word's original form will be displayed.
  • Page 20: Using The New Oxford Thesaurus Of English

    Using the New Oxford Thesaurus of English Input a word in this Thesaurus to find its synonyms, as well as antonyms and other related terms in the detail view. Looking up a word (Filter search) Find a set of related words by inputting the spelling of a given word. <Example>...
  • Page 21: Phrase Search

    Phrase search To search for idioms or phrasal verbs, enter no more than three words in the input field. The phrases containing ALL the entered words can be searched for. <Example> Search for a phrase containing ‘make’ and ‘up’, and find its synonyms. 1.
  • Page 22: Using The Oxford Dictionary Of Quotations

    Using the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations Input an author’s surname in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations to find his/her quotations. A search can also be initiated by keywords and themes, or it is possible to display quotations at random. Searching by an author name (Filter search) Find a set of related quotations by inputting the spelling of an author.
  • Page 23: Keyword Search

    Keyword search The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations can accept up to three keywords for a search. The quotations containing ALL the entered keywords can be searched for. <Example> Find quotations that incorporate ‘man’ and ‘woman’. 1. Press u to open the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations . Press the } key to place the cursor at the ‘Keyword search’, then press The input screen of the Keyword search appears.
  • Page 24: Theme Search

    Theme search Quotations organized under a particular theme, such as business, politics or love, can be searched. <Example> Find a quotation with ‘Age’ as its theme. 1. Press u to open the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. Press } twice to set the cursor at ‘Themes’, then press e.
  • Page 25: Using The Super Jump Function

    Using the Super Jump function Use the Super Jump function to select any word in the detail view of each dictionary, then initiate a search based on the selected word. How to use the Super Jump function <Example> Initiate a Super Jump search via the Oxford Dictionary of English . 1.
  • Page 26 Specifying a Dictionary to jump to In step 4 above, press d or t instead of pressing e, to specify the Dictionary to jump to. Note icon in the Super Jump window When the Note icon appears in the Super Jump window, press r and e to view the contents.
  • Page 27: Using The History Function

    Using the History function Use the History function to recall a headword or phrase previously searched in the Dictionaries. How to use the History function <Example> Recall the search history in the Oxford Dictionary of English . 1. Press d to open the Oxford Dictionary of English . 2.
  • Page 28: Using The Calculator Function

    Using the Calculator function The built-in calculator in the Electronic Dictionary can perform twelve-digit arithmetic calculations with memory function. To access the Calculator function, press a. Prior to initiating calculations • Before performing any calculation, press @ @ b to clear the memory and the display.
  • Page 29: Using The Converter Function

    Using the Converter function The Converter function consists of two converters: the Currency converter, and the Metric converter. Currency converter Setting a currency rate One conversion rate can be set. <Example> Set the following rate: £1 = C = 0.7 1.
  • Page 30: Metric Converter

    Metric converter Conversions between different units of measurement (length, mass, etc.) can be performed. <Example> Convert 40 feet to metres. 1. Press m 4 2 to access the Metric converter. 2. Use { } to select ‘Converter [length2]’. 3. Input ‘40’. You may input a simple formula, such as ‘25 + 15 =’, instead. 4.
  • Page 31: Appendices

    Appendices Replacing the battery Battery used • Use only the specified alkaline battery. Type Size / Model Alkaline battery Size “AAA” / LR03 Precautions • Fluid from a leaking battery accidentally entering an eye could result in serious injury. Should this occur, wash with clean water and immediately consult a doctor.
  • Page 32: Reset Procedure If Trouble Occurs

    1. Press the RESET switch located on the bottom of the unit, with the tip of a ball-point pen or similar object. Do not use an object with a breakable or sharp tip. The message ‘Do you want to initialize?’ appears. 2. Press Y to initialize the unit.
  • Page 33: Troubleshooting

    • A variant form of the word may have been entered. Enter the original form. Product support If you have read this operation manual, but you still require product support, you can: Visit our web site http://www.sharp.co.uk Or Telephone 08705 274277...
  • Page 34: Introductions To The Dictionaries

    Introductions to the Dictionaries Oxford Dictionary of English Introduction The Oxford Dictionary of English has been compiled according to principles which are quite different from those of traditional dictionaries. New types of evidence are now available in sufficient quantity to allow lexicographers to construct a picture of the language that is more accurate than has been possible before.
  • Page 35 (a) figurative extension of the core sense, e.g. HEADWORD: logjam CORE SENSE: a crowded mass of logs blocking a river. SUBSENSE: figurative a situation that seems irresolvable: EXAMPLE: the president can use his power to break the logjam over this issue. SUBSENSE: figurative a backlog: EXAMPLE: keeping a diary may ease the logjam of work.
  • Page 36 Specialist Vocabulary One of the most important uses of a dictionary is to provide explanations of terms in specialized fields which are unfamiliar to a general user. Yet in many traditional dictionaries the definitions have been written by specialists as if for other specialists, and as a result the definitions are often opaque and difficult for the general user to understand.
  • Page 37 Grammar In recent years grammar has begun to enjoy greater prominence than in previous decades. It is once again being taught explicitly in state schools throughout Britain and elsewhere. In addition there is a recognition that different meanings of a word are closely associated with different lexical and syntactic patterns.
  • Page 38 1 Types or varieties of: • food and drink, e.g. yogurt/yogurts, pasta/pastas, rum/rums. • plants: e.g. clover/clovers, barley/barleys. • fabric: e.g. gingham/ginghams, silk/silks. • certain languages or subjects: e.g. English/Englishes, music/musics. • metals and alloys: e.g. steel/steels, solder/solders. • rocks: e.g. granite/granites, lava/lavas, clay/clays. •...
  • Page 39 [postpositive]: used to mark an adjective which is used postpositively, i.e. it typically comes immediately after the noun which it modifies. Such uses are unusual in English and generally arise because the adjective has been adopted from a language where postpositive use is standard, e.g. galore in there were prizes galore for everything .
  • Page 40 3. Specialist reading A general corpus does not, by definition, contain large quantities of specialized terminology. For this reason, a directed reading programme was set up specially for the Oxford Dictionary of English , enabling additional research and collection of citations in a number of neglected fields, for example food and cooking, health and fitness, boats and sailing, photography, genetics, martial arts, and complementary medicine.
  • Page 41 Usage Notes ( Interest in questions of good usage is widespread among English speakers everywhere, and many issues are hotly debated. In the Oxford Dictionary of English , traditional issues have been reappraised, and guidance is given on various points, old and new. The aim is to help people to use the language more accurately, more clearly, and more elegantly, and to give information and offer reassurance in the face of some of the more baffling assertions about ‘correctness’...
  • Page 42 technical: normally used only in technical and specialist language, though not necessarily restricted to any specific subject field. rare: not in normal use. humorous: used with the intention of sounding funny or playful. dialect: not used in the standard language, but still widely used in certain local regions of the English-speaking world.
  • Page 43 Spelling It is often said that English spelling is both irregular and illogical, and it is certainly true that it is only indirectly related to contemporary pronunciation. English spelling reflects not modern pronunciation but the pronunciation of the 14th century, as used by Chaucer.
  • Page 44 A similar alternation is found in compound adjectives such as well intentioned. When used predicatively (i.e. after the verb), such adjectives are unhyphenated, but when used attributively (i.e. before the noun), they are hyphenated: his remarks were well intentioned but a well-intentioned remark . A general rule governing verb compounds means that, where a noun compound is two words (e.g.
  • Page 45 Adjectives The following forms for comparative and superlative are regarded as regular and are not shown in the dictionary: • words of one syllable adding -er and -est , e.g. great → greater, greatest • words of one syllable ending in silent e , which drop the -e and add -er and -est , e.g.
  • Page 46 (@) before /l/, /m/, or /n/ indicates that the syllable may be realized with a syllabic l, m, or n, rather than with a vowel and consonant, e.g. /"bVt(@)n/ rather than /"bVt@n/. (r) indicates an r that is sometimes sounded when a vowel follows, as in drawer, cha-chaing.
  • Page 47: New Oxford Thesaurus Of English

    (French) (German) (German) München (Irish) Dáil (Russian) Arkhangelsk > (French) Horta nasalized vowels diphthongs (~ indicates nasality ) pincette (German) used for anglicized French pronunciations cordon bleu (French) Danton, Lac Leman (French) Amiens, Rodin (French) Verdun (French) arrondissement New Oxford Thesaurus of English gemütlich Introduction The New Oxford Thesaurus of English (NOTE) has been compiled using new...
  • Page 48 Selection of entries The primary purpose of the thesaurus is to give lists of synonyms for the common everyday words of English: words with roughly the same meaning as the entry word or 'headword'. Not every word has synonyms. Some words, especially terms denoting kinds of animals, plants, and physical objects, have no synonyms, so they do not get entries in a thesaurus.
  • Page 49 In this title, the broadest possible definition of the term 'synonym' has been adopted, as being the one that will be most useful to users. Even words whose meaning is quite distantly related to that of the headword are listed if they can be used to get the same message across in appropriate contexts.
  • Page 50 Linguistic evidence The compilers of NOTE have had access to two major linguistic resources, the British National Corpus and the files of the Oxford Reading Programme. The British National Corpus is a body of 100 million words of English books, newspapers, and transcribed speech in machine-readable form, used for linguistic and lexicographi- cal research.
  • Page 51 historical: still used today, but only to refer to some practice or article that is no longer part of the modern world, e.g. crinoline as a synonym for petticoat . used with the intention of sounding funny or playful, e.g. termino- humorous: logical inexactitude as a synonym for lie .
  • Page 52: Oxford Dictionary Of Quotations

    Related terms A special feature of NOTE is that it gives not only synonyms and opposites but also other related terms, especially for concrete nouns such as milk (where lactic is not a synonym, but a word with a related meaning) and town ( municipal , urban , and oppidan ).
  • Page 53 `if ye be kind towards women and fear to wrong them, God is well acquainted with what ye do.' Sometimes the relationship is an echo rather than a direct borrowing. Confucius tells us that `A ruler who governs his state by virtue is like the north polar star, which remains in its place while all the other stars revolve around it,' and we are at once reminded of the assertion of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: `I am constant as the northern star.' At other times, we are made aware of a common tradition: the...
  • Page 54 Whenever the offence inspires less horror than the punishment, the rigour of penal law is obliged to give way to the common feelings of mankind. Some quotations signal moments of technological and cultural change. `Mr Watson, come here, I want you!' says Alexander Graham Bell to his assistant in the next room;...
  • Page 55 Roosevelt) have always elicited strong views (`ferocious, it forgives nothing' - Diana, Princess of Wales), but the importance of journalism is stated, with dignity, by Amy Goodman: `Go to where the silence is, and say something.' Views of the Present range from Cicero (`O tempora! O mores!') to Tom Wolfe (`We are now in the Me decade').
  • Page 56 alphabetically according to the first word of the quotation (ignoring ‘a’ and ‘the’). The special categories contained in this model are shown below: Advertising slogans Borrowed titles Catchphrases Closing lines Epitaphs Film lines Film titles Last words Military sayings, slogans, and songs Misquotations Contextual information regarded as essential to a full appreciation of the quotation precedes the text in an italicized note;...
  • Page 57 MEMO...
  • Page 58 MEMO...
  • Page 59 In Europe: This equipment complies with the requirements of Directive 89/336/ EEC as amended by 93/68/EEC. Dieses Gerät entspricht den Anforderungen der EG-Richtlinie 89/ 336/EWG mit Änderung 93/68/EWG. Ce matériel répond aux exigences contenues dans la directive 89/ 336/CEE modifiée par la directive 93/68/CEE. Dit apparaat voldoet aan de eisen van de richtlijn 89/336/EEG, gewijzigd door 93/68/EEG.
  • Page 60 SHARP CORPORATION PRINTED IN CHINA 03LGK (TINSE0693EHZZ)

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