Extension Cords - Makita 5360-21 Operator's Manual

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GROUNDING
Improperly connecting the grounding wire can
result in the risk of electric shock. Check with a
qualified electrician if you are in doubt as to
whether the outlet is properly grounded. Do not
modify the plug provided with the tool. Never
remove the grounding prong from the plug. Do
not use the tool if the cord or plug is damaged. If
damaged, have it repaired by a MILWAUKEE
service facility before use. If the plug will not fit
the outlet, have a proper outlet installed by a
qualified electrician.
Grounded Tools:
Tools with Three Prong Plugs
Tools marked "Grounding Required"
have a three wire cord and three
prong grounding plug. The plug must
be connected to a properly grounded
outlet (See Figure A). If the tool should
electrically malfunction or break
down, grounding provides a low re-
sistance path to carry electricity
away from the user, reducing the risk
of electric shock.
The grounding prong in the plug is connected through the green wire
inside the cord to the grounding system in the tool. The green wire in the
cord must be the only wire connected to the tool's grounding system and
must never be attached to an electrically "live" terminal.
Your tool must be plugged into an appropriate outlet, properly installed
and grounded in accordance with all codes and ordinances. The plug
and outlet should look like those in Figure A.
Double Insulated Tools:
Tools with Two Prong Plugs
Tools marked "Double Insulated" do
not require grounding. They have a
special double insulation system
which satisfies OSHA requirements
and complies with the applicable
standards of Underwriters Labora-
tories, Inc., the Canadian Standard
Association and the National Electri-
cal Code. Double Insulated tools may
be used in either of the 120 volt out-
lets shown in Figures B and C.
page 4
WARNING!
Fig. A
Fig. B
Fig. C

EXTENSION CORDS

Grounded tools require a three wire extension cord. Double insulated
tools can use either a two or three wire extension cord. As the distance
from the supply outlet increases, you must use a heavier gauge exten-
sion cord. Using extension cords with inadequately sized wire causes a
serious drop in voltage, resulting in loss of power and possible tool
damage. Refer to the table shown to determine the required minimum
wire size.
The smaller the gauge number of the wire, the greater the capacity of the
cord. For example, a 14 gauge cord can carry a higher current than a 16
gauge cord. When using more than one extension cord to make up the
total length, be sure each cord contains at least the minimum wire size
required. If you are using one extension cord for more than one tool, add
the nameplate amperes and use the sum to determine the required mini-
mum wire size.
Guidelines for Using Extension Cords
If you are using an extension cord outdoors, be sure it is marked
with the suffix "W-A" ("W" in Canada) to indicate that it is acceptable
for outdoor use.
Be sure your extension cord is properly wired and in good electrical
condition. Always replace a damaged extension cord or have it
repaired by a qualified person before using it.
Protect your extension cords from sharp objects, excessive heat
and damp or wet areas.
Recommended Minimum Wire Gauge
for Extension Cords*
Nameplate
Amperes
25'
0 - 5
16
5.1 - 8
16
8.1 - 12
14
12.1 - 15
12
15.1 - 20
10
* Based on limiting the line voltage drop to five
volts at 150% of the rated amperes.
READ AND SAVE ALL INSTRUCTIONS
FOR FUTURE USE.
Symbology
Double Insulated
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.
Canadian Standards Association
Mexican Approvals Marking
Volts Alternating Current
No Load Revolutions per Minute
Amperes
BPM
Extension Cord Length
50'
75'
100'
150'
200'
16
16
14
12
12
12
16
14
10
--
12
10
--
14
--
10
12
10
--
--
10
--
--
10
--
Blows per Minute (BPM)

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5359-21