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HP 4500G Family Configuration Manual

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Advertisement

3Com Switch 4500G Family
Switch 4500G 24-Port
Switch 4500G 48-Port
Switch 4500G PWR 24-Port
Switch 4500G PWR 48-Port
Product Version:
V05.02.00
6W101-20100310
www.3com.com
3Com Corporation
350 Campus Drive, Marlborough,
MA, USA 01752 3064

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Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting

   Related Manuals for HP 4500G Family

   Summary of Contents for HP 4500G Family

  • Page 1: Configuration Guide

    3Com Switch 4500G Family Configuration Guide Switch 4500G 24-Port Switch 4500G 48-Port Switch 4500G PWR 24-Port Switch 4500G PWR 48-Port Product Version: V05.02.00 Manual Version: 6W101-20100310 www.3com.com 3Com Corporation 350 Campus Drive, Marlborough, MA, USA 01752 3064...

  • Page 2

    Copyright © 2009-2010, 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced in any form or by any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or adaptation) without written permission from 3Com Corporation. 3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change.

  • Page 3: About This Manual

    About This Manual Organization 3Com Switch 4500G Family Configuration Guide is organized as follows: Volume Features 00-Product Product Overview Acronyms Overview Ethernet Link Ethernet Port Port Isolation MSTP Aggregation 01-Access Volume LLDP VLAN GVRP QinQ BPDU Tunneling Mirroring IP Addressing...

  • Page 4

    Conventions The manual uses the following conventions: Command conventions Convention Description Boldface The keywords of a command line are in Boldface. italic Command arguments are in italic. Items (keywords or arguments) in square brackets [ ] are optional. Alternative items are grouped in braces and separated by vertical bars. { x | y | ...

  • Page 5

    3Com Switch 4500G Family Getting This guide provides all the information you need to install Started Guide and use the 3Com Switch 4500G Family. Obtaining Documentation You can access the most up-to-date 3Com product documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:...

  • Page 6: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 Correspondence between Documentation and Software······································································1-1 2 Product Features ·······································································································································2-1 Introduction to Product ····························································································································2-1 Feature Lists ···········································································································································2-1 3 Features······················································································································································3-1 Access Volume ·······································································································································3-1 IP Services Volume·································································································································3-3 IP Routing Volume ··································································································································3-4 Multicast Volume·····································································································································3-5 QoS Volume············································································································································3-5 Security Volume ······································································································································3-6 High Availability Volume··························································································································3-7 System Volume ·······································································································································3-8...

  • Page 7

    Correspondence between Documentation and Software 3Com Switch 4500G Family Configuration Guide-V05.02.00 and 3Com Switch 4500G Family Command Reference Guide-V05.02.00 are for the software version V05.02.00 and V05.02.00P19 of the 3Com switch 4500G. The supported features are different between these software versions. For details, refer to Table 1-1.

  • Page 8

    Software Added and Modified Features Compared With Manual Version The Earlier Version Modified 06-Security Volume/ 12-ARP arp detection mode command features Attack Protection Deleted — — features V05.02.00 — — —...

  • Page 9: Product Features, Introduction To Product, Feature Lists

    Product Features Introduction to Product 3Com Switches 4500G are Gigabit Ethernet switching products which have abundant service features. They are designed as distribution and access devices for intranets and metropolitan area networks (MANs). They can also be used for connecting server groups in data centers. Feature Lists 3Com Switches 4500G support abundant features and the related documents are divided into the volumes as listed in...

  • Page 10

    Volume Features Basic System Device File System Login Configuration Management Management MAC Address HTTP SNMP RMON Table System 08-System Information Maintaining and Hotfix Volume Center Debugging Cluster Stack Management Management Automatic Configuration...

  • Page 11: Access Volume

    Features The following sections provide an overview of the main features of each module supported by the 3Com Switch 4500G. Access Volume Table 3-1 Features in Access volume Features Description This document describes: Combo Port Configuration Basic Ethernet Interface Configuration Configuring Flow Control on an Ethernet Interface Configuring the Suppression Time of Physical-Link-State Change on an Ethernet Interface...

  • Page 12

    Features Description LLDP enables a device to maintain and manage its own and its immediate neighbor’s device information, based on which the network management system detects and determines the conditions of the communications links. This document describes: LLDP Introduction to LLDP Performing Basic LLDP Configuration Configuring CDP Compatibility Configuring LLDP Trapping...

  • Page 13: Ip Services Volume

    IP Services Volume Table 3-2 Features in the IP Services volume Features Description An IP address is a 32-bit address allocated to a network interface on a device that is attached to the Internet. This document describes: IP Address Introduction to IP addresses IP address configuration Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is used to resolve an IP address into a data link layer address.

  • Page 14: Ip Routing Volume

    Features Description A network node that supports both IPv4 and IPv6 is called a dual stack node. A dual stack node configured with an IPv4 address and an IPv6 address can have both IPv4 and IPv6 packets transmitted. This document Dual Stack describes: Dual stack overview...

  • Page 15: Qos Volume, Multicast Volume

    Multicast Volume Table 3-4 Features in Multicast volume Features Description This document describes the main concepts in multicast: Introduction to Multicast Multicast Overview Multicast Models Multicast Architecture Multicast Packets Forwarding Mechanism Running at the data link layer, IGMP Snooping is a multicast control mechanism on the Layer 2 Ethernet switch and it is used for multicast group management and control.

  • Page 16: Security Volume

    Security Volume Table 3-6 Features in the Security volume Features Description Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA) provide a uniform framework used for configuring these three security functions to implement the network security management. This document describes: Introduction to AAA, RADIUS and HWTACACS AAA configuration RADIUS configuration HWTACACS configuration...

  • Page 17: High Availability Volume

    Features Description Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a security protocol providing secure connection service for TCP-based application layer protocols, this document describes SSL related configuration. Public Key This document describes Public Key Configuration. Configuration An ACL is used for identifying traffic based on a series of preset matching criteria.

  • Page 18: System Volume

    Features Description In the use of fibers, link errors, namely unidirectional links, are likely to occur. DLDP is designed to detect such errors. This document describes: DLDP Introduction Enabling DLDP Setting DLDP Mode DLDP Setting the Interval for Sending Advertisement Packets Setting the DelayDown Timer Setting the Port Shutdown Mode Configuring DLDP Authentication...

  • Page 19

    Features Description Basic system configuration involves the configuration of device name, system clock, welcome message, user privilege levels and so on. This document describes: Basic System Configuration Configuration display Basic configurations CLI features Through the device management function, you can view the current condition of your device and configure running parameters.

  • Page 20

    Features Description For the majority of protocols and features supported, the system provides corresponding debugging information to help users diagnose errors. This System Maintenance document describes: and Debugging Maintenance and debugging overview Maintenance and debugging configuration As the system information hub, Information Center classifies and manages all types of system information.

  • Page 21

    Features Description Network Time Protocol (NTP) is the TCP/IP that advertises the accurate time throughout the network. This document describes: NTP overview Configuring the Operation Modes of NTP Configuring Optional Parameters of NTP Configuring Access-Control Rights Configuring NTP Authentication A cluster is a group of network devices. Cluster management is to implement management of large numbers of distributed network devices.

  • Page 22

    Appendix A Acronyms # A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Z Acronyms Full spelling Return 10GE Ten-GigabitEthernet Return Authentication, Authorization and Accounting Activity Based Costing Area Border Router Alternating Current ACKnowledgement...

  • Page 23

    Acronyms Full spelling Border Gateway Protocol BIMS Branch Intelligent Management System BOOTP Bootstrap Protocol BPDU Bridge Protocol Data Unit Basic Rate Interface Bootstrap Router BitTorrent Burst Tolerance Return Call Appearance Certificate Authority Committed Access Rate Committed Burst Size Class Based Queuing Constant Bit Rate Core-Based Tree International Telephone and Telegraph Consultative...

  • Page 24

    Acronyms Full spelling Connectivity Verification Return Deeper Application Recognition Data Circuit-terminal Equipment Database Description Digital Data Network DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Designated IS DLCI Data Link Connection Identifier DLDP Device Link Detection Protocol Domain Name System Downstream on Demand Denial of Service Designated Router DSCP...

  • Page 25

    Acronyms Full spelling Forward Defect Indication Forwarding Equivalence Class Fast Failure Detection Forwarding Group Forwarding information base FIFO First In First Out FQDN Full Qualified Domain Name Frame Relay Fast ReRoute FRTT Fairness Round Trip Time Functional Test File Transfer Protocol Return GARP Generic Attribute Registration Protocol...

  • Page 26

    Acronyms Full spelling International Business Machines ICMP Internet Control Message Protocol ICMPv6 Internet Control Message Protocol for IPv6 IDentification/IDentity IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IETF Internet Engineering Task Force IGMP Internet Group Management Protocol IGMP-Snooping Internet Group Management Protocol Snooping Interior Gateway Protocol Incoming Label Map Internet Locator Service...

  • Page 27

    Acronyms Full spelling LACPDU Link Aggregation Control Protocol Data Unit Local Area Network Link Control Protocol LDAP Lightweight Directory Access Protocol Label Distribution Protocol Label Edge Router LFIB Label Forwarding Information Base Label Information Base Link Layer Control LLDP Link Layer Discovery Protocol Loss of continuity Call Logging Line Rate...

  • Page 28

    Acronyms Full spelling MLD-Snooping Multicast Listener Discovery Snooping Meet-Me Conference MODEM MOdulator-DEModulator Multilink PPP MP-BGP Multiprotocol extensions for BGP-4 Middle-level PE MP-group Multilink Point to Point Protocol group MPLS Multiprotocol Label Switching MPLSFW Multi-protocol Label Switch Forward Multicast Port Management Mobile Switching Center MSDP Multicast Source Discovery Protocol...

  • Page 29

    Acronyms Full spelling NPDU Network Protocol Data Unit Network Provider Edge Network Quality Analyzer NSAP Network Service Access Point NetStream Collector N-SEL NSAP Selector NSSA Not-So-Stubby Area NTDP Neighbor Topology Discovery Protocol Network Time Protocol Return Operation Administration and Maintenance OAMPDU OAM Protocol Data Units OC-3...

  • Page 30

    Acronyms Full spelling Point Of Presence Packet Over SDH Point-to-Point Protocol PPTP Point to Point Tunneling Protocol PPVPN Provider-provisioned Virtual Private Network Priority Queuing Primary Reference Clock Primary Rate Interface Protection Switching Power Sourcing Equipment PSNP Partial SNP Permanent Virtual Channel Pseudo wires Return QACL...

  • Page 31

    Acronyms Full spelling Rendezvous Point Tree RRPP Rapid Ring Protection Protocol Reservation State Block RSOH Regenerator Section Overhead RSTP Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol RSVP Resource ReserVation Protocol RTCP Real-time Transport Control Protocol Route Table Entry Real-time Transport Protocol Real-time Transport Protocol Return Source Active Subnetwork Bandwidth Management...

  • Page 32

    Acronyms Full spelling Shortest Path Tree Secure Shell Synchronization Status Marker Source-Specific Multicast Shared Tree STM-1 SDH Transport Module -1 STM-16 SDH Transport Module -16 STM-16c SDH Transport Module -16c STM-4c SDH Transport Module -4c Spanning Tree Protocol Signalling Virtual Connection Switch-MDT Switch-Multicast Distribution Tree Return...

  • Page 33

    Acronyms Full spelling Virtual Channel Identifier Virtual Ethernet Virtual File System VLAN Virtual Local Area Network Virtual Leased Lines Video On Demand VoIP Voice over IP Virtual Operate System VPDN Virtual Private Dial-up Network VPDN Virtual Private Data Network Virtual Path Identifier VPLS Virtual Private Local Switch Virtual Private Network...

  • Page 34: Manual Version

    Access Volume Organization Manual Version 6W101-20100310 Product Version V05.02.00 Organization The Access Volume is organized as follows: Features Description This document describes: Combo Port Configuration Basic Ethernet Interface Configuration Configuring an Auto-negotiation Transmission Rate Configuring Flow Control on an Ethernet Interface Configuring the Suppression Time of Physical-Link-State Change on an Ethernet Interface Configuring Loopback Testing on an Ethernet Interface...

  • Page 35

    Features Description MSTP is used to eliminate loops in a LAN. It is compatible with STP and RSTP. This document describes: MSTP Introduction to MSTP Configuring MSTP LLDP enables a device to maintain and manage its own and its immediate neighbor’s device information, based on which the network management system detects and determines the conditions of the communications links.

  • Page 36

    Features Description Port mirroring copies packets passing through a port to another port connected with a monitoring device for packet analysis to help implement network monitoring and troubleshooting. Traffic mirroring is implemented by a QoS policy, which defines certain match criteria to match the packets to be mirrored and defines the action of mirroring such packets to the specified destination.

  • Page 37: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 Ethernet Port Configuration ·····················································································································1-1 Ethernet Port Configuration ····················································································································1-1 Combo Port Configuration ···············································································································1-1 Basic Ethernet Port Configuration ···································································································1-1 Configuring an Auto-negotiation Transmission Rate·······································································1-2 Configuring Flow Control on an Ethernet Port ················································································1-3 Configuring the Suppression Time of Physical-Link-State Change on an Ethernet Port················1-4 Configuring Loopback Testing on an Ethernet Port ········································································1-4 Configuring a Port Group·················································································································1-5 Configuring Storm Suppression ······································································································1-5...

  • Page 38: Ethernet Port Configuration

    Ethernet Port Configuration Ethernet Port Configuration Combo Port Configuration Introduction to Combo port A Combo port can operate as either an optical port or an electrical port. Inside the device there is only one forwarding port. For a Combo port, the electrical port and the corresponding optical port are TX-SFP multiplexed.

  • Page 39: Configuring An Auto-negotiation Transmission Rate

    Similarly, if you configure the transmission rate for an Ethernet port by using the speed command with the auto keyword specified, the transmission rate is determined through auto-negotiation too. For a Gigabit Ethernet port, you can specify the transmission rate by its auto-negotiation capacity. For details, refer to Configuring an Auto-negotiation Transmission Rate.

  • Page 40: Configuring Flow Control On An Ethernet Port

    Figure 1-1 An application diagram of auto-negotiation transmission rate As shown in Figure 1-1, the network card transmission rate of the server group (Server 1, Server 2, and Server 3) is 1000 Mbps, and the transmission rate of GigabitEthernet 1/0/4, which provides access to the external network for the server group, is 1000 Mbps too.

  • Page 41: Configuring The Suppression Time Of Physical-link-state Change On An Ethernet Port

    Follow these steps to enable flow control on an Ethernet port: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view — interface-number Required Enable flow control flow-control Disabled by default Configuring the Suppression Time of Physical-Link-State Change on an Ethernet Port An Ethernet port operates in one of the two physical link states: up or down.

  • Page 42: Configuring A Port Group, Configuring Storm Suppression

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Enable loopback testing loopback { external | internal } Disabled by default. As for the internal loopback test and external loopback test, if a port is down (port state shown as DOWN), only the former is available on it; if the port is shut down (port state shown as ADM or Administratively DOWN), both are unavailable.

  • Page 43: Setting The Interval For Collecting Ethernet Port Statistics

    The storm suppression ratio settings configured for an Ethernet port may get invalid if you enable the storm constrain for the port. For information about the storm constrain function, see Configuring the Storm Constrain Function on an Ethernet Follow these steps to set storm suppression ratios for one or multiple Ethernet ports: To do…...

  • Page 44: Enabling Forwarding Of Jumbo Frames, Enabling Loopback Detection On An Ethernet Port

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Set the interval for collecting By default, the interval for flow-interval interval statistics on the Ethernet port collecting port statistics is 300 seconds. Enabling Forwarding of Jumbo Frames Due to tremendous amount of traffic occurring on an Ethernet port, it is likely that some frames greater than the standard Ethernet frame size are received.

  • Page 45: Configuring The Mdi Mode For An Ethernet Port

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Required Enable global loopback loopback-detection enable detection Disabled by default Optional Configure the interval for port loopback-detection loopback detection interval-time time 30 seconds by default interface interface-type Enter Ethernet port view —...

  • Page 46: Testing The Cable On An Ethernet Port

    3 and pin 6 are used for transmitting signals. To enable normal communication, you should connect the local transmit pins to the remote receive pins. Therefore, you should configure the MDI mode depending on the cable types. Normally, the auto mode is recommended. The other two modes are useful only when the device cannot determine the cable type.

  • Page 47

    and takes corresponding actions (that is, blocking or shutting down the port and sending trap messages and logs) when the traffic detected exceeds the threshold. Alternatively, you can configure the storm suppression function to control a specific type of traffic. As the function and the storm constrain function are mutually exclusive, do not enable them at the same time on an Ethernet port.

  • Page 48: Displaying And Maintaining An Ethernet Port

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Optional Specify to send log when the By default, the system sends traffic detected exceeds the log when the traffic detected upper threshold or drops down storm-constrain enable log exceeds the upper threshold or below the lower threshold from drops down below the lower a point higher than the upper...

  • Page 49

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the information about a display port-group manual manual port group or all the Available in any view [ all | name port-group-name ] port groups Display the information about display loopback-detection Available in any view the loopback function display storm-constrain Display the information about...

  • Page 50: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration·······························································································1-1 Overview ·················································································································································1-1 Basic Concepts································································································································1-2 Aggregating Links in Static Mode····································································································1-5 Aggregating Links in Dynamic Mode·······························································································1-7 Load Sharing Criteria for Link Aggregation Groups ········································································1-8 Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Task List ················································································1-9 Configuring an Aggregation Group ·········································································································1-9 Configuration Guidelines ·················································································································1-9 Configuring a Static Aggregation Group························································································1-10 Configuring a Dynamic Aggregation Group···················································································1-10...

  • Page 51: Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration

    Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration When configuring Ethernet link aggregation, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Task List Configuring an Aggregation Group Configuring an Aggregate Interface Configuring Load Sharing for Link Aggregation Groups Displaying and Maintaining Ethernet Link Aggregation Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Examples The extended LACP function is added in V05.02.00P19 on the 3Com Switch 4500G.

  • Page 52

    Basic Concepts Aggregation group, member port, aggregate interface Link aggregation is implemented through link aggregation groups. An aggregation group is a group of Ethernet interfaces aggregated together. For each aggregation group, a logical interface, called an aggregate interface is created. To an upper layer entity that uses the link aggregation service, a link aggregation group looks like a single logical link and data traffic is transmitted through the aggregate interface.

  • Page 53

    Table 1-1 Class-two configurations Item Considerations Port isolation Whether the port has joined an isolation group QinQ enable state (enable/disable), TPID for VLAN tags, outer VLAN QinQ tags to be added, inner-to-outer VLAN priority mappings, inner-to-outer VLAN tag mappings, inner VLAN ID substitution mappings Permitted VLAN IDs, default VLAN, link type (trunk, hybrid, or access), IP VLAN subnet-based VLAN configuration, protocol-based VLAN configuration,...

  • Page 54

    Table 1-2 Basic and extended LACP functions Category Description Implemented through the basic LACPDU fields including the system LACP priority, system MAC address, port LACP priority, port number, and operational key. Each member port in a LACP-enabled aggregation group exchanges the Basic LACP functions above information with its peer.

  • Page 55: Aggregating Links In Static Mode

    Currently, the 3Com Switch 4500G family support returning Marker Response PDUs only after dynamic link aggregation member ports receive Marker PDUs. Link aggregation modes There are two link aggregation modes: dynamic and static.

  • Page 56

    Selecting a reference port The system selects a reference port from the member ports that are in the up state and have the same class-two configurations as the aggregate interface. The candidate ports are sorted by duplex and speed in this order: full duplex/high speed, full duplex/low speed, half duplex/high speed, and half duplex/low speed.

  • Page 57: Aggregating Links In Dynamic Mode

    Because any port attribute or class-two configuration change on a member port may cause the aggregation state of the port and other member ports to change and thus affect services, you are recommended to do that with caution. A port that joins the static aggregation group after the selected port limit has been reached will not be placed in the selected state even if it should be in normal cases.

  • Page 58: Load Sharing Criteria For Link Aggregation Groups

    Figure 1-3 Set the state of a member port in a dynamic aggregation group Set the aggregation state of a member port Is there any hardware restriction? Is the port up? Port attribute/class-two configurations same as the reference port? Port attribute/class-two configurations same as the peer port of the reference port? More candidate ports than...

  • Page 59: Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Task List, Configuring An Aggregation Group, Configuration Guidelines

    MAC addresses carried in packets IP addresses carried in packets Port numbers carried in packets Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Task List Complete the following tasks to configure Ethernet link aggregation: Task Remarks Configuring an Configuring a Static Aggregation Group Aggregation Select either task Configuring a Dynamic Aggregation Group Group...

  • Page 60: Configuring A Static Aggregation Group, Configuring A Dynamic Aggregation Group

    Configuring a Static Aggregation Group To guarantee a successful static aggregation, ensure that the ports at both ends of each link are in the same aggregation state. Follow these steps to configure a static aggregation group: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view system-view...

  • Page 61: Configuring An Aggregate Interface, Configuring The Description Of An Aggregate Interface

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Required When you create a Layer 2 Create a Layer 2 aggregate interface bridge-aggregation aggregate interface, the system interface and enter the Layer 2 interface-number automatically creates a Layer 2 aggregate interface view static aggregation group numbered the same.

  • Page 62: Enabling Link State Trapping For An Aggregate Interface, Shutting Down An Aggregate Interface

    Enabling Link State Trapping for an Aggregate Interface With the link state trapping function enabled, an aggregate interface generates linkUp trap messages when its link goes up and linkDown trap messages when its link goes down. For more information, refer to SNMP Configuration in the System Volume.

  • Page 63

    You can configure global or group-specific load sharing criteria. A link aggregation group preferentially uses the group-specific load sharing criteria. If no group-specific load sharing criteria is available, it uses the global load sharing criteria. Configuring the global link-aggregation load sharing criteria Follow these steps to configure the global link-aggregation load sharing criteria: To do...

  • Page 64: Displaying And Maintaining Ethernet Link Aggregation, Ethernet Link Aggregation Configuration Examples

    Currently, when you configure the load sharing criterion or criteria for a link aggregation group, the switch supports the following criteria: Use a source IP address alone. Use a destination IP address alone. Use a source MAC address alone. Use or a destination MAC address alone. Combine a source IP address and a destination IP address.

  • Page 65: Static Aggregation Configuration Example

    Static Aggregation Configuration Example Network requirements As shown in Figure 1-4: Device A and Device B are connected through their respective Layer 2 Ethernet interfaces GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 through GigabitEthernet 1/0/3. Configure a Layer 2 static link aggregation group on Device A and Device B respectively , enable VLAN 10 at one end of the aggregate link to communicate with VLAN 10 at the other end, and VLAN 20 at one end to communicate with VLAN 20 at the other end.

  • Page 66

    [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/2] port link-aggregation group 1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/2] quit [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/3 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/3] port link-aggregation group 1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/3] quit # Configure Layer 2 aggregate interface 1 as a trunk port and assign it to VLANs 10 and 20. This configuration automatically propagates to all the member ports in link aggregation group 1.

  • Page 67: Dynamic Aggregation Configuration Example

    [DeviceA] display link-aggregation load-sharing mode Link-Aggregation Load-Sharing Mode: destination-mac address, source-mac address The output shows that all link aggregation groups created on the device perform load sharing based on source and destination MAC addresses. Dynamic Aggregation Configuration Example Network requirements As shown in Figure 1-5: Device A and Device B are connected through their respective Layer 2 Ethernet interfaces...

  • Page 68

    [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] link-aggregation mode dynamic [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit # Assign ports GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 through GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 to link aggregation group 1. [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/1] port link-aggregation group 1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/1] quit [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/2] port link-aggregation group 1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/2] quit [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/3 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/3] port link-aggregation group 1 [DeviceA-gigabitethernet1/0/3] quit...

  • Page 69: Aggregation Load Sharing Configuration Example

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BAGG1 0x8000, 000f-e2ff-0002 Shar The output shows that link aggregation group 1 is a load sharing Layer 2 dynamic aggregation group and it contains three selected ports. # Display the global link-aggregation load sharing criteria on Device A. [DeviceA] display link-aggregation load-sharing mode Link-Aggregation Load-Sharing Mode: destination-mac address, source-mac address The output shows that all link aggregation groups created on the device perform load sharing based on...

  • Page 70

    # Create VLAN 20, and assign port GigabitEthernet1/0/6 to VLAN 20. [DeviceA] vlan 20 [DeviceA-vlan20] port gigabitEthernet 1/0/6 [DeviceA-vlan20] quit # Create Layer 2 aggregate interface 1, and configure the load sharing criterion for the link aggregation group as the source MAC addresses of packets. [DeviceA] interface bridge-aggregation 1 [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] link-aggregation load-sharing mode source-mac [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation1] quit...

  • Page 71

    This configuration automatically propagates to all the member ports in link aggregation group 2. [DeviceA] interface bridge-aggregation 2 [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] port trunk permit vlan 10 20 Please wait... Done. Configuring GigabitEthernet1/0/3... Done. Configuring GigabitEthernet1/0/4... Done. [DeviceA-Bridge-Aggregation2] quit Configure Device B Configure Device B as you configure Device A.

  • Page 72: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 Port Isolation Configuration ·····················································································································1-1 Introduction to Port Isolation ···················································································································1-1 Configuring the Isolation Group ··············································································································1-1 Assigning a Port to the Isolation Group···························································································1-1 Displaying and Maintaining Isolation Groups··························································································1-2 Port Isolation Configuration Example······································································································1-2...

  • Page 73: Port Isolation Configuration, Introduction To Port Isolation, Configuring The Isolation Group

    VLAN, allowing for great flexibility and security. Currently: 3Com Switch 4500G family support only one isolation group that is created automatically by the system as isolation group 1. You can neither remove the isolation group nor create other isolation groups on such devices.

  • Page 74: Port Isolation Configuration Example, Displaying And Maintaining Isolation Groups

    Displaying and Maintaining Isolation Groups To do… Use the command… Remarks Display the isolation group display port-isolate group Available in any view information Port Isolation Configuration Example Network requirements Users Host A, Host B, and Host C are connected to GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, GigabitEthernet 1/0/2, and GigabitEthernet 1/0/3 of Device.

  • Page 75

    Uplink port support: NO Group ID: 1 Group members: GigabitEthernet1/0/1 GigabitEthernet1/0/2 GigabitEthernet1/0/3...

  • Page 76: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 MSTP Configuration ··································································································································1-1 Overview ·················································································································································1-1 Introduction to STP ·································································································································1-1 Why STP ·········································································································································1-1 Protocol Packets of STP··················································································································1-2 Basic Concepts in STP····················································································································1-2 How STP works ·······························································································································1-3 Introduction to RSTP·······························································································································1-9 Introduction to MSTP ····························································································································1-10 Why MSTP ····································································································································1-10 Basic Concepts in MSTP···············································································································1-11 How MSTP Works ·························································································································1-14 Implementation of MSTP on Devices ····························································································1-15 Protocols and Standards ···············································································································1-15...

  • Page 77: Mstp Configuration, Introduction To Stp, Why Stp

    MSTP Configuration BPDU dropping is added in V05.02.00P19 on the 3Com Switch 4500G. For details, please refer to Enabling BPDU Dropping. When configuring MSTP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Introduction to STP Introduction to RSTP Introduction to MSTP MSTP Configuration Task List Configuring MSTP...

  • Page 78: Protocol Packets Of Stp, Basic Concepts In Stp

    Protocol Packets of STP STP uses bridge protocol data units (BPDUs), also known as configuration messages, as its protocol packets. STP-enabled network devices exchange BPDUs to establish a spanning tree. BPDUs contain sufficient information for the network devices to complete spanning tree calculation. In STP, BPDUs come in two types: Configuration BPDUs, used for calculating a spanning tree and maintaining the spanning tree topology.

  • Page 79: How Stp Works

    Figure 1-1 A schematic diagram of designated bridges and designated ports All the ports on the root bridge are designated ports. Path cost Path cost is a reference value used for link selection in STP. By calculating path costs, STP selects relatively robust links and blocks redundant links, and finally prunes the network into a loop-free tree.

  • Page 80

    For simplicity, the descriptions and examples below involve only four fields of configuration BPDUs: Root bridge ID (represented by device priority) Root path cost (related to the rate of the link connecting the port) Designated bridge ID (represented by device priority) Designated port ID (represented by port name) Calculation process of the STP algorithm Initial state...

  • Page 81

    Initially, each STP-enabled device on the network assumes itself to be the root bridge, with the root bridge ID being its own device ID. By exchanging configuration BPDUs, the devices compare their root bridge IDs to elect the device with the smallest root bridge ID as the root bridge. Selection of the root port and designated ports on a non-root device Table 1-3 describes the process of selecting the root port and designated ports.

  • Page 82

    Figure 1-2 Network diagram for the STP algorithm Device A With priority 0 Device B With priority 1 Device C With priority 2 Initial state of each device Table 1-4 shows the initial state of each device. Table 1-4 Initial state of each device Device Port name BPDU of port...

  • Page 83

    BPDU of port Device Comparison process after comparison Port BP1 receives the configuration BPDU of Device A {0, 0, 0, AP1}. Device B finds that the received configuration BPDU is superior to the configuration BPDU of the local port {1, 0, 1, BP1}, and updates the configuration BPDU of BP1.

  • Page 84

    BPDU of port Device Comparison process after comparison After comparison: Because the root path cost of CP2 (9) (root path cost of the BPDU (5) plus path cost corresponding to CP2 (4)) is smaller than the root path cost of CP1 (10) (root path cost of the BPDU (0) + path cost corresponding to CP2 (10)), the BPDU Blocked port CP2: of CP2 is elected as the optimum BPDU, and CP2 is elected...

  • Page 85: Introduction To Rstp

    If a path becomes faulty, the root port on this path will no longer receive new configuration BPDUs and the old configuration BPDUs will be discarded due to timeout. In this case, the device will generate a configuration BPDU with itself as the root and send out the BPDUs and TCN BPDUs. This triggers a new spanning tree calculation process to establish a new path to restore the network connectivity.

  • Page 86: Introduction To Mstp, Why Mstp

    Introduction to MSTP Why MSTP Weaknesses of STP and RSTP STP does not support rapid state transition of ports. A newly elected root port or designated port must wait twice the forward delay time before transiting to the forwarding state, even if it is a port on a point-to-point link or an edge port, which directly connects to a user terminal rather than to another device or a shared LAN segment.

  • Page 87: Basic Concepts In Mstp

    Basic Concepts in MSTP Figure 1-4 Basic concepts in MSTP Region A0 VLAN 1 mapped to instance 1 VLAN 2 mapped to instance 2 Other VLANs mapped to CIST BPDU BPDU Region D0 BPDU Region B0 VLAN 1 mapped to instance 1, VLAN 1 mapped to instance 1 B as regional root bridge VLAN 2 mapped to instance 2...

  • Page 88

    VLAN-to-instance mapping table As an attribute of an MST region, the VLAN-to-instance mapping table describes the mapping relationships between VLANs and MSTIs. In Figure 1-4, for example, the VLAN-to-instance mapping table of region A0 is as follows: VLAN 1 is mapped to MSTI 1, VLAN 2 to MSTI 2, and the rest to CIST. MSTP achieves load balancing by means of the VLAN-to-instance mapping table.

  • Page 89

    During MSTP calculation, a boundary port’s role on an MSTI is consistent with its role on the CIST. But that is not true with master ports. A master port on MSTIs is a root port on the CIST. Roles of ports MSTP calculation involves these port roles: root port, designated port, master port, alternate port, backup port, and so on.

  • Page 90: How Mstp Works

    Port states In MSTP, port states fall into the following three: Forwarding: the port learns MAC addresses and forwards user traffic; Learning: the port learns MAC addresses but does not forward user traffic; Discarding: the port neither learns MAC addresses nor forwards user traffic. When in different MSTIs, a port can be in different states.

  • Page 91: Implementation Of Mstp On Devices, Mstp Configuration Task List

    Within an MST region, the packet is forwarded along the corresponding MSTI. Between two MST regions, the packet is forwarded along the CST. Implementation of MSTP on Devices MSTP is compatible with STP and RSTP. STP and RSTP protocol packets can be recognized by devices running MSTP and used for spanning tree calculation.

  • Page 92

    Task Remarks Enabling the MSTP Feature Required Configuring an MST Region Required Configuring the Work Mode of an MSTP Device Optional Configuring the Timeout Factor Optional Configuring the Maximum Port Rate Optional Configuring Ports as Edge Ports Optional Configuring Configuring Path Costs of Ports Optional the leaf nodes Configuring Port Priority...

  • Page 93: Configuring Mstp, Configuring An Mst Region

    Configuring MSTP Configuring an MST Region Make the following configurations on the root bridge and on the leaf nodes separately. Follow these steps to configure an MST region: To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Enter MST region view —...

  • Page 94: Configuring The Root Bridge Or A Secondary Root Bridge

    Configuring the Root Bridge or a Secondary Root Bridge MSTP can determine the root bridge of a spanning tree through MSTP calculation. Alternatively, you can specify the current device as the root bridge or a secondary root bridge using the commands provided by the system.

  • Page 95: Configuring The Work Mode Of An Mstp Device, Configuring The Priority Of A Device

    After specifying the current device as the root bridge or a secondary root bridge, you cannot change the priority of the device. Alternatively, you can also configure the current device as the root bridge by setting the priority of the device to 0. For the device priority configuration, refer to Configuring the Priority of a Device.

  • Page 96: Configuring The Maximum Hops Of An Mst Region

    After configuring a device as the root bridge or a secondary root bridge, you cannot change the priority of the device. During root bridge selection, if all devices in a spanning tree have the same priority, the one with the lowest MAC address will be selected as the root bridge of the spanning tree. Configuring the Maximum Hops of an MST Region By setting the maximum hops of an MST region, you can restrict the region size.

  • Page 97: Configuring Timers Of Mstp

    Based on the network diameter you configured, MSTP automatically sets an optimal hello time, forward delay, and max age for the device. The configured network diameter is effective for the CIST only, and not for MSTIs. Each MST region is considered as a device. The network diameter must be configured on the root bridge.

  • Page 98: Configuring The Timeout Factor

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Optional Configure the max age timer stp timer max-age time 2,000 centiseconds (20 seconds) by default The length of the forward delay time is related to the network diameter of the switched network. Typically, the larger the network diameter is, the longer the forward delay time should be. Note that if the forward delay setting is too small, temporary redundant paths may be introduced;...

  • Page 99: Configuring The Maximum Port Rate, Configuring Ports As Edge Ports

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Required Configure the timeout factor of the device stp timer-factor factor 3 by default Configuring the Maximum Port Rate The maximum rate of a port refers to the maximum number of BPDUs the port can send within each hello time.

  • Page 100: Configuring Path Costs Of Ports

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter Ethernet interface interface interface-type Enter view, or Layer 2 aggregate interface-number Required interface interface view view or port Use either command. group view port-group manual Enter port group view port-group-name Required Configure the current ports as edge ports stp edged-port enable All ports are non-edge ports by default.

  • Page 101

    Table 1-7 Link speed vs. path cost Duplex state Link speed 802.1d-1998 802.1t Private standard — 65535 200,000,000 200,000 Single Port 2,000,000 2,000 Aggregate Link 2 Ports 1,000,000 1,800 10 Mbps Aggregate Link 3 Ports 666,666 1,600 Aggregate Link 4 Ports 500,000 1,400 Single Port...

  • Page 102: Configuring Port Priority

    If you change the standard that the device uses in calculating the default path cost, the port path cost value set through the stp cost command will be invalid. When the path cost of a port is changed, MSTP will re-calculate the role of the port and initiate a state transition.

  • Page 103: Configuring The Link Type Of Ports

    When the priority of a port is changed, MSTP will re-calculate the role of the port and initiate a state transition. Generally, a lower priority value indicates a higher priority. If you configure the same priority value for all the ports on a device, the specific priority of a port depends on the index number of the port. Changing the priority of a port triggers a new spanning tree calculation process.

  • Page 104: Enabling The Output Of Port State Transition Information

    dot1s: 802.1s-compliant standard format, and legacy: Compatible format By default, the packet format recognition mode of a port is auto, namely the port automatically distinguishes the two MSTP packet formats, and determines the format of packets it will send based on the recognized format.

  • Page 105: Enabling The Mstp Feature, Performing Mcheck

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Required Enable output of port state transition stp port-log { all | This function is enabled by information instance instance-id } default. Enabling the MSTP Feature You must enable MSTP for the device before any other MSTP-related configurations can take effect. Make this configuration on the root bridge and on the leaf nodes separately.

  • Page 106: Configuring Digest Snooping

    By then, you can perform an mCheck operation to force the port to migrate to the MSTP (or RSTP) mode. You can perform mCheck on a port through the following two approaches, which lead to the same result. Performing mCheck globally Follow these steps to perform global mCheck: To do...

  • Page 107

    Before enabling digest snooping, ensure that associated devices of different vendors are interconnected and run MSTP. Configuring the Digest Snooping feature You can enable Digest Snooping only on a device that is connected to a third-party device that uses its private key to calculate the configuration digest.

  • Page 108: Configuring No Agreement Check

    Digest Snooping configuration example Network requirements Device A and Device B connect to Device C, a third-party device, and all these devices are in the same region. Enable Digest Snooping on Device A and Device B so that the three devices can communicate with one another.

  • Page 109

    Figure 1-7 shows the rapid state transition mechanism on MSTP designated ports. Figure 1-7 Rapid state transition of an MSTP designated port Figure 1-8 shows rapid state transition of an RSTP designated port. Figure 1-8 Rapid state transition of an RSTP designated port Downstream device Upstream device Proposal for rapid transition...

  • Page 110: Configuring Protection Functions

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter system view — system-view Enter Ethernet interface view, or interface interface-type Enter interface Layer 2 aggregate interface-number Required or port group interface view Use either command. view port-group manual Enter port group view port-group-name Required Enable No Agreement Check...

  • Page 111

    ports and start a new spanning tree calculation process. This will cause a change of network topology. Under normal conditions, these ports should not receive configuration BPDUs. However, if someone forges configuration BPDUs maliciously to attack the devices, network instability will occur. MSTP provides the BPDU guard function to protect the system against such attacks.

  • Page 112

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Enter port group port-group manual view port-group-name Required Enable the root guard function for stp root-protection the port(s) Disabled by default Among loop guard, root guard and edge port settings, only one function (whichever is configured the earliest) can take effect on a port at the same time.

  • Page 113

    Enabling TC-BPDU guard When receiving topology change (TC) BPDUs (the BPDUs used to notify topology changes), a switch flushes its forwarding address entries. If someone forges TC-BPDUs to attack the switch, the switch will receive a large number of TC-BPDUs within a short time and be busy with forwarding address entry flushing.

  • Page 114: Displaying And Maintaining Mstp, Mstp Configuration Example

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Required Enable BPDU dropping for the bpdu-drop any port(s) Disabled by default Displaying and Maintaining MSTP To do... Use the command... Remarks View information about abnormally Available in any view display stp abnormal-port blocked ports View information about ports blocked Available in any view display stp down-port...

  • Page 115

    Figure 1-10 Network diagram for MSTP configuration Configuration procedure VLAN and VLAN member port configuration Create VLAN 10, VLAN 20, and VLAN 30 on Device A and Device B respectively, create VLAN 10, VLAN 20, and VLAN 40 on Device C, and create VLAN 20, VLAN 30, and VLAN 40 on Device D; configure the ports on these devices as trunk ports and assign them to related VLANs.

  • Page 116

    <DeviceB> system-view [DeviceB] stp region-configuration [DeviceB-mst-region] region-name example [DeviceB-mst-region] instance 1 vlan 10 [DeviceB-mst-region] instance 3 vlan 30 [DeviceB-mst-region] instance 4 vlan 40 [DeviceB-mst-region] revision-level 0 # Activate MST region configuration. [DeviceB-mst-region] active region-configuration [DeviceB-mst-region] quit # Specify the current device as the root bridge of MSTI 3. [DeviceB] stp instance 3 root primary # Enable MSTP globally.

  • Page 117

    # Activate MST region configuration. [DeviceD-mst-region] active region-configuration [DeviceD-mst-region] quit # Enable MSTP globally. [DeviceD] stp enable Verifying the configurations You can use the display stp brief command to display brief spanning tree information on each device after the network is stable. # Display brief spanning tree information on Device A.

  • Page 118

    GigabitEthernet1/0/2 ALTE DISCARDING NONE GigabitEthernet1/0/3 ROOT FORWARDING NONE Based on the above information, you can draw the MSTI corresponding to each VLAN, as shown in Figure 1-11. Figure 1-11 MSTIs corresponding to different VLANs 1-42...

  • Page 119: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 LLDP Configuration···································································································································1-1 Overview ·················································································································································1-1 Background ·····································································································································1-1 Basic Concepts································································································································1-2 How LLDP Works ····························································································································1-5 Protocols and Standards ·················································································································1-6 LLDP Configuration Task List ·················································································································1-6 Performing Basic LLDP Configuration ····································································································1-7 Enabling LLDP·································································································································1-7 Setting LLDP Operating Mode ········································································································1-7 Setting the LLDP Re-Initialization Delay ·························································································1-8 Enabling LLDP Polling·····················································································································1-8 Configuring the TLVs to Be Advertised ···························································································1-8 Configuring the Management Address and Its Encoding Format ···················································1-9...

  • Page 120: Lldp Configuration

    LLDP Configuration Displaying the LLDP information about the neighboring devices in the form of a list is added in V05.02.00P19 on the 3Com Switch 4500G. For details, please refer to the keyword list in the command display lldp neighbor-information. When configuring LLDP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview LLDP Configuration Task List Performing Basic LLDP Configuration...

  • Page 121

    Basic Concepts LLDP frames LLDP sends device information in LLDP data units (LLDPDUs). LLDPDUs are encapsulated in Ethernet II or SNAP frames. Ethernet II-encapsulated LLDP frame format Figure 1-1 Ethernet II-encapsulated LLDP frame format The fields in the frame are described in Table 1-1: Table 1-1 Description of the fields in an Ethernet II-encapsulated LLDP frame...

  • Page 122

    The fields in the frame are described in Table 1-2: Table 1-2 Description of the fields in a SNAP-encapsulated LLDP frame Field Description The MAC address to which the LLDPDU is advertised. It is fixed to Destination MAC address 0x0180-C200-000E, a multicast MAC address. The MAC address of the sending port.

  • Page 123

    Type Description Remarks ID of the sending port. If MED TLVs are included in the LLDPDU, the port ID TLV carries the MAC address of the sending port or the bridge Port ID MAC in case the port does not have a MAC address. If no MED TLVs are included, the port ID TLV carries the port name.

  • Page 124: How Lldp Works

    Type Description Indicates the supported maximum frame size. It is now the MTU Maximum Frame Size of the port. LLDP-MED TLVs LLDP-MED TLVs provide multiple advanced applications for voice over IP (VoIP), such as basic configuration, network policy configuration, and address and directory management. LLDP-MED TLVs satisfy the voice device vendors’...

  • Page 125: Lldp Configuration Task List

    TxRx mode. A port in this mode sends and receives LLDP frames. Tx mode. A port in this mode only sends LLDP frames. Rx mode. A port in this mode only receives LLDP frames. Disable mode. A port in this mode does not send or receive LLDP frames. Each time the LLDP operating mode of a port changes, its LLDP protocol state machine re-initializes.

  • Page 126: Performing Basic Lldp Configuration, Enabling Lldp, Setting Lldp Operating Mode

    Task Remarks Setting Other LLDP Parameters Optional Setting an Encapsulation Format for LLDPDUs Optional Configuring CDP Compatibility Optional Configuring LLDP Trapping Optional LLDP-related configurations made in Ethernet interface view takes effect only on the current port, and those made in port group view takes effect on all ports in the current port group. Performing Basic LLDP Configuration Enabling LLDP To make LLDP take effect on certain ports, you need to enable LLDP both globally and on these ports.

  • Page 127: Setting The Lldp Re-initialization Delay, Enabling Lldp Polling, Configuring The Tlvs To Be Advertised

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet interface interface-type Enter interface view interface-number Ethernet Required interface Use either command. view or port Enter port port-group manual group view group view port-group-name Optional lldp admin-status { disable | Set the LLDP operating mode rx | tx | txrx } TxRx by default.

  • Page 128: Configuring The Management Address And Its Encoding Format

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter Enter Ethernet interface interface-type interface-number Ethernet interface view Required interface Use either view or Enter port command. port-group manual port-group-name port group group view view Optional lldp tlv-enable { basic-tlv { all | port-description | system-capability | system-description | By default, all system-name } | dot1-tlv { all | port-vlan-id |...

  • Page 129: Setting Other Lldp Parameters, Setting An Encapsulation Format For Lldpdus

    Setting Other LLDP Parameters The TTL TLV carried in an LLDPDU determines how long the device information carried in the LLDPDU can be saved on a recipient device. You can configure the TTL of locally sent LLDP frames to determine how long information about the local device can be saved on a neighbor device by setting the TTL multiplier.

  • Page 130: Configuring Cdp Compatibility

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet interface interface-type Enter Ethernet interface view interface-number Required interface view or Use either command. Enter port port-group manual port group view group view port-group-name Required Ethernet II encapsulation Set the encapsulation format for format applies by default.

  • Page 131: Configuring Lldp Trapping

    Configuring CDP Compatibility CDP-compatible LLDP operates in one of the follows two modes: TxRx, where CDP packets can be transmitted and received. Disable, where CDP packets can neither be transmitted nor be received. To make CDP-compatible LLDP take effect on certain ports, first enable CDP-compatible LLDP globally and configure CDP-compatible LLDP to operate in TxRx mode.

  • Page 132: Displaying And Maintaining Lldp, Lldp Configuration Examples, Basic Lldp Configuration Example

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Required lldp notification remote-change Enable LLDP trap sending enable Disabled by default — Quit to system view quit Optional Set the interval to send LLDP lldp timer notification-interval traps interval 5 seconds by default Displaying and Maintaining LLDP To do…...

  • Page 133: Configuration Procedure

    Configuration procedure Configure Switch A. # Enable LLDP globally. <SwitchA> system-view [SwitchA] lldp enable # Enable LLDP on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 (you can skip this step because LLDP is enabled on ports by default), and set the LLDP operating mode to Rx. [SwitchA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] lldp enable [SwitchA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] lldp admin-status rx...

  • Page 134

    Number of neighbors Number of MED neighbors Number of CDP neighbors Number of sent optional TLV Number of received unknown TLV Port 2 [GigabitEthernet1/0/2]: Port status of LLDP : Enable Admin status : Rx_Only Trap flag : No Roll time : 0s Number of neighbors Number of MED neighbors...

  • Page 135: Cdp-compatible Lldp Configuration Example

    Port 2 [GigabitEthernet1/0/2]: Port status of LLDP : Enable Admin status : Rx_Only Trap flag : No Roll time : 0s Number of neighbors Number of MED neighbors Number of CDP neighbors Number of sent optional TLV Number of received unknown TLV As the sample output shows, GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 of Switch A does not connect any neighboring devices.

  • Page 136

    # Enable LLDP globally and enable LLDP to be compatible with CDP globally. [SwitchA] lldp enable [SwitchA] lldp compliance cdp # Enable LLDP (you can skip this step because LLDP is enabled on ports by default), configure LLDP to operate in TxRx mode, and configure CDP-compatible LLDP to operate in TxRx mode on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2.

  • Page 137: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 VLAN Configuration ··································································································································1-1 Introduction to VLAN ·······························································································································1-1 VLAN Overview ·······························································································································1-1 VLAN Fundamentals ·······················································································································1-2 Types of VLAN ································································································································1-3 Configuring Basic VLAN Settings ···········································································································1-3 Configuring Basic Settings of a VLAN Interface ·····················································································1-4 Port-Based VLAN Configuration ·············································································································1-5 Introduction to Port-Based VLAN ····································································································1-5 Assigning an Access Port to a VLAN ······························································································1-7 Assigning a Trunk Port to a VLAN···································································································1-8 Assigning a Hybrid Port to a VLAN ·································································································1-9...

  • Page 138: Vlan Configuration, Introduction To Vlan, Vlan Overview

    VLAN Configuration When configuring VLAN, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to VLAN Configuring Basic VLAN Settings Configuring Basic Settings of a VLAN Interface Port-Based VLAN Configuration MAC-Based VLAN Configuration Protocol-Based VLAN Configuration Displaying and Maintaining VLAN VLAN Configuration Example Introduction to VLAN VLAN Overview...

  • Page 139: Vlan Fundamentals

    Confining broadcast traffic within individual VLANs. This reduces bandwidth waste and improves network performance. Improving LAN security. By assigning user groups to different VLANs, you can isolate them at Layer 2. To enable communication between VLANs, routers or Layer 3 switches are required. Flexible virtual workgroup creation.

  • Page 140: Types Of Vlan, Configuring Basic Vlan Settings

    The Ethernet II encapsulation format is used here. Besides the Ethernet II encapsulation format, other encapsulation formats, including 802.2 LLC, 802.2 SNAP, and 802.3 raw, are also supported by Ethernet. The VLAN tag fields are also added to frames encapsulated in these formats for VLAN identification.

  • Page 141: Configuring Basic Settings Of A Vlan Interface

    As the default VLAN, VLAN 1 cannot be created or removed. You cannot manually create or remove VLANs reserved for special purposes. Dynamic VLANs cannot be removed with the undo vlan command. A VLAN with a QoS policy applied cannot be removed. For isolate-user-VLANs or secondary VLANs, if you have used the isolate-user-vlan command to create mappings between them, you cannot remove them until you remove the mappings between them first.

  • Page 142: Port-based Vlan Configuration, Introduction To Port-based Vlan

    Before creating a VLAN interface for a VLAN, create the VLAN first. Port-Based VLAN Configuration Introduction to Port-Based VLAN Port-based VLANs group VLAN members by port. A port forwards traffic for a VLAN only after it is assigned to the VLAN. Port link type You can configure the link type of a port as access, trunk, or hybrid.

  • Page 143

    Figure 1-4 Network diagram for port link type configuration Default VLAN By default, VLAN 1 is the default VLAN for all ports. You can configure the default VLAN for a port as required. Use the following guidelines when configuring the default VLAN on a port: Because an access port can join only one VLAN, its default VLAN is the VLAN to which it belongs and cannot be configured.

  • Page 144: Assigning An Access Port To A Vlan

    Actions (in the inbound direction) Actions (in the outbound Port type direction) Untagged frame Tagged frame Receive the frame if its VLAN ID is the same as the default VLAN ID. Tag the frame with Remove the default VLAN tag and Access the default VLAN Drop the frame if its...

  • Page 145: Assigning A Trunk Port To A Vlan

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet interface interface-type Required interface view interface-number Use either command. In Ethernet interface view, the Enter Layer-2 interface subsequent configurations apply aggregate bridge-aggregation to the current port. interface view interface-number Enter port...

  • Page 146: Assigning A Hybrid Port To A Vlan

    Follow these steps to assign a trunk port to one or multiple VLANs: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Required interface interface-type Ethernet Use either command. interface-number interface view In Ethernet interface view, the subsequent configurations Enter Layer-2...

  • Page 147

    Follow these steps to assign a hybrid port to one or multiple VLANs: To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter system view system-view — Enter Ethernet interface interface-type Required interface view interface-number Use either command. In Ethernet interface view, Enter Layer-2 interface bridge-aggregation subsequent aggregate...

  • Page 148: Mac-based Vlan Configuration, Introduction To Mac-based Vlan, Configuring A Mac Address-based Vlan

    MAC-Based VLAN Configuration Introduction to MAC-Based VLAN MAC-based VLANs group VLAN members by MAC address. They are mostly used in conjunction with security technologies such as 802.1X to provide secure, flexible network access for terminal devices. MAC-based VLAN implementation With MAC-based VLAN configured, the device processes received packets as follows: When receiving an untagged frame, the device looks up the list of MAC-to-VLAN mappings based on the source MAC address of the frame for a match.

  • Page 149: Protocol-based Vlan Configuration, Introduction To Protocol-based Vlan

    MAC-based VLANs are available only on hybrid ports. Because MAC-based dynamic port assignment is mainly configured on the downlink ports of the user access devices, do not enable this function together with link aggregation. With MSTP enabled, if the MST instance for the corresponding VLAN is blocked, the packet with the unknown source MAC address will fail to be sent to the CPU.

  • Page 150: Configuring A Protocol-based Vlan

    Protocol-based VLANs are only applicable on hybrid ports. In this approach, inbound packets are assigned to different VLANs based on their protocol types and encapsulation formats. The protocols that can be used for VLAN assignment include IP, IPX, and AppleTalk (AT). The encapsulation formats include Ethernet II, 802.3 raw, 802.2 LLC, and 802.2 SNAP. A protocol-based VLAN is defined by a protocol template comprised of encapsulation format and protocol type.

  • Page 151

    To do… Use the command… Remarks current port. In port group view, the subsequent configurations apply to all ports in the port group. Enter port port-group manual Layer-2 aggregate group view port-group-name interface view, subsequent configurations apply Layer-2 aggregate interface and all its member ports.

  • Page 152: Ip Subnet-based Vlan Configuration, Configuring An Ip Subnet-based Vlan

    IP Subnet-Based VLAN Configuration Introduction In this approach, packets are assigned to VLANs based on their source IP addresses and subnet masks. A port configured with IP subnet-based VLANs assigns a received untagged packet to a VLAN based on the source address of the packet. This feature is used to assign packets from the specified network segment or IP address to a specific VLAN.

  • Page 153: Displaying And Maintaining Vlan, Vlan Configuration Example

    After you configure a command on a Layer-2 aggregate interface, the system starts applying the configuration to the aggregate interface and its aggregation member ports. If the system fails to do that on the aggregate interface, it stops applying the configuration to the aggregation member ports. If it fails to do that on an aggregation member port, it simply skips the port and moves to the next port.

  • Page 154

    GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 allows packets from VLAN 2, VLAN 6 through VLAN 50, and VLAN 100 to pass through. Figure 1-5 Network diagram for port-based VLAN configuration Configuration procedure Configure Device A # Create VLAN 2, VLAN 6 through VLAN 50, and VLAN 100. <DeviceA>...

  • Page 155

    Unknown-speed mode, unknown-duplex mode Link speed type is autonegotiation, link duplex type is autonegotiation Flow-control is not enabled The Maximum Frame Length is 9216 Broadcast MAX-ratio: 100% Unicast MAX-ratio: 100% Multicast MAX-ratio: 100% Allow jumbo frame to pass PVID: 100 Mdi type: auto Link delay is 0(sec) Port link-type: trunk...

  • Page 156: Isolate-user-vlan Configuration, Configuring Isolate-user-vlan

    Isolate-User-VLAN Configuration When configuring an isolate-user VLAN, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Configuring Isolate-User-VLAN Displaying and Maintaining Isolate-User-VLAN Isolate-User-VLAN Configuration Example Overview An isolate-user-VLAN adopts a two-tier VLAN structure. In this approach, two types of VLANs, isolate-user-VLAN and secondary VLAN, are configured on the same device.

  • Page 157

    Assign non-trunk ports to the isolate-user-VLAN and ensure that at least one port takes the isolate-user-VLAN as its default VLAN; Assign non-trunk ports to each secondary VLAN and ensure that at least one port in a secondary VLAN takes the secondary VLAN as its default VLAN; Associate the isolate-user-VLAN with the specified secondary VLANs.

  • Page 158: Displaying And Maintaining Isolate-user-vlan, Isolate-user-vlan Configuration Example

    Displaying and Maintaining Isolate-User-VLAN To do... Use the command... Remarks Display the mapping between an display isolate-user-vlan isolate-user-VLAN and its secondary Available in any view [ isolate-user-vlan-id ] VLAN(s) Isolate-User-VLAN Configuration Example Network requirements Connect Device A to downstream devices Device B and Device C; Configure VLAN 5 on Device B as an isolate-user-VLAN, assign the uplink port GigabitEthernet 1/0/5 to VLAN 5, and associate VLAN 5 with secondary VLANs VLAN 2 and VLAN 3.

  • Page 159

    [DeviceB] vlan 2 [DeviceB-vlan2] port gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceB-vlan2] quit # Associate the isolate-user-VLAN with the secondary VLANs. [DeviceB] isolate-user-vlan 5 secondary 2 to 3 Configure Device C # Configure the isolate-user-VLAN. <DeviceC> system-view [DeviceC] vlan 6 [DeviceC-vlan6] isolate-user-vlan enable [DeviceC-vlan6] port gigabitethernet 1/0/5 [DeviceC-vlan6] quit # Configure the secondary VLANs.

  • Page 160

    gigabitethernet 1/0/2 gigabitethernet 1/0/5 VLAN ID: 3 VLAN Type: static Isolate-user-VLAN type : secondary Route Interface: not configured Description: VLAN 0003 Name: VLAN 0003 Tagged Ports: none Untagged Ports: gigabitethernet 1/0/1 gigabitethernet 1/0/5...

  • Page 161: Voice Vlan Configuration, Oui Addresses

    Voice VLAN Configuration When configuring a voice VLAN, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Overview Configuring a Voice VLAN Displaying and Maintaining Voice VLAN Voice VLAN Configuration Overview As voice communication technologies grow more mature, voice devices are more and more widely deployed, especially on broadband networks, where voice traffic and data traffic often co-exist.

  • Page 162: Voice Vlan Assignment Modes

    Number OUI address Vendor 00e0-bb00-0000 3Com phone In general, as the first 24 bits of a MAC address (in binary format), an OUI address is a globally unique identifier assigned to a vendor by IEEE. OUI addresses mentioned in this document, however, are different from those in common sense.

  • Page 163

    Figure 3-2 Only IP phones access the network Both modes forward tagged packets according to their tags. The following tables list the required configurations on ports of different link types in order for these ports to support tagged or untagged voice traffic sent from IP phones when different voice VLAN assignment modes are configured.

  • Page 164: Security Mode And Normal Mode Of Voice Vlans

    Table 3-3 Required configurations on ports of different links types in order for the ports to support tagged voice traffic Voice VLAN Support for Port link type assignment untagged voice Configuration requirements mode traffic Automatic — Access Configure the default VLAN of the port as Manual the voice VLAN.

  • Page 165: Configuring A Voice Vlan, Setting A Port To Operate In Automatic Voice Vlan Assignment Mode

    Table 3-4 How a voice VLAN-enable port processes packets in security/normal mode Voice VLAN Packet type Packet processing mode working mode Untagged packets If the source MAC address of a packet matches an OUI address configured for the device, it is forwarded in the Packets carrying the voice VLAN;...

  • Page 166: Setting A Port To Operate In Manual Voice Vlan Assignment Mode

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Optional voice vlan mac-address By default, each voice VLAN has default OUI Add a recognizable oui mask oui-mask addresses configured. Refer to Table 3-1 OUI address [ description text ] the default OUI addresses of different vendors.

  • Page 167: Displaying And Maintaining Voice Vlan, Voice Vlan Configuration Examples, Automatic Voice Vlan Mode Configuration Example

    To do... Use the command... Remarks Refer to Assigning an Access Access port Use one of the three Assign the Port to a VLAN. approaches. port in manual voice VLAN Refer to Assigning a Trunk Port After you assign an access port Trunk port assignment to a...

  • Page 168

    Device A uses voice VLAN 2 to transmit voice packets for IP phone A and voice VLAN 3 to transmit voice packets for IP phone B. Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 to work in automatic voice VLAN assignment mode. In addition, if one of them has not received any voice packet in 30 minutes, the port is removed from the corresponding voice VLAN automatically.

  • Page 169: Manual Voice Vlan Assignment Mode Configuration Example

    [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Configure GigabitEthernet 1/0/2. [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/2 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] voice vlan mode auto [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] port link-type hybrid [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] voice vlan 3 enable [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/2] quit Verification # Display the OUI addresses, OUI address masks, and description strings supported currently. <DeviceA>...

  • Page 170

    Figure 3-4 Network diagram for manual voice VLAN assignment mode configuration Configuration procedure # Configure the voice VLAN to operate in security mode. (Optional. A voice VLAN operates in security mode by default.) <DeviceA> system-view [DeviceA] voice vlan security enable # Add a recognizable OUI address 0011-2200-0000.

  • Page 171

    0060-b900-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Philips/NEC phone 00e0-7500-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 Polycom phone 00e0-bb00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 3com phone # Display the current voice VLAN state. <DeviceA> display voice vlan state Maximum of Voice VLANs: 8 Current Voice VLANs: 1 Voice VLAN security mode: Security Voice VLAN aging time: 1440 minutes Voice VLAN enabled port and its mode: PORT VLAN...

  • Page 172

    Table of Contents 1 GVRP Configuration ··································································································································1-1 Introduction to GVRP ······························································································································1-1 GARP···············································································································································1-1 GVRP···············································································································································1-3 Protocols and Standards ·················································································································1-4 GVRP Configuration Task List ················································································································1-4 Configuring GVRP Functions··················································································································1-4 Configuring GARP Timers·······················································································································1-5 Displaying and Maintaining GVRP··········································································································1-6 GVRP Configuration Examples···············································································································1-7 GVRP Configuration Example I·······································································································1-7 GVRP Configuration Example II······································································································1-8 GVRP Configuration Example III·····································································································1-9...

  • Page 173: Gvrp Configuration, Introduction To Gvrp

    GVRP Configuration The GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) is a GARP application. It functions based on the operating mechanism of GARP to maintain and propagate dynamic VLAN registration information for the GVRP devices on the network. When configuring GVRP, go to these sections for information you are interested in: Introduction to GVRP GVRP Configuration Task List Configuring GVRP Functions...

  • Page 174

    Hold timer –– When a GARP application entity receives the first registration request, it starts a Hold timer and collects succeeding requests. When the timer expires, the entity sends all these requests in one Join message. This helps you save bandwidth. Join timer ––...

  • Page 175

    GARP message format Figure 1-1 GARP message format Figure 1-1 illustrates the GARP message format. Table 1-1 describes the GARP message fields. Table 1-1 Description on the GARP message fields Field Description Value Protocol ID Protocol identifier for GARP One or multiple messages, each containing Message ––...

  • Page 176: Gvrp Configuration Task List, Configuring Gvrp Functions

    about active VLAN members and through which port they can be reached. It thus ensures that all GVRP participants on a bridged LAN maintain the same VLAN registration information. The VLAN registration information propagated by GVRP includes both manually configured local static entries and dynamic entries from other devices.

  • Page 177: Configuring Garp Timers

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter Ethernet Enter Ethernet interface view, interface view or interface interface-type Required Layer 2 Layer 2 aggregate interface-number aggregate interface view Perform either of the interface view, commands. or port-group Enter port-group port-group manual view view port-group-name...

  • Page 178: Displaying And Maintaining Gvrp

    To do… Use the command… Remarks Enter Required Enter Ethernet or Ethernet Layer 2 interface interface-type Perform either of the interface aggregate interface-number commands. view, Layer interface view Depending on the view you 2 aggregate accessed, the subsequent interface configuration takes effect on a view, or Enter port-group port-group manual...

  • Page 179: Gvrp Configuration Examples, Gvrp Configuration Example I

    To do… Use the command… Remarks display gvrp state interface Display the current GVRP state interface-type interface-number vlan Available in any view vlan-id display gvrp statistics [ interface Display statistics about GVRP Available in any view interface-list ] Display the global GVRP state display gvrp status Available in any view Display the information about...

  • Page 180: Gvrp Configuration Example Ii

    [DeviceB] gvrp # Configure port GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, allowing all VLANs to pass through. [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on trunk port GigabitEthernet 1/0/1. [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] gvrp [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Create VLAN 3 (a static VLAN).

  • Page 181: Gvrp Configuration Example Iii

    [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Create VLAN 2 (a static VLAN). [DeviceA] vlan 2 Configure Device B # Enable GVRP globally. <DeviceB> system-view [DeviceB] gvrp # Configure port GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 as a trunk port, allowing all VLANs to pass through. [DeviceB] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceB-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1.

  • Page 182

    [DeviceA] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1 [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port link-type trunk [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port trunk permit vlan all # Enable GVRP on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1 and set the GVRP registration type to forbidden on the port. [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] gvrp [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] gvrp registration forbidden [DeviceA-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] quit # Create VLAN 2 (a static VLAN). [DeviceA] vlan 2 Configure Device B # Enable GVRP globally.

  • Page 183: Table Of Contents

    Table of Contents 1 QinQ Configuration ···································································································································1-1 Introduction to QinQ ································································································································1-1 Background and Benefits ················································································································1-1 How QinQ Works·····························································································································1-2 QinQ Frame Structure ·····················································································································1-2 Implementations of QinQ·················································································································1-3 Modifying the TPID in a VLAN Tag ·································································································1-3 Protocols and Standards ·················································································································1-4 QinQ Configuration Task List··················································································································1-5 Configuring Basic QinQ ··················································