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Follow the instructions in this
chapter to set up your computer
and learn the basics.
1
Getting Started
The illustration on the next page shows all the equipment you will need to set
up your computer and begin using it. (Note that your monitor and keyboard
may look slightly different depending on what you purchased.)
Place your equipment on a sturdy, flat surface near a grounded wall outlet.
(Your Power Macintosh was designed to be used and carried in the horizontal
position, as shown on the next page—it should not be used tipped on its side.)
You may place monitors weighing up to 70 lb. (31.75 kg) on top of the
computer.
Before following the setup instructions in this chapter, you may want to read
"Arranging Your Office" in Appendix A (in the section on health-related
information) for tips on adjusting your work furniture so that you're
comfortable when using the computer.
1

Summary of Contents

  • Page 1

    Follow the instructions in this chapter to set up your computer and learn the basics. Getting Started The illustration on the next page shows all the equipment you will need to set up your computer and begin using it. (Note that your monitor and keyboard may look slightly different depending on what you purchased.) Place your equipment on a sturdy, flat surface near a grounded wall outlet.

  • Page 2

    Macintosh computer Monitor Keyboard cable (sometimes built into the keyboard as shown here) Keyboard Mouse Monitor cable (sometimes built into the monitor) Apple PlainTalk Microphone (optional) Monitor power cord (sometimes built into the monitor) Computer power cord...

  • Page 3

    When picking up your computer, be sure to grasp it by the sides. IMPORTANT Grasping it by the front or back can cause the computer’s cover to lift off. When lifting or carrying the computer, always grasp it by the sides, as shown. Do not lift or carry the computer by grasping the front and back.

  • Page 4

    Setting the correct voltage for your computer does not set the WARNING voltage for your monitor even if the monitor’s power cord is connected directly to your computer. To protect your monitor, be sure to use the appropriate adapter or voltage converter, if necessary. Check to see that the voltage switch on the back of your computer is Set the switch to show “115”...

  • Page 5

    Voltages for different locations Country Single voltage Japan S. Korea 100/220 Jamaica, Taiwan Peru 110/220 Brazil, Lebanon 110–220 Phillipines Bermuda, Canada, Puerto Rico, United States, Venezuela Mexico Saudi Arabia 127/220 Hong Kong India, South Africa 220–250 Israel, Pakistan, Singapore Australia, Kuwait, Malta, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Papua New Guinea, Oman, Qatar, United Kingdom Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain,...

  • Page 6

    Plug the socket end of the computer’s power cord into the recessed power socket ≤ (marked with the symbol ) on the back of the computer. Plug the other end of the power cord into a three-hole grounded outlet or power strip. Be sure to set the voltage switch on the back of your computer WARNING for the voltage system to which you’re connecting the computer.

  • Page 7

    This section contains instructions on connecting most types of monitors. Monitors from manufacturers other than Apple may require adapters for their monitor cables and power cords. If you are connecting a non-Apple monitor, also refer to the instructions that came with the monitor.

  • Page 8

    Connect the monitor power cord to the monitor. On some monitors, the cord is already attached. Plug in the monitor power cord. Some monitor power cords are designed to plug into the back of your computer. Some monitor power cords must be connected to a grounded electrical outlet, not to the computer.

  • Page 9

    Connecting the monitor cable After you plug in the monitor power cord, you connect the monitor cable to the computer’s monitor port. To connect the monitor cable, follow these steps: Attach the monitor cable to the monitor. On some monitors, the cable is already attached. Attach the monitor cable to the monitor port on the back panel of the computer.

  • Page 10

    The plug and the port are marked with the ◊ icon (symbol). The positions of the port and icon on your keyboard may be different from those pictured. By the way: A port marked with the ◊ icon is called an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port.

  • Page 11

    (The positions of the port and icon on your keyboard may be different from those pictured here.) By the way: A port marked with the ◊ icon is called an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port.

  • Page 12

    Turn on your monitor. See the information that came with your monitor for the location of the power switch. On Apple monitors, the power switch is usually located on the front of the unit. By the way: When the monitor is plugged into the computer, you only need to turn on the monitor once.

  • Page 13

    Turn on your computer by pressing the Power key on the keyboard. The Power key is marked with a triangle. Its location depends on which keyboard you have. You hear a tone from the computer as it starts up. Getting Started...

  • Page 14

    Check to see what’s on your screen. You’ll see a sequence of messages describing what is happening, followed by the Energy Saver dialog box. m If you’re a beginning Macintosh user, press the Return key. m If you’re an experienced Macintosh user, you may want to set your energy- saving options now (refer to the information about saving energy in Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu, and “Saving Energy With the Energy Saver Control Panel,”...

  • Page 15

    Skip now to “What’s Next?” m If you see a blinking question mark, see “Solutions to Common Problems” in Chapter 6. m If you see anything else on your screen, or if you see nothing at all, see the next section, “Problems Turning Your Computer On?” Note: To save energy, your computer is automatically set to put itself to sleep if you haven’t used it for 30 minutes or more (the screen dims).

  • Page 16

    What’s next? You’ve finished setting up your computer. Continue with one of the following steps: m If you are new to the Macintosh, turn to the next section, “Learning the Basics.” When you’ve learned the basic Macintosh skills, turn to the section “Saving Energy With the Energy Saver Control Panel”...

  • Page 17

    Learning the basics If you are new to the Macintosh, you should begin by looking at the easy-to-use program called the Macintosh Tutorial. The tutorial teaches you the basic skills you’ll need to use your computer. To start the tutorial, follow these steps: Slide your mouse along your mouse pad or desk.

  • Page 18

    With the tip of the arrow on the question mark, press and hold down the mouse button. A list of choices (called a menu) appears. This is the Guide (h) menu, which is the place to go when you have a question about how to use your computer. While holding down the mouse button, move the arrow until the words “Macintosh Tutorial”...

  • Page 19

    Reviewing the basics You can use the following illustrations to review the elements you use on your screen to do work with your computer. Icons Menu Window Menus The strip across the top of the screen is called the menu bar. The symbols and words in it represent menus of commands.

  • Page 20

    Icons Icons are small pictures that represent disks, programs, documents, and folders. You can double-click any icon to open it and see what it contains. This icon represents your computer’s internal hard disk. Icons like this one represent application programs, which you use to create documents and do other work.

  • Page 21

    You can get to the Energy Saver control panel by clicking Specify Settings in the Energy Saver dialog box that appears when you start your computer or by choosing Control Panels in the Apple () menu. The Energy Saver control panel displays the pre-set options, which you can accept or change.

  • Page 22

    Waking your computer from sleep To wake the computer from sleep, press any key on the keyboard. (It may take a moment or two for the computer to awaken.) The documents and application programs you had open when the computer went in to sleep are still open and unsaved changes are preserved.

  • Page 23

    Turning the computer off Using the Power key To turn the computer off using the Power key on the keyboard, follow these instructions: If the computer is in sleep, press the Power key (or any key on the keyboard except Caps Lock) to wake it.

  • Page 24

    With the tip of the arrow on the word Special, press and hold down the mouse button. While holding down the mouse button, move the arrow until the words “Shut Down” are highlighted, then release the button. Trouble? If a problem with the computer prevents you from using the Power key on the keyboard or choosing Shut Down—for example, if the computer “freezes”...

  • Page 25

    Refer to the section “Obtaining Updated Apple Software” in Chapter 6 for information about getting updated Apple software. Refer to “Ask Apple Online Technical Support,” in Chapter 6, for information about getting answers to your computer questions using eWorld.

  • Page 27

    Use the instructions in this chapter to learn about the help available to you in the Guide menu. Getting Help The Guide menu is your main source of information when you’re working with your computer. The menu is identified by a question mark (h) in the upper-right corner of the screen.

  • Page 28

    Getting answers to your questions When you have a question while working with your computer, you can get the answer by choosing Macintosh Guide from the Guide (h) menu. Pull down the Application menu (in the upper-right corner of the screen) and choose Finder to make it the active application program.

  • Page 29

    Notice the three buttons at the top of the window: Topics, Index, and Look For. Macintosh Guide gives you three ways of finding information: lets you choose from a list of general subjects; it is like the table of Topics contents in a book.

  • Page 30

    Click “Customizing Your Computer” or “Setting Options,” whichever is available, in the list of topics. When you click any topic area, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK.

  • Page 31

    Getting answers with the Index button In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Index button. An alphabetical list of subjects appears on the left side of the window. Slider Scroll bar Scroll through the alphabetical list until the phrase “background pattern” is visible. You can scroll through the list either by dragging the slider to the letter B or by using the scroll bar at the right of the list.

  • Page 32

    Click the question “How do I change the background pattern?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click this Topics button.

  • Page 33

    Getting answers with the Look For button In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Look For button. A small box appears on the left side of the window, where you can type text. To activate the text box, click here. Type a word or phrase in the text box…...

  • Page 34

    Click the question “How do I turn off the Empty Trash warning?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. If you want to close Macintosh Guide, click here. Click here to see the next step (if there is one).

  • Page 35

    Tips for using Macintosh Guide Here are a few tips for using Macintosh Guide effectively: m Macintosh Guide is available only when you are in the Finder—the desktop area where you can see the icons of disks, folders, and files. (Other programs may also have help available in the Guide menu, however.) If you don’t see Macintosh Guide in the Guide menu, pull down the Application menu (to the right of the Guide menu) and...

  • Page 36

    Identifying objects on the screen Sometimes you’ll see an unfamiliar item on the screen and ask yourself, “What’s that?” You can get an answer by using a Macintosh feature known as Balloon Help. Balloon Help explains the function of icons, menus, commands, and other items on the Macintosh screen in balloons like those you see in comic strips.

  • Page 37

    Learning useful shortcuts You can perform many tasks in the Finder more quickly if you use keyboard or mouse shortcuts. For example, instead of clicking an icon and choosing Open from the File menu, you can simply double-click the icon to open it. Follow these steps to learn keyboard and mouse shortcuts: Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the icon) and choose Shortcuts.

  • Page 38

    Read about the shortcuts available for the category you selected. Click the right arrow in the lower-right corner of the window to display the next window (if there is one). When you finish reading about the shortcuts for your category, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window.

  • Page 39

    If it is a SCSI or ADB device, make sure to turn off your computer before connecting the device. For further information, consult your Apple-authorized dealer, the manufacturer of the component you want to add, or the Technical Information...

  • Page 40

    Expansion bay Monitor Behind the front panel there (AppleVision AV is an expansion bay for an Display with built-in optional 3-1/2" storage device microphone and stereo (1.60" high). speakers shown here) Floppy disk drive Hard disk drive (internal) CD-ROM drive (optional) Computer CD-ROM drive Open/Close button...

  • Page 41

    (3) SCSI port Sound output port Ethernet port (AAUI) ≈ Ethernet port (10BASE-T) Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port Sound input port ™ Monitor port Connects a monitor to your Macintosh. Access covers for Your Macintosh supports up to three Peripheral Component expansion slots (3) Interconnect (PCI) cards.

  • Page 42

    Connecting audio equipment Your Macintosh can play and record stereo sound from a variety of sources. You can listen to or reproduce stereo sound by connecting audio equipment to the sound input and output ports on the computer. If you have an internal CD-ROM drive, you can also use your computer to play and record sound from audio compact discs (CDs).

  • Page 43

    Extended miniplug The smaller connector (a “stereo miniplug”) is found most often on stereo equipment. The slightly longer connector is found on the Apple PlainTalk Microphone and other voice quality microphones. If your equipment has a different type of connector, you can purchase an adapter at an electronics supply store.

  • Page 44

    Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Connecting and positioning a microphone With appropriate software, you can use the Apple PlainTalk Microphone that comes with some Macintosh computers (or a compatible line-level microphone) to record your voice or other sounds.

  • Page 45

    ) on the back of the computer. Place the microphone at the top center of the monitor, so that the microphone’s Apple ( ) icon is facing you. If you can’t place the microphone on top of the monitor, position the microphone according to these guidelines: m The microphone should be between 1 and 3 feet away from you.

  • Page 46

    Connecting external stereo speakers You can take advantage of your computer’s stereo sound output by attaching externally powered (amplified) speakers. Assemble the speakers and the cable you need. You need a cable with stereo miniplugs at each end to connect one or both speakers to the computer.

  • Page 47

    Connecting external SCSI devices Your computer has a port for connecting devices that use the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI, pronounced “skuh-zee”). The SCSI port permits high-speed communication between the computer and the device. The SCSI icon appears above the port on the computer’s back panel. SCSI icon SCSI port You can connect SCSI devices to the SCSI port in a chain.

  • Page 48

    SCSI peripheral interface cable The total length of the cables in a SCSI chain should not exceed 6 IMPORTANT meters (20 feet). SCSI cables must have a 110-ohm impedance. For best results, use SCSI cables manufactured by Apple Computer. Chapter 3...

  • Page 49

    If your SCSI device has a built-in terminator, you may choose to use it as your first or last device in the chain, or you may have your Apple-authorized service provider remove any extra built-in terminators. You can attach or remove external terminators yourself.

  • Page 50

    Connecting a SCSI device Use these general instructions in conjunction with the instructions that came with your SCSI device: Turn off your Macintosh. Make sure the SCSI device is switched off. WARNING Do not connect or disconnect any device while the device or your Macintosh is turned on.

  • Page 51

    DRAM, VRAM, or cache DIMMs. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for service. If you install additional DIMMs yourself, you risk damaging your equipment and this damage would not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer.

  • Page 52

    Depending on the configuration you purchased, these drives may already be installed. If you want to add an internal drive to your Macintosh, see your Apple-authorized dealer. For more information about internal drives, see the Technical Information booklet that came with your Macintosh.

  • Page 53

    Your computer comes equipped with two built-in network interfaces: LocalTalk and Ethernet. You can also purchase additional Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) cards for alternative networks such as TokenRing, ISDN, or FDDI. To connect your computer to a network you need to do two things: connect your computer to the network using the appropriate cable, and set up your network configuration in the AppleTalk control panel, the TCP/IP control panel, or both.

  • Page 54

    If you see an error message after configuring your AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels, such as, “Unable to locate host,” or “Could not create a socket,” this could indicate a problem in the TCP/IP configuration. Contact your network administrator for additional assistance. Chapter 3...

  • Page 55

    Macintosh to speak typed text in compatible applications such as SimpleText You’ll find these and other programs in the Apple Extras folder on your hard disk. (Drive Setup is in the Utilities folder.) To find out if a program needs to be installed, look inside the program’s folder for an icon labeled Installer.

  • Page 56

    CD-ROM disc that contains system software, be sure to make a backup copy of the programs in the Apple Extras folder. Backup copies allow you to restore your software if anything should go wrong. It is a good idea to always make backup copies of application programs and other software.

  • Page 57

    Macintosh Easy Open) before you install any software. To start Apple Extensions Manager, restart your computer while holding down the Space bar. Use Apple Extensions Manager to turn off all system extensions except Macintosh Easy Open (this extension is needed to rebuild the desktop correctly).

  • Page 58

    Finding out which programs are open If you have several programs and windows open, you can find out which program is active and which other programs are open by pulling down the Application menu. Switching programs You can switch to another open program or desk accessory by choosing its name from the Application menu.

  • Page 59

    Backing up your files Making backup copies of important files is good protection against possible damage to the originals. m You can back up files stored on your hard disk by copying them to floppy disks. m You can back up an entire floppy disk by copying it to another floppy disk of the same capacity or larger, or by copying it to a hard disk.

  • Page 60

    Shared libraries Power Macintosh programs use special files called shared libraries. These files help Power Macintosh programs to run more efficiently, and can be used by more than one Power Macintosh program simultaneously. Any necessary shared libraries are installed automatically in the System Folder when you install Power Macintosh programs.

  • Page 61

    Read this chapter for information on using the internal CD-ROM drive, if your computer has one. Using the Optional CD-ROM Drive Read this chapter for information on using the optional internal CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory) drive, if your computer has one. (CD-ROM drives are also sometimes called CD-ROM players.) Refer to Appendix A, “Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips,”...

  • Page 62

    Inserting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to insert a CD-ROM disc into your CD-ROM drive. Then follow the instructions provided with your disc, as well as the instructions in this manual. Start up your Macintosh computer, if it’s not already on. Press the Open/Close button to open the tray of the CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 63

    File menu, or simultaneously press the x and E keys. (AppleCD Audio Player is a program that allows you to control your CD-ROM drive and is available in the Apple [K] menu.) If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 64

    Guide (h) menu. To start, stop, and otherwise control audio discs, use the AppleCD Audio Player program, available in the Apple () menu. Your audio CD software will only play tracks that contain audio information. You can listen to an audio CD or audio tracks in the background while you do other work on your computer.

  • Page 65

    Working with Photo CDs You can use your CD-ROM drive to open Photo CD images stored on Photo CDs. A Photo CD image is a digitized version of a standard photograph that you can open and view on your computer screen. You can do many things with the images on your Photo CDs: m Open and view the images individually on your computer screen.

  • Page 66

    Sharing a CD-ROM disc over a network You can share a CD-ROM disc using your computer’s file-sharing feature. If the disc has audio portions, you will be able to hear the audio yourself, but other people on the network will not. Likewise, you cannot hear the audio portions of discs you access over a network.

  • Page 67

    Chapter 6 Troubleshooting part...

  • Page 69

    Consult this chapter if you experience problems using your computer. Troubleshooting When you have questions If you want to know how to do a particular task with your computer, refer to Macintosh Guide in the Guide (h) menu. For instructions on using Macintosh Guide, see “Getting Help,”...

  • Page 70

    Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you attempt to repair the computer yourself, any damage you may cause to the computer will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer.

  • Page 71

    If you need repair service, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple- authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you know that the problem is with a particular application program, contact the manufacturer of that software for assistance.

  • Page 72

    Turn off your computer with the power button on the front panel of the computer, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. If the computer does not turn off, try pressing and holding down the power button for 3–4 seconds.

  • Page 73

    Solutions to common problems This section contains descriptions of problems you could experience with your computer. Some problems may be caused by your CD-ROM drive, so if you don’t find your problem here, be sure to check the section “Solutions to CD-ROM Problems,”...

  • Page 74

    Apple-authorized service provider replace the battery. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. When you start up, a disk icon with a blinking question mark appears in the middle of the screen.

  • Page 75

    m System software may not be installed on the startup hard disk, the system software may be damaged, or the hard disk may not be working properly. Start up your computer using the Disk Tools floppy disk or (if you have a built-in CD-ROM drive) with the CD-ROM disc that contains system software.

  • Page 76

    Disc” in the section “Initializing a Hard Disk” later in this chapter.) If the “sad Macintosh” icon appears again, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an Apple- authorized service provider or Apple for assistance.

  • Page 77

    m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start your computer using the Disk Tools floppy disk or (if you have a built-in CD-ROM drive) with the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. (For instructions on how to start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc”...

  • Page 78

    Do not use excessive force. If none of these solutions works, take the computer or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the disk removed. You installed a CD-ROM drive after you bought your computer and your computer won’t restart after you’ve copied software for your CD-ROM drive to the System Folder.

  • Page 79

    You can’t start an application program, or it quits unexpectedly. Or, when you try to open a program, you see a message that not enough memory is available. One of the following is probably the cause: m The Macintosh ran out of memory. Quit the programs that you have open and then open the program you want to use, or restart your Macintosh.

  • Page 80

    A dialog box with a bomb appears. Your system has a software problem. m Write down what you were doing when the message appeared and write down the message’s text and its number, if there is one. m Restart your Macintosh. (See “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble”...

  • Page 81

    If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Troubleshooting...

  • Page 82

    If the computer beeps every time you press a key, Easy Access is probably turned on. Open Easy Access from the control panels listed under the Apple (K) menu and turn it off. m You haven’t selected any text or set the insertion point (i).

  • Page 83

    If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. You can’t open a document, or you see a message that an application program can’t be found.

  • Page 84

    You experience problems using a document from a DOS computer. If you can’t open a DOS document using a Macintosh program, try the following: m Open the document from within the program by choosing Open in the program’s File menu. m Use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh program will open the document.

  • Page 85

    Solutions to CD-ROM problems Problems using the CD-ROM drive The CD-ROM drive icon does not appear on screen. m If you have other internal SCSI devices attached to your computer, make sure that each device has a unique SCSI ID number. (If your CD-ROM drive was installed in your computer at the factory, it has SCSI ID 3.) Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI devices if you need to reset SCSI ID numbers.

  • Page 86

    If you don’t, you may damage the CD-ROM drive. If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. Your computer won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 87

    m Try starting your computer from the CD-ROM disc that contains system software while holding the “c” key down. If only the hard drive icon appears on the desktop, then there may be a hardware problem with your CD-ROM drive. If the CD-ROM icon appears above the hard drive icon, try reinstalling your CD-ROM software following the instructions in “Installing or Reinstalling CD-ROM Software”...

  • Page 88

    m The disc may be damaged. Try another disc in the drive, and try the original disc in another drive. If the original drive reads other discs or if the original disc doesn’t work in another drive, the disc is probably damaged.

  • Page 89

    m If you have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, adjust the connector to make sure they are firmly connected. Make sure the volume control on your headphones or speakers is not turned down too low. m Some programs change the sound options to suit their needs. You may need to reset the sound options in a control panel.

  • Page 90

    After you open an image on a Photo CD, the image is scrambled, colors are displayed incorrectly, or no image appears in the window. m The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (high- resolution) image files. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program.

  • Page 91

    Power Macintosh. Obtaining updated Apple software Apple software updates include all of the latest versions of Apple software, including most printer drivers, system enablers, and updates to utilities, networking, and communication software.

  • Page 92

    Technical Support,” available through eWorld. You can expect a response to your posted question the next business day after posting it. To use Ask Apple Online Technical Support, log on to eWorld and go to the Computer Center building in the Town Square. Use the following path:...

  • Page 93

    Inside the Ask Apple USA area, you have a choice of the following 10 bulletin board areas: m Power Macintosh—All Power Macintosh computers, A/V and GeoPort. m Performa—All Macintosh Performa computers. m PowerBook—All PowerBook computers, Mobile Computing and Telecom. m Quadra and Centris—All Macintosh Centris and Quadra computers.

  • Page 94

    CompuServe Apple software updates are posted to two separate areas on CompuServe: Apple Support Forum and Apple New Updates. All updates are posted simultaneously to both areas. Updates are removed from the Apple New Updates area after three weeks. Apple Support Forum (GO APLSUP) contains all software and information libraries.

  • Page 95

    Internet: ftp.info.apple.com This is a file transfer protocol (ftp) server with all of the latest Apple software updates. (This ftp site was formerly called ftp.austin.apple.com.) m Host name: ftp.info.apple.com, IP number: 204.96.16.4 m Path: ftp/Apple.Support.Area/Apple.SW.Updates You can also download Apple software updates via our Worldwide Web server, www.info.apple.com.

  • Page 96

    Initializing a hard disk Before you can use a new disk, the disk must be prepared so that the computer knows where to store information on the disk. This preparation is called initializing (or formatting) the disk. When do you need to initialize a hard disk? The hard disk inside your computer was initialized at the factory, so you shouldn’t need to initialize it.

  • Page 97

    Starting up from a CD-ROM disc To initialize, test, or repair a hard disk, or to install system software on a hard disk, you need to start up your computer from another disk. If your computer has a CD-ROM drive, you can start up your computer using the CD-ROM disc containing system software that came with the computer.

  • Page 98

    How to initialize a hard disk You initialize an Apple SCSI hard disk by using a program called Drive Setup, which is on the floppy disk labeled Disk Tools that came with your computer. If your computer came with a CD-ROM drive and you didn’t receive floppy disks, you can find Drive Setup on the CD-ROM disc that contains system software.

  • Page 99

    Repairing a damaged disk Disks can become damaged by repeated use and handling. When do you need to repair a disk? If you see a message reporting that a disk is damaged or unreadable, you may need to repair the disk. Try these suggestions first If you can’t start up from a hard disk or you don’t see the hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following:...

  • Page 100

    Test the disk following the instructions that come next. How to test a hard disk You can test an Apple SCSI hard disk with the Drive Setup program, which is on the floppy disk labeled Disk Tools that came with your computer. If your computer has a built-in CD-ROM drive, and you didn’t receive floppy disks,...

  • Page 101

    Aid or another disk repair program (see the instructions in the next section), or you may need to reinitialize the disk (see “Initializing a Hard Disk” earlier in this chapter). Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance if necessary. If you had a hard disk from another manufacturer installed after you bought your computer, use the software that came with the disk or contact the disk vendor to get the latest version of software.

  • Page 102

    Click the icon of the disk you want to test. Disk icons appear in a box at the top of the Disk First Aid window. Click Repair to begin testing and repairing the disk. You can’t repair the startup disk or the disk that contains the Disk First Aid program, but you can test these disks by clicking Verify.

  • Page 103

    Once you have recovered all the information you can, erase (reinitialize) the disk. If initialization doesn’t work, discard the damaged disk (if it’s a floppy disk), or take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair (if it’s a hard disk).

  • Page 104

    When should you reinstall system software? If you have a problem with your system software, you may see this icon in the middle of the screen: If this icon appears, follow the instructions in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” earlier in this chapter to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in the next section, “Installing System Software,”...

  • Page 105

    Find and open the Disk First Aid icon. You may need to look in a folder called Utilities to find Disk First Aid. After Disk First Aid starts, follow the instructions on the screen. Disk First Aid checks your hard disk for any problems. When Disk First Aid has finished checking your hard disk, choose Quit from the File menu.

  • Page 106

    Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. Disk on which You click here to install system software the software you need. will be installed To install the software on a different disk, you click here. Make sure that the hard disk named in the box is the one on which you want to install system software.

  • Page 107

    If you don’t have a CD-ROM drive, see the service and support information that came with your computer for information on how to contact Apple directly for assistance. Doing a clean installation of system software The steps in this section outline what is commonly called a “clean”...

  • Page 108

    To do a clean installation, follow these steps: Start up your computer from the Disk Tools disk or the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” or “Starting Up From a Floppy Disk” in the section “Initializing a Hard Disk” earlier in this chapter. Find and open the Disk First Aid icon.

  • Page 109

    Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. For a clean installation, DO NOT click the Disk on which Install button. system software will be installed To install the software on a different disk, you click here. Make sure that the hard disk named in the Destination Disk box is the one on which you want to install system software.

  • Page 110

    If you don’t have a CD-ROM drive, see the service and support information that came with your computer for information on how to contact Apple directly for assistance. Chapter 6...

  • Page 111

    Replacing special software Special software consists of items such as control panels, system extensions, custom utilities, fonts, or Apple menu items that you may have added to your old System Folder. To make sure that special software does not create any...

  • Page 112

    Choose Custom Install from the pop-up menu. The Custom Install dialog box appears, listing all available system software components. Scroll through the list of components, clicking the checkbox next to each component you want to install. You can see and select individual items within each component by clicking the arrow to the left of the component, then clicking the item you want to install.

  • Page 113

    When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, click Quit. If a message reports that installation was not successful, try installing again. (Follow the instructions on the screen.) Restart your Macintosh. The system software is installed and your computer is ready to use. Don’t forget to eject the CD-ROM disc or floppy disk containing system software when you are finished.

  • Page 114

    Installing or reinstalling CD-ROM software Start up your computer from disk 1 from your set of system software disks or the CD-ROM disc that contains your system software. See “Starting Up From a Floppy Disk” or “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc”...

  • Page 115

    Select Multimedia Software by clicking the checkbox next to it. To get additional information about each component listed, click the box with the letter i in it to the right of the component. Click Install. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, click Quit.

  • Page 117

    Appendix A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips Appendix B Installing an Expansion Card Appendix C Special Keys on Your Keyboard part...

  • Page 119

    Read this appendix for important health and safety instructions, as well as tips on keeping your computer in good working order. Appendix A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips For your own safety and that of your equipment, follow all the instructions in this chapter.

  • Page 120

    Musculoskeletal discomfort As with any activity that involves sitting for long periods of time, using a computer can make your muscles sore and stiff. To minimize these effects, set up your work environment carefully, using the guidelines that follow, and take frequent breaks to rest tired muscles.

  • Page 121

    Eye fatigue Eye fatigue can occur whenever the eyes are focused on a nearby object for a long time. This problem occurs because the eye muscles must work harder to view an object that’s closer than about 20 feet (6 meters). Improper lighting can hasten the development of eye fatigue.

  • Page 122

    You may have to raise your chair so your forearms and hands are at the proper angle to the keyboard. If this makes it impossible to rest your feet flat on the floor, you can use a footrest with adjustable height and tilt to make up for any gap between the floor and your feet.

  • Page 123

    Apple has reviewed scientific reports and sought the counsel of government regulatory agencies and respected health organizations. Based on the prevailing evidence and opinions, Apple believes that the electric and magnetic fields produced by computer monitors do not pose a health risk.

  • Page 124

    Safety instructions For your own safety and that of your equipment, always take the following precautions. Turn off the computer completely and disconnect the power plug (by pulling the plug, not the cord) if any of the following conditions exists: m the power cord or plug becomes frayed or otherwise damaged m you spill something into the case m your Macintosh is exposed to rain or any other excess moisture...

  • Page 125

    Depending on what you spilled and how much of it got into your equipment, you may have to bring your equipment to an Apple-authorized service provider. m Protect the computer and its components from direct sunlight and rain or other moisture.

  • Page 126

    If, after you take these steps, the keyboard doesn’t work, take it to an Apple-authorized service provider for repair. m If you spill liquid that is greasy, sweet, or sticky, unplug the keyboard and take it to an Apple-authorized service provider for repair. Appendix A...

  • Page 127

    Handling floppy disks Store disks at Do not use a temperatures pencil or an between 50° F eraser on a disk and 125° F. or disk label. Keep disks dry. 125° F (52° C) 50° F (10° C) Do not touch the Keep disks away Avoid exposing exposed part of the...

  • Page 128

    Handling CD-ROM discs Keep these important safety instructions in mind as you use CD-ROM discs: m Hold a disc by the edges or by one edge and the center hole. Do not touch the disc surface. m To clean discs, wipe the shiny surface with a soft damp cloth, working in straight lines from center to edge.

  • Page 129

    Do not force the tray open by hand. m Do not wipe the lens with a paper towel or other abrasive surface. If you need to clean the lens, see an Apple-authorized service provider for a lens cleaner. m Never transport your computer with a disc inside the CD-ROM drive.

  • Page 130

    Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. If nothing works, take the computer or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the disk removed.

  • Page 131

    Cleaning your equipment Follow these general rules when cleaning the outside of your computer and its components: m Use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth to clean the computer’s exterior. Avoid getting moisture in any openings. m Don’t use aerosol sprays, solvents, or abrasives. Cleaning the computer case To clean the case, do the following: Turn off the computer completely and then disconnect the power plug.

  • Page 132

    Turn the mouse upside-down and turn the plastic ring on the bottom counterclockwise to disengage it. On some mouse devices, you may need to press the plastic ring (rather than turn it) to disengage it. If the mouse is locked, see the next section, “Locking and Unlocking the Mouse,”...

  • Page 133

    Wipe the mouse ball with a clean, soft, dry, and lint-free cloth. If necessary, wash the mouse ball with warm soapy water (use a mild soap such as a dishwashing liquid) and then dry the mouse ball thoroughly. Gently blow into the mouse case to remove any dust that has collected there. Put the ball and the ring back in place.

  • Page 134

    Locking and unlocking the mouse Some mouse devices can be locked so that the ball can’t be removed. A locking mouse has a small hole on the plastic ring. To lock the mouse, follow these steps: Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole.

  • Page 135

    To unlock the mouse, follow these steps: Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole. (The hole may be located here on your mouse.) Press down on the paper clip while you turn the ring counterclockwise. Turn the ring a very short distance.

  • Page 137

    If you attempt to install the card yourself, any damage you may cause to the computer or card will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. If the card is not an Apple-labeled product, check with an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider to see if you...

  • Page 138

    Expansion card power requirements The combined power consumption of expansion cards must not exceed the limits specified for your Macintosh model. If you have more than one expansion card installed, check the information that came with your cards to make sure that their power consumption is within the limits specified in the Technical Information booklet.

  • Page 139

    While pressing the release buttons, pull the top cover forward approximately two inches to release it from the chassis. Remove the cover from the computer. After you’ve slid the cover forward about two inches, lift it straight up and off the computer.

  • Page 140

    Touch the metal part of the power supply case inside the computer to discharge static electricity. Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside the computer. Power supply Flip the expansion card cover open. Flip the expansion card cover open. Appendix B...

  • Page 141

    Being careful not to touch the sharp edges, pull out the port access cover behind the expansion slot you want to use, and set the access port cover aside. (back of computer) Push the port access cover in gently with the finger of one hand while pulling it straight up with the other hand.

  • Page 142

    Align the connector end of the card with the expansion slot. Port access opening Install the PCI card in any of the three PCI slots. As you lower the card, you may find it helpful to hold the card slightly forward (front of computer) of its final position until you actually fit the card into its slot.

  • Page 143

    Press the card gently but firmly until the connector is fully inserted. m Don’t force the card. If you meet a lot of resistance, pull the card out and try again. m To see if the card is properly connected, pull it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it’s connected.

  • Page 144

    Replace the cover on the computer. Lower the cover all the way down onto the case, leaving a two-inch gap. Push the cover back until it snaps into place. Set the top cover down so that there is about a two-inch gap between the back of the top cover and the back of the chassis.

  • Page 145

    The special keys on your keyboard depend on the model of keyboard you have; some keyboards do not have all the keys listed here. Special keys on Apple keyboards Use to move the insertion point, as an alternative to using the Arrow keys pointer.

  • Page 146

    Special keys on Apple keyboards (continued) Control key In combination with other keys, this key provides shortcuts or control modifies other actions. Delete key Use to delete selected material, or the character to the left of the delete insertion point.

  • Page 147

    Choose Key Caps from the Apple (K) menu, then choose the font from the Key Caps menu. Characters appear here when you press...

  • Page 148

    If you see rectangles: If you see rectangles instead of diacritical marks on some of the pictures of keys in Key Caps, try pressing Option-x to see the diacritical marks. However, you only need to use the Option key (not Option-x) in combination with the other keys to type letters with diacritical marks.

  • Page 149

    Special key combinations If difficulties with your mouse or computer don’t allow you to use standard methods of quitting a program or restarting your computer, you can try using these special key combinations. To do this... …press this key combination x-Option-Esc Force a program to quit x–Control–Power key...

  • Page 151

    19, 57 AppleCD Audio Player program 63, acute accent (´), typing 148 64, 86 ADB ports 10, 11, 41, 82 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) ports 10, 11, air circulation around computer 41, 82 components 125 Apple Extensions Manager 57...

  • Page 152

    87–88 24, 69–70, 81, 90 icon doesn’t appear on desktop 86–87 arrow pointer on screen, moving 17–18 inserting 56, 62 Ask Apple Online Technical Support overview 61 service 92–93 playing audio CDs 64 audio CDs adjusting volume control 46, 89...

  • Page 153

    CD-ROM software, installing 113–115 CompuServe, obtaining Apple software cedilla (ç), typing 148 updates from 94 chair, adjusting for optimal support and computer components. See equipment comfort 121 computer power cord 2, 6 circumflex (^), typing 148 connecting C key (at startup), to start from a audio equipment 42–46...

  • Page 154

    Delete key 146 Easy Access, turning off 82 desktop, rebuilding 72, 77, 83 Easy Install dialog box 106, 109–110 device drivers, SCSI 50 Eject CD command (AppleCD Audio DHCP bootstrapping protocol 54 Player File menu) 63, 86 diacritical marks, typing 147–148 ejecting diagnosing problems.

  • Page 155

    Eject CD command (AppleCD Audio health-related information about Player program) 63, 86 computer use 119–123 Put Away command 63, 86 help. See Apple-authorized service files, backing up 59 providers; Balloon Help; file sharing, CD-ROM discs and 66 customer service; Macintosh...

  • Page 156

    Look For button 29, 33–34 Internet moving the window out of the way 35 configuring your system for 53–54 returning to the main window 30, 32, obtaining Apple software updates from 94–95 Topics button 29–30 ISDN networks 53 using the scroll bar 31...

  • Page 157

    131 online help. See Balloon Help; Guide connecting 7–9 menu; Macintosh Guide electromagnetic emissions from 123 online services, obtaining Apple software illustration 2, 40 updates from 91–95 positioning 7, 122 Open/Close button on CD-ROM drive safety instructions for 126...

  • Page 158

    ports AAUI Ethernet 40, 41 radio or television reception, interference ADB 10, 11, 41, 82 Audio In (on external speakers) 46 with vi, 126 RAM. See also memory illustration 40–41 expanding 51 monitor 9, 41 resetting parameter RAM 73 SCSI 41, 47, 50 Read Me files 25, 56 sound input/output 41, 42, 44–46 read-only memory, defined 61...

  • Page 159

    screen. See also monitor software updates, obtaining 91–95 dark, troubleshooting 73 Sound control panel 46 dimming 21–22, 126 sound input/output ports 41, 42, 44–46 minimizing glare and reflections speaker on computer, illustration 40 122, 123 speakers, connecting external stereo positioning 7, 122 speakers 46 screen saver programs 73, 126 special characters and symbols, typing...

  • Page 160

    performance decreases after adding software 90 Tab key 146 Photo CD problems 89–90 TCP/IP control panel 53 printer problems 91 television or radio reception, interference problems turning on the computer 15 with vi, 126 screen is dark 73 temperature limits for floppy disks 127 SCSI devices not recognized 74, 85 10BASE-T Ethernet connector 52 shared library problems 60, 84...

  • Page 161

    3–6, discomfort 121–122 12, 130 Worldwide Web server (Internet), setting for your monitor 4, 8 obtaining Apple software voltage converter for monitor 4, 8 updates from 95 voltages for different countries 5 voltage switch 3–4, 6, 12...

  • Page 163

     Power Macintosh User’ s Guide Includes setup, troubleshooting, and important health-related information for Power Macintosh 7200 series computers...

  • Page 164

    Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors.

  • Page 165

    Contents Communications regulation information Preface Welcome to Power Macintosh Part I 1 Getting Started Plugging in the computer Installing an expansion card Connecting a monitor Connecting the mouse and keyboard Connecting other equipment Turning the computer on Problems turning your computer on? What’s next? Learning the basics Reviewing the basics...

  • Page 166

    2 Getting Help Getting answers to your questions Identifying objects on the screen Learning useful shortcuts 3 Connecting Additional Equipment Your computer at a glance Connecting audio equipment Connecting external SCSI devices Expanding memory Installing internal drives Connecting network cables 4 Installing and Using Application Programs Installing application programs Working with several programs at a time...

  • Page 167

    If you have trouble Solutions to common problems Solutions to CD-ROM problems If your computer’s performance decreases Solving printer problems Obtaining updated Apple software Initializing a hard disk Repairing a damaged disk Installing or reinstalling system software Installing or reinstalling CD-ROM software...

  • Page 168

    Radio and television interference The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with radio and television reception.

  • Page 169

    Apple-authorized service provider. If you have an internal Apple CD-ROM drive in your computer, your computer is a Class 1 laser product. The Class 1 label, located in a user-accessible area, indicates that the drive meets minimum safety requirements.

  • Page 171

    Your Macintosh computer is powered by the new † microprocessor (or “chip”). This microprocessor was designed by Apple Computer, Inc., Motorola, Inc., and IBM Corporation. The † microprocessor uses Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) technology to deliver very high performance at the lowest possible cost.

  • Page 173

    Chapter 1 Getting Started Chapter 2 Getting Help Chapter 3 Connecting Additional Equipment Chapter 4 Installing and Using Application Programs Chapter 5 Using the Optional CD-ROM Drive part...

  • Page 174

     Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, California 95014-2084 408-996-1010 034-0012-A http://www.apple.com Printed in U.S.A.

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